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2021 Conference Reimagined Improving Students’ Practice Through Metacognition

THE JOY OF VIDEO MODELING Transitioning from In-Person to Online Music Teaching


EVEN TEACHERS NEED TEACHERS As an educator, one of the most impactful ways to improve is by educating yourself. That’s why the Yamaha Educator Suite (YES) helps music teachers access professional development opportunities, music teacher resources, program health support, advocacy assistance and more. YES brings you a network of like-minded teachers, experts and professionals, who want to help you achieve your goals. Let us help you raise the bar. Go to Yamaha.io/educatorsFMD

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Florida Music Director


Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education

402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@fmea.org)

Editor-in-Chief

D. Gregory Springer, PhD Florida State University College of Music 122 N. Copeland Street Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925 (office) (dgspringer@fsu.edu)

Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Florida State University, KMU 222 (850) 644-3005 (jrarthur@fsu.edu) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Largo (727) 588-6055; (reynoldsj@pcsb.org) John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@fmea.org)

Advertising Sales Valeria Anderson (val@fmea.org)

Director of Finance and Client Relations

Richard Brown , MBA, CAE, CMP (richard@fmea.org) 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844

Official FMEA and FMD Photographers

Bob O’Lary Debby Stubing

Art Director & Production Manager

Lori Danello Roberts, LDR Design Inc. (lori@flmusiced.org)

Contents December 2020

Volume 74 • Number 5

F E AT U R E S

FMEA President-Elect Candidates.. . . . . . . . 8-9 FOA President-Elect Candidates. . . . . . . . . 10-12 2021 FMEA Virtual Conference Registration. . . . . . . . . . . Life as a College Student. . . President’s Concert. . . . . . General Sessions. . . . . . . . FMEA Mini-Concert Hour.. All-State Experience. . . . . . Schedule of Events. . . . . . .

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The Joy of Video Modeling

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A Win for Students With Disabilities and Everyone Else. .

Thinking About Learning:

Recommendations and Tips for Piano Lessons.

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. 14 . 15 . 16 . 17 18-19 20-28 29-43

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54

Improving Students’ Practice Through Metacognition.

Transitioning from In-Person to Online Music Teaching

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’Tis the Season Due to COVID. . . . . . . . . . . . 62 D E PA R T M E N T S

Circulation & Copy Manager

Advertiser Index. . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Component News.. . . . . . . . . . 65

Copy Editor

President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . 5

Research Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . 69

Advocacy Report. . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Committee Reports. . . . . . . . . 70

Corporate Partners . . . . . . . . . 13

Executive Director’s Notes. . . . . 74

2020-21 FMEA Donors. . . . . . . 44

Officers and Directors.. . . . . . . 75

Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632 Susan Trainor

Academic Partners. . . . . . . . . . 64


Advertiser Index

The Florida Music Director is made possible by the participation of the following businesses whose advertisements appear in this issue. They make it possible to provide you with a high-quality publication, and we gratefully acknowledge their support of our mission. We hope you will take special notice of these advertisements and consider the products and services offered. It is another important way you can support your professional association and the enhancement of Florida music education. The publisher does not endorse any particular company, product, or service. The Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) is not responsible for the content of any advertisement and reserves the right to accept or refuse any advertisement submitted for publication. Information for advertisers (rate card, insertion orders, graphics requirements, etc.) can be found at FMEAMediaKit.org. ADVERTISERS Florida Gulf Coast University.............................................................................4 University of Florida...........................................................................................7 Yamaha Corporation of America.................................................................. IFC The advertiser in bold provides additional support to FMEA members through membership in the Corporate and Academic Partners program. This Partner deserves your special recognition and attention.

Florida Music Director reserves the right to refuse any ad not prepared to the correct specifications OR to rework the ad as needed with fees applied. 2020-21 FMEA Membership: You are eligible for membership in the Florida Music Education Association if you are an individual engaged in the teaching, supervision, or administration of music in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, or universities within the state. Visit FMEA.org/membership to learn more about the benefits of active membership.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Direct correspondence regarding subscriptions to: Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education, 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL, 32301-2757. Subscription cost included in FMEA membership dues ($9); libraries, educational institutions, and all others within the United States: $27 plus 7.5% sales tax. CIRCULATION: 4,500 educators. Published eight times annually by The Florida Music Education Association, Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education: 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757. FMEA reserves the right to approve any application for appearance and to edit all materials proposed for distribution. Permission is granted to all FMEA members to reprint articles from the Florida Music Director for non-commercial, educational purposes. Non-members may request permission from the FMEA office. SUBMISSIONS: Article and art submissions are always considered and should be submitted on or before the 1st of the month, one month prior to the publication issue to: D. Gregory Springer, PhD, dgspringer@fsu.edu.

All articles must be provided in digital format (e.g., Microsoft Word). All applicable fonts and images must be provided. Images must be at least 300 dpi resolution at 100% of the size. All submissions must be accompanied by a proof (color, if applicable). Ads may be submitted via email to val@fmea.org.

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Steven N. Kelly, PhD

President’sMessage

President Florida Music Education Association

Yes We Can!

Celebrate at the 2021 FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference & All-State Experience reetings, FMEA members! I am excited to see so many of « Our keynote speakers are Alysia Lee, a

G

our members working every day to keep music in their

citizen artist of the Kennedy Center for

the challenges, but I celebrate the many unique ways musical

of fine arts, and Dr. Judy Bowers, pro-

schools and championing success for their students. I recognize success is being achieved every day throughout Florida. Bravo!

I am very excited to formally announce the 2021 FMEA Virtual

Professional Development Conference & All-State Experience,

January 13-16, 2021. Like you, FMEA has had to adjust to COVID challenges and be flexible in every way. I believe it is essen-

tial that our profession continues to grow. Information is still changing, music is still being performed, and teachers are still

teaching. Students want music; our communities want music. By preparing now, Florida music educators will be more prepared

than ever for the return to normal and for adjusting to whatever

the new aspects of “normal” are! We will get to the other side to

our current challenges, and I am confident that music education will be stronger than ever!

FMEA has developed an incredible opportunity for our

members. Through collaboration with Conn-Selmer, along with the mighty FMEA office and the FMEA Conference

Planning Committee, the 2021 Virtual Professional Development

Conference will be among the largest state music education asso-

ciation meetings this year. Our theme continues to be Celebrating Music Excellence: Past, Present, & Future. During our virtual con-

the Arts and the Maryland coordinator fessor emerita in the College of Music

at Florida State University and the Emy-

Lou Biedenharn endowed chair in music at the University of Louisiana Monroe.

There will be SO MUCH ENERGY in

« Clinics on music educator wellness, steel pans, inclusive these speakers!

classrooms, guitar techniques, music and diverse populations, jazz techniques, literature selection, and digital music,

« Awards and recognitions presented to members, programs, and special guests. « Exhibitors, yes exhibitors, from across the country. « The FMEA Preconference on Wednesday afternoon. « All-State experiences for outstanding students selected for these honors. « There will even be opportunities for you to connect virtually among other topics.

with friends and colleagues around the state through our nightly “Happy Hour” chat rooms.

The FMEA conference is our annual homecoming and an

ference we will recognize the hard work and dedication of all of

opportunity to renew and recharge, to meet new people, to learn

As always, there will be something for everyone and for every

Our 2021 conference will be no different, just presented differ-

our Florida music teachers and their students.

area! More than 120 sessions will be presented including clinics,

« Large

master classes, and concerts. Here are some of the highlights: and small mini-per-

formances

Melbourne

including High

the

School

Chamber Orchestra and the Fleming Island High School Wind Ensemble.

new ideas, to experience outstanding music, and to be inspired.

ently. There truly will be something for everyone. You will never have so many varied opportunities at one time. Bring a friend, an administrator, and a parent. They will be amazed. Our con-

ference is a huge reminder of all the excellence and opportunity in Florida music education!

I look forward to seeing you in our musical virtual world, to

sharing your energy, to experiencing your students, and to celebrating all our successes.

Steven N. Kelly, PhD, President

Florida Music Education Association

December 2020

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AdvocacyReport The Path Forward T

Jeanne W. Reynolds

Chairwoman Government Relations Committee

he elections are over, and now the real work begins. What did we learn?

Ten Florida school districts won voter approval to increase local

property or sales taxes to help support their local school systems. Two years ago, several other districts also passed similar referendums.

This year only one district lost its local educational tax referendum, and that was by a very slim margin.

It has become clear that Floridians strongly support quality edu-

cation. In my own district, Pinellas County, our referendum passed

by 80%! In such polarized times, results like these speak volumes.

Education and arts education are strongly supported in my commu-

nity and in many others. One can certainly make an argument that the state should be funding education adequately so that districts do

not need these referendums. For now, what is abundantly clear is that there is strong public support for education and strong support for

arts education, as demonstrated by these results. Our job is to hold our elected state officials accountable for adequately funding and supporting education including comprehensive arts education.

« Send a congratulatory note to ALL of your newly elected officials The first two items on your to-do list follow here.

if you have not done so already. Tell them you are an arts educator and look forward to working with them to support public edu-

cation including arts education. Election results can be found on

« Plan to attend the FMEA Virtual Conference. your supervisor of elections website.

Network with

other educators to build a larger, more effective advocacy coalition in your area.

Early in my career, I was the choral director at Clearwater High

School. I had the pleasure of working with a wonderful band director

named Robert W. Smith. I could write volumes about the wonderful experience of working with Robert. Suffice it to say, Robert is an

amazing teacher, musician, composer, and arranger, as well as a bril-

liant arts advocate. He has graciously allowed me to quote from one of his social media posts that followed the election. Robert calls this the opportunity of a lifetime, and I think he is right.

Thank you for those words, Robert. We are ready to roll up our

sleeves and get to work.

Robert W. Smith

Educators: With the results of the election now determined, we have an opportunity and responsibility to reimagine

and reinvent our education system once again. Between the pandemic, imminent change in the Secretary of Education’s

office and a First Lady that is and will continue to be a working educator, this may be the greatest opportunity of our lifetimes to positively affect all American students.

I urge all to unite in purpose and conviction for a positive common future. A balanced curriculum that includes the

arts as an integral part of our students’ development is

the highest priority. Our world needs creativity now more

than ever before to insure we will be able to overcome the

challenges ahead. Creativity is part of all human endeavor. However, I contend the arts provide the best setting to develop the creative potential in each and every child.

It is now time to heal our society and unite in purpose and passion. Let’s reflect on this moment in history and move

forward with the goal of creating a better future for our children and future generations.

In the words of a gifted songwriter, “I believe the children are the future. Teach them well and let them lead the way.”

Advertise with FMEA in print and online 6    F l o r i d a

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Bridging Music and Medicine

XANDER BOGGS IS COMBINING MUSIC AND MEDICINE.

WHY NOT BOTH?

“Music is all about the communication of emotion. It’s all about recognizing other people’s feelings and what they’re trying to say without words. With medicine, you have to have that same compassion.”

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Study music in combination with... • Master of Science in Management or Entrepreneurship • Pre-Health Professions • Second Bachelor’s Degree (engineering, psychology, journalism and more) • Minors & Certificates

READ MORE:

arts.ufl.edu/bridging-music

Photo by Brianne Lehan / UF Photography

AUDITIONS WILL BE CONDUCTED BY PRE-RECORDED VIDEO SUBMISSIONS All Incoming Freshman

Transfer Students

January 16, 2021 January 23, 2021 January 24, 2021

March 20, 2021 Recorded auditions should be submitted by March 1, 2021

Recorded auditions should be submitted by December 31, 2020 for review and scholarship consideration.

UF Application Deadline: Nov. 1

In addition to video submissions, virtual meetings with faculty and students will occur on one of the selected dates. A detailed schedule and links to meetings will be available two weeks prior to each pre-selected date.

ARTS.UFL.EDU/MUSIC

MORE INFO: music@arts.ufl.edu or 352.392.0224

December 2020

7


FMEA President-Elect Candidate Jason Locker

J

ason Locker is senior administrator of visual and performing arts for Orange County Public Schools. In this capacity, he

serves as the content area leader for choral music, as the supervising administrator for the district’s elementary orchestra pro-

gram, and as the coordinator of the OCPS All-County Series. He holds the BME from the University of Florida and the MME from

Florida State University, and is pursuing the PhD in educational leadership and policy studies at the University of South Florida.

Prior to his current position, Mr. Locker was a high school

choral music educator for 18 years. Choirs under his direction

consistently received superior ratings at district and state music

performance assessments; were invited to perform in several prestigious events and venues; and regularly collaborated in

music, service projects, and community outreach with choral and instrumental ensembles from neighboring schools. In addi-

tion to NAfME/FMEA, he is an active member of the Florida Music Supervision Association, the Florida Vocal Association, the American Choral Directors Association, the American

Educational Research Association, and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia

Music Fraternity. As president of the Florida Vocal Association, he serves on the FMEA Board of Directors and is a member

ing music education taught by highly qualified professionals,

Previously he served on the FSMA Board of Directors, as chair of

professional development, and mentorship. It would be my goal

of the FMEA Government Relations and Awards committees. the FVA Clinics and All-State Committees, as an ACDA state and regional repertoire and resources chair, and in local leadership roles. An active clinician and board-approved adjudicator, he

has presented district professional development workshops as

well as interest sessions at conferences of FMEA, ACDA, Phi Mu Alpha, and the Tri-M Music Honor Society. Vision

and all music educators deserve equitable access to resources, to identify or establish funding sources to promote diversity

and to increase access to outstanding FMEA programs such as the Professional Development Conference, Summer Institute,

Emerging Leaders program, and all-state ensembles. Utilizing virtual meeting technology may also provide a way to make

certain FMEA programs and professional development offerings accessible to larger audiences.

This year has shown us once again that children need music

As a native Floridian, I am proud of the education I received

and the arts in their lives to connect with the world around

my 20th year as a music educator, I look back on the multitude of

trouble. In a world of quarantine and social distance, music pro-

from kindergarten through graduate school in this state. Now in

mentors and colleagues who have taught and cared for me, and

I am grateful for the critical role the Florida Music Education Association has played in my personal journey. As reflected in

its mission statement, FMEA (and each of its component associ-

ations) is a community of professionals who work tirelessly to

them, to express themselves, and to soothe them in times of

vides the community for which the soul yearns. While we learn new lessons and add new tools to our music education toolbox, let us not lose sight of the fact that we will make it through this unprecedented time.

We must continue to advocate for music’s essential role in

“promote quality, comprehensive music education in all Florida

the lives of all children, to mentor the new generation of music

The part of the mission statement that stands out to me is the

embrace change while maintaining our foundational standards

schools.”

word all. All students deserve equitable access to an outstand-

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education colleagues that are entering the profession, and to of excellence.


FMEA President-Elect Candidate Harry “Skip” Pardee

H

arry “Skip” Pardee serves as district coordinator of fine arts for the Collier County Public Schools (Naples, Marco

Island, Everglades City, and Immokalee, Florida), where he oversees music, visual art, theater, and dance, grades K-12. Specifically,

Mr. Pardee provides direction on Florida Standards through

curriculum, crafts professional development for arts teachers,

provides guidance for facilities and equipment standards, and serves as liaison for all arts organizations and their involvement

with the public schools. Mr. Pardee is a graduate of the New England Conservatory Preparatory School (trumpet), received the BME and MME degrees from the University of Florida, and is pursuing the EdD at Florida Gulf Coast University. Mr. Pardee

also serves on the FMEA Board of Directors as president of the Florida Music Supervision Association. Vision

The Florida Music Education Association’s mission to promote quality, comprehensive music education in all Florida schools is inextricably tied to leadership, advocacy, and the visibility of

music educators in the field. A robust arts education for students does not just “happen” without dedicated, passionate music educators, combined with school and district leaders demanding

it so. With one of the largest music education association mem-

berships in the country, FMEA must continue efforts to lead the

way toward a healthy arts education for all students. We do this by celebrating successes loudly and proudly, embracing every opportunity to shape young lives with music-making, and finding new ways to innovate and inspire in the classroom. The arts

are the “connective tissue” for society, and music education is

more essential now than ever. With all this in mind, our organization must do all it can to champion the noble work of the music educators in our state.

December 2020

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FOA President-Elect Candidate Laurie Bitters

L

aurie Bitters has served as director of orchestras

at Winter Park High School for the past 14 years.

She oversees the orchestra program consisting of four

orchestras, teaches AP Music Theory and IB Music, serves as the advisor for Tri-M Music Honor Society, mentors student interns and first-year teachers, and conducts the

pit orchestra for musical productions. Under Laurie’s

leadership, the orchestra program has grown from 75

to more than 200 students and has consistently received superior ratings at FOA district and state music perfor-

mance assessments. Park Philharmonic, under Laurie’s

direction, performed at the ASTA National Orchestra Festival in Atlanta and was named the first-ever Orlando Philharmonic High School Orchestra of Distinction.

Laurie’s extensive teaching career spans 28 years

including five years teaching undergraduate string music

education courses and conducting the New Horizons

Orchestra at Eastman School of Music and 10 years in the public schools of Orem, Utah, where she taught orchestra,

choir, composition, and AP Music Theory. Laurie earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music education from

Brigham Young University, where she studied cello with Roger Drinkhall and private conducting with Ronald

Staheli. Laurie has also completed doctoral coursework at

the needs of a wide range of skills and abilities, as well

Laurie serves on the FOA Board as co-chair of the

mentary, middle, and high school classrooms everyday

Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.

Music Committee and is co-chair of Orange County Public Schools All-County Orchestra. For the past 10

years, she has traveled throughout Florida as a certified FOA adjudicator.

Laurie is a passionate educator who invests whole-

heartedly in her students and colleagues, making each individual feel seen and heard. She never shies away

from the opportunity to help others succeed and enjoy the learning process.

Of her goals for FOA, Laurie states, “Having taught

people from ages 6 to 92, I have a solid understanding of

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as a passion for lifelong learning. What we do in our ele-

has tremendous implications for our students’ musical

development and contributions to society for the rest of their lives. I am committed to a pedagogically appropriate

and diverse repertoire to help students and teachers alike grow in their understanding of and appreciation for our

art form. In the spirit of collaboration and service, I am

excited about the potential opportunity to help empower

other teachers, to serve as a resource within our field, to expand professional development, to grow orchestral

offerings in underserved areas, and to promote orchestra programs throughout Florida.”


FOA President-Elect Candidate Rufus Jones, Jr.

R

ufus Jones, Jr., DMA, began his formal training to become

an orchestral conductor at the University of Texas at Austin.

After graduating with the BA in music, he continued his formal

training as a Clifford D. Clarke graduate fellow at the State University of New York in Binghamton, where he received the

MM in instrumental conducting. Dr. Jones completed his formal training at Texas Tech University, where he received the DMA in orchestral conducting. Dr. Jones has studied with interna-

tionally recognized conductors Louis Lane, Gustav Meier, Kirk

Trevor, Donald Portnoy, Timothy Perry, Kenneth Kiesler, and Gary Lewis.

Dr. Jones has conducted youth, university, and profession-

al orchestras throughout this country and abroad. He has

been accepted to prestigious conducting programs including

Tanglewood Music Festival (auditor), the Conductors Institute in South Carolina (fellow), and the Leiston Abbey Conducting Masterclass in Suffolk, England (fellow).

His professional career started as assistant conductor of the

Knoxville Symphony Orchestra in 1998, under the leadership of

then music director, Maestro Kirk Trevor. As a guest conductor,

Dr. Jones has appeared with the Utah Symphony, Shreveport Symphony, Siena Chamber Orchestra, Detroit Youth Symphony, Omaha Area Youth Symphony, Binghamton Youth Symphony, and the Greater Dallas Youth Orchestra, to name a few.

Prior to moving to South Florida, Dr. Jones was assistant

professor of music at Georgetown University in Washington,

D.C. He served as director of the chamber music program, wind

ensemble, and symphony orchestra. He also taught courses in music theory, music history, and conducting.

Symphony Orchestra premiered the string quartets from his collection.

His latest project, Dean Dixon: Negro at Home, Maestro Abroad,

His academic research has focused on African-American

is the first-ever full-length biography of one of the greatest

nationally recognized peer-reviewed journal and encyclopedia.

April 16, 2015. Alex Ross, music critic for The New Yorker, selected

classical musicians. His work has been published in an inter-

Dr. Jones has written extensively on the music of William Grant Still. In 2009, his three-volume edition, The Collected Folk

Suites of William Grant Still, was published and featured at the inaugural William Grant Still Tribute Conference in Natchez, Mississippi. The principal string players of the Mississippi

American conductors of the 20th century. It was released on

Dr. Jones’s book as one of “nine notable music books of 2015.” In 2018, the paperback edition was released.

Dr. Jones is music director at Gulliver Preparatory, lead

conductor of the Miami Music Project Leaders Orchestra, and conductor of the Florida Youth Orchestra’s Principal Orchestra.

December 2020

11


FOA President-Elect Candidate Cheri A. Sleeper

C

heri A. Sleeper is a product of the Florida public educa-

tion system, having attended elementary and secondary

schools in Tampa. She has been an educator for 34 years in the

state of Florida, teaching kindergarten through 12th grade. She graduated from King High School and returned to teach as the

orchestra/band director for 14 years. Currently, Mrs. Sleeper is the orchestra/band director at Strawberry Crest High School and has been in that position for 13 years. She has increased her

student numbers to three full ensembles, which include string

and full orchestra. At both schools, her ensembles receive accolades for their musical excellence at the district and state levels.

Under her musical leadership, she has inspired four future music

educators, including the 2019 Florida Teacher of the Year, Dr. Dakeyan Graham.

Cheri Sleeper is the current chairwoman for FOA District 7.

She has held this position for five years. During her tenure, she has organized music performance assessments, holds four dis-

trict FOA meetings annually, assists directors with equipment

and instrument needs, serves as a mentor to novice directors,

and makes recommendations on obtainable literature for the unique nature of a school’s ensemble. She has also assisted the FOA handbook committee as well as the committee currently

editing the FOA Music Lists. Mrs. Sleeper has served as a clinician and adjudicator throughout the state of Florida and has been an active member on several committees to write and update music curriculum.

Given the opportunity to serve the Florida Orchestra

Association as president-elect, Mrs. Sleeper’s mission is two-fold: The FOA should provide avenues through which our students

have the opportunity to pursue excellence and longevity in their

musical endeavors. The goal would be to help students find

encing many emotions, situations, and challenges in this “fluid”

ties, community ensembles, and professionals to help them see

mentoring to both our young and veteran teachers.

musical avenues to make connections with colleges, universi-

how music can improve their lives well beyond their secondary

situation. Mrs. Sleeper’s mission is to offer ideas, options, and Cheri Sleeper earned the BME at Florida State University

experiences.

and a master’s degree in arts and educational leadership at the

Orchestra Association and other component organizations help

She is blessed with a fabulous, supportive family, many friends,

In these unsettling times, it is important that the Florida

music teachers in their everyday efforts. Instructors are experi-

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University of South Florida. She has two sons and one grandson. and her two “fur babies,” Buddy and Sammi.


Please take time to thank and support our 2020-2021 Corporate Partners.

GOLD PARTNERS

SILVER PARTNERS Music Man, Inc. The Horn Section, Inc.

BRONZE PARTNERS Cadence Music Excelcia Music Publishing Head’s House of Music

J. W. Pepper & Son, Inc. Neil A. Kjos Music Company

Partners as of November 4, 2020.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

December 2020

13


PAST, PRESENT, & FUTURE

Looking Forward to Seeing You at the 2021 FMEA Virtual Conference. CLICK to Register Now. 2021 FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference Registration Fees Regular FMEA Member............................................... $75 FMEA First-Year Teacher.............................................. $50 Collegiate FMEA Member............................................ $25 FMEA All-State Student................................................ $10 Non-FMEA Member, NAfME Member.......................... $75 Retired FMEA Member.................................................. $0 Fee for Preconference Registration................................... $0

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I


! n I l l A I’m Life as a College Music Student Monday, December 14, 6:30pm Presented by members of Florida NAfME Collegiate Student participants will hear from current college music majors. Topics will include how to prepare for college life, what to expect as a music major, tips for success, and more!

CLICK HERE

to Register

NOW

December 2020

15


FMEA President’s Concert Wednesday, January 13, 2021 (8pm-9pm) Coordinator: Steven Kelly; Sponsored by FMEA Fleming Island High School Wind Ensemble Directors: James Bruce, Alexander Buck, Mara Rose The Fleming Island High School Wind Ensemble is the top performing ensemble at Fleming Island High School and is primarily under the direction of Mara Rose. The Fleming Island

High School Wind Ensemble has received the Otto J. Kraushaar Award, given to bands that receive a superior in marching, district concert assessment, and state concert assessment for six of the last eight years. The Fleming Island Wind Ensemble has received a rating of superior at District Concert Festival

since the school opened in 2003. Additionally, the wind ensemble has received a superior

at State Concert Festival nine of the last 10

years. In 2019, Ms. Rose was a recipient of the Andrew J. Crew award, through the

Florida Bandmasters Association, which is given to directors that have received superiors at the state level for five consecutive years.

Fleming Island has traveled and performed

throughout the state of Florida and recently performed in London, England, and in Rome, Italy.

Melbourne High School Chamber Orchestra Director: Michelle Eggen The orchestra at Melbourne High School is a 140+ member program featuring five string orchestra classes, a sympho-

ny orchestra, IB Music, Tri-M Music Honor Society, and Happy Harmonies, an MHS community outreach group.

The MHS Orchestra seeks to create lifelong musicians who respect and care for the world around them while maintaining a high standard of performance. Consistently

earning superior ratings at district and state music performance assessments, “Mel-Hi” Orchestra students are

well-rounded individuals, striving for personal academic achievement while also participating in various sports,

clubs, and activities on-and off-campus. The orchestra director is Michelle Eggen, cellist and graduate of Florida State University (BME, MME), and the string consultant

is Gary Mousseau, bassist and graduate of University of South Florida (BME).

16    F l o r i d a

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General Sessions FMEA

FIRST GENERAL SESSION

Thursday, January 14, 2021 (5pm-5:50pm) Presenters: Steven Kelly, Alysia Lee Coordinator: Melissa Nelson Sponsored by FMEA KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Music Educator as Citizen Artist

Keynote speaker Alysia Lee is a musician, music

educator, teaching artist, arts administrator, and arts advocate. Her unique perspective of the arts

ecosystem and her passion for advancing justice remain central to her work. In this keynote

address, Ms. Lee will share her experience applying great advice from visual artist Michael Bell to

“create a direct line from you to your art� to her work with students, families, institutions, and communities.

FMEA

SECOND GENERAL SESSION

Friday, January 15, 2021 (5pm-5:45pm) Presenters: Judy Bowers, Steven Kelly Coordinator: Melissa Nelson Sponsored by FMEA KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Professional Evolution: Learn From an Ant Bed

Whether personal or professional,

change is seldom easy, and living/working through a national health crisis has

forced schools to change far beyond normal expectations. Dr. Judy Bowers,

professor emerita in the College of Music at Florida State University and the

Emy-Lou Biedenharn endowed chair in

FMEA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE

CLOSING

CEREMONY

Saturday, January 16, 2021 (5:45pm-6:45pm) Presenters: Steven Kelly, Kenneth Williams, Shelby Chipman, Kathleen Sanz, John Southall

music at the University of Louisiana

Sponsored by FMEA

lution that can arise from identifying current emergency tactics

The closing ceremony will include

Monroe, will examine opportunities for positive professional evothat may still have value when traditional music programs return.

tribute to all Florida music educators.

December 2020

17


FMEA Mini-Concert Hour

H. B. Plant High School Jazz Ensemble Director: Brian Dell The band program at H. B. Plant High School in Tampa provides a myriad of experiences in the performing arts for its students. Performing ensembles include the nationally acclaimed wind ensemble, symphonic band, campus band, jazz band, chamber

ensembles, indoor percussion, football band, and competitive

marching band. The jazz band has consistently earned superior

ratings at both the district and state levels of the FBA jazz MPA. Ensemble performances include the 2019 Essentially Ellington Regional in Orlando and the 2018 demo ensemble for the FMEA Professional Development Conference in Tampa. The H. B.

Plant Jazz Band was named a 2019 National Jazz Band Honors

Commended Winner and 2018 National Jazz Band Honors

Winner through the Foundation of Music Education Mark of Excellence. Members consistently represent Plant High School in the Hillsborough All-County Jazz Band.

Armwood High School Hawk Jazz Ensemble Director: Bradley Esau After being dormant for five years, the jazz ensemble at Armwood

High School was restarted in fall 2018. Initially started as an afterschool activity, it became a class

during the school day this past

school year. The performance level

has been high, and the ensemble is the on-call ensemble for various

events on campus and in the community.

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Fellsmere Elementary Ukulele Club Director: Sara DiPardo Based in Indian River County, the Fellsmere Elementary Ukulele

Club was founded in 2018 by director Sara DiPardo. Fellsmere Elementary is a long-time Title I school with a high Hispanic

population (84%). Most students come from Mexico, Honduras,

or Guatemala. Even though these students come from Hispanic countries, they do not know many Latin folksongs. The primary goal in Ukulele Club is to learn folksongs from other Latin countries while incorporating ukulele as well. The funding for the

club’s ukuleles was made possible by generous local donations.

The Ukulele Club meets twice a week in the morning before school and is composed of students in third, fourth, and fifth

grades. Students use a school-owned ukulele or purchase their own. The Ukulele Club performs at the school board meeting

during Hispanic Heritage Month, at the local Fellsmere Frog Leg Festival, at the Holiday Cheer Tour around the campus, and at the Cleveland Clinic Indian River Hospital.


Wednesday, January 13, 2021 (7pm-8pm) Coordinator: Shelby Chipman Sponsored by FMEA

chosen for this high honor. Every member takes part in the FVA

Solo & Ensemble Vocal Festival where they receive superior ratings in various categories. At the Choral MPA Festival, they

have received straight superiors for the last three years. These students love to sing and realize how important being a part of a choir is. It develops self-esteem, confidence, and the ability

to communicate with each other. There is an elevated sense of

achievement during the rehearsal process when harmonies and the music come together. They truly become a family through Lake Nona High School Symphonic Orchestra

song.

Director: Vincent Conrod The Lake Nona High School Symphonic Orchestra program

consists of 22 students in grades 9-12. The goal of the LNHS Orchestra program is to provide students with as much exposure to standard orchestral literature as possible, with the philos-

ophy that while most students will not pursue a career in music, all students can gain an appreciation and knowledge of music

that will remain with them throughout their lives. The LNHS

Orchestra program seeks to provide as complete an educational

experience as possible to all students, and regularly hosts events geared toward the success of LNHS orchestra students and students in the surrounding schools.

Woodrow Wilson Middle School Jazz Band Director: Jeff Cayer Wilson has historically enjoyed a strong performing arts depart-

ment. The first class play was performed in Wilson’s auditorium in 1925. Traditionally, the performing arts have also included

an orchestra and a band. The first stage band, which included

Sol Fleischman on the drums and Morris Acton on the piano, North Fort Myers Academy Chamber Choir Director: Stacy McDonald

performed for the students on a regular basis. This stage band

originated in the 1920s and then reunited to entertain once more

at the 50th anniversary celebration for Wilson. One former band

The North Fort Myers Academy for the Arts Chamber Choir was

director, Warrend Frederick, served Wilson from 1953 to 1978.

It is an auditioned choir and has gone from strength to strength

which was sung at athletic events and pep rallies. Through

formed four years ago under the direction of Stacy McDonald. since its conception. The middle school choir takes part in school

concerts and events and is seen throughout the community, especially during Christmas time spreading holiday cheer. They

perform for district school board meetings and the Lee County Sounds of the Season video. They represent the school at the SFR

During his time at Wilson he composed the Wilson Pep Song, the years, the band and the orchestra have won many awards,

always reputed to be of superior achievement. Wilson Middle

School regularly is recognized by FMEA for the high percentage of students enrolled in the music program.

airport, take part in the River District Arts Walk, and perform with the Spirit of the Gulf barbershop chorus. Students in this group are excited by choral music and work hard to be selected

for the FMEA All-State Chorus. Each year, several students are

December 2020

19


All-State Experience SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 2021 6pm-8pm

All-State Guitar Ensemble Virtual Rehearsal Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

Zoom, 10

8pm-9pm

CONCERT All-State Popular Music Collective Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

Presenter: David Williams Coordinator: David Williams

Zoom, 2

SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 2021 10am-10:45am

Conductor Conversation: Cheryl Floyd All-State Middle School Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Cheryl Floyd Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 10

10am-10:45am

Conductor Conversation: John Rosbottom Middle School Honors Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: John Rosbottom Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 4

10am-10:45am

Conductor Conversation: Alex Kaminsky High School Honors Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Alex Kaminsky Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 5

10am-10:45am

Conductor Conversation: Rodney Dorsey All-State Symphonic Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Rodney Dorsey Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 9

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Friday, January 15 & Saturday, January 16, 2021 11am-11:45am

All-State Conductor Session Middle School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Kira Omelchenko Coordinator: William Sanderson

Zoom, 8

11am-11:45am

Conductor Conversation: Gordon Brock All-State Concert Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Gordon Brock Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 10

11am-11:45am

All-State Concert Chorus Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Eugene Rogers Coordinator: Thomas Jomisko

Zoom, 7

11am-11:45am

All-State Middle School Mixed Chorus Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Emily Ellsworth Coordinator: Andrea Lange

Zoom, 9

12noon-12:45pm

All-State SSAA Chorus Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Rosephanye Powell Coordinator: John Luffred

Zoom, 1

12noon-12:45pm

All-State TTBB Chorus Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Andrew Minear Coordinator: Jeffry Bogue

Zoom, 2

12noon-12:45pm

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Lynnel Joy Jenkins Coordinator: Elizabeth Phillips

Zoom, 4

12noon-12:45pm

Conductor Conversation: Chris Dorsey All-State Middle School Jazz Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Christopher Dorsey Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 8

12noon-12:45pm

Conductor Conversation: Rob Parton All-State High School Jazz Band Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Rob Parton Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Zoom, 9

12noon-1:10pm

All-State Guitar Ensemble – Virtual Rehearsal Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

Zoom, 10

1pm-1:45pm

All-State Conductor Session High School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Rebecca MacLeod Coordinator: Jarrod Koskoski

Zoom, 8

1:15pm-2pm

CONCERT: All-State Guitar Ensemble Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

Zoom, 10

2pm-2:45pm

All-State Conductor Session All-State Middle School Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Paul Davis Coordinator: Tosha Knibb

Zoom, 8

3pm-3:45pm

All-State Conductor Session All-State Concert Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: William Wiedrich Coordinator: Steven Bossert

Zoom, 8

4pm-4:45pm

All-State Conductor Session All-State Symphony Orchestra and All-State Concert Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenters: Douglas Drose, Kirt Mosier Coordinator: Andrea Szarowicz

Zoom, 8

December 2020

21


All-State Experience SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 2021 9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Piano For piano players in the All-State Middle School Jazz Band Sponsored by FBA

Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Flutes (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State flute players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenters: Charlene Cannon, Spencer Katz Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 2

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Oboe (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State oboe players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Dawn Hardy Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 3

9am-10am

Band Opportunities in High School (Session A) Tri-M Students and Directors of Middle School Students Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Dayna Cole Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 4

9am-9:45am

Voice Master Class: Soprano 1—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: John Luffred

Zoom, 5

9am-9:45am

Voice Master Class: Soprano 2—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Thomas Jomisko

Zoom, 6

9am-9:45am

Voice Master Class: Alto 1—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jeffry Bogue

Zoom, 7

9am-9:45am

Voice Master Class: Alto 2—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jason Locker

Zoom, 8

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Bassoon (Middle School Ensembles) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Michael Hardy Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

10am-10:50am

Q&A With Composer: All-State Ensembles Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: TBA Coordinator: Matthew Davis

Zoom, 1

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Bass Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jeremy George Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 4

10am-10:45am

Band Opportunities in High School (Session B) Tri-M Students and Directors of Middle School Students Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Dayna Cole Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Clarinets (Middle School Honors Band) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Christine Pascual-Fernandez Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 2

10am-10:45am

Voice Master Class: Tenor 1—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Thomas Jomisko

Zoom, 5

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Saturday, January

23, 2021

10am-10:45am

Voice Master Class: Tenor 2—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jason Locker

Zoom, 6

10am-10:45am

Voice Master Class: Bass 1—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: John Luffred

Zoom, 7

10am-10:45am

Voice Master Class: Bass 2—All-State Concert Chorus and All-State SSAA/TTBB Choruses Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jeffry Bogue

Zoom, 8

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Clarinets (All-State Middle School Band) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jessica Speak Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Guitar For guitar players in the All-State Middle School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Abe Alam Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Trumpets (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State trumpet players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Erich Rivero Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Saxophones (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State saxophonists in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Ajori Spencer Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 2

11am-12:45pm

Mixed Chorus Soprano Room: Master Class and Community Building Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Andrea Lange

Zoom, 3

11am-12:45pm

All-State Mixed Chorus Alto Room: Master Class and Community Building Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Elizabeth Phillips

Zoom, 4

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: French Horns (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State French horn players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Natalie Janas Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 4

11am-12:45pm

All-State Mixed Chorus Tenor and Bass Room: Master Class and Community Building Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jeannine Stemmer

Zoom, 5

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Trombone (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State trombone players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Andrew Dubbert Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 6

Continued on page 24

December 2020

23


All-State Experience SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 11am-11:45am

Band Opportunities in High School (Session C) Tri-M Students and Directors of Middle School Students Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Dayna Cole Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

12noon-12:45pm

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Saxophone For saxophone players in the All-State Middle School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Melton Mustafa Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

12noon-12:45pm

FBA Master Class: Euphonium (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State euphonium players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Alex Pedigo Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 2

12noon-12:45pm

Band Opportunities in High School (Session D) Tri-M Students and Directors of Middle School Students Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Dayna Cole Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

1pm-1:45pm

All-State Middle School Orchestra and Middle School Honors Orchestra Technique Session “We’re All in This Together” Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Sarah Black Ball Coordinator: Carol Griffin

Zoom, 1

1pm-2:45pm

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus T1 Room Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Elizabeth Phillips

Zoom, 4

1pm-2:45pm

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus T2 Room Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Andrea Lange

Zoom, 5

1pm-2:45pm

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus T3 Room Clinic Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jeannine Stemmer

Zoom, 6

1pm-1:45pm

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Trumpet For trumpet players in the All-State Middle School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: J.B. Scott Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 7

1pm-1:45pm

FBA Master Class: Tuba (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State tuba players in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Phil Beatty Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 8

2pm-2:45pm

Music After High School For All-State Symphonic Orchestra, All-State Concert Orchestra, and High School Honors Orchestra. Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Katarzyna (Kasia) Bugaj Coordinator: Jason Jerald

Zoom, 1

2pm-2:45pm

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Trombone For trombonists in the All-State Middle School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: John Normandin Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

2pm-2:45pm

FBA Master Class: Percussion (Middle School Ensembles) For All-State percussionists in the All-State Middle School Band and the Middle School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Bobby Blum Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

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Saturday, January

23, 2021

3pm-4pm

FBA Master Class: Middle School Jazz Percussion Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Marcus Grant Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

3pm-3:45pm

Middle School Violin Workshop: All-State Middle School Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Tina Raimondi Coordinator: Tosha Knibb

Zoom, 4

3pm-3:45pm

Middle School Viola Workshop: All-State Middle School Orchestra and Middle School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Victor Fernandez Coordinator: Jarrod Koskoski

Zoom, 3

3pm-3:45pm

Middle School Cello Workshop: All-State Middle School Orchestra and Middle School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Robert-Christian (Tian) Sanchez Coordinator: William Sanderson

Zoom, 2

3pm-3:45pm

Middle School Bass Workshop: All-State Middle School Orchestra and Middle School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: August Berger Coordinator: Steven Bossert

Zoom, 1

3pm-3:45pm

Middle School Bass Workshop: All-State Middle School Orchestra and Middle School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: August Berger Coordinator: Steven Bossert

Zoom, 1

4pm-4:45pm

Middle School Violin Workshop: Middle School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Tina Raimondi Coordinator: Tosha Knibb

Zoom, 10

4pm-4:45pm

High School 1st Violin Workshop: All-State Symphonic Orchestra, All-State Concert Orchestra, and High School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Leonid Yanovskiy Coordinator: Matthew Davis

Zoom, 1

4pm-4:45pm

High School 2nd Violin Workshop: All-State Symphonic Orchestra, All-State Concert Orchestra, and High School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Ben Sung Coordinator: Andrea Szarowicz

Zoom, 9

4pm-4:45pm

High School Viola Workshop: All-State Symphonic Orchestra, All-State Concert Orchestra, and High School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Lauren Hodges Coordinator: Steven Bossert

Zoom, 2

4pm-4:45pm

High School Cello Workshop: All-State Symphonic Orchestra, All-State Concert Orchestra, and High School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Jamie Clark Coordinator: Jarrod Koskoski

Zoom, 3

4pm-4:45pm

High School Bass Workshop: All-State Symphonic Orchestra, All-State Concert Orchestra, and High School Honors Orchestra Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Brian Powell Coordinator: William Sanderson

Zoom, 4

December 2020

25


All-State Experience SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Saturday, January 30, 2021 9am-9:45am

Band Opportunities in College-CBDNA (Session A—for High School) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Douglas Phillips Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Trumpets (All-State Concert Band and High School Honors Band) For All-State trumpet players in the All-State Concert Band and the High School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: John Almeida Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Flutes (All-State Concert Band and High School Honors Band) For All-State flute players in the All-State Concert Band and the High School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Tammara Phillips Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 2

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: Bassoon (High School Ensembles) For All-State bassoon players in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, High School Honors Band, and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Monica Ellis Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 3

9am-10am

FBA Master Class: Clarinets (All-State Concert Band) For All-State clarinetists in the All-State Concert Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Deborah Bish Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 5

9am-9:45am

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Piano For pianists in the All-State High School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Per Danielsson Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 8

10am-10:45am

FVA College/University Participation Forum— All-State Concert Chorus Room Sponsored by FBA

Coordinator: Thomas Jomisko

Zoom, 1

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Trombone (All-State Concert Band and High School Honors Band) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: David Schmidt Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

10am-10:45am

FVA College/University Participation Forum— All-State SSAA Chorus Room Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: John Luffred

Zoom, 2

10am-10:45am

FVA College/University Participation Forum— All-State TTBB Chorus Room Sponsored by FVA

Coordinator: Jeffry Bogue

Zoom, 3

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Bass For bass players in the All-State High School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Dennis Marks Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 4

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Flutes (All-State Symphonic Band and Orchestras) For All-State clarinetists in the All-State Symphonic Band and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Hilary Abigana Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 5

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Saturday, January

30, 2021

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Clarinets (All-State Symphonic Band) For All-State clarinetists in the All-State Symphonic Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jerome Simas Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 6

10am-10:45am

FBA Master Class: Alto Saxophones (High School Ensembles) For All-State tenor and bari saxophonists in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, and High School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Edward Goodman Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 7

10am-10:45am

Band Opportunities in College-CBDNA (Session B—for High School) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Kyle Prescott Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 8

10am-10:45am

Master Class: Low Saxophones (High School Ensembles) For All-State tenor and bari saxophonists in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, and High School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jonathan Hulting-Cohen Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

11am-11:45am

Band Opportunities in College-CBDNA (Session C—for High School) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Douglas Phillips Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Guitar For guitarists in the All-State High School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Stephen Luciano Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Clarinets (All-State Concert Band) For All-State clarinetists in the All-State Concert Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Deborah Bish Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 2

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Oboe (High School Ensembles) For All-State trumpet players in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, High School Honors Band, and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Toyin Spellman-Diaz Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 3

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: Trombone (All-State Symphonic Band and Orchestras) For All-State trombonists in the All-State Symphonic Band and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Domingo Paliuca Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 8

11am-11:45am

FBA Master Class: French Horns (High School Ensembles) For All-State French hornists in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, High School Honors Band, and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Chris Castellanos Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

12noon-12:45pm

Band Opportunities in College-CBDNA (Session D—for High School) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Kyle Prescott Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

December 2020

27


All-State Experience SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Saturday, January

30, 2021

12noon-12:45pm

FBA Master Class: All Low Clarinets For all All-State low clarinet players. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jerome Simas Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

12noon-12:45pm

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Saxophone For saxophonists in the FBA All-State High School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jeff Rupert Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

12noon-12:45pm

FBA Master Class: Tubas (High School Ensembles) For All-State tuba players in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, High School Honors Band, and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: William Russell Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 8

12noon-12:45pm

FBA Master Class: Euphoniums (High School Ensembles) For All-State euphonium players in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, and High School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Gail Robertson Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

1pm-1:45pm

Band Opportunities in College-CBDNA (Session E-for High School) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Douglas Phillips Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

1pm-1:45pm

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Trumpet For saxophonists in the All-State High School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

1pm-1:45pm

FBA Master Class: High School Trumpets (All-State Symphonic Band and Orchestras) For All-State trumpet players in the All-State Symphonic Band and either Orchestra. Sponsored by FBA

Presenters: Jeff Conner, Jose Sibaja Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

2pm-2:45pm

Band Opportunities in College-CBDNA (Session F-for High School) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Kyle Prescott Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 1

2pm-2:45pm

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Trombone For trombonists in the All-State High School Jazz Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Kevin Jones Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

2pm-2:45pm

FBA Master Class: Percussion (High School Ensembles) For All-State percussionists in the All-State Symphonic Band, All-State Concert Band, and High School Honors Band. Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Alan Keown Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 9

3pm-4pm

FBA Master Class: High School Jazz Percussion Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jason Furman Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Zoom, 10

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PAST, PRESENT, & FUTURE

2021 FMEA Virtual Professional Development

Schedule of Events

So much awaits you on the following pages. We believe there is something for everyone. Although the format has morphed, the content remains captivating, educational, and inspiring.

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Schedule of Events ON-DEMAND In addition to the scheduled sessions listed below, more than 40 other sessions, including the FMEA Virtual Awards Ceremony, Not Just About Slavery: Music for Black History Month, and so much more, will be available for on-demand viewing. See the online conference schedule for details.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 2021 6pm-7pm

FBA Adjudication: Virtual Adjudication Primer Workshop Sponsored by FBA

Presenters: Josh Bula, Jon Sever Coordinator: Richard Davenport

Workshop for all FBA adjudicators to introduce the virtual platform and technical instruction for effective virtual evaluation of MPA events.

7pm-8pm

FBA Adjudication Workshop: Virtual Solo & Ensemble (Session A) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jon Sever Coordinator: Richard Davenport

FBA Adjudication Workshop that will address procedures for adjudicating virtual solo & ensemble performances.

8pm-9pm

FBA Adjudication Workshop: Virtual Concert Band (Session A) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jon Sever Coordinator: Richard Davenport

FBA Adjudication Workshop that will address procedures for adjudicating virtual concert band MPA performances.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 2021 10am-11:45am

FBA General Business Meeting Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Ian Schwindt Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

1pm-2pm

FBA Adjudication Workshop: Virtual Concert Band (Session B) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jon Sever Coordinator: Richard Davenport

FBA Adjudication Workshop that will address procedures for adjudicating virtual concert band MPA performances.

1pm-2pm

FBA Adjudication Workshop: Virtual Solo & Ensemble (Session B) Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Jon Sever Coordinator: Richard Davenport

FBA Adjudication Workshop that will address procedures for adjudicating virtual solo & ensemble performances.

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Wednesday, January 13, 2021 FMEA PRECONFERENCE: Multicultural Music Education 5pm-5:10pm

OPENING SESSION Multicultural Music Education Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Shelby Chipman Coordinator: Shelby Chipman

Welcome by Dr. Steven Kelly and Dr. Shelby Chipman.

5:15pm-5:50pm

SESSION 1 Personal Excellence = Teaching Excellence Health and Wellness for Music Teachers Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Karen Dillard Coordinator: Shelby Chipman

The importance of health and wellness continues to be a concern in our society. This session will provide a summary of life transformation stories, both physical and mental. Additional discussion will include the importance of self-care through the topics of nutrition, exercise, sleep, and how it ties into our role as happy, successful teachers. Ultimately, better health is central to human happiness and well-being, and in the world of music, more sharing of musical expression.

5:55pm-6:35pm

SESSION 2 Social Emotional Learning Strategies in a Hybrid World! Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Bryan Munera, Angela Pagunsan, Amy Wacksman Coordinator: Shelby Chipman

Learn from instrumental music educators experiencing reallife challenges in a hybrid world. During this session, Bryan Munera, Amy Wacksman, and Angela Pagunsan will share their experiences rehearsing their ensembles in a hybrid setting. These middle school directors will share information about specific programs and equipment they are using to assist them while teaching multiple modalities at the same time. A key feature of this session is the incorporation of Social Emotional Learning strategies into the hybrid classroom designed to engage both virtual and face-to-face students. There will be time for questions at the end of the session by utilizing the chat feature. You won’t want to miss this!

6:40pm-7:20pm

SESSION 3 Drawing on the Past to Survive the Present and Guide the Future Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Alice-Ann Darrow Coordinator: Shelby Chipman

Many young music educators have little idea of what public schools were like before some of our greatest landmark legislation. The purpose of this session is to provide a music educator’s personal reflections on the educational changes these legislative events set forth and to describe how this history can provide strength for today and guidance for the future.

6pm-8pm

All-State Guitar Ensemble - Virtual Rehearsal Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

7pm-8pm

FMEA MINI-CONCERT HOUR H. B. Plant High School Jazz Ensemble; Director: Brian Dell Armwood High School Hawk Jazz Ensemble; Director: Bradley Esau Fellsmere Elementary Ukulele Club; Director: Sara DiPardo Lake Nona High School Symphonic Orchestra; Director: Vincent Conrod North Fort Myers Academy Chamber Choir; Director: Stacy McDonald Woodrow Wilson Middle School Jazz Band; Director: Jeff Cayer Sponsored by FMEA

Coordinator: Shelby Chipman

8pm-9pm

FMEA PRESIDENT’S CONCERT Fleming Island High School Wind Ensemble; Directors: James Bruce, Alexander Buck, Mara Rose Melbourne High School Chamber Orchestra; Director: Michelle Eggen Sponsored by FMEA

Coordinator: Steven Kelly

9pm-9:45pm

USF Alumni Reception Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

Coordinator: David Williams

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Schedule of Events THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2021 5pm-5:50pm

FMEA FIRST GENERAL SESSION Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Steven Kelly, Alysia Lee Coordinator: Melissa Nelson

6pm-8pm

All-State Guitar Ensemble — Virtual Rehearsal Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

6pm-6:45pm

Effects of ConductingGesture Instruction on Eighth-Grade String Orchestra Students Performance and Response to Conducting Emblems Sponsored by Research Committee

Presenter: Charles Patterson Coordinator: Don Coffman

This study is an investigation of the effects of short-term conducting-gesture instruction on eighth-grade string orchestra students. Comparison was done between conducting-based instruction and modeling-based instruction. Participants were 31 eighth-grade string orchestra students. During five consecutive days, experimental-group subjects (n = 14) received instruction designed to improve recognition and response to conducting gestures. The control group (n = 17) participated in modeling-based instruction of the same musical techniques targeting the conducting gestures (without any conducting explanation). The study used two measures of conducting-gesture recognition: (1) a written examination; and (2) an individual performance examination.

6pm-6:45pm

First, We Sing! Little Songs and Games for Reading, Writing, and More Sponsored by FEMEA

Presenter: Susan Brumfield Coordinator: Luis Rios

Readiness for music reading and writing begins early, through listening, singing, moving, and playing games. The musical development that happens in these early years paves the way for older learners to acquire musical literacy by working through developmentally sequenced steps. Dr. Susan Brumfield has worked extensively in the choosing, transcription, and annotation of songs and rhymes that are just right for singing, playing, reading, and writing in grades K-2. In this session, she will present teaching activities, singing games, and new ways to incorporate a fresh batch of songs into your curriculum, ready to take home and use in your classroom tomorrow.

6pm-6:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE A Day in My Quaver Classroom Sponsored by QuaverMusic.com

Presenter: Steve Skinner Coordinator: Lorri Naylor

Whether you are a current QuaverMusic teacher or are just curious to see what it’s all about, this session will provide you with proven strategies to bring your lessons to life in a whole new way. Learn how technology can be successfully integrated to engage students in active music-making experiences. Come experience how this combination of ready-to-go resources and customizable content allows you to do what you do best—TEACH—and walk away with resources you can try with your students tomorrow!

6pm-6:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Exploring the Modern Band Method Sponsored by Hal Leonard

Presenter: Scott Burstein Coordinator: Sandy Lantz

This session will explore the new Modern Band Method series by Little Kids Rock and Hal Leonard, the first method for teaching a full-class popular music ensemble. This series provides a guided lesson plan for the absolute beginner, complete with audio tracks, video lessons, and many popular songs by the biggest musical artists of the day. Each book is filled with instruction in composition, improvisation, music theory, and instrumental technique, and works in tandem with the other books in the series so all students can learn and play music together in the same full band.

6pm-6:45pm

Our Shared Song: Creating a Choral Collective Through Introspection, Depiction, and Reflection Sponsored by FVA

Presenters: Kari Adams, Kevin Fenton, Michael Hanawalt Coordinator: Carlton Kilpatrick

During this interactive session, presenters will use musical examples to show how a rehearsal process can shift from being “me” (conductor) centered to “we” (choral collective) centered. Conferees will explore three elements of the rehearsal process: introspection (the conductor’s exploration of the score), depiction (gestures and rehearsal activities that provide a window to the possible), and reflection (thoughtful questioning that ignites the imagination and celebrates the contributions of each singer in the choral collective). These elements will outline a process that allows singers to become more engaged, generous, and soulful members of the choral collective.

6pm-6:45pm

Remembering the Joys of Teaching: Why Did I Go Into Teaching Again? Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Robert Gillespie Coordinator: Matthew Davis

We enter our profession with enthusiasm, zeal, courage, and passion for teaching! However, after years of facing challenging students, classroom discipline problems, administrators who do not value strings, and critical parents, we begin to wonder: Why am I doing this again? Come focus on the many JOYS of string teaching. We will laugh a lot, tell stories, have a good time, and find our first love again for our profession.

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The FMEA First General Session will be presided by FMEA President Steven Kelly, PhD, and will feature a keynote address by musician, music educator, teaching artist, arts administrator, and arts advocate Alysia Lee.


Thursday, January

14, 2021

6pm-7pm

You Can Do It! Teaching Digital Beat Making in Your Music Classroom Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

Presenter: Jonathan Kladder Coordinator: David Williams

Music technology changes fast, but the opportunities to enhance creative thinking in your music classroom with digital beat making are vast! As a significant portion of our students now listen and make music using digital technology, this session will offer examples of software for creating beats in your classroom. We will explore activities that incorporate beat-making experiences for your students in all contexts, including general music classrooms, ensemble spaces, and even ideas for integrating student-created beats into formal concerts. Come and experience the exciting possibilities of expanding your students’ musicianship using accessible and easy-to-use music technology in your classroom. Hands-on and practical applications for beat making will be provided for participants.

7pm-7:45pm

Adults’ Mental Images of Music Sponsored by Research Committee

Presenter: Giulia Ripani Coordinator: Don Coffman

How can we encourage lifelong participation in musical activities? Understanding how adults define and use music at different age levels is crucial to design educational spaces that respond to adults’ changing musical interests and needs. Despite the growing interest in musical adulthood, little research has addressed adults’ musical experiences from a developmental perspective. This session will present results and implications of a study that examined adults’ mental images of music and musical selves across the lifespan. Projective techniques such as drawings and free linguistic associations were used to access participants’ inner thoughts. Echoing new developmental theories, results identified stable and changing elements in adults’ uses of music and definitions of musical selves across the lifespan.

7pm-7:45pm

Creating Community Through Choral Text Sponsored by FVA

Presenters: Carol Krueger, Hillary Ridgley Coordinator: Solangi Santiago

The foundation of choral music is the connection between the music and the text. As a conductor, the study of the music is never complete without the analysis and understanding of the text. In performance, one of the challenges directors encounter is engaging the choir in expressing the text to the audience, and for the singers to invest in the text and music. Creative and practical strategies for engaging singers in expressing the text, understanding and unifying the mechanics of the text, and current research will be explored.

7pm-7:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Back to Bach: New Methods for Enhancing Ensemble Musicianship Sponsored by The Bach Initiative

Presenter: Peter Folliard Coordinator: Nicholas Lockey

Intended for directors of all types and levels of instrumental ensembles, Dr. Peter Folliard presents a new method for refining ensemble musicianship through his new text, The Bach Initiative. Folliard begins the presentation by sharing his lifelong relationship with the music of J. S. Bach and his stories about employing Bach’s chorales with professional, collegiate, and secondary ensembles to refine his ensemble’s musicianship. Folliard discusses various areas of musicianship including awareness, intuition, shaping, intonation, articulation/bowing, and voice leading, and shows how a conductor can best address these areas through the study and rehearsal of the four-part chorales of J. S. Bach. Folliard demonstrates, through audience participation/singing and recorded examples, how a conductor can employ this method with an ensemble to more fully develop the musicianship of the ensemble.

7pm-7:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Guitar Class Assessment: Tools and Techniques Sponsored by Class Guitar Resources, Inc.

Presenter: Edward Prasse Coordinator: Edward Prasse

In this session, attendees will experience the assessment tools imbedded in the First Year Guitar student text and teacher manual from Class Guitar Resources, Inc. Specific strategies including use of scoring rubrics for both individual playing assignments and trio projects, written worksheets and exams, and “zone grading” strategies will be discussed and demonstrated. Translation: come to this session if you are ready to sharpen your guitar curriculum and raise the rigor for your students!

7pm-7:45pm

One Stop Rhythm Shop: Tips to Get Your Rhythm Section Groovin’ in Various Styles—From Swing to Salsa Sponsored by FBA

Presenters: Richard DeRosa, Michele Fernandez Coordinator: Edgar Rubio

One Stop Rhythm Shop provides an aural, visual, and interactive experience for educators and students (handouts included). Tips for full rhythm section include playing swing, funk, ballads, cha-cha, salsa, bossa nova/samba styles with authenticity, as well as interpreting a drum part and setting up common ensemble swing rhythms. The information and live demonstration will yield immediate results for students at any level, from elementary to high school. Michele and Rich share their pedagogical methods with today’s inquiring music educators. In addition to their significant professional experiences with Latin and jazz styles, both educators bring a wide spectrum of experience: Michele at the public school level and Rich at the university level. Both have presented pedagogical clinics in international settings and conducted all-state, all-region, and all-county bands at the middle/high school levels. Both are published composers with music designed for public school students.

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Schedule of Events 7pm-7:45pm

The Hardest But Most Important Task in Our Profession: Teaching Beginners in a Large, Heterogeneous Class to Play Correctly Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Robert Gillespie Coordinator: Carol Griffin

Teaching beginners in a large, heterogeneous class to play well is one of the hardest tasks in our profession. To get the high school orchestra to play its best, beginners must play well from the start. Teachers who effectively teach beginners are worth their weight in gold! Come explore the best pedagogy, research, motivation, assessment, technology, sequencing, and strategies for young string students.

8pm-8:45pm

Assessing the Correlation Between Student Engagement and Musical Capacity in College Students Sponsored by Research Committee

Presenter: Yangqian Hu Coordinator: Don Coffman

In higher education, one of the major challenges is student engagement. Higher education institutions not only require faculty to have a command of the subject matter, but they must also implement effective approaches to engage their students. In the study field of music in higher education, there has been increasing interest in the influences of music on emotional and cognitive functions. The effects of music could be moderated by people’s music background and their music engagement level. The effects of music and music engagement level are even more important among college students as they continue to be involved in music for their lifetime. The aim of this research is to explore and identify the correlation between student engagement and musical capacity in college. The questionnaire consists of two parts; the first part is to evaluate the participants’ engagement in school, and the second part is the music capacity of participants. The data and analysis will be completed by January 2021.

8pm-9:45pm

Crossover and Digital Music Showcase Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

Coordinator: David Williams

8pm-8:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Breezin’ Thru Theory Online: Perfect for Your Performance Program (At Anytime) Sponsored by Breezin’ Thru, Inc.

Presenter: Jean McKen Coordinator: Jason Thomashefsky

Bring any device and see why Breezin’ Thru Theory is perfect for building musicianship and confidence in your students. And more important, as an online learning tool, see how it can support your music program under any circumstances—at home or school. You’ll see how it engages students, frees up time, and builds mastery fast: anytime, anywhere, any device! Great planning tools, track progress with ease, 24 scaffolded chapters, curriculum aligned, middle and high school.

8pm-8:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Just Intonation: Help Your Ensemble Hear and Play Better in Tune Sponsored by Yamaha Corporation of America

Presenter: Thomas Bough Coordinator: Valeria Anderson

Playing perfectly in tune requires more than just a tuner! Setting the length of the tuning slide, neck, or string simply minimizes the amount of adjustments the students need to make. However, literally every note they play will need to be adjusted to some degree. The skill of LISTENING and ADJUSTING while playing is the mark of all great musicians, and can be developed and improved by players of any age by tuning against a drone. The ability of the drone to switch between equal temperament and just intonation provides a listening environment more applicable to ensemble performance for the students. Attendees will witness the demonstration of exercises that can easily be applied to their ensemble to help students develop their listening skills while matching pitches perfectly tuned to make the chords and melodies resonate.

8pm-8:45pm

I Sing Because I’m Happy: Engaging and Retaining Black Men in Choral Music Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Marshaun Hymon Coordinator: Charlie Toomer

This session will discuss how to engage and retain Black men in choral music. The experiences of Black men in school are unique, and choral music is shown to benefit their development in school. It is important for music educators to shift their pedagogy and instruction to best support and enhance the gifts of Black men. Through small- and large-group discussion, opportunities for sight singing, and instructional practice, participants will walk away able to implement actionable strategies that will assist in creating safe spaces for Black men in choral music.

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Thursday, January

14, 2021

8pm-8:45pm

Keep on Going: Overcoming Roadblocks to Resilience Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Mickey Smith, Jr. Coordinator: Tamara Lewis

As a traveling educator and musician, GRAMMY Music Educator Mickey Smith, Jr., has encountered numerous teachers who have taken their craft to higher levels of excellence. And he said he has learned from them. Such high levels of job performance naturally turn into high levels of learning, and the combination of the two creates a harmony between teacher and student, which creates a sound 180 days of instruction. “You quickly see, ‘Hey, this isn’t the only show in town,’” Smith said. “You take ideas, you learn from them, start implementing things, and my classroom gets stronger.” Smith, a three-time GRAMMY Music Educator Award nominee, said he has used his experience to develop Sound 180, a program to help empower teachers and make them more effective, to help people teach uplifted, and to find their joy.

8pm-8:45pm

Practical Strategies for Ensemble Motivation and Growth Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Kari Adams Coordinator: Valeria Anderson

Motivating adolescent students can be challenging because of the popular view of music as inborn talent rather than crafted skill. How can ensemble directors keep students engaged in rehearsals and promote practice outside of class? This session will explore how educators can use positive motivation strategies derived from the world of psychology and our teaching experiences to effectively motivate students to participate in ensembles, accept challenges, and practice individually. Teachers will walk away with specific examples of how to give students feedback that will encourage them to see their musical ability as inside rather than outside their control.

8pm-8:45pm

Two- and Four-Year Panel: Current Challenges in Collegiate Music Education Sponsored by FCMEA

Presenters: Mark Belfast, Robyn Bell, Dianna Campbell, Marc Decker Coordinator: Marc Decker

A panel of two- and four-year public and private instructors in higher education will discuss two major challenges facing higher education. The first subject concerns the pandemic and how it will change undergraduate curriculum, creative approaches for ensemble rehearsals and performances, methods of promoting student wellness during these challenging times, and ways of addressing the increased technological and facility needs necessary to promote student safety. The second subject is a discussion on diversity and inclusion including university and department initiatives, curriculum development, and community collaborations. There will be time at the end of each major subject for questions and answers.

8pm-8:45pm

Who’s in the Seats? Why It’s Important to Reach Everyone in the Stadium! Sponsored by Multicultural Network

Presenters: Gabriel Arnold, Jack Eaddy, Chandler Wilson Coordinator: Bruce Green

This session will provide strategies to reach different constituents in the stadium. With university stadium audiences getting younger and younger, it is becoming imperative for the bands to provide music that reaches everyone. This session will address the importance of playing different genres of music at events, investigating your stadium demographics, and reaching a broader audience. In addition to providing strategies for success, panelists will discuss how to get buy-in from your school and community, how to tailor specific arrangements for your audience, and how to create a game day experience that is worthwhile for everyone. Panelists will offer insights and share strategies they have used to change the game day experience for their respective universities.

9pm-10pm

Contemporary Media Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: David Williams

Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

9pm-10pm

Diverse Learners Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Alice-Ann Darrow

Sponsored by Diverse Learners Committee

9pm-10pm

FBA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Sponsored by FBA

9pm-10pm

FEMEA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Ernesta Chicklowski

Sponsored by FEMEA

9pm-10pm

Florida NAfME Collegiate Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Julian Grubb

Sponsored by Florida NAfME Collegiate

9pm-10pm

FOA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Matthew Davis

Sponsored by FOA

9pm-10pm

FVA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Jason Locker

Sponsored by FVA

9pm-10pm

General Music Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

9pm-10pm

Multicultural Network Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Bruce Green

Sponsored by Multicultural Network

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Schedule of Events FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 2021 5pm-5:45pm

FMEA SECOND GENERAL SESSION Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Judy Bowers, Steven Kelly Coordinator: Melissa Nelson

The Second General Session will be presided by FMEA President Steven Kelly, PhD, and will feature a keynote address by Judy Bowers, PhD, professor emerita in the College of Music at Florida State University and the Emy-Lou Biedenharn endowed chair in music at the University of Louisiana Monroe.

6pm-6:45pm

Don’t “Crack” Under Pressure! Teaching Adolescent Boys Sponsored by FVA

Presenters: Cathy Montero, Danielle Zier Coordinator: Angela Guira

Oh, the crazy world of the male changing voice. Choral directors are often hesitant and unsure of how to help our boys navigate this rite of passage. But despite our self-perceived inadequacies and limited experiences, we are the experts, and for them it’s all new. We’ve either gone through it ourselves or had boys in our choir who look to us for direction. This is likely our one chance to lead them to form lifelong opinions about singing. Their personal experiences in our classroom will either make them love it, or avoid it at all costs. It is our responsibility to provide them with the tools and guidance to have a successful experience in our choirs and a future that includes music. Cathy Montero and Danielle Zier have had great success in creating and maintaining boys’ choirs in their respective programs. Their choirs of 30+ boys have a great retention rate throughout middle school and even into high school. In this practical session for teachers at all levels, they will provide activities, strategies, and materials backed by experience and research that have been used to grow noteworthy middle school boys’ choirs. Resources will include concepts and activities for teaching music theory and sight reading, warm-ups for better vocal techniques, and time-tested repertoire, all geared toward a developing men’s program.

6pm-7pm

Embrace Not Knowing: Search and Learn Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

Presenter: Natalie Mallis Coordinator: David Williams

Are you new to teaching and feeling intimidated? Perhaps you’ve been teaching awhile and are feeling stuck? Embrace an “I don’t know” mentality and figure it out—together! Let your students guide you. Join us for an interactive and engaging experience where “not knowing” is encouraged! Together, we will explore the unknowns of progressive teaching methods and investigate approaches to facilitating a learner-centered classroom where our students develop intellectual curiosity and create meaning.

6pm-6:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Sound Shaping and Breath Release for the Flute Sponsored by Florida Flutes

Presenter: Nora Lee Garcia Coordinator: Fred Schiff

You can let your flute section members decide on their own the sound shapes and the phrases they create, or you can help them become the section you want to hear. Join Dr. Garcia as she takes you through the fundamentals of shape and release; techniques that can be shared with every level on the day you get back to your classroom.

6pm-6:45pm

Multicultural Network Business Meeting Sponsored by Multicultural Network

Coordinator: Bruce Green

Annual business meeting for the FMEA Multicultural Network members and those interested in ensuring that quality music education experiences are available for ALL Florida students as well as professional development for music educators.

6pm-6:45pm

Music Selection for Elementary, Middle, and High School Steel Pan Ensembles Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Jared Allen, Shaun Bennett, William Sahely Coordinator: Shannon Stem

The aim of this clinic is to equip both new and experienced directors with a database of music choices that are appropriate for beginning, intermediate, advanced, and mixed ensembles at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Topics in this clinic will include but not be limited to appropriate music, arrangements, music selection based on ability, and music selection based on age. The clinicians aim to provide the attendees with selections that can immediately be used in their program, as well as offer access to websites and resources where source material can be found.

6pm-6:45pm

Read Me a Story Sponsored by FEMEA

Presenter: Thomas Pierre Coordinator: Jenny Chambless

Singing, chanting, moving, playing, and creating are what children do instinctively. Read to your students and incorporate the arts as a point of access to teach, influence, and inspire. Witness your students connect their learning to real-life experience.

6pm-6:45pm

The Benefits of Team Teaching Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Marina McLerran, Roy McLerran Coordinator: Stephen Grindel

This session will discuss the benefits of team teaching in secondary instrumental ensembles and will provide suggestions for best utilizing clinicians and private lessons staff. Team teaching is more than having multiple experts working with students, and requires long-term planning, open communication, and curriculum alignment. Suggestions will be presented for a multitude of program sizes and staffing circumstances.

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Friday, January

15, 2021

6pm-6:45pm

The Care and Maintenance of Our “Grown-Up” Beginners: Second Semester Tips for Retaining Students After Their First Year of Playing Sponsored by FBA

Presenters: Carol Allen, Jeanie Berry, DaLaine Chapman, Hannah Jennings, Kerry Waldo Coordinator: Richard Davenport

While there is no exact approach for retaining beginners in your program, there are ways to secure a high percentage of them playing their instrument and returning to your class the following year. Maintaining a balance between fun and work, and keeping students engaged during the third nine weeks, is often difficult given the number of distractions the second semester brings. The attention our beginners require during this time is sometimes overlooked as state testing approaches and as the upperclassmen work toward their music performance assessments. This presentation focuses on the importance of paying close attention to our youngest players as they begin their second semester of instruction and what we can do to keep them engaged, interested, and happy—all three ingredients making a recipe for success.

7pm-7:45pm

Accessible Success: Supporting Collegiate Music Education Students With Special Needs Sponsored by FCMEA

Presenters: Sandra Adorno, Vimari Colón-León, Alice-Ann Darrow, Candice Davenport Mattio, Stephen Zdzinski Coordinator: Marc Decker

University music students with special needs face unique challenges as systems place the onus of seeking support resources on the students themselves. Inherently at higher risk of stress, failure, and dropout, music education students with special needs face compounded issues with little guidance. This discussion panel seeks to explore faculty experiences with creating inclusive and supportive spaces for special needs music education students. Topics will include entrance interviews, field experiences and internships, creating awareness, advising, grappling with uninformed faculty, collaborating with campus resources, and the perspective of a current music education doctoral student and future faculty member with special needs.

7pm-7:45pm

Band After COVID: Planning for Recovery Sponsored by FBA

Presenter: Ian Schwindt Coordinator: Richard Davenport

FBA President Ian Schwindt will moderate a conversation with a panel of directors from around our great state that will provide strategies for strengthening band programs during and after our “new normal” of music education after COVID.

7pm-7:45pm

Bass-ics: What Every String Teacher Needs to Know About the Bass Bow Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Brian Powell Coordinator: Valeria Anderson

Dr. Brian Powell is a professional bassist and teacher at the Frost School of Music who has more than two decades of experience directing public school and honors orchestras. From these experiences he has witnessed how issues of tone and articulation of the lower strings (which are often unaddressed) can fundamentally transform the sound and unity of an orchestra. This session is for orchestra teachers who want to gain a deeper understanding of how to unlock the potential of their lower string sections, particularly with the double bass. This session will present clear, easy-to-understand strategies that will help your lower strings have a bigger, more focused, pure, even, and resonant sound. Attendees will learn more about the German and French bow and how these strategies apply differently to each. And more important, session members will see clear correlations in how this pedagogy pertains to all string instruments in the orchestra.

7pm-7:45pm

Creating a Culture of Vocal Health in the Choral Ensemble Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Brett Epperson Coordinator: Paul Roy

Choral conductors are responsible for cultivating the culture of their ensembles. Singers tend to draw a significant portion of their identity from their involvement in singing. Choral directors are also often the primary teacher of voice and vocal techniques to their chorus members. This session explores avenues for deliberately establishing a culture where healthy vocal technique is paramount, supporting students’ social identity as “singers,” and pursuing lifelong learning regarding vocal pedagogy.

7pm-7:45pm

Meet the Supervisors and School District Exhibit Sponsored by FMSA

Presenter: Skip Pardee Coordinator: Lindsey Williams

Please join the music supervisors from around the state of Florida in a “meet and greet” session combined with a school district exhibit to learn about teaching opportunities in our state. We welcome current or future music educators to this session. We look forward to meeting you!

7pm-7:45pm

This Is What I Can Do ... What Will You Add? Building Inclusive Ensembles Sponsored by Diverse Learners Committee

Presenter: Christine Lapka Coordinator: Alice-Ann Darrow

Experience “reverse inclusion” as we start the session with students who chant, sign, sing some of the pitches, “fill in” on a modified guitar, and improvise on harmonica. Participants will be asked to add their musical abilities to the group. During the process, we will work cooperatively to create a musical product. At the conclusion, participants will discuss the principles of reverse inclusion and how they can use these techniques in the future.

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Schedule of Events 7pm-7:45pm

Vibrato: From Foundational Building Blocks to Expression Sponsored by FOA

Presenters: Katarzyna (Kasia) Bugaj, George Speed Coordinator: Jason Jerald

Vibrato is a technical and artistic element of string playing that allows performers to “bring the sound alive” and shape musical phrasing. While an intermediate technique, the foundations of successful vibrato development rest in the early stages of learning to play a stringed instrument. This session will explore upper and lower string vibrato development from the first steps to advanced expressive use. Participants will come away with an assortment of exercises and vibrato development tips.

7:30pm-9pm

FEMEA Business Meeting and Drumming Thursday Night Sponsored by FEMEA

Presenter: Ernesta Chicklowski Coordinator: Ernesta Chicklowski

Come sing and play with your friends! Participants will learn fun drumming pieces. Please try to bring your own drum. Bring your friends and join the FUN!

8pm-9pm

CONCERT All-State Popular Music Collective Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

Director: David Williams Coordinator: David Williams

8pm-8:45pm

Developing Community in the Rehearsal Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Greg LeFils Coordinator: Audrey Carballo

8pm-8:45pm

FCMEA General Membership Meeting Sponsored by FCMEA

Coordinator: Marc Decker

8pm-8:45pm

Instructional Strategies and Practices for the Beginning Steelband Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Presenter: William Sahely Coordinator: Edward Prasse

During this clinic, attendees will learn about successful instructional strategies and practices in the beginning steelband ensemble. Topics in this clinic will include but not be limited to instrument selection, performance techniques and pedagogy, music selection, and recruitment. As a director of six beginning steelbands per year, William Sahely intends for this session to inform fellow steelband directors on some of the strategies he has developed in his time as a teacher. The aim of the clinic is to provide quality, informative ways for steelband directors to enhance their beginning level ensemble, thereby enhancing their upper level ensembles.

8pm-8:45pm

Interview Strategies for Preservice Music Teachers Sponsored by FMSA

Presenter: Skip Pardee Coordinator: Lindsey Williams

Join music supervisors and program leaders from around the state of Florida in a group discussion and breakout session about interview strategies for preservice music teachers. Learn some take-home strategies from our state’s program leaders to be prepared for your first job interview. Don’t miss this opportunity to hone your interview skills!

8pm-8:45pm

Memorization: Playing From the Heart Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Chung Park Coordinator: Matthew Davis

Having fun with memorization.

8pm-8:45pm

Research Poster Session Sponsored by Research Committee

Coordinator: Don Coffman

Fifty presenters (graduate students, faculty) are eager to chat with you about their research studies. Come for a virtual stroll, view the posters, and visit with the presenters. Download the handout for a listing of presenters and the titles of their research.

9pm-10pm

Contemporary Media Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: David Williams

Sponsored by Contemporary Media Committee

9pm-10pm

Diverse Learners Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Alice-Ann Darrow

Sponsored by Diverse Learners Committee

9pm-10pm

FBA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Ian Schwindt

Sponsored by FBA

9pm-10pm

FEMEA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Ernesta Chicklowski

Sponsored by FEMEA

9pm-10pm

Florida NAfME Collegiate Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Julian Grubb

Sponsored by Florida NAfME Collegiate

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We conductors are responsible for creating an environment of belonging and acceptance. This session will examine strategies for fostering a communal environment involving vulnerability, nurturing, trust, collaboration, playing, building traditions, and fostering group commitment.


Friday, January 9pm-10pm

FMSA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Harry “Skip” Pardee

Sponsored by FMSA

9pm-10pm

FOA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Matthew Davis

Sponsored by FOA

9pm-10pm

FVA Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Jason Locker

Sponsored by FVA

9pm-10pm

General Music Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

9pm-10pm

Multicultural Network Evening Chat Hour

Coordinator: Bruce Green

Sponsored by Multicultural Network

15, 2021

SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 2021 8am-9am

FMEA Emerging Leaders Coffee Talk: Getting to Know Our TEAM! Sponsored by Emerging Leaders

Presenter: Mary Palmer Coordinator: Malissa Baker

It may sound quaint, but this is an opportunity to join us for coffee and conversation, face-to-face, in real time! Florida’s music education leaders and Florida Music Education Association emerging leaders will be on hand for informal talks, to answer questions, and to enjoy getting to know you. The “NEWS,” that is, teachers new to the music education profession, new to the Florida Music Education Association, or new to the FMEA Professional Development Conference, and the “SEASONEDS” are welcome.

8am-9am

Pecha Kucha: A Kaleidoscope of Classroom Practices and Tips Presented by FMEA Emerging Leaders Sponsored by Emerging Leaders

Coordinator: Malissa Baker

From first principles of physics, to carts, to “doubling,” to testing, to connecting, to STEAM, to techie—there’s something for everyone! Presented in a Pecha Kucha format, there will be something NEW every couple of minutes. All conference attendees are invited to join us.

9am-9:45am

Balance, Posture, and Gesture: Expanding Conducting Vocabulary for Better Health Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Brittan Braddock, Rosemary Engelstad Coordinator: Dorothy Yorty

Conducting is a musical tool that we use in rehearsal every day. This session will explore balance and posture in relation to our conducting gesture, shoulder health, and movement. We all form habits that create repetitive gestures, but can work to achieve a healthy balance through diversified movement practices. Be prepared to move in this session!

9am-9:45am

Florida NAfME Collegiate Move That Bus!—How to Plan and Execute Memorable Travel Experiences for Your Students! Sponsored by Florida NAfME Collegiate

Coordinator: Mark Belfast

The world is full of learning opportunities for students that extend beyond the four walls of the music classroom. Traveling with students offers experiences they can remember for the rest of their educational careers. Whether it is a simple trip to perform at MPA or taking a group to perform at Carnegie Hall, traveling and performing is a part of music education that other disciplines cannot offer. This session is geared for new and future teachers and will explore where to go, how to plan, and most important, how to pay for it!

9am-9:45am

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Do You Hear What I Hear? Lessons Learned From Master Musicians Sponsored by Neil Kjos Music Company

Presenter: Jeff King Coordinator: Marc Decker

As much as we are all teachers, we are, first and foremost, all STUDENTS, called to pass on what we learn to each other. In this session, Texas band director and author Jeff King shares the lessons learned from other master musicians on his 36-year quest to develop exercises for superior tone, flexibility, range, articulation, dynamics, technique, listening skills, and more. Application of these exercises takes place during the “daily drill”—that time between the first note of rehearsal to the working of literature—where students warm up both physically and mentally and where new concepts and skills are introduced and reinforced. What makes this time genuinely effective is thoughtful application to the repertoire being studied. This leads to better music-making in every performance setting, regardless of students’ experience or ability.

Continued on page 40

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Schedule of Events 9am-9:55am

FVA General Business Meeting Sponsored by FVA

Presenter: Jason Locker Coordinator: Jason Locker

9am-10am

Graduate Student Research Presentations Sponsored by Research Committee

This session features two graduate student research presentations. Presenters: Amalia Allan, Dawn Mitchell White, Rachel Sorenson Coordinator: Don Coffman

9am-9:45am

Meaningful Movement: Dalcroze Eurhythmics in the General Music Classroom Sponsored by FEMEA

Presenter: David Frego Coordinator: Shannon Stem

Participants will be engaged in brain to body to feelings through purposeful movement that explores the elements of music (focus, pulse, beat, duration, meter, and phrasing). Direct transfers will be made to the Orff and Kodály curriculum. Handouts will provide extensions on lessons.

9am-9:45am

The Missing Faces in Music Education Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: David Cruz, Alicia Romero-Sardinas Coordinator: Valeria Anderson

Research findings suggest there is an underrepresentation of minority students in music education classrooms. There are numerous factors we can consider that contribute to this imbalance as well as hidden biases we may hold when teaching. The music world outside of “school music” has more diverse artists with whom students may identify. The challenge for music teachers is how to merge the students’ music with school music and create a vessel of expression and authenticity to represent our diverse students and their communities. As a result of this session, you will discover how your own students can serve as a guide and play an active role in the learning process.

10am-10:45am

Feeling the Burn: Learning to Assess Your Level of Teacher Burnout Sponsored by FOA

Presenter: Raine Allen Coordinator: Carol Griffin

This presentation will address the realities—and the myths—of the elusive “work-home balance” as it relates to the high-stress field of music education. Also discussed will be the obvious and not so obvious signs of teacher burnout, and the realities and benefits of committing to a healthy work-life balance.

10am-10:45am

Florida NAfME Collegiate Budgeting Without a Budget: How to Reallocate Your Resources and Gain Support for a Successful Year Sponsored by Florida NAfME Collegiate

Presenters: Margaret Flood, Jennifer Jimenez Coordinator: Mark Belfast

This session recommends ways to access and reallocate resources without having to spend money. Resources include, but are not limited to, sheet music, instruments and equipment, uniforms, marching band, and color guard, etc. Discussion will include ways teachers can collaborate with their district colleagues to pool and share materials. It will also encourage teachers to reach out to community members for support through donations and community partnerships. Sample materials such as letters soliciting donations from community businesses, applying for small grants, and applications and spreadsheets for tracking inventory will be provided.

10am-10:45am

Flipped Assessments for Secondary Music Ensembles Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Michael Douty Coordinator: Valeria Anderson

For secondary music ensembles, individually assessing students outside of rehearsal time is beneficial to both student learning and ensemble performance. Borrowing insights from flipped classroom strategies (Baker 2000) and competency-based assessment models (Lurie 2011), students can submit video assessments for individualized teacher feedback and work toward musical mastery at their own pace. The increasing availability of smartphones and other devices with a video camera makes it possible for most students to submit assessments from home. Free apps streamline the process. Accommodations are possible for students with access problems. When online/distance learning becomes necessary, ensembles using flipped assessments can smoothly transition to at-home learning. This model has been implemented in middle school band and orchestra classrooms in a Title I school, fostering individual student success and ensemble excellence.

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Saturday, January

16, 2021

10am-10:45am

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Online Recorder Instruction and Blended Learning Sponsored by Macie Publishing Company

Presenter: Dale Schubert Coordinator: Emily Kinnunen

School closures caused by COVID-19 demonstrate the value and sometimes necessity of being able to teach online. Blended learning can be defined as “an educational program, formal or informal, which combines online digital media with traditional classroom methods.” Dale will present a fun dedicated website for teaching recorder both in the classroom and at a distance! This engaging, student-friendly program enables you to stay connected with your students and easily give daily assignments including emailable music theory pages. Whether in class or at home, your students will develop strong music-reading skills and successfully learn to play the recorder without missing a beat. This session will include information regarding platforms for teaching remotely and helping to implement 1:1 initiatives. Bring your laptop! Free trial access codes will be provided as well as free recorders.

10am-10:45am

Jazz for the Rock Guitarist Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Presenter: David Tyson Coordinator: Edward Prasse

It is common for a young guitarist to show interest in joining the jazz ensemble with little to no experience in the genre. Music teachers often cite feeling underprepared to teach players of this instrument effectively. This session will provide introductory materials for the teacher and student, introducing basic jazz concepts to rock guitarists. Concepts will include basic equipment choices, chord voicings, comping rhythms, fingering choices, and improvisation. Technological materials relevant to jazz guitar will also be introduced. The audience is encouraged to participate in this interactive session. While the presenter will provide eight guitars, attendees are encouraged to bring their own instruments.

10:15am-11am

Being Present With Peers Sponsored by FEMEA

Presenter: BethAnn Hepburn Coordinator: Ashley Peek

Your role as the teacher becomes the role of a facilitator as the students make meaning through creative group tasks in the elementary setting. This session will explore lessons for grades K-5 that use a variety of hands-on manipulatives to enhance student understanding through peer interactions. Model lessons will include both Orff Schulwerk and Kodály pedagogical strategies. The session will also highlight the research grounded in sociocultural theories that informs our practice to support peer collaboration in the elementary music setting. Strategies for peer-assisted learning for decoding music notation, group rhythmic compositions, and partners for improvisation will be modeled for grades 1-5.

11am-11:45am

Call and Response: Teaching Improvisation for All Levels Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Jeffrey Benatar Coordinator: Melissa Nelson

Dr. Jeff Benatar has created a 15-step pedagogy for teaching the Call and Response method of interaction and improvisation. Steps 1-8 are activelistening based. Step 9 adds a transcription. Steps 10-15 engage students on their instruments. This process will empower student improvisers.

11am-11:45am

Florida NAfME Collegiate What Kind of Teacher Are You? Sponsored by Florida NAfME Collegiate

Presenter: Douglas McCullough Coordinator: Mark Belfast

There are three kinds of teachers. Teachers who make things happen! Teachers who watch things happen! Teachers who wonder what is happening?

11am-11:45am

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Teaching Blues Improvisation in Guitar Class Sponsored by Class Guitar Resources, Inc.

Presenter: Edward Prasse Coordinator: Edward Prasse

In this session, attendees will be presented with the “Blues” curricular sequence and content from the new H.O.T. Hands-On Training Second Year Guitar student text. Topics such as 12-bar format, powerchords, turnarounds, Chuck Berry style soloing techniques, string bending, pentatonic scale voicing, and phrasing patterns will be examined from both the student’s and teacher’s perspective. Attendees will leave this session with a deeper insight of the Blues curriculum found in this text. Bring your guitar and let’s play the BLUES!

11am-11:45am

The Middle School Conductor: Reinforcing Fundamentals Through Purposeful, Intentional Gesture Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Erin Bodnar Coordinator: Jacob Reedy

The aim of this hands-on session is to bring awareness to the influence of the middle school teacher’s conducting in reinforcing the teaching of fundamentals. The session will examine the effect of posture, horizontal gestures, breathing, musical releases, and much more on creating a better sound from your ensemble. Participants will practice a variety of gestures that will aid their current teaching and will leave the session with tangible strategies for improving the sound of their ensembles through gesture.

Continued on page 42

December 2020

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Schedule of Events 11am-11:45am

Visually Impaired Students: Equitable Inclusion and Access in a Traditional Music Degree Curriculum Sponsored by FCMEA

Presenter: Stacie Rossow Coordinator: Marc Decker

Students with visual impairment and complete blindness have had only two choices if they wanted to pursue a degree in music: have some standard requirements waived or altered or find an institution that deals only with similar students. With increased technology and accessibility, we cannot continue to tell these talented students they need not have the same level of musical literacy, the same standards of achievement, or access to materials as their fully sighted colleagues. These students should be provided the tools to learn to read and understand music just as their sighted peers. This paper session will present the real-world challenges and successes encountered in working with visually impaired students in a traditional collegiate music program, from gaining access to printed scores and working with the student accessibility office to the basics of Braille music notation.

11:30am12:15pm

Building a Classroom Community Through History, Culture, and New Music Ensembles Sponsored by FEMEA

Presenter: James Mader Coordinator: Dorothy Yorty

This hands-on presentation will demonstrate how various drum and xylophone ensembles address the needs of the urban music classroom, addressing the needs of the urban student and how the academic study of music (the African diaspora of the Yoruba) will develop various learning modalities, life skills, and social awareness, thus tying in our past, present, and future.

1pm-1:45pm

FMEA PRODUCT SHOWCASE Your Next-Gen Private Music Studio Sponsored by Your NextGen Private Music Studio

Presenter: Mimi Butler Coordinator: Cody Puckett

Brand new: Your Next-Gen Private Music Studio. A respected speaker and author of three private teaching guides, Mimi Butler has compiled the very latest tips, trends, and information from private music studio teachers across the United States, including new teaching tech, global internet instruction, digital cash management, the millennial parent, and social media.

1pm-1:45pm

Inside the Publishing World Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Larry Clark Coordinator: Melissa Hinds

Clinician Larry Clark draws on his 25 years of working in the music publishing business as a composer, author, editor, and music publisher to present teachers with useful information on how copyright works and how it affects what you do in the classroom, along with explanations of what a publisher is, how you get published, and what goes into the process of bringing music to educators to use with their students. Additional resources for how to find more information online and how technology will affect how we use copyrights and published music will be provided.

1:15pm-2pm

CONCERT: All-State Guitar Ensemble Sponsored by Secondary General Music Committee

Coordinator: Edward Prasse

2pm-5pm

FMEA College Fair Sponsored by FMEA

Coordinator: Josh Bula

2pm-2:45pm

Superior Flutes — Ten Ways to Improve Your Flute Section Today Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Karen Large Coordinator: Jay DeDon

For many music educators, the flute is the most elusive of all wind instruments to teach. The lack of reed or mouthpiece makes it truly unique in the wind band. Dr. Karen Large, assistant professor of flute at FSU, will present 10 pillars of flute teaching that will produce immediate gains in the sound, intonation, and technique of any flute section. Additionally, she will address common pitfalls and how to correct them, host an open Q&A session, and send attendees back to their band rooms with a handout and resources for future reference. Superior flutes are within your reach!

2pm-2:45pm

They Did It on Their Own! Teaching Independent Musicianship in Your Large Ensemble Classroom Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Daniel Taylor Coordinator: D. Gregory Springer

Growing students into independent, lifelong/life-wide musicians is a primary goal for many music educators and education organizations throughout the United States. The large ensemble classroom, though, is sometimes criticized as being too product based and director led. This clinic provides strategies (including scaffolded coaching, encouraging student decision-making, and increasing student motivation) that can be used by secondary music teachers to increase self-regulated learning and musical independence. Special emphasis will be given to large ensemble programs that may or may not have access to private instruction through additional staff members.

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Saturday, January

16, 2021

3pm-3:45pm

Chamber Music — The Secret Ingredient to Better Large Ensemble Skills and Better Students Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Osvaldo Gomes, Daniel Hasznos Coordinator: Patricia Gingras

Students engaged in chamber ensemble activities produce better results for their entire music program. Incorporating chamber music into the overall mix of performance offerings is an effective and exciting way to instill strong fundamental performance skills, interpersonal and communication skills, and solid musicianship. Chamber music, distinctly used as a pedagogical process, provides opportunities for students to develop heightened awareness of the finer details of performance. By using a chamber scaled approach, students naturally become sensitive to refinements of tonal concepts, intonation, balance, blend, matching articulation, rhythm, and sense of pulse. By removing the conductor from the process of rehearsal or by empowering students in a collaborative rehearsal/performance model, students gain greater autonomy of musical ideas. An environment that encourages the sharing of ideas provides students an authentic pathway to build self-image, self-esteem, and self-efficacy.

4pm-4:45pm

Skittles Does Not Equal Musical Excellence: Tackling Teachers’ Perception of Problematic Student Behaviors Sponsored by FMEA

Presenter: Pamela Richardson Coordinator: Crystal Berner

As our society changes, so do the needs of our students. No matter how much change takes place, their needs as human beings must be met in order for them to experience musical excellence in our classes. When time becomes a focal point, it is easy to lose sight of the process and the journey as we rush to get a product from the students. Rushing against the clock and placing our faith in intrinsic rewards while dealing with behaviors can lead to missed opportunities to build relationships. In this session, we will tackle teachers’ perceptions about behavior and go over the variables that serve as hindrances in order to shed light on what students really need to flourish.

5:45pm6:45pm

FMEA Virtual Conference Closing Ceremony Sponsored by FMEA

Presenters: Steven Kelly, Kenneth Williams, Shelby Chipman, Kathleen Sanz, John Southall

A tribute to all Florida music educators.

December 2020

43


FLORIDA MUSIC EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 2020-2021 DONORS Thank you to all of the donors who have shown their dedication to the improvement of music education in Florida by supporting our Mission through financial contributions. Our donors support specific causes by donating to the FMEA funds of their choice: FMEA Scholarship Fund

June M. Hinckley Scholarship

Music Education Advocacy

Professional Development for Members

General Fund

Mel & Sally Schiff Music Education Relief Fund

The following have graciously donated to FMEA from April 1, 2020, through November 4, 2020.

MAESTRO’S CIRCLE ($10,000 and up) No current donors at this time

ARTIST’S CIRCLE ($1,000 – $9,999)

Artie Almeida In Honor of June Audrey Holcombe Grace & Katie Grace Miller Clifford Madsen Russell Robinson

DONATE TODAY FOR A STRONGER TOMORROW. With your support, FMEA will continue to grow its programs for teachers and students, strengthen united advocacy efforts, and improve your professional development opportunities. Visit FMEA.org to learn more information about each fund and to make a donation.

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SUSTAINERS ($100 – $999)

Ann Adams-Valle In Dedication of Bobby L. Adams Lucinda Balistreri In Honor of June M. Hinckley Anthony Chiarito Dayna Cole In Memory of Linda Mann Alice-Ann Darrow In Honor of Mr. & Mrs. O. B. Darrow Virginia Densmore In Memory of Jeff Bradford, Byron & Bobbie Smith

Florida Bandmasters Association In Memory of Bobbie & Byron Smith Patricia Flowers Stanley Hoch Dennis Holt Marsha Juday Steven Kelly Carlton Kilpatrick Sheila King In Memory of John W. King Frances Lilly In Memory of Byron & Bobbie Smith

Jason Dobson

Jason Locker In Memory of June M. Hinckley Natalie Mallis Angel Marchese Carolyn Minear Ree Nathan John Nista Kimberly Oppermann On Behalf of the Board of Directors of HCEMEC, Inc. David Pletincks In Honor of Alexis & Jonathan Pletincks Mary Catherine Salo In Memory of Gary Rivenbark & Wes Rainer

Steven Salo In Honor of John “Buck” Jamison & Dr. Bill Prince Kathleen Sanz In Honor of June M. Hinckley & In Memory of A. Byron Smith J. Mark Scott In Honor of Dr. Judy Arthur & Dr. Judy Bowers; In Memory of Byron & Bobbie Smith on behalf of the Florida Vocal Association D. Gregory Springer

Harry Spyker In Honor of Fred & Marlene Miller Gregory St. Jacques In Honor of Bobbie & Byron Smith Jeannine Stemmer In Memory of Barbara Kingman & Lauren Alonso Leiland Theriot In Memory of Clayton Krehbiel Robert Todd In Memory of Gary Rivenbark Richard Uhler David Williams Kenneth Williams

PATRONS ($25 – $99)

Carlos Abril David Bayardelle In Memory of Matthew Jensen Mark Belfast In Memory of Dr. Mark A. Belfast, Sr.

Patrick Carney In Memory of Stephen & Sally Carney Greg Carswell Renee Cartee Carol Casey Shelby Chipman

Melanie Faulkner

Kevin Lusk

Margaret Flood In Memory of Dr. Karen Kennedy

Robert McCormick

Bradley Franks In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark

Karen Bradley In Memory of Harold Bradley

Zachary Chowning

Tina Gill In Memory of Gary W. Rivenbark

Gordon Brock

Debbie Cleveland

Cheryce Harris

Katarzyna (Kasia) Bugaj

Don Coffman

Julie Hebert

Alexander Busby

David Cruz

John Henderson

Stanley Butts

Matthew Davis In Memory of Robert Morrison

John Jarvis

Tara Callahan In Memory of Kristin Y. Clark Audrey Carballo In Memory of Irwin Bernard

Dale Choate

Marc Decker Virginia Dickert In Memory of Lindsay Keller & Deborah Liles Debbie Fahmie

Michael Johnson Mary Keyloun Cruz In Memory of George & Laurice Keyloun Lu Anne Leone Joseph Luechauer

Jeneve Medford Jarvis Katie Grace Miller In Honor of My Aunt Artie Ronald Miranda Amy Nickerson In Memory of Carola F. Nickerson Mary Palmer Galen Peters Edward Prasse Marie Radloff In Memory of Charles F. Ulrey C. William Renfroe In Memory of Herbert Beam, past FVA President & my high school choral director

Alicia Romero-Sardinas In Honor of John Rose Melissa Salek Ted Shistle Kyle Spence Missy Tanton Dobson In Memory of Bobbie & Byron Smith Valerie Terry Howard Weinstein In Memory of Barry Weinstein Julian White In Dedication of Kenneth Tolbert Marguerite Wilder In Memory of Bobbie & Byron Smith Anonymous (7)

FRIENDS (up to $24)

Shirley Andrews

Beth Ann Delmar

Gloria Berkowitz In Memory of Judy Berger

Dennis Demaree

Crystal Berner Antonio Borges Dan Brockman Nicholas DeCarbo

Jodie Donahoo Christopher Dorsey Wanda Drozdovitch Ashley Espinal

Anna Marie Friars In Memory of Matthew McLaughlin

Deborah Mar In Memory of Barbara Kingman

Jimmy Gillis

Christopher Miller

Walter Halil

Kristy Pagan

Harold Hankerson

Hank Phillips

Jason Jerald

Edgar Rubio

Emily Langerholc

Jack Salley

Patricia Losada

John Southall Thomas Stancampiano Phil Tempkins Michelle Tredway Gary Ulrich Lisa Wilson Anonymous (7)

December 2020

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The Joy of Video

A Win for Students With

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Modeling

Disabilities and Everyone Else

L

by Christine Lapka, EdD

Living in Central Florida, the home of painter Bob Ross,

I am reminded of his famous quote “We don’t make mistakes, just happy little accidents.� We can take away

a few positives from the time of COVID-19. One of these positive outcomes is our comfort with or increased use

of technology. If you have created videos of desired musical outcomes, you probably used video modeling, a

teaching practice that benefits students with disabilities.

Specifically, evidence from research studies indicates

how different types of video modeling can function as

a research-based practice for students with autism and intellectual disabilities (Franzone & Collet-Klingenberg, 2008). We also know repetition can occur when students

have unlimited access to video tutorials. That repetition

is a helpful practice for students with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, and sensory impairments.

We know that many of the methods used for excep-

tional populations work even better for typical students, which is a tenet of Universal Design for Learning

(UDL). UDL guides teachers to provide multiple means

of engagement, representation, and expression so that the classroom environment and instruction work well for typical students and for those who have disabilities.

Engagement is how we motivate students. Representation

refers to visual, auditory, and instructional input provided by teachers. When students sing or talk out loud, com-

municate with sign language, or play instruments, these are examples of expression.

When possible, UDL begins with methods that work

for a range of abilities instead of ones that only work Continued on page 48

December 2020

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The Joy of Video Modeling Continued from page 47

for students who are typical. A paral-

Figure 1

lel would be designing a building with

Original and Mirror Image Point of View

ramps that everyone can use instead of taking up space with both stairs and

ramps. For some time, music teachers have been using universal methods, like

mnemonic rhythm duration syllables, to reach students who are typical and students with disabilities in our classes and ensembles. Video modeling is another

universal method that enables us to effectively reach a range of students with and

without disabilities. Beyond showing vid-

eos of a desired performance, there are other types of videos to improve teaching effectiveness for all of your students.

As you probably know, basic video

modeling can effectively show students

how to hold instruments, demonstrate

posture while singing, and provide aural

and visual models of the music. What we might forget is the need for a mirror

image and the ease of which we can flip

the image on the screen. I often wanted to teach instrument skills standing next

Original image

(Photo by Bill Froom, used with his permission)

to each student or by standing directly in

flip, or flip horizontal. With the flipped

with the thought “if only they could

can imitate what they see without having

front of students with my back to them see through me and see what I see.” I

went as far as thinking about buying a

left-handed guitar for teaching in a mirror image. Experts in the field of excep-

tionalities have made us aware of the need for point-of-view fingering charts to

image on the right (see Figure 1), students

addition, point-of-view modeling is great

with a flipped video image to provide a clear image of which hand to use.

Another way for students to “see

“watchers” see the skill as if they were

ment (see Figure 1). Even novice teachers have been known to instruct and allow

students to hold instruments backward. Being aware of visuospatial cognition can set the learners on the right path.

With a few easy taps, the teacher can

switch the view using mirroring, image

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Players of certain musical instruments

they can use a live or prerecorded video

teachers can be face to face with a class,

that might be created if you are looking at hand on the top of a woodwind instru-

example).

(e.g., piano and percussion) can benefit

through” the model is by using point-

a model that appears to place a different

der, or head mounts (see Figure 2 for one

to navigate a reversed model. Even when

help students with visuospatial cognition

(McCord, 2016). You can see the confusion

Mirror image

of-view modeling. In this method, the

the model. Before the age of smartphones, point-of-view modeling was difficult.

Now, with action mount smartphone

harnesses, you can use your smartphone like a more expensive mini camera and

easily show students what it looks like from the performer’s perspective. Several

mounting options are available, including chest (male or female), neck, shoul-

Music Director

from seeing the player’s perspective. In for teaching classroom procedures and social skills. Imagine showing how to pick up and move the tubano drums (without pulling the heads off) or how to

respectfully work together in a sectional. For the tubano video, the teacher wears

the chest-mounted camera, moves the

drum, and describes the actions he or she

is taking while handling the drum. The description could include “Remember to

use the handle and the side of the drum instead of touching the drumhead on the

top.” For social skills, you might want to

have a few students act out a memorized script as they use good manners during a


Figure 2

Camera Chest Mount for Point-of-View Modeling

benefit from a model and a guide when

nesses discussed earlier, a tripod is essen-

There are additional favorable out-

create high-quality videos with a mount

they are working independently.

tial for stable video. In the end, you can

comes for students. There is evidence

or a tripod, a light, and some preparation.

that video modeling is effective no matter

More than likely, we have developed

who the model is (peer, adult, self). So, if

better technology skills from our time

models, using yourself or other adults

pushed into video teaching, but do not let

you are having trouble finding student

as online teachers. We may have been

seems to work just as well (McCoy &

that cloud your judgment on the impor-

Hermansen, 2007). Videos were also help-

tance of modeling and repetition. My

ful in promoting generalization—that is,

hope is that we continue to provide video

transferring the skill to a new situation.

modeling after we go back to face-to-

In addition, many of our students like

face instruction. Creating videos during

watching videos, and using the motiva-

COVID-19 might be our “happy acci-

tion provided by a video makes sense.

dent.”

Finally, video modeling can help students who pay attention to everything in the

Before joining the faculty at

content from the teacher. Students with

Florida,

room and subsequently miss some of the (Photo by Bill Froom, used with his permission)

attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

small group practice. After the videos are

model again—but on their time, outside

completed, teachers can avoid publicly

revealing who needs the extra practice

setting can alleviate social anxiety and save class time.

Video prompting is another specific

method that guides the learner to imitate the action immediately after the model.

Wynkoop et al. (2018) found that it was helpful when students watched a video model and then watched the video again

in the presence of a teacher who added commentary or verbal prompts. Perhaps

the verbal prompting does not have to be face to face. You could create anoth-

er video that pauses and instructs the student to take a turn. A time-saving

option might be to use the original video

with added edits. These edits would have

You might be interested in reading her chapter in Exceptional Pedagogy for Children with

Franzone, E., & Collet-Klingenberg, L. (2008). Overview of video modeling. Madison, WI: The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin. https:// www.waisman.wisc.edu/cedd/connections/ pdfs/VideoModeling_Overview.pdf

explanation. Show us something and then

be economical with your words. After all, the practice is called video modeling; this

is not a lecture. As for light and sound,

adding an LED selfie clip light or a tripod

McCord, K. (2016). Specified learning disabilities and music education. In D. V. Blair & K. A. McCord (Eds.), Exceptional music pedagogy for children with exceptionalities: International perspectives (pp. 176-196). Oxford University Press.

and a ring light will improve the quality

of the video image. Internal microphones

are suitable, but if you want an external microphone, you have options for spend-

McCoy, K., & Hermansen, E. (2007). Video modeling for individuals with autism: A review of model types and effects. Education and Treatment of Children, 30(4), 183-213. https://www.jstor.org/stable/42899952

ing between $17 and $200. Make sure the microphones are compatible with your

device (some purchasing advice is available at https://microphonebasics.com).

phone in airplane mode to avoid feedback

International

References

Avoid starting the video with a long

action. You can even add in some helpful

Exceptionalities:

Perspectives.

all like to look and sound good on video.

blank footage (time) with a voice-over

feedback. Many of our students would

therapy influenced her public school teaching.

write, reduce, and review. Being prepared

Also, although I have not found this to be

encouraging the student to imitate the

University. An additional degree in music

I will leave you with a few technical

will save you time in retakes and edits. We

Christine

music at Western Illinois

of class.

by asking the student to watch the video

Dr.

Lapka was a professor of

may need the opportunity to see the

tips. If you have lengthy explanations,

prior to class. Pre-teaching in a private

the University of Central

Wynkoop, K., Robertson, R., & Schwartz, R. (2018). The effects of two video modeling interventions on the independent living skills of students with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Journal of Special Education Technology, 33(3), 145-158. https://doi.org/10.1177/0162643417746149

a problem yet, some suggest putting your or distortion. Lastly, beyond the body har

December 2020

49


THINKING ABOUT LEARNING:

Improving Students’ Practice Through Metacognition

T

by Michael Alsop

The term metacognition was coined by John Flavell (1979)

Planning

learning. These influences can result from personal,

tice routines and their influences on learning. People

to describe individuals’ awareness of influences on their

Good planning starts with an evaluation of normal prac-

behavioral, or environmental factors (Zimmerman &

work best at different times of day. For example, night

Kitsantas, 2005). Just as educators teach practice strategies for improving musical performance, they can teach metacognitive strategies to raise students’ awareness of their

learning (Bathgate et al., 2012). Research has shown that

musicians who utilize metacognitive strategies are more self-aware and make more efficient use of practice time

(Byo & Cassidy, 2008). In fact, practicing without applying metacognitive strategies such as mental engagement or self-reflection can lead to developmental stagnation

(Brundage, 2016). Over the years, several characteriza-

tions have been used in trying to make this concept easier to explain, including “thinking about thinking,” “learn-

owls might practice most effectively late in the evening,

while for others, splitting practice between sessions in the morning and late afternoon might be most effective. Students should reflect on their own habits and try practicing at different times of day to learn what works best

for them. Other factors around practice settings should also be considered, such as room temperature, comfort

level, acoustics, and the number and type of distractions. Awareness of the influences of personal habits and envi-

ronments on learning can help students make appropriate adjustments to routines if necessary.

Many novice musicians dive into practice without

ing about learning,” or “knowledge about knowledge”

forethought, often resulting in mindless repetition or a

the most effective way to describe metacognition to

planning involves setting personal and musical goals

(Schleifer & Dull, 2009). Based on my own experiences,

students for the first time is “thinking about learning.”

Practice strategies that encourage students to think about their learning fall into three stages: planning, monitoring, and evaluating (Benton, 2014).

“Failing to plan is planning to fail.” 50    F l o r i d a

Music Director

focus on already-mastered skills and music. Successful for each practice session and then selecting the most

appropriate strategies for achieving those goals. The most effective goals are specific (e.g., perform a B-flat major

scale in eighth notes at 144 beats per minute with a slur

two, tongue two articulation) rather than general (e.g., get faster at the B-flat major scale). Practice strategies for – Anonymous

musical skills are beyond the scope of this article but play

a vital role in students’ ability to implement their plans.


Metacognitive strategies should be taught alongside musi-

determine what skills need the most attention. Goal

Just as teachers weave a central focus throughout a

short- and long-term goals. Help students gain an under-

cal practice strategies, not in place of them.

lesson plan to address ensemble needs, students can plan their practice around one or two of their weakest skill sets. A self-reflection exercise such as ranking aspects

of performance (e.g., rhythmic accuracy, intonation, dic-

time frames should be practical and include a balance of

standing of skill development processes by explaining the incremental and often non-linear characteristics of musical growth.

Continued on page 52

tion, musicianship) from strongest to weakest could help

December 2020

51


Improving Students’ Practice Through Metacognition Continued from page 51

“Wherever you are, be there totally.” – Eckhart Tolle Monitoring

of the mistake may not immediately be

to learning. The mindless approach to

ing to fix the wrong thing. For example,

Being present in the moment is crucial music-making is exhibited across all age

groups, but particularly by novice musicians in practice (Greer, 2013). Students

can apply all the musical practice strategies available in the world, but with-

out mental engagement, progress will be slow (Brundage, 2016). Although planning is important, students need to know

apparent, and time could be wasted trybrass players might stop mid-session and immediately start lip slur exercises when a lyrical passage is not going as smoothly

as they would like, when the problem might actually be related to slow finger technique, a common issue for novice musicians performing slow music.

Some monitoring techniques revolve

that fluidity and revising plans are OK

around mindfulness reminders and can

anticipated. When mistakes happen, it

top of music, placing sticky notes on

when tasks take longer or shorter than is important to pause and consider why,

instead of immediately diving into prescribed practice strategies. The root cause

52    F l o r i d a

include writing notes about goals at the practice room mirrors, or setting a timer

for every 20 minutes and stopping to reflect on goal progress each time it goes

Music Director

off. Other techniques involve purposeful

attention focusing. Students can select repetitions during which they will focus

intently on only one aspect of performance. This strategy involves removing

distractions that might draw focus to other aspects of performance. For example, turn off the metronome for a few

minutes if intonation is the focus, or step away from the piano or other reference

pitch while honing the diction of a choral piece. An important pitfall to avoid with monitoring is paralysis by analysis. Using

too many monitoring strategies at once or getting bogged down focusing too much

on one performance skill set can be coun-

terproductive and lead to stagnation and frustration. Students should experiment to find what monitoring techniques work best for them.


“Without proper self-evaluation, failure is inevitable.” – John Wooden Evaluating

The best tool for self-evaluation is

and an expansive list of techniques for

nate issues that are less noticeable from

ble settings and individual practice. By

Students should take time to rate their

recording practice. Recordings illumi-

practice sessions. General feedback, such

the performer’s perspective. Directors

performance, especially at the end of

as broad statements about articulation or intonation, is not as useful as specific feedback, such as identifying problematic measures. Utilizing rubrics can help

students define excellence and develop

critical evaluation skills. These could be pre-established rubrics used by teachers

or organizations, or rubrics created by the student in collaboration with the teacher. Good rubrics are objective and have

thorough descriptions for each gradation,

simply applying a number between 1 and 10 to a performance will not do much to help a student track his or her progress.

development of personal and musical skill sets.

missed from the podium. One enlightening experiment is to compare observations from the practice recording against

Michael Alsop is pursuing a

Another is to compare recordings over

a graduate teaching assistant

PhD in music education and is

perceptions of how it went in real time.

at the University of Georgia.

time to determine what strategies are or

He taught middle school band

are not working.

are cyclical. Observations from evalu-

definitions, and the subjective nature of

more meaningful practice and improved

ings and realizing the number of things

one. For this reason, many of the statemay not be valuable because they lack

their own learning, we set them up for

experiences evaluating rehearsal record-

Conclusion

level solo and ensemble judging sheets

teaching students how to think about

understand this phenomenon well from

making it clear what differs between a “good” performance and an “excellent”

metacognitive instruction in both ensem-

in Brazil, Indiana for six years and holds prior degrees in music education from DePauw University and the University of Louisville.

The three stages of metacognitive practice

ations influence the planning of future

References

practice and the cycle begins again.

Bathgate, M., Sims-Knight, J., & Schunn, C. (2012). Thoughts on thinking: Engaging novice music students in metacognition. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 26(2), 403-409. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.1842

Readers are encouraged to check out

Carol Benton’s (2014) book Thinking About Thinking: Metacognition for Music Learning

Benton, C. W. (2014). Thinking about thinking: Metacognition for music learning. Rowman & Littlefield Education.

for an outstanding review of literature

Brundage, S. (2016). Fooled by fluency: Understanding illusions and misjudgments in music learning. American Music Teacher, 66(2), 10-13. https://www.jstor.org/ stable/26385737 Byo, J. L., & Cassidy, J. W. (2008). An exploratory study of time use in the practice of music majors: Self-report and observation analysis. Update, 27(1), 33-40. https://doi. org/10.1177/8755123308322272 Flavell, J. H. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive-developmental inquiry. American Psychologist, 34(10), 906-911. Greer, A. (2013). Thinking outside the box: Meta-cognition and the music lesson. American Music Teacher, 62(5), 24-27. https:// www.jstor.org/stable/43543600 Schleifer, L. L. F., & Dull, R. B. (2009). Metacognition and performance in the accounting classroom. Issues in Accounting Education, 24(3), 339-367. https://doi. org/10.2308/iace.2009.24.3.339 Zimmerman, B. J., & Kitsantas, A. (2005). The hidden dimension of personal competence: Self-regulated learning and practice. In A. J. Elliot & C. S. Dweck (Eds.), Handbook of competence and motivation (pp. 509-526). Guilford Press.

December 2020

53


Transitioning from In-Person to Online Music Teaching

Recommendations and Tips for Piano Lessons by Ricardo Pozenatto

Z

Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, Google Hangouts … videocon-

communication, and students’ motivation, among others.

an increase in users as witnessed in 2020, especially by

reshapes and changes behaviors of students and teachers,

ferencing applications and platforms have never seen educators. All the changes happening in the world due

to COVID-19 have forced music teachers to rethink music education in ways rarely imagined before—including

remote teaching. When in-person instruction is impossible, technology assumes a position of vital importance in

Naturally, one will quickly notice how distance learning

demanding adaptation and flexibility to the new online learning environment. Consequently, many teachers may

feel lost or overwhelmed amid these inevitable adjustments.

With the hope of supporting quality online music

continuing the learning.

education, the purpose of this article is to provide tips

teaching, important instructional aspects should be con-

transition successfully from in-person to online teaching.

As music teachers transition from in-person to online

sidered and reevaluated. These include the use of tech-

nology, teaching methodologies, virtual interaction and

54    F l o r i d a

Music Director

and recommendations for music educators on how to

Although the focus of this essay is on piano lessons, many of the suggestions presented here could be easily adapted


to online teaching in other musical settings. Here you will

sive. Although high-quality microphones, such as a Blue

applications used for online teaching, how to resolve

piano sound, the speed of the Internet connection may

find references for the most common videoconferencing

some practical and pedagogical issues raised by online

music teaching, and instructional recommendations that could enhance your online lessons.

Videoconference Apps in Music Instruction: How Can We Enhance the Sound Quality?

There are many videoconferencing platforms that music teachers use for online instruction, including Zoom,

Skype, FaceTime, Google Hangouts, Messenger, and

WhatsApp. It is important to understand that none of them are yet capable of imitating the live sound quality

present at in-person lessons. That is because videocon-

ference applications are built to capture a human vocal range, and not a piano pitch range, which is quite exten-

Yeti microphone, could better capture the quality of a affect the transfer of sound (and therefore its quality) during your online lesson. Keep in mind that the more

technology you add to your online lesson setup, the more prepared to manage that technology you should be. Here are some questions to consider: How would you con-

nect and position your microphone with your electronic device? What is more important for you—to provide good sound quality for your student or to receive good sound

quality from your student? Therefore, who should purchase a high-quality microphone?

An easier and accessible way of enhancing the quality

of the sound during an online lesson is to modify some

settings in the software you use. I will focus on the Zoom Continued on page 56

December 2020

55


Transitioning Continued from page 55

platform in this article, but the settings in other online platforms can be adjusted similarly. These settings can be easily modified through a computer, and they should be applied to both the

teacher and the student so the sound quality on both ends is

« Turn off the automatic microphone volume. There is an enhanced.

arrow next to the “audio” option. By clicking on it you can

access “audio settings” (Figure 1). Under the microphone options, uncheck the checkbox “Automatically adjust vol-

ume” (Figure 2). This will help your microphone capture

« Turn on the “original sound” option. In “audio settings,” sounds more easily from your physical environment.

click on “Advanced settings” (Figure 3). Check the box

“Show in-meeting option to ‘Enable Original Sound’ from

Unfortunately, it is possible that even

with those changes to the audio set-

tings, the sound quality may still not be adequate. An alternative is to use

an extra tool that provides live online

audio in high definition through the website cleanfeed.net.

Cleanfeed is a multitrack/multi-party live audio and recording tool that utilizes only a browser. The use of wired headphones is mandatory when utilizing the Cleanfeed website (a subscrip-

tion to the site is necessary for wireless headphones usage). To Figure 2

The “Automatically adjust volume” Option in the Zoom Platform

microphone.” Then, click on the new option that will appear

in the top-left corner of your screen (Figure 4). This option

will allow your microphone to capture the high and low frequencies of the piano, which would have been cut if the default settings were selected since they are out of a vocal

« Change other audio settings. In the “Advanced settings,” range.

change to the options as shown in Figure 5. Although you

may hear more background noise interference with these selections, they will help your device capture the sustained notes of the piano.

Figure 1

How to Easily Access Audio Settings From the Screen’s Bottom-Left Icon on the Zoom Platform Figure 3

Finding the “Advanced” Audio Options in the Zoom Platform

56    F l o r i d a

Music Director


include the Cleanfeed audio during your Zoom meeting, simply

disable or turn off Zoom’s audio while using the audio from Cleanfeed. That way, you will simultaneously have video and audio from different sources.

Using the Available Technology:

The Lesson Setup and the Teacher’s Organization

Teachers can use advanced technology to enhance the quality of their online lessons. One may consider the speed of the Internet connection, the implementation of quality external microphones, and even multiple view angles of the teacher and the student.

Here, I will focus on a basic setup for online instruction and the organization of the materials used in lessons.

Continued on page 58 Figure 4

Selecting the “Enable Original Sound” Option in the Zoom Platform

Figure 5

Selecting Better Audio Processing Options in the Zoom Platform

December 2020

57


Transitioning Continued from page 57

The basic setup of an online piano lesson should include at

bird’s-eye view (Figure 8), simply pile books on your piano (or

can be easily accomplished by any electronic device that pos-

weight of any kind, use a spatula to serve as a support for your

least one view from the teacher and one from the student. This sesses a video camera and has access to the Internet. The most

common devices are laptops, cellphones, and tablets. A side view is the best option since it can provide a complete view of the

on your music stand in the case of a grand piano), and with a phone or tablet. Other ideas can be found in the document by the MTNA at FSU (2020).

In a recent publication, Dumlavwalla (2020) listed eight key

upper body—fingers, hands, arms, and shoulders—and it will

characteristics that effective online instructors possess. One

communication and facial expression). Most likely, some teach-

goal. As with regular in-person lessons, the teacher should keep

also include the teacher’s and the student’s faces (essential for ers and students will possess two electronic devices (laptop/

computer plus cellphone/tablet). This will expand the setup to

two views from each end, teacher and student (Figure 6). This setup can offer a closer view of the hands and fingers, enabling teachers to better assist students on finger position (among other benefits).

Since many teachers are currently facing financial difficul-

of them is to be organized, and technology can help with that track of each student’s assignments and progress. It is best if these documents are stored in one place that can be accessed by

teacher and student, just like a traditional assignment book that

most teachers use when sending students back home to practice.

Google offers tools that can make this virtual communication easy and effortless.

Anyone who possesses a Google account should have access

ties, there are easy ways to achieve two views without having

to Google Drive, an online file storage system developed by

National Association at Florida State University (MTNA at FSU)

ing access to the student and the student’s parents if desired.

to purchase tripods. A document written by the Music Teachers

demonstrated how one can easily arrange those views by using

tools we all have in our homes. For a close-up side view, a cup can be an easy solution when using a phone (Figure 7). For a Figure 6

Google. The teacher can create a folder for each student, grant-

Through the folder, the instructor can share files and documents

with the student, including video and audio recordings, or images and photos. Additionally, in the folder, the teacher can

Zoom Meeting With Three Views From the Teacher: Join a 45-Minute Meeting With Multiple Electronic Devices (A Zoom subscription is required for longer meetings with multiple attendees.)

58    F l o r i d a

Music Director


Figure 7

Left Image: Side View Using a Cup; Right Image: Result From the Side View Using a Cup (MTNA at FSU, 2020)

easily create a Google Doc to keep track of the student’s weekly

assignments. Google Docs includes two main advantages over

Figure 8

Bird’s-Eye View Setup (MTNA at FSU, 2020)

composing your student’s assignment in a Word document. It

creates a document outline when using the “headings” option while typing, enabling easy access to a certain lesson date. Further, it also enables the student to easily edit the document,

for instance, by writing questions for the teacher—and this can serve as an extra communication tool between teacher and student. Using a shared folder through Google Drive is more

beneficial than sharing files through email. All materials will be

found in one place for each student, providing easy accessibility to all involved—teacher, student, and parents. Challenges of Online Music Lessons

Although technology makes it possible to continue music edu-

cation remotely, it also creates a few challenges concerning teaching modalities. As music educators know, there are three

main learning modalities: aural, visual, and kinesthetic. Online lessons may provide limited but reasonable aural and visual experiences; however, the current technology does not support

the kinesthetic modality in online teaching or learning. Since the Continued on page 60

December 2020

59


Transitioning Continued from page 59

teacher is not physically present with the student, it is impos-

student execute a desired physical motion. For instance, for the

used to doing (e.g., moving the student’s elbow to support a

associated with holding a round doorknob and opening a door;

sible to move the student’s body in ways music teachers are so technically difficult passage; touching the student’s shoulder to bring self-awareness in moments of tension). Therefore, it is natural that the teacher will use aural and verbal instruction more frequently, which may cause a delay in the student’s learning

rotation technique (wrist and forearm rotation), the image can be for the technique of upward wrist, imagine a balloon attached to the wrist through a string, making it gently float upward to the sky after releasing a key.

When teaching young and beginner students, the teacher

process. The expectations of online instruction must be different

must also consider the natural fatigue that may occur due to a

Teachers must always aim for quality over quantity during

used. Teachers should always remember to provide an array of

from in-person lessons.

the learning process. Parents may be observing the lesson— especially if the student is a younger child. If so, the teacher may

request the parent to demonstrate and even move the student’s body according to the teacher’s instructions.

Videoconference calls have the disadvantage of not provid-

high level of focus on the screen of the electronic device being

activities as the lesson progresses, having the student frequently

stand up and move away from the piano bench. Activities such

as singing, tapping, or clapping can also create some variety between listening and playing.

Teachers can share their computer screen during online meet-

ing a real-time audio response. This microsecond lag makes it

ings through various types of online platforms. Teachers should

synchronous online lesson. To accommodate this issue, teachers

ing varied types of activities. It can range from a simple lesson

impossible for teachers to play duets with their students during a

may prerecord their part of the duet piece and share it with their students in advance. During the lesson, the student may play

along with the teacher’s recording. Additionally, depending on

the level of the repertoire of the student (e.g., advanced works

and longer pieces), I would suggest that teachers experiment

with a hybrid of synchronous and asynchronous lessons. The

student should prerecord his or her performance and send it to the teacher before the lesson. There are two main advantages

to this hybrid lesson approach. First, the teacher will hear the student through a better sound quality (since video recordings

more effectively capture the instrument’s sound). Second, the

prerecording will save some lesson time, enabling the instructor to promptly provide feedback to the student during the synchro-

take advantage of this feature and enrich their lessons by creatsegment of observing a musical performance (e.g., by watching

a music video performance on YouTube) to explaining selected music theory concepts. Materials created for diverse activities for music lessons may include explanatory introduction of triad

inversions, sight-reading “flashcards,” rhythmic composition

activities, and rhythmic ear-training activities. These materials can be created using PowerPoint software, making it is easy

for the teacher to manipulate the elements as the student par-

ticipates and observes the animations on the shared computer screen. To create more interaction—possibly with older stu-

dents—the materials can be adapted to Google Slides so both teachers and students can manipulate the materials in real time.

nous portion of the lesson.

Resources for Online Teaching

Additional Recommendations and Tips

resources to help, guide, and support music teachers in the face

As previously mentioned, it is possible that the speed of students’

progress will decrease in online instruction. Therefore, teachers must prioritize the quality of instruction. Since there are impediments to the kinesthetic modality of learning, the teacher should

develop clearer, more precise, and more objective instructional feedback. For instance, when guiding students—especially the young ones—to find a key on the keyboard in order to start play-

ing a piece, one may use directions such as “right hand, finger 3, on G; left hand, finger 5, on C.” Additionally, since the teacher

and the student cannot play at the same time, verbal directives

such as “my turn” and “your turn” might be helpful to organize the playing during the lesson. (In online lessons, the teacher’s

demonstrations tend to greatly increase.) Finally, the teacher will also need to use as many analogies as possible to have the

60    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Professional associations have created online materials and of the current situation due to COVID-19. The Frances Clark

Center, in collaboration with professionals in the fields of piano pedagogy and online teaching, has created a website concerning

issues around COVID-19 and online piano lessons (Teaching in

the Time of COVID-19: Resources for Online Instruction, 2020). All content presented on this website is accessible at no charge.

The webpage features webinars with varied topics, such as the online teaching of elementary and advanced students, engage-

ment during online piano lessons, diversity and inclusion, and solutions for online studio recitals, among others. The site also includes helpful tip sheets on relevant topics, such as online group piano instruction, adult students, special learners, mental

well-being, physical wellness, and promoting creativity through distance learning.


As teachers become more com-

fortable with online teaching, they may want to expand their basic lesson setup to a more advanced arrangement,

including

camera

views from different angles and

even the use of software specifically built for remote online piano teach-

ing. TimeWarp Technologies (2020) offers music software and apps (such

as the SuperScore Music app, Home Concert Xtreme, Classroom Maestro, and Internet MIDI) that, when prop-

erly used, could boost any online music lesson. Some of these tech-

nologies may require the use of digital pianos at both ends of instruction (i.e., for teachers and students). Final Thoughts

Technology has come to support distance learning in ways never imagined before. As music educators, we should continue

to embrace its advancements while maintaining a high level of teaching excellence that our students expect from us. As discussed, adaptations are necessary when nurturing essential

values in our students through music-making (such as patience, organization, and independence). Resources and materials about

online piano teaching are available on the Internet, and many of them can help and support a smoother transition from in-person to online teaching. Above all, music educators should strive to keep music-making alive in the homes of their students while the world adapts to a new reality.

Brazilian pianist Ricardo Pozenatto is a doctoral can-

didate in the Piano Pedagogy program at Florida State

University. He also serves as president of the MTNA@ FSU, the collegiate chapter of the Music Teachers National Association at Florida State University. References Dumlavwalla, D. (2020). Striving for excellence in online piano pedagogy: Characteristics of expert teachers using video-conferencing format. Piano Magazine. https://www.claviercompanion.com/article-details/ striving-for-excellence-in-online-piano-pedagogy MTNA at FSU. (2020). Online teaching on a budget: Using items you already own. https://www.fmta.org/online-teaching.html Teaching in the Time of COVID-19: Resources for Online Instruction. (2020, June 16). Retrieved from https://claviercompanion.com/ teaching-in-the-time-of-covid-19 TimeWarp Technologies. (2020, June 16). Retrieved from https://timewarptech.com/

December 2020

61


’Tis the Season Due to COVID

I

by Dorothy Yorty, Chairwoman FEMEA District 2

It’s the holiday season, and as usual, I am

use hands-on manipulatives, play circle

ress. It touched my heart to see my stu-

and smells of the holiday. One of my

and love preparing for the opportunity

that they missed our classes. They sang

looking forward to all the sights, sounds, favorite things is to experience students

performing for their parents. Oh yeah. There won’t be any of those this year.

How about a concert? Maybe virtual con-

games, and more. We have music clubs

to WOW our parents with the students’ amazing performances. It is glorious. Who would want to do anything differently?

Spring break came and all of a sud-

certs? A holiday party? Shopping at the

den we weren’t going back to school

at the lights in our neighborhoods might

teaching virtually in a Google classroom.

mall? I think driving in our cars looking be popular this year.

It seems everything looks different!

During this time I have reflected back

on my early days when I traveled all over the United States with singing groups. We ate whatever we could find and slept in

the bus, at hotels, or wherever we could

stop long enough to rest for a few hours. It was a crazy schedule, performing every

night and living on a bus with eight other people. We were grateful to have the opportunity to perform for another

audience. I learned to be flexible and to be thankful for whatever we had.

I believe learning to be flexible and

thankful for what I have has helped me through the pandemic. COVID-19 has changed our world in many ways. It has

stretched us, shaken us, played with our emotions, and challenged us to change the way we do things.

Like many of you, I am a music teach-

er who teaches students with hands-on opportunities in the classroom. We sing,

dance, play instruments, use puppets, tap the steady beat with beat buddies,

62    F l o r i d a

due to COVID. What? Now we would be

How would that work? All of us began

trying to find ways to make this happen. Opportunities became available for us

to access websites we had never heard of. We learned how to do Zoom meet-

ings. We learned how to communicate with our students and have them record

responses to our assignments. Suddenly the music community began reaching

dents’ recordings. They would say hi and

our songs and completed assignments. One of my favorite assignments was when

the students had to record themselves singing and moving to a circle song. I

taught them how to achieve this by them-

selves, and encouraged them to invite their family members to join in on the fun. Some of my students sent me videos of their entire family singing and moving

to the circle song. On other assignments I

would see the parents in the background dancing or doing surprise appearances.

It was great fun! All of us were engaging in musical lessons, laughing and smiling during COVID.

In my district, we are teaching music

out to each other in ways I had never

face to face, and providing materials for

taught each other how to use the web-

classes. We are teaching music on a cart to

experienced before. We shared ideas and sites that would help us. New Facebook

groups were created. The teachers in our district came together on Zoom meetings to help each other. FEMEA began to offer

helpful webinars, lesson plans, and blogs.

I met and learned from musicians from

all over the world. Our Orff chapter made

webinars available, too. I don’t know what I would have done without them. We

became a community working toward

one goal: learning how to teach music during COVID.

I began sharing lessons with my stu-

dents and working on tracking their prog-

Music Director

the teachers who are teaching the virtual the face-to-face classes. My cart is incredible. Our art teacher’s father helped out by building extra handy-dandy shelves. I had

fun painting and decorating it. All of the

music teachers in my county are teaching

music with their own original flair while continuing to maintain the integrity of

our craft. I am personally using a Bitmoji virtual classroom for all of my classes. Before COVID I didn’t know how to do

this. I never entertained it at all when I was in my comfortable classroom. My

abilities in the virtual world have grown by leaps and bounds due to COVID.


I have to tell you that when I push my

cart down our halls, there’s a pep in my step. Not because I want to teach from a cart. I am looking forward to teaching

Appreciation for hearing our students

Dorothy Yorty earned a degree in music at

granted, and that’s due to COVID.

she traveled and sang extensively across the

almost over. We will celebrate as we see

optimistic attitude that I will be teaching

the hope that 2021 will bring back the life

there again soon. The pep in my step is

due to a flexible and thankful attitude. I am thankful to see our students and to interact with them in a face-to-face set-

ting. The students need us! I want them to be so excited I’m coming with my cart

to share an inspirational time of music again. They do feel that way. They squeal

with delight when I walk in the door.

We engage in interactive computer activ-

ities, they hum with the songs, we play rhythmic patterns with cups and plates

(cup drums and hand drums with pencil drumsticks). It’s a new way to learn music,

but we are learning and enjoying our temporary musical journey due to COVID.

I look forward to the time we are able

to have concerts again. I will miss them

this year, but this is only for a season.

United States and Canada. During her travels,

With a sigh of relief we can say 2020 is

in my classroom again. In fact, my class-

room is set up and decorated due to my

Southeastern University. Upon graduating,

perform again will never be taken for

Dorothy recorded four projects in Nashville. When Dorothy’s young-

a new year just around the corner, with

est son entered kindergarten, she began the

we enjoyed before the pandemic. I will

journey into elementary

never forget what I learned in 2020 and

music education. She

how our lives have been changed. Yes,

taught in private schools

we have been stretched and shaken, had

for eight years. In 2009, she began teaching at

our emotions played with, and have been

Patriot Elementary in the Lee County School

challenged on the way we have always

District. She had the opportunity to work and

done things, but we have grown in ways

teach at Edison Park Creative and Expressive

we never would have otherwise. I am

Arts School for three years and then returned

thankful to all of you for the ways you

to Patriot Elementary. Dorothy has completed

have continued to pursue excellence in

Orff Levels 1 & 2 as well as Conversational

teaching music to your students, for com-

Solfège Levels 1 & 2. She has been the co-chair

ing together in unity to help each other,

of the Lee County Elementary Honor Choir

for learning new things, for continuing

for six years. She served as the treasurer and

to help each other through the ups and

is now president of the Southwest Florida

downs. You have shown strength and

Orff Chapter. She has been an integral part of

resilience in the midst of COVID. I am

developing the curriculum for the elementary

thankful to be a part of such amazing

music teachers in Lee County.

music teachers.

Happy holidays!

December 2020

63


Please take time to thank and support our 2020-2021 Academic Partners.

GOLD PARTNERS

SILVER PARTNERS Jacksonville University

BRONZE PARTNERS Florida College

University of Florida

Partners as of November 4, 2020.

*Please visit FMEA.org/partners for partnership details or call 850-878-6844.

64

Florida Music Director


FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Creating Community … Creating Calm!

Ernesta Chicklowski, President

#MusicEducation911

A

s we enter our school campuses,

stakeholders to connect with each day.

their progress in the lesson. Starting class-

and excited waves from our students

word, or boost of confidence will go fur-

with words of reflection, thought, and

we are greeted by “masked smiles”

each day. We bring so much value to the lives of our students with every small interaction and connection. Weekly music lessons may look very different these days,

whether in our classroom

or on the screen, but the

love for our students is still

the same. We may be navigat-

ing how to use different tools, but

ers, trusted adults, and other empowering

will create a structure and flow that will

“noticing,” and acknowl-

allow students to transition more calmly

edgement provides our

to their next academic class of the school

students with a sense of

day.

belonging and connection.

They need us and we need them.

We all need each other to

Acknowledging our students’ current

lean on these days.

Creating calm in your class-

emotional and mental health and hav-

ing a positive mindset will allow us to

room will help your students find

room or lessons may look a bit different

important. Students are longing for teach-

ful of starting and ending classes on time

tive day with affirmations,

Creating a sense of community within

dents during this tumultuous time is so

with my students of all ages. Being mind-

Setting the tone for a posi-

grounding and will allow for mental

our school to create stability for our stu-

encouragement has worked well for me

ther than you would ever expect.

we are still connecting with our students to ensure they are learning.

es with connecting activities and ending

That extra pat on the back, encouraging

continue to cultivate, nourish, encourage, and inspire our young musicians. This

space to create. The buzz of the music

starts with recognizing our own personal growth and acknowledging how we are

during these days of adjustment. Try pro-

doing! Music education is essential educa-

viding your students with an opportunity

tion that is a lifeline for all of our students.

to connect with others, work alone, and

#MusicEducation911

then circle back with them privately about

The Florida Music Education Association values the broad human diversity in the state of Florida. We are distraught and frustrated by the continued injustice and violence toward Black people in our country. Social inequality and violence, in any form, must not be tolerated in our nation. FMEA sees, hears, and supports the struggles of our teachers and students in the Black community. We are with you, and together we can and will do better to end discrimination while advocating for equality.

December 2020

65


ComponentNews FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD, Advisor

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

Julian Grubb, President

Florida NAfME Collegiate Hosts a

Virtual Fall Conference by Alexis Hobbs

T

D

ecember! I love December and the holiday season.

The fall semester wraps up, which means we all get to

spend more time with our families. The weather cools off a

bit, and the fire pits come out for roasting marshmallows (or

just burning things … which is always fun). Joyful music is playing everywhere. If you need some good tunes to add to

your holiday music rotation, check out one of these playlists:

he 2020 Florida NAfME Collegiate Fall Conference was held via Zoom on October 25. It was a day full of

a new kind of networking and professional development.

CLICK

CLICK

This is always such a wonderful time. As Sammy Cahn

We had 147 members register for this conference! Our

wrote for Frank Sinatra, “It’s that time of year when the

a spunky elementary music session with Mrs. Ernesta

ter NOW for the FMEA Virtual Professional Development

very blessed with the quality professional development

I bet Sammy and Francis would have loved our conference,

The success of our virtual Fall Conference would not have

As you already know, this year’s FMEA Professional

Fall Conference had a wide range of presentations, from

world falls in love. Every song you hear seems to say regis-

Chicklowski to a Q&A with music supervisors. We were

Conference next month.” OK … I made up that last part, but

opportunity presented to collegiate members.

and you will, too!

been possible without the incredible support and assistance

Development Conference will be a virtual event. Live virtual

would also like to thank Dr. Steven Kelly, FMEA president,

as well as all day on Saturday, January 16. A large number

endless support of our collegiate component.

and after the conference, but a conference registration will

Collegiate Fall Conference presenters for providing us with

tion cost for this year’s conference is only $25 for Florida

not have the opportunity to attend, all sessions are posted

memberships. That’s a steal, considering the significant

Collegiate chapters in Florida are doing! Make sure to check

conference schedule in this issue of the Florida Music Director,

Instagram @flnafmecollegiate,

NAfME Collegiate on Saturday, January 16, from 9 a.m. until

of Dr. Mark Belfast, Florida NAfME Collegiate advisor. We

sessions will be held during the evenings of January 13-15

and Dr. Shelby Chipman, FMEA president-elect, for their

of additional sessions will be available on demand during

We are very appreciative of our 2020 Florida NAfME

be required to access those fantastic resources. The registra-

an inspiring day of professional development. If you did

NAfME Collegiate members with active NAfME/FMEA

on our website along with updates about what NAfME

amount of resources you’ll be able to access! Review the full

out our website, flnafmecollegiate.com,

and make special note of the three sessions hosted by Florida

at flcnafme.podbean.com.

follow us on

and listen to our podcast

Alexis Hobbs is a junior music education major at Southeastern

12 noon. Additional conference information is available at fmea.org.

Don’t forget, we will also be holding elections for a new

University in Lakeland, Florida. She is actively

state executive board this January. I hope you will consider

chapter, where she serves as president-elect.

the state during 2021. If you would like to learn more about

the Southeastern String Orchestra, Symphony

or any member of the current board.

involved in Southeastern’s NAfME Collegiate

running for a position and serving collegiate members across

She is a multi-instrumentalist and plays in

any of the board positions, please don’t hesitate to contact me

Orchestra, Jazz Ensemble, and Athletic Pep Band.

May you experience great joy and peace in this season.

66    F l o r i d a

Music Director


ComponentNews I

hope this message finds each of you well and looking forward to the con-

clusion of a very interesting 2020! I want

to take this opportunity to share with

you parts of a note I delivered to arts

colleagues in my district last month, after what have been some of the most

exhausting months in teaching for so many of us.

#2020 … I think that’s all we need to

see/hear to sum up the challenges this

year has presented (and there’s still a month of it left!). If you’ll allow me, I think

there is one word that describes our teach-

ers right now: exhausted. You are putting in endless hours of work to prepare for

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION

Harry “Skip” Pardee, President

doing during this time. We may not have

the same way you are, dealing with

« Most important, despite all the obsta-

all the answers either, but we promise

many of the challenges you are.

to do the best we can to help in any way possible. So, as we usher in a new calen-

cles (especially in #2020), the work

dar year, we hope you are as energized

you are doing every day changes

and enthused about our noble profession

students’ lives for the better. Every

as ever before. You are not alone in this

single opportunity we have to shape

journey; you have music education family

a student is a blessing. The smallest

here in FMEA that will never give up on

interaction with a student today may

why we do what we do. If the program

have a profound effect on him or her

leaders in FMSA can be of any help to

for many years or even a lifetime;

you, please do not hesitate to contact

make it a good one!

us. We hope to see all of you at the 2021

Please also know the Florida Music

FMEA Virtual Professional Development

Supervision Association (FMSA) is here

Conference in January!

to support the amazing work you are

classes you have spent a career mastering in “precedented times.” You have given up your weekends, evenings, and early

mornings, doing your best to plan expe-

FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION

take in, and for some, attempting to rep-

Matthew Davis, President

riences that your face-to-face classes will licate that same experience virtually for

standards. Because you are great teachers,

H

that you are doing a disservice to the stu-

students. Bob Gillespie from The Ohio State University will be presenting two

those at home. You may have felt defeated when those experiences fell short of your you might even begin to feel (mistakenly)

dents under your care, even though most of the issues you and your students are facing are completely out of your control.

All of these sentiments have a sneaky way

of controlling our thoughts and behavior

throughout the day and can leave us feeling empty.

« Considering

The point of my message today is this:

the circumstances, it

would be pretty unusual to not feel

« While at times it feels like we as visuany of the above.

al and performing arts teachers are

alone in our schools and very few can “relate,” rest assured there are amaz-

ing colleagues across this state feeling

appy holidays and warm greetings! As you prepare for a well-deserved win-

ter break, please make sure you have registered for the 2021 FMEA Virtual

Professional Development Conference. We are very excited about our 2021 conference, both the professional development sessions and our offerings for our all-state sessions: “Remembering the Joys of Teaching” and “Teaching Beginners in a Large,

Heterogeneous Class to Play Correctly.” Other sessions will include clinics from Kasia Bugaj and George Speed, Chung Park and Erik Bryan, Judy Evans and Roland Forti, Vivian Gonzalez, and Raine Allen. These sessions will be sure to re-energize you with new ideas and techniques!

We are also proud to provide virtual offerings to our all-state students. These

sessions will begin on Saturday, January 16, with sessions for each of our five all-

state orchestras led by their conductors Douglas Droste, William Wiedrich, Paul Davis, Rebecca MacLeod, and Kira Omelchenko. These sessions will also be open

to FMEA members, so virtually stop by and be inspired by these great conductors and educators at work! All-state students will also be offered supplemental sessions during the following weeks that include sessions on technique, instrumental master classes, and discussions with conductors, teachers, and composers.

As we finish the first half of this year, I wish you the best in your performances.

Have a safe and restful winter break. Take time for yourself and your family.

December 2020

67


ComponentNews T

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Marc Decker, DMA, President

hanks to all who attended the fall

to be spectacular, and I look forward

Access in a Traditional Music Degree

ing. I am continually inspired by the work

with colleagues, and learning new strat-

Rossow. This session will present the real-

FCMEA general membership meet-

of so many in higher education and find myself reenergized by our great talks. On

behalf of the entire membership, I want to extend a special thank you

to insightful presentations, catching up

egies to bring to my classroom. There are several sessions I would like to high-

light that explore issues specific to higher education. The first of those

to Dr. Robyn Bell from the

is a panel led by Dr. Sandra

State College of Florida who

Adorno, “Accessible Success:

presented on Florida require-

Supporting Collegiate Music

ments for the Associate of

Education

Arts in Music curriculum

and potential solutions to the

With

complicated issue that affects

the students themselves. This

discussion panel will explore

faculty experiences with creating inclu-

eral membership meeting scheduled at

needs music education students.

the upcoming FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference.

The conference in January is going

sive and supportive spaces for special

Another session targeting collegiate

music instructors, “Visually Impaired Students:

program, from gaining access to printed scores and working with the student

accessibility office to the basics of Braille music notation.

Finally, FCMEA will continue our tra-

in Collegiate Music Education.” This

need to continue this conversation, and I look forward to doing so at our next gen-

students in a traditional collegiate music

needs face unique challenges seeking support resources on

on time and then transfer to

tered in working with visually impaired

dition of hosting a recurring event, “Two-

as systems place the onus of

students’ ability to graduate

world challenges and successes encoun-

Special Needs.” University

music students with special

problems they pose. This is a

four-year institutions. We

Students

Curriculum,” will be led by Dr. Stacie

Equitable

Inclusions

and

and Four-Year Panel: Current Challenges

year’s panelists represent a variety of

institutions including large public, small private, two-year, and four-year schools.

Higher education is facing much adversi-

ty, and only together can we work toward creative, meaningful, and sustainable change to help our students.

I look forward to seeing you all at the

FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference. Stay safe and teach well!

NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) made the difficult decision to cancel the in-person All-National Honor Ensembles, originally scheduled to take place November 4-8 in Orlando. This virtual event will include several rehearsals with the 2020 ANHE conductors and workshops with renowned clinicians, and each ensemble will create a final recorded performance, which will be premiered online. Details regarding other exciting opportunities including merchandise pre-orders, mock auditions, and a College Fair will be shared in the coming weeks. For more information, CLICK HERE .

68    F l o r i d a

Music Director

A VIRTUAL 2020

All-National Honor Ensembles (ANHE)

program will take place on Thursday, January 7 – Saturday, January 9, 2021.


RESEARCH COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN

ResearchPuzzles FOR MUSIC TEACHERS

Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami

This on-going column seeks to stimulate awareness of research issues for FMEA teachers and researchers.

How might we respond to this current pandemic existence?

I

’m departing from my usual approach and pointing you

toward two essays that recently appeared in an NAfME

research journal you might not know, The Journal of Music Teacher Education.

David Rickels (2020) recently contributed “Of Cheese and

Change.” In it he alludes to the probably familiar book Who

Moved My Cheese? (Johnson, 1988) and to the perhaps less

extent that the “glue” holding cities together had been the

need to overcome the friction of distance for the purpose of efficient communication, that glue has now evaporated and the end of urban civilization is in sight. (Coucielis, 1996, pp. 387-388)

We are, indeed, now physically distant and yet so near to

familiar I Moved Your Cheese (Maholtra, 2013). Both books are

each other via technology like Zoom. We collectively sense a

through stories of mice looking for constantly shifting cheese

the “glue” that holds us together. Yet, Thornton points out that

entertaining parables about how to respond to change, conveyed

in a maze. Johnson’s guidance was to accept change, don’t just grumble, but rather keep looking for the cheese, which brings a positive, proactive response to change. Maholtra countered this advice by suggesting you should refuse to accept reality as given

and work to reconfigure it. Rickels, in summarizing the essence of I Moved Your Cheese, asks,

Why do we need to seek cheese? Could there be something

else to seek? Whose ends does the maze serve? Does there have to be a maze at all? Ultimately, the young mouse ventures outside the maze and discovers how the maze itself can be manipulated. This type of thinking about change—

based on questioning the assumptions and structures that create a need for change—is critically important to our field at this moment in history.

After posing the question “What is our cheese—the goals we

hold for music teachers as learners, and are those goals really

loss of connection, of making music together, which is some of many students prefer to make music by themselves and ends her letter asking,

Were they always welcome in our music spaces? Does the

post-2020 music education embrace students who crave music-making in the enormous number of ways we see emerging as significant in this time? What does distance mean to music education in your present?

I confess that for the past nine months I have never reflected

more intensely about the what, how, and why of my teaching. My cheese has been moved. I’ve been forced to reexamine my assumptions and to reconsider how I will prepare future music

teachers for a world that seems permanently altered. All possibilities are in play, and I shift from discouragement to excitement as I weigh options I have not considered before. I wish you all well in your searching and questioning.

the ones we want?” Rickels then presents three areas that he

References

rent reality: (a) asserting the values of equity and inclusion; (b)

Couclelis, H. (1996). The death of distance [Editorial]. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 23(4), 387-389. https://doi.org/10.1068/b230387

(c) reexamining their roles as teachers in a democracy.

Johnson, S. (1998). Who moved my cheese? An amazing way to deal with change in your work and in your life. G. B. Putnam’s & Sons Publishers.

believes teachers should keep in mind as they reflect on the cur-

care for the physical and emotional health of their learners; and

Linda Thornton’s (2020) “Music Education at a Distance” is an

open letter. In it she quotes an editorial from 1996 that is perhaps even more applicable in 2020:

Modern technology, so the argument goes, has rendered

distance less and less significant . . . People can now stay at

Malhotra, D. (2013). I moved your cheese: For those who refuse to live as mice in someone else’s maze, Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Rickels, D. A. (2020). Of change and cheese. Journal of Music Teacher Education, 30(1), 3-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/1057083720962879 Thornton, L. (2020). Music education at a distance. Journal of Music Teacher Education, 29(3), 3-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/1057083720928615

home and continue working as usual . . . Professional and

social relations can be established and maintained almost equally easily over any distance across the globe. To the

Email your questions and feedback to d.coffman1@miami.edu Research Puzzles.

December 2020

69


CommitteeReports

DIVERSE LEARNERS COMMITTEE Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD, Chairwoman

2021 FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference:

Past, Present, & Future

Addressing Diversity in the Music Classroom

F

MEA is excited to announce that the FMEA Professional Development Conference will be reimagined into a virtual

online experience for January 2021! We have the opportunity to

explore new ways of seeing old friends, retooling our teaching, and learning new and valuable information.

When I participate in any virtual event, I think of the attend-

ees who because of disability, family obligations, or lack of transportation are able to participate only because the event is virtual.

Even though we may miss seeing our friends face to face, we can celebrate yet another way FMEA is attempting to be inclusive.

This month I am happy to preview the following 2021 FMEA

sessions with speakers who will present on important topics of diversity and inclusion. The topics will be music students with disabilities and the role of music in advocating for social justice. We are fortunate to have numerous Florida teachers present-

ing as well as Dr. David Knapp from Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York.

vernacular music-making, community music, music technology, and steel band pedagogy.

This Is What I Can Do … What Will You Add? Building Inclusive Ensembles Friday, January 15

7pm-8pm

Zoom, 9

Experience reverse inclusion as we start the session with students who chant, sign, sing some of the pitches, “fill in” on a modified

guitar, and improvise on harmonica. Participants will be asked to add their musical abilities to the group. During the process,

we will work cooperatively to create a musical product. At the conclusion, participants will discuss the principles of reverse inclusion and how they can use these techniques in the future. Christine Lapka, EdD

University of Central Florida

The New American All-Stars: Literacy, Trauma, and Community Music Making With Refugee Youth Thursday, January 14

that support community needs. His research interests include

7pm-8pm

Zoom, 8

Dr. Christine Lapka is committed to guiding teacher education candidates in the areas of

elementary music methods, exceptionalities in

music, methods of instruction, and assessment.

The New American All-Stars is a popular music ensemble

Before joining the faculty at the University of Central Florida,

incorporates the ethnic popular musical interests of the refugee

Throughout her career, she found her two undergraduate

literacy skills while allowing members to address trauma and

therapy).

port members’ self-efficacy and group affiliation, leading to

The Missing Faces in Music Education

David Knapp, PhD,

Research findings suggest that there is an underrepresentation

Dr. David Knapp is an assistant professor of

are numerous factors we can consider that contribute to this

he teaches modern band, music technology,

The music world outside of “school music” has more diverse art-

He received the PhD in music education from Florida State

teachers is how to merge the students’ music with school music

program at SU, which facilitates music-making partnerships

our diverse students’ and communities’ backgrounds.

for newly arrived refugee youth. Pedagogically, the ensemble

Dr. Lapka was a professor of music at Western Illinois University.

youth. Learning experiences are constructed around critical

degrees invaluable to her teaching (music education and music

prior experiences. Additionally, the band is designed to supimproved outcomes in members acclimating to their new home.

Saturday, January 16

9am-10am

Zoom, 5

Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York

of minority students in the music education classrooms. There

music education at Syracuse University, where

imbalance as well as hidden biases we may hold when teaching.

steel band, and philosophy of music education.

ists with whom students may identify. The challenge for music

University in 2012. He also directs the Music in Community

and create a vessel of expression and authenticity to represent

70    F l o r i d a

Music Director


David J. Cruz

ences and internships, creating awareness, advising, grappling

South Miami Senior High School of the Arts

with uninformed faculty, collaborating with campus resources,

Mr. David J. Cruz is a music teacher at South

and the perspective of a current music education doctoral stu-

Miami Senior High School of the Arts; he con-

dent and future faculty member with special needs.

ducts the orchestra, chorus, and guitar class,

and teaches secondary general music. Mr. Cruz

Sandra Sanchez Adorno, PhD

where he received the BM degree in music education and music

Florida International University

graduated from the University of Miami Frost School of Music therapy. He completed his MME at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Mr. Cruz served as president of the Dade

County Music Educators Association and district chair for the

Florida Orchestra Association District 16. In addition to his work with the school, he directs the Christ the King adult choir and is

an active pianist in the community. Mr. Cruz is a board-certified music therapist, a K-12 music educator, and holds credentials in

Smithsonian Folkways world music and American Eurhythmics Levels I & II.

Panel Moderator

Dr. Sandra Sanchez Adorno is an assistant pro-

fessor of music education at Florida International University. A native of Florida, she has worked

as a general music teacher for Palm Beach County Schools, Frost Music Reach, and the Stetson University Community School

of Music and continues to serve as a clinician and mentor for in-service and preservice music educators around the country.

Sandra has presented at national and international conferences

including the International Conference on Musical Cultures and

the American Orff Schulwerk Association National Conference.

Alicia Romero-Sardiñas, PhD

Dr. Adorno serves on the editorial board for The Orff Echo

Ronald W. Reagan/Doral Senior High

and as president-elect of Florida Collegiate Music Educators

Dr. Alicia Romero-Sardiñas serves as the

Association.

conductor of the Cantoras du Mundo and

Panel members: Vimari Colón-León, Alice-Ann Darrow, Candice

Reagan Singers at Ronald W. Reagan/Doral

Senior High in Doral, Florida. Born and raised in Miami to Cuban parents, Alicia is a first-generation American and the first in her family to finish college. In an effort to honor her father’s lifelong dream of a college education, she didn’t stop at

a bachelor’s but finished the PhD from FIU while working full

Davenport Mattio, Stephen Zdzinski

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Differentiating Instruction in the Elementary Music Classroom On Demand

time as a teacher. Alicia has presented at FMEA and the National

Not all students come to the music classroom with the same

served on the board of WECIAS (Where Every Child Is a Star)

same understandings and skills are taught with different levels

Council for Teachers of English National Conference in 2013. She and has helped coordinate and run summer music programs with WECIAS as well as Florida International University for the past two years.

Accessible Success: Supporting Collegiate Music Education Students With Special Needs Friday, January 15

7pm-7:45pm

Zoom, 6

abilities. Music activities that allow all students to develop the

of support, challenge, or complexity. Participants will engage in tiered music activities that are accessible to learners with a range of skills and abilities. Danielle Hatch

Sabal Point Elementary

Ms. Danielle Hatch is in her seventh year as a

music educator and holds the BME in general

University music students with special needs face unique chal-

music education from Florida State University.

the students themselves. Inherently at higher risk of stress, fail-

Orff ensemble at Sabal Point Elementary in Seminole County,

face compounded issues with little guidance. This discussion

also holds an Orff Level II Certification, is an active member

sive and supportive spaces for special needs music education

Ensemble.

lenges as systems place the onus of seeking support resources on

She teaches grades K-5 general music and directs a choir and

ure, and dropout, music education students with special needs

where she just received her school’s Teacher of the Year. She

panel seeks to explore faculty experiences with creating inclu-

in CFOC, and directed the 2020 Volusia County Chorus/Orff

students. Topics will include entrance interviews, field experi-

Continued on page 73

December 2020

71


CommitteeReports

AWARDS COMMITTEE

Debbie Fahmie, Chairwoman

A

the value of music education and the role they play

long with the rest of the world, your FMEA

in assuring that all students receive high-quality

Awards Committee has done the Pandemic

music education. You will hear from the nomina-

Pivot and is planning for an exciting FMEA

tors about why they put forth the nomination.

Virtual Awards Ceremony in January! My ini-

We also have a very special guest who will be

tial disappointment in not getting to celebrate

cohosting the ceremony with me.

our awardees in person at a 7 a.m. breakfast

I hope you are as excited as I am about cele-

turned into excitement as a new plan for hon-

brating our honorees. I have gotten an enthusias-

oring these wonderful people began to emerge.

tic response from the awardees and the nominators

This year’s On-Demand Awards Ceremony will

about going to this format, and I anticipate a very

put a big spotlight on our awardees as you will have

an opportunity to hear from each one of them. You will get

a glimpse into the hearts and minds of the awardees regarding

inspirational event—one you won’t want to miss!

Please join me in applauding the 2021 FMEA award winners.

Drum roll please … Elementary Music Educator of the Year

Rosemary Pilonero

Villages Elementary of Lady Lakes School, Lake County Nominated by Joani Slawson on behalf of FEMEA

Secondary Music Educator of the Year

Laura Pinfield

Westshore Junior/Senior High School, Brevard County Nominated by Amy Davis

Superintendent of the Year

Alberto Carvalho, Superintendent

Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Nominated by Pauline Latorre on behalf of FEMEA District School Board/School Board Member of the Year

Carol J. Cook, Chairperson Pinellas County School Board

Nominated by Meghan Alfaro on behalf of FEMEA Leadership Award

College Music Educator of the Year

Dr. Don Coffman, Professor and Chair

Department of Music Education & Music Therapy Frost School of Music, University of Miami

Nominated by Dr. Carlos Abril Administrator of the Year

Dr. Kelly Paduano, Principal Timber Creek High School, Orange County

Kristy Pagan, District Elementary Music Support Specialist and Music Teacher Miami-Dade County Public Schools; Amelia Earhart Elementary School

Nominated by Pauline Latorre and David Cruz on behalf of FEMEA Exemplary Model Program

West Port Rock Pack Dean Marino, Teacher

West Point High School, Marion County Nominated by Joanne Crowder

Nominated by Wesley Roy on behalf of FVA

72    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Exemplary Model Project

“SONGBIRD” Evan Powers, Teacher

Orange County Public Schools

Nominated by Wesley Roy on behalf of FVA Distinguished Service Award

Denise Gagne Musicplay

Nominated by Jenny Chambless on behalf of FEMEA 2021 Music Education Service Award Carla P. Maxwell........................... 25 Years Lakeville Elementary School Orange County

Melinda Fradley............................ 26 Years West Orange High School Volusia County

Rhonda C. Gauger......................... 29 Years Hickory Creek Elementary School St. John’s County

Eric W. Mendez.............................. 32 Years Maitland Middle School Orange County

Audrey W. Carballo...................... 38 Years Bob Graham Education Center Miami-Dade County


EMERGING LEADERS COMMITTEE

Mary Palmer, EdD, Chairwoman

I

Diverse Learners continued from page 71

n “normal” times, the arts are considered a luxury. But in these more uncertain

Jessica Niemiec

YOU are among the heroes of our time. Your creativity and resilience inspire

Ms. Jessica Niemiec earned the BME

times, the arts are considered essential.

Windy Ridge K-8 School

and uplift our profession as music educators. Thank you!

in general music edu-

The 2021 FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference offers new

cation and the BM

opportunities for stretching your scope and your creativity. Please join the

degree in flute perfor-

Emerging Leaders for our two sessions.

mance. Ms. Niemiec,

Emerging Leaders once again will present a series of great ideas in Pecha Kucha

a passionate teacher

format (Saturday, January 9, 8 a.m.):

and flutist, teaches at

Windy Ridge K-8 School in Orlando.

Crystal Berner

Pinellas County, Elementary Music

Avoiding Teacher Burnout

Francis Bermudez

Palm Beach County, Chorus and Steel Pans

Humble Leadership

Scott Browning

Pinellas County, Creative Arts Academy Director

The Humanity Gap in Schools

Christian Gordon

Osceola County, Jazz

Jazz and Improvisation

girls track.

Emily Kinnunen

Orange County, Elementary

The Book Nook: Bringing Music to Life Through Children’s Literature

Brittany Purves

Karista MacRostie

Palm Beach County, Choral

Project-Based Learning in Music

Ms. Brittany Purves is the music teach-

Stephanie McNoughton

Pinellas County, Elementary

Have Experience? Share with a “Newbie” Teacher!

Windermere, Florida,

Laura Meehan

Hillsborough County, Caminity Exceptional Center, Adaptive Learning

Teaching in a SelfContained Classroom

Broward County, Upper School Music Director

Ensure Health and Wellness of Music Educators

Broward County, Middle School Associate Band and Orchestra Director

Techniques for Student Recruitment

Marcos Rodriquez Kaylyn Todd

Her instructional day includes elementary music and middle school

class guitar, as well as an ESE music

class. Additionally, Ms. Niemiec is director of the Windy Ridge Chorus Club and a coach for middle school

Bay Lake Elementary School

er at Bay Lake Elementary School in where she teaches K-5 general music. She

is in charge of the Chorus Club at Bay

Lake, which consists

of fourth and fifth grade students. She completed the specialized studies

certificate in special music education

at Florida State University and works with students of varying abilities.

This year’s “Coffee Talk” will be an evening edition (Thursday, January 7,

9 p.m.). Once again you’ll have the opportunity to interact with FMEA and NAfME leaders. Relax with your beverage of choice as we get to know each other and are inspired!

Applications for 2021-22 FMEA Emerging Leaders will be available soon. Please

nominate FMEA members who seem destined to become the next leaders of our

profession—in schools, communities, regions, statewide, nationally, and beyond! Self-nominations will be accepted.

YOU are so important to the future of music and the other arts in our schools

and communities. The pathways you create will change and enhance thousands of lives!

Enjoy the holiday season and its enduring music.

December 2020

73


ExecutiveDirector’sNotes

FMEA Executive Director Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

REGISTRATION IS OPEN! 2021 FMEA Virtual Professional Development Conference & All-State Experience

J

oin us January 13-16, 2021, for the FMEA Virtual

The mission

of the Florida

Music Education Association is to promote quality,

comprehensive music education in all

Florida schools.

Professional Development Conference. Here is

« More than 120 sessions, including 70+ live, just a sampling of what you will experience:

interactive sessions covering a variety of topics

for music educators in all subjects and teaching

« On-demand access to recordings of all sessions after the conference « Virtual Exhibit Hall with world-class exhibilevels

tors featuring colleges, universities, companies, and organizations providing products and ser-

« College Fair event on Saturday to meet and vices for music educators and students

interact with representatives from colleges and

« Networking opportunities for attendees with universities from across the nation

session presenters, colleagues, and alumni

« All-State student experience featuring a

master classes with conductors and performers, a

college fair, and access to the virtual exhibit hall. In addition, the All-State Guitar Ensemble and the

Popular Music Collective auditions have been com-

pleted and are beginning virtual rehearsals. Advocacy

The election is over, and now the work begins to

determine legislative leadership, committees, and committee chairs. It is critical in the coming months

that we continue to build relationships with our sen-

ators and representatives. The decisions made at the state level impact all students and teachers. Please

be sure to talk with your legislators and devel-

op ongoing relationships with them. Plan talking points about the importance of arts education for the students of Florida.

through virtual events and social media

2021 Legislative Session

variety of master classes with distinguished

on March 2 and end on April 30. The FMEA leader-

conductors and performers, a college fair, and

« Performances and mini-concerts from some of Florida’s top programs « Preconference on Wednesday focusing on access to the virtual exhibit hall

“Health & Wellness for Music Educators”

The 2021 Legislative Session is scheduled to begin ship, along with the leadership of FSMA and FAEA, will meet with lobbyists in early December to deter-

mine strategies for the upcoming session. We will be reaching out to everyone with our message that The Arts Are Essential in all Florida schools.

We continue to provide periodic updates from

FMEA All-State Student Experience

the COVID-19 aerosol study. Please visit the website

completed. The Florida Bandmasters’ Association,

of this study by the University of Colorado Boulder

The 2021 All-State Ensemble auditions have been the Florida Orchestra Association, and the Florida

Vocal Association are finalizing the schedule for the selected students that will feature a variety of

for current information on the preliminary results and the University of Maryland. Please review the

study and prepare accordingly for yourself and your students.

Stay safe and healthy throughout the holiday season!

Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

74    F l o r i d a

Music Director


F LO R I DA M U S I C E D U C AT I O N A SSO C I AT I O N

Officers and Directors

EXECUTIVE BOARD President

Steven N. Kelly, PhD

Florida State University; College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu Past President

Kenneth Williams, PhD

Douglas Anderson School of the Arts 2445 San Diego Road; Jacksonville, FL 32207 (904) 346-5620; kenwms@flmusiced.org President-Elect

Shelby Chipman, PhD

Florida A&M University, Department of Music Foster-Tanner Music Bldg., Room 318 Tallahassee, FL 32307; (850) 599-8165 shelby.chipman@famu.edu FBA President

Ian Schwindt

Titusville High School 150 Terrier Trail S.; Titusville, FL 32780-4735 (321) 264-3108; schwindt.ian@brevardschools.org FCMEA President

Marc Decker, DMA

Florida Atlantic University 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 deckerm@fau.edu FEMEA President

Ernesta Chicklowski

Roosevelt Elementary School 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090 ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us Florida NAfME Collegiate President

Julian Grubb

Florida Gulf Coast University 1519 Neptune Dr.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 430-9466; grubb.julians@outlook.com

Historian/Parliamentarian & Executive Director....................................................Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793; kdsanz@fmea.org

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION President......................................................................... Marc Decker, DMA Florida Atlantic University; 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 deckerm@fau.edu

Editor-in-Chief.....................................................D. Gregory Springer, PhD FSU College of Music; 122 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 644-2925; dgspringer@fsu.edu

FLORIDA NAfME COLLEGIATE

FSMA President ........................................................................Valerie Terry Carlos E. Haile Middle School 9501 SR 64 E.; Bradenton, FL 34212 vterrymusic@gmail.com

President....................................................................................Julian Grubb Florida Gulf Coast University, 1519 Neptune Dr.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 430-9466; grubb.julians@outlook.com Past President................................................... Katherine Attong-Mendes University of Miami; kxa395@miami.edu

FMEA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS

FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Awards.................................................................................... Debbie Fahmie fahmied@yahoo.com

President..................................................................... Ernesta Chicklowski Roosevelt Elementary School; 3205 S. Ferdinand Ave.; Tampa, FL 33629 (813) 272-3090; ernesta.chicklowski@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Budget/Finance, Development.................................. Steven N. Kelly, PhD Florida State University, College of Music, KMU 330 Tallahassee, FL 32306; (850) 644-4069; skelly@admin.fsu.edu

Past President...............................................................Rosemary Pilonero rosemary@femea.flmusiced.org

Committee Council............................................................... Debbie Fahmie fahmied@yahoo.com

Executive Director............................................................. Jennifer Sullivan 1750 Common Way Rd., Orlando, FL 32814 (321) 624-5433; slljenn@aol.com

Conference Planning Committee.............................John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College; 3209 Virginia Ave.; Fort Pierce, FL 34981 (772) 462-7810; johnsouthall@me.com

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION

Contemporary Media................................................... David Williams, PhD University of South Florida; 4202 E. Fowler Ave., MUS 101 Tampa, FL 33620; (813) 974-9166; davidw@usf.edu

President.....................................................................Harry “Skip” Pardee Collier County Public Schools; 5775 Osceola Trail; Naples, FL 34109 (239) 377-0087; pardeh@collierschools.com

Diverse Learners.....................................................Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD Florida State University, Music Education and Music Therapy 123 N. Copeland St.; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 645-1438; aadarrow@fsu.edu

Past President............................................................................Scott Evans scott.evans@ocps.net Treasurer......................................................................................... Ted Hope Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Emerging Leaders............................................................ Mary Palmer, EdD 11410 Swift Water Cir.; Orlando, FL 32817 (407) 382-1661; mpalmerassoc@aol.com FMEA Corporate & Academic Partners....................................Fred Schiff All County Music; 8136 N. University Dr.; Tamarac, FL 33321-1708 (954) 722-3424; fredallcounty@aol.com

FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION President................................................................................Matthew Davis Harrison School for the Arts; 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com

Government Relations..................................................Jeanne W. Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Administration Bldg. 301 4th St., SW, P.O. Box 2942; Largo, FL 33779-2942 (727) 588-6055; reynoldsj@pcsb.org

Past President...........................................................................Jason Jerald jason.jerald@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Multicultural Network...........................................................Bruce J. Green (407) 927-3141; bruce.green@ocps.net

Executive Director............................................................. Donald Langland 220 Parsons Woods Dr.; Seffner, FL 33594 (813) 502-5233; Fax: (813) 502-6832; exdirfoa@yahoo.com

Professional Development........................................................Scott Evans Orange County Public Schools; 445 S. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; scott.evans@ocps.net Research...................................................................... Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami; d.coffman1@miami.edu

Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104; mabelfast@seu.edu

Secondary General Music.............................................................Ed Prasse Leon High School; 550 E. Tennessee St.; Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 617-5700; prassee@leonschools.net

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; jo@barefootaccounting.com

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

Florida NAfME Collegiate Advisor

FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION President.................................................................................. Jason Locker Orange County Public Schools; 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jason@fva.net Past President.....................................................................Tommy Jomisko tommy@fva.net

Student Development.............................................. Michael Antmann, EdD Freedom High School; 2500 W. Taft-Vineland Rd.; Orlando, FL 32837 (407) 816-5600; michael.antmann@ocps.net

Executive Director....................................................................J. Mark Scott 7122 Tarpon Ct.; Fleming Island, FL 32003 (904) 284-1551; exec@fva.net

Collier County Public Schools 5775 Osceola Trail; Naples, FL 34109 (239) 377-0087; pardeh@collierschools.com

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE

Business Manager..................................................................Jo Hagan, CPA 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260; business@fva.net

FOA President

Local Co-Chairpersons Ted Hope—(813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us Melanie Faulkner—(813) 272-4461; melanie.faulkner@sdhc.k12.fl.us Hillsborough County Public Schools, School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602

CENTER FOR FINE ARTS EDUCATION

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Director of Finance & Client Relations...............................Richard Brown, CAE (richard@fmea.org)

FMSA President

Harry “Skip” Pardee

Matthew Davis

Harrison School for the Arts 750 Hollingsworth Rd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 499-2855; matthew.lawson.davis@gmail.com FVA President

Jason Locker

Orange County Public Schools 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; jason@fva.net Member-at-Large

Edgar Rubio

Silver Trail Middle School 18300 Sheridan St.; Pembroke Pines, FL 33331 (754) 323-4321; merenguesax@aol.com

Exhibits Managers fmeaexhibits@fmea.org

402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793 Executive Director....................... Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD (kdsanz@fmea.org) Director of Operations........................Valeria Anderson, IOM (val@fmea.org)

President...................................................................................Ian Schwindt Titusville High School; 150 Terrier Trail S.; Titusville, FL 32780-4735 (321) 264-3108; schwindt.ian@brevardschools.org

Technology Director......................................Josh Bula, PhD (josh@fmea.org) Public Affairs & Communications Coordinator..................................... Jenny Abdelnour, CAE (jenny@fmea.org)

Past President..................................................................... Cathi Leibinger Ransom Everglades School; 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; pastpresident@fba.flmusiced.org

Marketing & Membership Coordinator................................. Jasmine Van Weelden (jasmine@fmea.org)

Executive Director......................................................................Neil Jenkins Florida Bandmasters Association P.O. Box 840135; Pembroke Pines, FL 33084 (954) 432-4111; Fax: (954) 432-4909; exec@fba.flmusiced.org

December 2020

75


PAST, PRESENT, & FUTURE

e c n e i r e p x E l a u t r A Vi MORE THAN 120 SESSIONS, including 70+ live, interactive sessions covering a variety of topics for music educators in all subjects and teaching levels ON-DEMAND ACCESS TO RECORDINGS OF ALL SESSIONS after the conference VIRTUAL EXHIBIT HALL with world-class exhibitors featuring colleges, universities, companies, and organizations providing products and services for music educators and students

2021 FMEA VIRTUAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE January 13-16, 2021

ALL-STATE EXPERIENCE January 15-16, 23, & 30, 2021

COLLEGE FAIR event on Saturday to meet and interact with representatives from colleges and universities from across the nation NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES for attendees with session presenters, colleagues, and alumni through virtual events and social media ALL-STATE STUDENT EXPERIENCE featuring a variety of master classes with distinguished conductors and performers, a college fair, and access to the virtual exhibit hall PERFORMANCES AND MINI-CONCERTS from some of Florida’s top programs PRECONFERENCE on Wednesday focusing on “Health & Wellness for Music Educators”

FOR INFORMATION:

FMEA.org/Conference Florida Music Education Association Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, Florida 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632

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Florida Music Director December 2020  

The official publication of the Florida Music Education Association. Featured in this issue: Transitioning from In-Person to Online Music Le...

Florida Music Director December 2020  

The official publication of the Florida Music Education Association. Featured in this issue: Transitioning from In-Person to Online Music Le...

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