Page 1

Lessons Learned From Teaching in a Low-Socioeconomic High School

Raising the Lowered Bar

Prelude to the 2019 Conference


Executive Director Florida Music Education Association Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education

402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844 or (800) 301-3632 (kdsanz@fmea.org)

Editor-in-Chief

Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD Southeastern University College of Arts & Media 1000 Longfellow Blvd. Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104 (office) (mabelfast@seu.edu)

Editorial Committee Terice Allen (850) 245-8700, Tallahassee (tallen1962@hotmail.com) Judy Arthur, PhD Florida State University, KMU 222 (850) 644-3005 (jrarthur@fsu.edu) William Bauer, PhD University of Florida, Gainesville (352) 273-3182; (wbauer@ufl.edu) Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD College of Music, FSU, Tallahassee (850) 645-1438; (aadarrow@fsu.edu) Jeanne Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Largo (727) 588-6055; (reynoldsj@pcsb.org) John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College, Fort Pierce (772) 462-7810; (johnsouthall@fmea.org)

Advertising Sales Valeria Anderson (val@fmea.org) Richard Brown (richard@fmea.org) 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 878-6844

Official FMEA and FMD Photographers

Bob O’Lary

Debby Stubing

Art Director & Production Manager

Lori Danello Roberts, LDR Design Inc. (lori@flmusiced.org)

Circulation & Copy Manager

Valeria Anderson, (800) 301-3632

Copy Editor

Susan Trainor

Contents December 2018

Volume 72

Number 5

F E AT U R E

Lessons Learned From Teaching in a Low-Socioeconomic High School Raising the Lowered Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Prelude to the 2019 Conference . . .

How Do I Get to the Conference? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Student Leadership Workshop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Conference Registration and Fees.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 Registration Policies & Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-21

Frequently Asked Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Ticket Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Contracted Hotels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 All-State Rehearsals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-25

Sneak Peek at FMEA Preconference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

College Night. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

All-State Conductors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29

President’s Concert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-31 General Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Thurday and Friday Concerts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-36 Student Conference Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

D E PA R T M E N T S President’s Message. . . . . . . . . . 4

Corporate Partners. . . . . . . .

Advertiser Index. . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Research Puzzles. . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Advocacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Officers and Directors.. . . . . . . . 49

2018-19 FMEA Donors. . . . . . . 8-9

Executive Director’s Notes. . . . . . 50

Component News.. . . . . . . . . . . 37

Academic Partners. . . . . . . . . . . 51

Committee Reports. . . . . . . . . . 42 December 2018

46-47

3


President’sMessage

Kenneth Williams, PhD President Florida Music Education Association

Lifelong Learner …

Is that your photo next to this definition in the dictionary?

Y

es, the quest for attaining knowledge, skill and wisdom can be arduous and requires sig-

nificant investment of both time and energy. When all is said and done, I find at the end of

many days that I have no energy left to read a book or an article, or to study a score, or to listen

to a new recording, or to practice an unfamiliar instrument ... do you experience this, too? And when Miss Julia Child reminds me that “You’ll never know everything about anything, especially

something you love,” I accept it as a personal challenge to at least strive to be all-knowing about this miraculous thing called music and the art of teaching. Therefore, if I am to continue to

fill my intellectual capacity, I must schedule adequate time and develop the discipline to be a constant learner. I must surround myself with brilliant and talented people and use their

inspiration to excite my curiosity, which lends to my excitement to learn. I owe this to myself. More important, I owe this to the students in my charge.

Where to go to be inspired? Start with your colleagues; their collective experience and wis-

dom are invaluable. You may be fortunate to have a district music supervisor who facilitates

quality professional development, and if that resource is not available in your district, do not hesitate to ask whether you might join your neighboring district colleagues when they have

the opportunity to learn. We are all lucky to live in Florida where we benefit from the exceptional learning opportunities brought to us by our wonderful FMEA component organizations.

Attend those workshops and conferences, and be inspired to expand your knowledge base.

And of course, come to the FMEA Professional Development Conference in January. You won’t find a more valuable and varied learning experience under one roof in the span of four days. Invest the time and effort, and come away with both knowledge and inspiration.

The 2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference – ARTISTRY: Teaching & Performing will feature Robert Duke as our keynote speaker at

the First General Session on Thursday, January 10. Professor Duke is the Marlene

and Morton Meyerson centennial professor and head of music and human learn-

4    F l o r i d a

ing at The University of Texas at Austin, where he is a University and University Music Director


of Texas System distinguished teaching professor, an Elizabeth Shatto Massey distinguished fellow in teacher education and

the director of the Center for Music Learning. He is also a

clinical professor in the Dell Medical School at The University of Texas and was the founding director of the psychology of

learning program at the Colburn Conservatory of Music in Los Angeles. When I think of ARTISTRY: Teaching & Performing, I think of Robert Duke. Do not miss this learning opportunity.

Also at the First General Session, we will experience excep-

tional artistry from American bass-baritone Timothy Jones.

Jones enjoys a reputation as a charismatic presence on operatic and concert stages throughout the United States, Europe and South America. His eagerly anticipated performances combine intelligent musicianship, commanding vocal technique and a unique ability to connect with audiences. He is a master

teacher and a member of the faculty of the Moores School of

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Direct correspondence regarding subscriptions to: Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education, 402 Office Plaza, Tallahassee, FL, 32301-2757. Subscription cost included in FMEA membership dues ($9); libraries, educational institutions and all others within the United States: $27 plus 7.5% sales tax. CIRCULATION: 4,500 educators. Published eight times annually by The Florida Music Education Association, Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education: 402 Office Plaza Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757. FMEA reserves the right to approve any application for appearance and to edit all materials proposed for distribution. Permission is granted to all FMEA members to reprint articles from the Florida Music Director for non-commercial, educational purposes. Non-members may request permission from the FMEA office. SUBMISSIONS: Article and art submissions are always considered and should be submitted on or before the 1st of the month, one month prior to the publication issue to: Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD, mabelfast@seu.edu. All articles must be provided in digital format (e.g., Microsoft Word). All applicable fonts and images must be provided. Images must be at least 300 dpi resolution at 100% of the size. All submissions must be accompanied by a proof (color, if applicable). Ads may be submitted via email to val@fmea.org. Florida Music Director reserves the right to refuse any ad not prepared to the correct specifications OR to rework the ad as needed with fees applied. 2018-19 FMEA Membership: You are eligible for membership in The Florida Music Education Association if you are an individual engaged in the teaching, supervision or administration of music in elementary and secondary schools, colleges or universities within the state.

Visit FMEA.org/membership to learn more about the benefits of active membership.

Music, University of Houston. Timothy Jones is the epitome of ARTISTRY: Teaching & Performing.

Attending the Second General Session on Friday, January

11, is a must. You will be treated to world-class artistry by the Melodica Men. What started off as two guys playing toy instru-

ments for fun is now an internationally acclaimed musical duo. Joe Buono and Tristan Clarke became friends while studying

music at the Peabody Conservatory, and they have been playing melodica together since May 2016. You will be amazed by how

much fun performing with artistic intent can be. The Melodica Men will also grace the conference with a concert on Thursday.

Do not forget Wednesday’s FMEA Preconference; the lineup

of presenters is awe inspiring. Bring a colleague or two to the

conference so they might share in this learning opportunity. Bring your administrator to the conference so he or she, too,

might learn first-hand of the rigor and value that quality music education brings to your school’s students and what a valuable resource you are to your school’s learning community. I hope to see you in Tampa. Sincerely,

Kenneth Williams, PhD, President

Florida Music Education Association

Advertiser Index The Florida Music Director is made possible by the participation of the following businesses whose advertisements appear in this issue. They make it possible to provide you with a high-quality publication, and we gratefully acknowledge their support of our mission. We hope you will take special notice of these advertisements and consider the products and services offered. It is another important way you can support your professional association and the enhancement of Florida music education. The publisher does not endorse any particular company, product or service. The Florida Music Education Association (FMEA) is not responsible for the content of any advertisement and reserves the right to accept or refuse any advertisement submitted for publication. Information for advertisers (rate card, insertion orders, graphics requirements, etc.) can be found at FMEAMediaKit.org. ADVERTISERS

Florida Atlantic University...........................................................................BC Florida Gulf Coast University....................................................................... 15 Smoky Mountain Music Festival.................................................................... 45 University of Florida......................................................................................... 6 University of South Florida........................................................................ IFC Advertisers shown in bold provide additional support to FMEA members through their membership in the Corporate and Academic Partners program. These advertisers deserve your special recognition and attention.

December 2018

5


6    F l o r i d a

Music Director


AdvocacyReport

T

Jeanne W. Reynolds

Chairwoman Government Relations Committee

he 2018 midterm elections have come and gone. Democracy

local schools. Clearly there is support for public education at the

trating. Just as it always has been. The margin of victory for the

So, how can we use our skills to build strong support statewide

is alive and well. It’s also messy, unpredictable and frus-

2018 governor’s race was razor thin, less than 1%. The last three

gubernatorial elections were close, but this was the closest one yet. Florida remains a very diverse state with passionate voters on both sides of the aisle. FMEA members have strong community-building skills. Let’s use our skills

local level. This does not necessarily translate to the state level.

«« Send a congratulatory note to ALL of your newly elected offi-

for education? What are our next steps?

cials if you have not done so already. Please contact recently

elected state representatives and senators. This information can be found on your supervisor of elections website, listed here: https://dos.elections.

to find common ground.

w

Whether the candidates you sup-

myflorida.com/supervisors/.

ported won or lost, we all should celebrate voter engagement and interest in this election.

officials regardless of party

affiliation. No exceptions.

Voter turnout for the 2018

Support for arts education

elections was more than

w

is a nonpartisan issue.

10% higher than that of the 2014 election. In 2014,

Commit to holding

these newly elected offi-

the turnout was 50.5% of

cials accountable. Keep

registered voters. Initial

track

figures for the 2018 elec-

of

their

voting

records, and voice your

tion suggest the turnout

support for or concern

was close to 62%. This gain

about their votes. That is your

is something we all can

job in a democracy. As the say-

celebrate. Let’s build on this

growth and encourage our mem-

w 

bership to remain engaged in the political process.

ing goes, democracy is not a spec-

tator sport.

Encourage your music program

parents to register as part of the FMEA par-

As of September 30, there were 13,200,872

registered voters in the state of Florida. If 62% of vot-

Commit to working collabo-

ratively with all newly elected

ent advocacy network. We are building a database of

ers cast a vote, that means roughly 5,016,331 did not vote. Let that

parents we can call upon to help with our upcoming legislative

today, while we celebrate the growth in the percentage of voters

As musicians, we know how to work as an ensemble. Every

sink in. More than 5 million registered voters did not vote. So,

who voted in the 2018 election, going forward our work is clear. We must increase the percentage of voters who participate in the process. Music educators are skilled at motivating people. Let’s

session.

day, in every music classroom in Florida, we inspire diverse groups of students with widely differing backgrounds and

beliefs to come together and make music. This is our superpow-

use our skills to inspire an energized electorate. Engaged voters

er. Keep encouraging fellow FMEA members, friends and family

One interesting takeaway from this election is the fact that

the 2019 Legislative Session with our newly elected officials the

are good for democracy and good for our arts advocacy cause.

several counties successfully passed legislation that involved

citizens voluntarily taxing themselves to put more dollars into

to engage in the political process. Let’s work together and make best session ever. It’s time for us to step up and use our superpower for good outside the classroom.

December 2018

7


8    F l o r i d a

Music Director


December 2018

9


Lessons Learned From Teaching in a Low-Socioeconomic High School PART TWO

Raising the

T

This is the second article in a series that addresses some of the challenges I encountered while teaching in a low-socioeconomic (low-SES) high school in rural northwest Georgia. This article attempts to offer strategies for working with students in a low-

SES environment. The previous article in this series noted the importance of differ-

entiating between the two types of problems in schools—academic and social—and recognized that while my students had exhibited academic capabilities, the areas in which they most needed help had to do with social issues.

After reading Christopher Emdin’s For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood (and the

Rest of Y’all Too), I found that many of the scenarios he described in urban schools

were similar to my experiences at a small rural school. Emdin identified two charac-

teristics common within an urban, low-SES school environment that he termed the pedagogy of poverty.1 These characteristics are social issues: “the oppressive classroom”

by Robert Clark, PhD

and “the lowered bar.” The first article in this series, “Escaping the Oppressive

Classroom,” focused on four strategies for developing an appropriate learning

environment for students from low-SES backgrounds. These strategies included:

1) minimum rules that were rooted in respect and often involved students’ input; 2) avoiding confrontation with students by “taking away the audience”; 3) teaching

students to differentiate between types of feedback and to avoid the temptation to

“take it personally”; and 4) checking my own rigid orthodoxies by valuing, accepting and implementing (when appropriate) students’ input.

This article will describe strategies for addressing the effects of the lowered bar,

the second characteristic found in a pedagogy of poverty. While this article cannot provide all of the answers, I am hopeful that a few small strategies might beget suc-

cesses that lead to even more approaches to raising the bar for students in low-SES

10    F l o r i d a

environments. Music Director


Lowered Bar The lowered bar is easily recognizable as a generalized apathy or lack of pride.

Students, parents, fellow teachers, community members and even members of our own administration seemed to have no problem expressing the opinion that our

school just could not be like the other schools. A list of excuses always followed that statement, blaming parents, funding, elementary teachers, poor health care, over-

medication, unemployment and on and on.

The first time I walked into the band room at the school, I noticed the locker room

was filthy, littered with trash and old broken school instruments, and the walls, shelves and lockers were covered with graffiti. When I brought this to the attention

of the administrator who was with me, I was shocked to hear the response “we just don’t have nice things here.” For the students, the word used to describe anything

broken or old, including the community and the entire school, was “ghetto.” There can be an upside to a low expectation, though, especially when you are a new

teacher: Any success feels like a big accomplishment. I was cringing through the

first halftime performance while the principal was loving it. When I asked him

what he liked so much, he said, “They didn’t have to restart!” The symptoms of the lowered bar can be reduced, however, and I found four ideas that increased the expectations for our program.

Continued on page 12

December 2018

11


Escaping the Raising the OppressiveBar Classroom Lowered Continued from page 11 25

“Listening to and valuing the input of students gives them a voice in how the classroom runs. Additionally, I found that allowing students to have some input engendered a trusting relationship with me.”

director’s job just to make sure there were

conditions return over time. I gave every-

had at least one job (and often more) they

one older student was a sort of mentor to

worried about how they would feel about

a change in the apathy that was previ-

organized strictly by instrument or gen-

1. We had to clean house, literally.

With the equipment, instruments and

facilities in such deplorable shape (the doors to practice rooms couldn’t be opened because there was so much stuff crammed inside!), I knew the students would have to be engaged. Otherwise, I

could spend weekends cleaning it myself, and I knew that until the students had

some investment as a result of their own

work, they would only let the previous one a job—every single student. I was

performed for the band. The result was

all of the work that needed to be done ini-

ously so prevalent. The students began

of keeping up with their jobs throughout

have the best equipment, instruments and

tially, and then the required maintenance the year, but I was pleasantly surprised that many of the students were excited to

improve the looks and organization of our room. On top of that, many students

came forward with suggestions, proposing ways to fix broken equipment or to reorganize storage spaces. Many of my

students lived on farms or had parents with industrial tools, and those students

to understand that even if we did not facilities, we still had to be grateful for and take care of what we did have. These jobs began to extend into music rehearsal, with students working together to set up

chairs and stands, tune instruments and

pass out and collect music. The reason that these were not officer jobs performed by a select few students was that—just

like our one rule of respect—all students

a few fun activities (i.e., the yearly trip) and everything else would take care of

itself. At a low-SES school, I found I had to purposely structure a family environ-

ment for it to develop. Just as students had

learned respect for facilities, equipment

and instruments by taking responsibility

for them, they also had to learn respect for each other by helping one another.

I assigned students to “quads” in which

three younger students. Quads were not der, though generally the leaders were

upperclassmen. The groups met at the

end of rehearsals, and each quad leader went over announcements with his or her

group. Reminders such as what to wear

for the Friday pep rally or when to be

picked up after the game were distributed through the quads. Quad leaders were charged with communicating with the

members of their small group, helping to resolve conflicts between students and taking care of small issues such as replac-

begged to be able to fix broken music

needed to develop a sense of respect for

ing missing music. The quad leaders met

the band practice field. In this way, many

and the facilities. The best part of this pro-

their input. This group served as a council

stands, build tuba racks and maintain

students were able to express their own

personal brilliances that are not easily assessed in traditional school work.

Once the initial cleaning and reorga-

nization was done, which took the entire summer and most of the fall, students

took on at least one job for the remainder of the year. Some examples of student

selves, others, the band, the equipment cess was when students proposed ideas to improve storage, fix a piece of equipment

or make an activity more efficient. Those

moments represented success in this proj-

practice field and painting lines. These were not “officer positions”—everyone

12    F l o r i d a

The quads were often tested together

the quads were the natural organization-

windows and floors, vacuuming, filing

grass and weeds, mowing the marching

with me during our meetings.

for others.2

Many of the students needed positive

ing band trailer, trimming or edging

leaders to communicate ideas or concerns

on music, especially in marching band.

care, which we often learn to do by doing

responsibilities included weekly main-

music, loading and unloading the march-

for the band, and I encouraged the quad

ect, which was about students learning to

2. We needed to create a family, on

tenance of school instruments, cleaning

with me every week, and I listened to

purpose.

peer and family relationships, and they

were looking for what Emdin calls “socioemotional stability.”3 I used to believe that

these “family” atmospheres could only grow organically, and that it was the band

Music Director

I would hear music tests in quartets, so

al unit. These groups began rehearsing music together outside of practice, eating together during lunch and cultivat-

ing friendships that crossed traditional instrument and grade-level boundaries.

In this sense, the quad leaders became like co-teachers, helping me to manage

much of the social (and some of the academic) facets of the band.


When I first arrived at the school,

one of the major complaints about the band was that it had historically been

full of drama, and it seemed to be an endless source of conflict for the admin-

istration. Though “kids are kids,” and there is always some disagreement in

any group, the quad plan seemed to turn

around the drama problem. It became obvious that many students in the band needed quality relationships with others, and increased mentorship along with the assignment of responsibilities to every

student helped to foster a family environment. Christopher Emdin writes:

… students from broken families are less academically proficient than their peers from more stable homes. Many interpret this to mean that the

traditional family model of mother, father, and 2.5 children propagat-

ed as the societal ideal is the only

model of family that works. I argue

that those who do not have this traditional family structure can benefit from what we know about how

this structure supports the academic

and socioemotional development of children. 4

The efforts mentioned above are almost

entirely social and, seen in a vacuum, have nothing to do with music, but I believe they were beneficial for my students’

intrapersonal and interpersonal develop-

ment.

3. I listened to my students.

Listening to and valuing the input of

students gives them a voice in how the classroom runs. Additionally, I found

that allowing students to have some input engendered a trusting relationship

with me. For example, the band council,

which was made up of quad leaders,

approached me about one of my rigid

spective I had not considered: We lived

at the school, attendance and tardiness to

to stand on the track during the break,

in a very small town, and when you have

orthodoxies. When I first started teaching

everyone notices. In a small town, that

rehearsals had been a major problem—no

can mean extreme embarrassment—a

doubt a symptom of the lowered bar. I

punishment that did not fit the crime!

thought I could improve this problem

Instead, they proposed a consequence

if I made the punishment for being late

that wound up being more meaningful

powerful enough. So, students who were

and powerful. Students who were late to

late to marching band practice during

practices would not be allowed to choose

the week were not allowed to go to third

their bus seat on away trips. Once this

quarter break on Friday night. Instead,

new consequence was instituted, I saw

those students had to stand at attention

an immediate improvement in punctual-

on the track during the break. I had

ity to practice and less resentment from

used this consequence multiple times

those receiving a consequence (though

and it had been effective, but now the

they were really unhappy!).

council was asking me to change the

Continued on page 14

consequence. The students had a per-

December 2018

13


Raising the Lowered Bar Continued from page 13

Giving up control can be scary, but I

had to be reevaluated and reimagined,

say increased all of the good behaviors I

did not have to be lowered. My ortho-

but not eliminated, and the standards

learned that allowing students to have a

doxies had to become more “goals” than

wanted to see in my students. I learned

“rules,” and many of these goals had to be

that I did not always have to pick every

approached by approximation over time.

piece on a concert or have the ultimate

In my first year, we had very few

answer to every question. By my last year at the school, the students were so

students who could play independently

did not even have to assign them—the

low-stakes solo and ensemble event was

or in small groups, so having our own

invested in their responsibilities that I

a better solution. Likewise, alternatives

drum majors posted a sign-up sheet

to expensive trips had to be found, and

during summer practices and all of the

it was imperative that quality musical

jobs were filled.

and social experiences were at the heart

The ultimate manifestation of my stu-

of these trips. We took short trips to see

dents taking responsibility came when

some of the great college ensembles in

we had a student using a wheelchair in

our area, and we took the day off school

the marching band, and groups of stu-

so we could get there early, take a cam-

dents assigned themselves the job of help-

pus tour, eat in the cafeteria and attend

ing him throughout the year. Their list of

a rehearsal. We went to Atlanta to the art

responsibilities ranged from getting off

museum and then the symphony. While

the bus first in order to scout the acces-

we were only travelling for a couple of

sibility of our location to assisting him

hours and the costs were low, the magni-

in getting to the marching band practice field (over a long stretch of hilly ground).

One student even gave up her spot in the

with standards. This could be seen in the

so they became a team that marched

as “everyone must play 12 major scales,”

show to push this student’s wheelchair,

one spot. This group was self-assigned— I never asked them to help. It was at this

point that I realized the family environment was happening, and it was important to the students. At the same time that

expectations were rising for the social factors in our band, the expectations for

sons, so I had to make the goals manage-

“everyone in the top ensemble must audi-

was going to go home one day and come

tion for All-State,” “all students have to participate in solo and ensemble,” “you can’t be in jazz band class if you’re not in

a concert band class” and “only someone in the top ensemble can be drum major.”

We are all serious about our rigid

orthodoxies, and it would probably be

raising the bar for social expectations had

ers to agree on what would be an accept-

also raised the bar for academic ones.

4. I reevaluated and reimagined my “rigid orthodoxies.”

One final lesson I learned had to do

with something I mentioned in part one of this series—my “rigid orthodoxies.” I

had always equated my rigid orthodoxies

14    F l o r i d a

Not a single student took private les-

requirements I had for my classes, such

academic (musical) performance were also

rising. I couldn’t help but believe that

tude of the experience was high.

impossible to get a group of music teach-

able for my students—realistically, no one back the next playing 12 scales. This is a truth of building a program, but especial-

ly true when many students do not live in a situation where they can practice at

home. As a result, practice at school was

highly encouraged, and I had to keep the room open for practice before and after school and during lunch.

One successful outcome I previously

able set of them for the profession, much

mentioned—our student using a wheel-

Even writing about them here chances

that my rigid orthodoxies almost messed

less a unilateral justification for them.

offending someone. I believed that any

compromise on my orthodoxies meant “lowering the standards.” What I came

to realize over time in a low-SES school,

though, was that many of my orthodoxies

Music Director

chair in the marching band—was one

up. When this student approached me about being in marching band, I immedi-

ately said yes, but I had already made up my mind about the best situation for him (which was the front ensemble) because


he already played piano and of course, he

the constant preparation of performances

State University in Americus. His teach-

his wheelchair! I discovered how wrong

No two schools are alike, and these are

Southwestern Winds, courses in conducting

surely didn’t want to march a spot with

I was when he told me at the end of his

just a few of the important lessons I

return to band in 10 grade. I was dev-

low-SES school. It was my experience

freshman year that he was not going to th

astated and asked what could be done to change his mind. He let me know that he

ing responsibilities include conducting the

toward the service of my students’ needs.

and music education and private trumpet

instruction. He has taught band, orchestra

learned while teaching in one particular

and chorus in the public schools of Duval

that a focus on social learning led to

County and Brevard County, Florida, and

improved academic (musical) outcomes. I

Walker County, Georgia. Dr. Clark is a graduate of Florida State University.

had wanted to march a spot and that I had

would close by reminding you, especial-

feeling incredibly small! Fortunately, he

teachers, that kids need you, everywhere.

Endnotes

encourage you to take your talents and

passion to the schools where kids need

1   Christopher Emdin, For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood (And the Rest of Y’all Too): Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education (Boston: Beacon Press, 2016), 12, 32, 120-128.

to be constantly checked to adapt to

Robert

2   See Charles Madsen and Clifford Madsen, Teaching/Discipline: A Positive Approach for Educational Development (Raleigh: Contemporary Publishing Company, 2016), 160-161.

saved my sanity and was an important

mental music education

never offered him that chance. I was left agreed to return the next year, marched a spot in the show, and he did so through his senior year.

I found that my rigid orthodoxies—

the way things just had to be—needed my new school. Keeping this in mind

part of shifting my paradigm away from

ly the young teachers and soon-to-be You can do good wherever you are. I

you the most.

Clark,

PhD,

serves as director of instru-

3   Emdin, For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood, 26-27.

at Georgia Southwestern

4

Ibid.

December 2018

15


How Do I Get to the Conference?

Making Your Case to Attend the 2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference

G

Getting approval to attend the Florida

gets in today’s economy, school principals

Development Conference may require

to attend professional development. That

Music Education Association Professional developing a proposal. Due to tight bud-

and districts carefully scrutinize requests does not mean you shouldn’t give it your best effort by showing your administrators how your attendance will benefit

the students in your school. Rather than assuming your administrators are aware of the critical importance of you profes-

sionally benefitting from content-specific

sessions, consider submitting a formal proposal.

Through this proposal you can demon-

strate how your participation directly

relates to the strategies and the objectives of your school (including those beyond the classroom). This will allow you to

articulate the need for your continuing

education and how it will benefit your students, your school and you.

«« Write

Develop Your Case

down three of the most

important goals and strategies being

16    F l o r i d a

addressed in your school’s plan.

Music Director


«« Think about how you personally con-

tribute to those three goals and strategies. How does your work as a music

educator affect the overall mission of

your school? Make a list of your per-

sonal contributions to your school’s

«« Review the conference’s professiongoals and strategies.

al development schedule to better understand how the information

provided will support your school’s goals. Mark meetings that relate to your list of personal contributions

to the attainment of those goals and strategies, and make note of the cli-

nicians and others you will be able to observe and/or with whom you

will be able to interact while at the conference. List the high-quality per-

formances you will observe and from which you will learn. You can down-

Student Leadership WOR K SHOP

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 12:30 pm-4 pm TCC, Ballroom A Cost: $30 per student Directors and chaperones are FREE

load the conference app from the FMEA’s website and bookmark your

«« Write

sessions.

down your case for how

attending the FMEA Professional Development Conference and meet-

ing the people there will help you contribute to your school’s goals and strategies, and use this case with your

administrators when making your request to attend the conference.

Additionally, let your administrators

know that this conference has more than

10,000 teachers, administrators, students and parents in attendance, making it one of the largest music education conferences in the nation.

Finally, ask your administrators to sup-

Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser

Dr. Tim, as he’s known around the country, asks each student to

bring an open mind and enthusiasm as he discusses the importance of being a leader. This session is for high school student leaders.

port you to attend the 2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference, January 9-12 in Tampa.

December 2018

17


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

2019 CONFERENCE REGISTRATION All registration information must be entered online at fmea.org/conference. At the end of the online form, you will have the opportunity to print an invoice to send in with a check until one week before the preregistration deadline or to pay online instantly with a credit card until the preregistration deadline. PLEASE NOTE: Exhibitors may scan the barcode on your badge with your permission. Students and chaperones will also have a barcode on their badges. In order for them to receive information from the exhibitors, we ask you to provide the ACTUAL MAILING and EMAIL ADDRESSES for each of your students and chaperones.

18    F l o r i d a

Music Director


2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference & All-State Concerts January 9-12, 2019

Tampa Convention Center

REGISTER FOR CONFERENCE

Registration Fees and Procedures

The following information is for your information only, and is not an invoice for registration. Register for the conference online at flmusiced.org/flmusicapps/conference/register.

DESCRIPTION

Director/Member

Collegiate Member

Retired Member

Preregistration (Sept. 22 - Dec. 7)

On-Site Registration

$50

$80

$130 $0

$160 $0

Non-Teaching Spouse

$65

$90

Paid Chaperone

$45

$65

All-State Student

$55

$85

Non-Teaching Spouse of Retired Member Free Chaperone

$0

$0

$0

$0

Tri-M Student

$30

$30

Preconference Workshop (First-Year Teachers)

$25

$25

Preconference Workshop Concert Tickets

VIP Member

VIP Preconference Workshop

Leadership Workshop Student

Leadership Workshop Chaperone

Student Experience - Student

Student Experience - Chaperone

$50 $15 $0 $0

$30 $0

$30

$30

$60 $15 $0

$0

$30 $0

$30

$30

To take advantage of early discounted rates, you must register and pay before the deadline. If you are

mailing a check to the FMEA office to pay for your registration, it must be postmarked SEVEN DAYS BEFORE the preregistration deadline.

December 2018

19


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

Registration Policies 1. All participants—directors, students, chaperones and guests—must be registered for the conference.

2. Only directors may register their groups or pick up registration materials if preregistered.

3. All participating students must be chaperoned. As required by the Florida School Music Association, at least one chaperone, other than a director, is required for every 10 students

or fraction thereof; however, FMEA policy allows for one free chaperone for every six students or fraction thereof.

4. An additional paid chaperone may be registered for (a) each six students registered or (b) for each all-state rehearsal site where registered students are performing.

5. If a participating student is not accompanied by the direc-

tor from that student’s school, then the principal from that

school must furnish a letter designating the person from the school or school district who is to be in charge of that student.

20    F l o r i d a

Music Director

The letter shall be addressed to the FMEA executive director, must explain the extenuating circumstances preventing the

director from attending and must be submitted with registration materials. The school will be notified of approval.

6. Student observers are not allowed to attend the conference.

If any student observers are brought to the conference, the offending school’s participation in the conference may be eliminated the following year. (Tri-M students registered and

participating in sessions or working for the all-state concerts are exempt from this rule.)

7. All school music teachers must register for the confer-

ence as FMEA directors and must be current members of

FMEA. This includes directors of invited performing groups,

mini-concerts and session presenters. All-state conductors from Florida schools, colleges or universities must also be FMEA members. No current music teacher may register as a chaperone.


Refund Policies 1. Full registration refunds are available for cancellation requests made through December 15, 2018.

2. No registration refunds will be made for cancellations made after December 15, 2018, except for emergency situations. These will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

3. Refunds must be requested in writing (email is acceptable). 4. All requests for refunds must be received no later than

January 31, 2019. Requests received after that date will not be processed.

5. All refunds will be issued after the conference is completed.

6. Concert tickets are non-refundable.

Frequently Asked Questions Do I get free tickets for my students’ family members to attend the concert?

Chaperone Registration

Chaperone registration is based on the following rules:

«« For each elementary student registered, one free chaperone and one paid chaperone may be registered. «« Any additional attendees must purchase a guest pass at Elementary Students

on-site registration for entry into the convention center.

«« For every six students registered, one free chaperone

Middle School and High School Students

and one paid chaperone may be registered. No other

chaperones may be registered until the seventh student

«« Any additional attendees (chaperones or guests) must

No. You can pre-order and pay for their tickets when you preregister.

Can I get free tickets to any concerts?

No. Registered attendees (directors, chaperones, students) are allowed admission to concerts with their name badge, so no ticket

is necessary. Attendees who are not registered for the conference (parents, family, etc.) must purchase tickets. At the Straz

Performing Arts Center, registered attendees with their conference name badge will be handed a ticket immediately before they walk in the door.

Can I buy extra tickets any time?

is registered.

If you are an FMEA member registered for the conference, you

purchase a guest pass at on-site registration for entry into

area at any time during the regular registration hours. Everyone

the convention center.

«« If you have students in more than one performing ensem-

EXCEPTIONS

ble, you may pay for a chaperone for each performing

«« If you have students from different schools, you may pay

may purchase tickets at the computers in the on-site registration else may purchase tickets beginning at 11 am on Thursday. There are more family members and guests

coming to watch my all-state student than I have tickets. How and when do I get tickets for them?

ensemble in which you have registered students.

Extra tickets may be purchased when general ticket sales open on

for a chaperone for each school for which you have regis-

area for $15 each.

Thursday at 11 am. Tickets will be sold at the main registration

tered students.

December 2018

21


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

All-State Ticket Policy 1. Registered (BADGED) attendees do not

require tickets to attend any all-state concert. This includes directors/members,

directors’ non-teaching spouses, performing all-state students, registered chaper-

ones, collegiate student members, retired

members and VIP guests that you entered as part of your conference registration.

2. All nonregistered (NONBADGED) attend-

ees (parents, family members, guests, etc.) are required to

purchase tickets for any all-state concert they wish to attend at $15 per ticket.

3. There are no free or allotted tickets. All concert attendees must either wear their conference badge or purchase a ticket.

4. A director who preregisters online may reserve and prepay for all-state concert tickets for nonregis-

tered attendees for concerts in which he or

she has registered all-state students. If paid for online, these tickets will be preloaded into the director’s registration package.

8. All ticket sales are final. Concert tickets are non-refundable. 9. For entrance, ticketing and concert purposes, a concert is

defined as the pair of ensembles that are performing in the same venue in a common, defined block of time. An example of a concert for purposes of entrance, ticketing, etc., is the

2 pm concert on Saturday for the Middle School Honors Band and the High School Honors Band.

Concerts at the Straz Performing Arts Center

5. A director who registers on site may pur-

If tickets have not been purchased for them by a

tered attendees for concerts in which he or

(parents, family members, guests, etc.) may pur-

chase all-state concert tickets for nonregis-

she has registered all-state students during the on-site registration process.

6. A director with all-state students may purchase additional concert tickets for nonregistered attendees for concerts in which

he or she has performing students at the conference on-site registration desk or at a designated ticket sales location at any time.

registered director, all nonregistered attendees

chase tickets for any Straz concert they wish to

attend at $15 per ticket at the FMEA registration

desk between 11 am on Thursday and 7 pm on Friday. Starting at 9 am on Saturday, all remaining tickets for Straz concerts will be sold outside of the Straz Performing Arts Center.

Registered (BADGED) conference attendees no longer need to pick up free tickets

in advance.

There will be a separate line for badged attendees. An FMEA staff mem-

7. General ticket sales for all-state concerts will

ber or volunteer will be standing at the front of this line leading into the

registration desk. There is no requirement

performing arts center. Only one ticket per badged person will be distrib-

begin at 11 am on Thursday at the FMEA that the director or any other registered

attendee be the person to purchase tickets after this time.

22    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Straz center to distribute tickets to badged attendees as they walk into the uted, and that person must immediately walk into the Straz center and give the ticket to the Straz staff member who is collecting tickets.


Hotels Contracted for 2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference

HOTEL – Cutoff date: 11/10/18

Barrymore Hotel Tampa Riverwalk 111 West Fortune Street, Tampa, FL 33602 Courtyard by Marriott Downtown Tampa 102 East Cass Street, Tampa, FL 33602 DoubleTree by Hilton Tampa Airport Westshore 4500 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 Embassy Suites Downtown 513 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 Embassy Suites Westshore 555 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 Four Points by Sheraton Suites Tampa Airport Westshore 4400 West Cypress Street, Tampa, FL 33607 (includes comp internet) Hilton Downtown 211 North Tampa Street, Tampa, FL 33602 Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport 700 North Westshore Blvd., Tampa, FL 33609 (includes comp internet & parking) Marriott Waterside 700 South Florida Avenue, Tampa, FL 33602 Residence Inn 101 East Tyler Street, Tampa, FL 33602 (includes comp breakfast & internet) Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel 200 North Ashley Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 Westin Tampa Waterside 725 South Harbour Island Blvd., Tampa, FL 33602 Discounted parking: $10 overnight valet only

Single

(813) 223-1351 Group Code: FMEA (813) 229-1100 Group Code: FMEA (813) 879-4800 Group Code: FMEA (813) 769-8300, ext. 1 Group Code: FMEA (800) 749-2974 Group Code: FMEA (888) 627-8261 Group Code: FMEA (800) 445-8667 Group Code: FMEA (800) 315-2621 or (813) 289-8200 Group Code: FMEA (888) 236-2427 Group Code: FMEA (800) 627-7468 Group Code: FMEA

(800) 325-3535 Group Code: FMEA (800) 937-8461 Group Code: FMEA

ROOM RATES Double Triple

Quad

$139

$139

$139

$139

$152

$152

$152

$152

$153

$153

$153

$153

$239

$239

$249

$259

$189

$189

$199

$209

$140

$140

$140

$140

$205

$205

$205

$205

$124

$124

$124

$124

$205

$205

$205

$205

$171

$171

$171

$171

$197

$197

$217

$217

$194

$194

$194

$194

December 2018

23


All-State Rehearsals All-State Concert Band

All-State Elementary Orff Ensemble

All-State Intercollegiate Band

REHEARSALS: SR, Riverwalk Ballroom

REHEARSALS: TCC

REHEARSALS: DW, Lake Forest Ballroom

Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday..................................................9am-12n

Thursday................ 10am-11am, TCC, West Hall A Thursday..................11am-6pm, TCC, West Hall A Friday...........................8:30am-10:15am, TCC, 14 Friday....................10:45am-1pm TCC, Ballroom A

Thursday.........................................9am-12:30pm Thursday.......................................... 1:30pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.................................................8:30am-12n Friday......................... 3pm-4pm, TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 5:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

All-State Concert Chorus REHEARSALS: MW, Grand Ballroom Thursday.......................................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm

CONCERT: Friday, January 11, 2019, 1:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

All-State Guitar Ensemble REHEARSALS: MW Tuesday............... 7pm-9pm, Ballroom, Salons 1-3 Wednesday..........8:30am-5pm, Ballroom, Salon 4 Thursday...................................8am-12n, TCC, 20 CONCERT: Thursday, January 10, 2019, 12:30pm TCC, 20

CONCERT: Friday, January 11, 2019, 4pm TCC, Ballroom A

All-State Middle School Band REHEARSALS: HTD, Palma Ceia Ballroom Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday..................................................9am-12n CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 5:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 5pm Straz, Morsani Hall

All-State Concert Orchestra REHEARSALS: MW, Florida Ballroom, Salons 5-6 Thursday...........................................8:15am-9am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday...................................... 7:30am-8:30am

All-State Middle School Jazz Band REHEARSALS: WTW, Conch Wednesday....................................... 2pm-5:30pm Wednesday.............................................7pm-9pm Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.................................................8:30am-12n

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 9am TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Friday, January 11, 2019, 7:30pm MW, Grand Ballroom

All-State High School Jazz Band REHEARSALS: TCC, 30A

Wednesday.............................................1pm-6pm Thursday.............................................. 8am-11am Thursday..................................11:45am-12:45pm

Wednesday....................................... 2pm-5:30pm Wednesday.............................................7pm-9pm Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.................................................8:30am-12n

CONCERT: Thursday, January 10, 2019, 1:45pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Friday, January 11, 2019, 7:30pm MW, Grand Ballroom

All-State Elementary Chorus REHEARSALS: TCC, 14

24    F l o r i d a

Music Director

All-State Middle School Mixed Chorus REHEARSALS: HTD, Bayshore Ballroom 1-3 Thursday.........................................12:30pm-1pm Thursday.......................................... 1pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:45am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 10am Straz, Morsani Hall


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing KEY

All-State Middle School Orchestra REHEARSALS: MW, Meeting Room 8 Thursday................................................8am-9am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday.................................................7am-8am CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 9am TCC, Ballroom A

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus REHEARSALS: HTD, Bayshore Ballroom 5-7 Thursday..........................................12n-12:30pm Thursday................................... 12:30pm-4:15pm Thursday..................................... 6:15pm-8:45pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:15am Friday...........................................1:15pm-4:15pm CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 10am Straz, Morsani Hall

All-State Reading Chorus REHEARSALS: ESD, Gandy Meeting Room

DW = Doubletree Westshore

SR = Sheraton Riverwalk

ESD = Embassy Suites Downtown

Straz = Straz Performing Arts Center

HTD = Hilton Tampa Downtown

TCC = Tampa Convention Center

MW = Marriott Waterside

WTW = Westin Tampa Waterside

All-State SSAA Chorus

High School Honors Band

REHEARSALS: WTW, Oasis Ballroom

REHEARSALS: SR, Bayshore Ballroom

Thursday.......................................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm

Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday..................................................9am-12n CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 2pm MW, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 2pm Straz, Morsani Hall

High School Honors Orchestra

All-State Symphonic Band

REHEARSALS: ESD, Skyway Room

REHEARSALS: TCC, 22 Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday..................................................9am-12n

Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday...................................... 7:30am-8:30am

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 5:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 4:30pm MW, Grand Ballroom

All-State Symphonic Orchestra

Middle School Honors Band

REHEARSALS: TCC, 24

REHEARSALS: HTD, Esplanade Suite

Thursday.........................................9am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday...................................... 7:30am-8:30am

Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday.......................................... 7pm-9:30pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday..................................................9am-12n CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 2pm MW, Grand Ballroom

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 9am TCC, Ballroom A

Middle School Honors Orchestra

All-State TTBB Chorus

REHEARSALS: SR, Riverview Room

Thursday.......................................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday............................................... 1:30pm-4pm Saturday............10am-11am, MW, Grand Ballroom

REHEARSALS: ESD, Bayside Ballroom Thursday.......................................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday..................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm Thursday.......................................... 6:30pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.......................................... 1:30pm-4:30pm

Thursday.......................................... 8am-8:30am Thursday....................................8:30am-11:30am Thursday................................................1pm-5pm Thursday................................................7pm-9pm Friday.........................................8:30am-11:30am Friday.....................................................1pm-5pm Saturday...................................... 7:30am-8:30am

CONCERT: Friday, January 11, 2019, 6:30pm TCC, Ballroom A

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 2pm Straz, Morsani Hall

CONCERT: Saturday, January 12, 2019, 4:30pm MW, Grand Ballroom

December 2018

25


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

Sneak Peek at FMEA Preconference Wednesday, January 9, 2019 • 1 pm-5 pm Tampa Convention Center, 18

Sessions and Presenters To Be or Not to Bop: Practical Jazz Techniques Every Director Ought to Know

Dr. Mark Belfast

Dr. André Thomas Keynote Address

Associate Professor of Music Education

Owen F. Sellers Professor of Music

Mr. Kenneth Boyd

Assistant Dean College of Arts & Media Southeastern University

Director of Choral Activities and Professor of Choral Music Education Florida State University

Ms. Shelby Montgomery

Let’s Get Rock’n: Rock Orchestra Director of Orchestras

George Jenkins High School & Lakeland Highland Middle School

Lakeland, Florida

Dr. Carlos Abril

Movement in the Music Classroom Professor of Music Education Director of Undergraduate Music Education

26    F l o r i d a

University of Miami Music Director

Director of Bands

West Orange High School Winter Garden, Florida


December 2018

27


Meet the 2019 All-State Conductors

Dr. Ann Adams

Middle School Honors Band

Mr. Steven Amundson

Mr. Alan Baylock

All-State High School Jazz Band

Dr. Travis J. Cross

All-State Symphonic Orchestra

All-State Concert Band

Dr. James K. Bass

Mrs. Michele Fernandez Denlinger

All-State TTBB Chorus

28    F l o r i d a

All-State Middle School Jazz Band

Music Director

Dr. Rodney Dorsey

Dr. Beth Gibbs

All-State Intercollegiate Band

All-State Reading Chorus

Dr. Eugene Dowdy

Ms. Cyndee Giebler

Dr. Robert Gardner

Mr. Sydney Guillaume

All-State Concert Orchestra

All-State Middle School Orchestra

All-State Elementary Orff Ensemble

All-State Middle School Treble Chorus


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

Mr. Daniel Gutierrez All-State Middle School Mixed Chorus

Dr. David Hedgecoth All-State Middle School Band

Mrs. Beth Holmes

All-State SSAA Chorus

Dr. Brad Holmes

All-State Concert Chorus

Mr. Chuck Hulihan

Dr. Ryan Kelly

All-State Elementary Chorus

Dr. Sarah McKoin

Mrs. Michelle Fella Przybylowski

All-State Guitar Ensemble

All-State Symphonic Band

Dr. Laura Joella

Ms. Andrea L. Meyers

High School Honors Orchestra

Dr. Kelly A. Miller

High School Honors Band

All-State Elementary Orff Ensemble

Middle School Honors Orchestra

December 2018

29


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

President’s Concert Wednesday, January 9, 2019 7:30 pm Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A

Jason Albert & Stephen Gabin, Coordinators

Douglas Anderson School of the Arts Chamber Orchestra Brian Griffin, Director

The Douglas Anderson School of the

Arts Chamber Orchestra (Jacksonville, Florida) is the flagship ensemble of the orchestra program at Douglas Anderson. In 2012, the Douglas

Anderson Chamber Orchestra per-

formed at the annual Midwest Clinic International Band, Orchestra and Music Conference in Chicago. In

2011, the Douglas Anderson Chamber Orchestra performed at the FMEA Clinic-Conference.

30    F l o r i d a

Music Director


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

President’s Concert Wednesday, January 9, 2019 7:30 pm Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A

Jason Albert & Stephen Gabin, Coordinators

� Buchholz High School Wind Symphony

Shawn Barat, Director The Wind Symphony is

Buchholz High School’s

principal concert ensemble and has earned a reputation as one of the finest

symphonic organizations in the country. The band has performed at the

CBDNA/NBA Southern Regional Conference in

2002 and 2014, Carnegie

Hall in 2009, the Music for

All National Concert Band

Lake Nona High School Chorus Justin Chase & Aaron Kass, Directors

Festival in 2012, the FMEA Professional Development Conference in 2014, the ABA Convention in

2014, the Midwest Clinic

The Lake Nona Singers is the top auditioned group of the

International Band,

360+ member Lake Nona High School Choral Department.

The Lake Nona High School Choral Department started with

just 40 high school singers 10 years ago. Now graduates of the Lake Nona Singers have gone on to major in music or musical

theatre at institutions that include Florida State University, the

Orchestra and Music Conference in 2002,

2009 and 2014 and at the Kennedy Center in 2017.

University of Central Florida, Florida Gulf Coast University, Penn State and Marymount College of Manhattan.

December 2018

31


ARTISTRY:

Teaching &Performing

FMEA General Membership Sessions

1 nd 2 st

Thursday, January 10, 2019 10:30 am Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A

Kenneth Williams, Presider

Kenneth Williams,

Jason Albert, Coordinator

FMEA President

Featuring . . Keynote by Dr. Robert Duke Timothy Jones

Friday, January 11, 2019, 9 am Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A

Kenneth Williams, Presider; Jason Albert, Coordinator

Featuring . .

Hall of Fame Presentation Mary Palmer,

Hall of Fame Presenter

Annual FMEA Awards Presentation Debbie Fahmie,

Awards Committee Chairwoman

32    F l o r i d a

Music Director

Concert by Melodica Men

(ensemble description on page 33)


Thursday Concerts January 10, 2019

Melodica Men

Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A 7:30 pm

What started off as two guys play-

Holiday Pops concert series. Since then,

internationally acclaimed musical duo.

Symphony Orchestra, featured on ABC’s

they have been soloists with the Atlanta

ing toy instruments for fun is now an

Joe Buono and Tristan Clarke became

The Gong Show, briefly seen on NBC’s America’s Got Talent and have gained

friends while studying music at

230,000+ social media followers and

the Peabody Conservatory, and

more than 30 million views worldwide

they have been playing melod-

thus far. You can find the Melodica Men

ica together since May 2016. A

on Facebook, YouTube and Instagram.

melodica is a cross between

Behind the scenes, the Melodica Men

a keyboard and a harmonica

because you have to blow air

are pioneering a new way of learning

vibrate.

ca. Pilot programs in elementary schools

music as a language through the melodi-

into it to make the reeds inside

began in January 2018, and a full online

In July 2016, the Melodica

curriculum is in the works. You can

Men funded their tour of

learn more about their music education

Seattle and Paris by busking

mission on Patreon.com.

in the street. In September

2016, their Rite of Spring video

Tristan is a graduate of the Juilliard

went viral and gained more

School and plays principal trumpet

day. In December 2016, they

earned two master’s degrees from the

with the Jacksonville Symphony. Joe has

than 1.5 million views in one

Peabody Conservatory and is currently

played their solo debut with the

teaching and composing.

Jacksonville Symphony at the

Mini-Concerts Tampa Convention Center, Lobby Stage

Southwest Middle School Jazz Ensemble I

Amy Bernloehr, Director; Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 4 pm–4:30 pm

The Jazz Ensemble I is the advanced performing jazz group

at Southwest Middle School. The group has earned straight

Robert Morgan High School Nightingales

Angel Marchese, Director; Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 2:30 pm–3 pm

Nightingales is one of five performing ensembles at Robert Morgan High School. Members include magnet and non-mag-

net students who demonstrate exceptional musical proficiency. Nightingales has consistently rated superior at state MPA since

2017. Students in Varsity Chorus have performed at Florida All-State, ACDA, regional, state and national honor choirs,

Carnegie Hall and Magnet Schools of America National Conference.

superior ratings at MPA every year since the ensemble’s inception in 2013. The Jazz Ensemble is made up of seventh and eighth grade

students from all backgrounds. The

group was selected to perform for the OCPS Principals’ breakfast in 2016. The Jazz Ensemble

I is the top performing group at Southwest Middle School, presenting performances at Disney Springs and for many community events.

December 2018

33


Friday Concerts January 11, 2019

10:30 am Digital Music Showcase Waterside, Florida Ballroom, Salons 1-3 David Williams, Director

FMEA’s Digital Music Showcase will feature original

student compositions performed live. The Digital Music

Showcase is designed to encourage musical creativity, critical thinking and collaboration by students in K-12 schools.

7:30 pm Millikin University Choir Tampa Convention

Center, Ballroom A

Brad Holmes, Director

Jay Dunn, Jason Albert & Stephen Gabin, Coordinators

The Millikin University Choir presents this concert as part of its 2019 tour of the Southeast. The flagship of the Millikin choral fleet, the University Choir features 45 upper-class students from a variety of majors. Membership in the choir places high demands on these

students, who travel extensively throughout the United States representing the university in a variety of settings. In recent years, the choir has also toured internationally to Spain,

Ireland, Scotland, England, China, Taiwan, Haiti, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. The Millikin University Choir has gained national recognition, due in part to six invitations to perform at national and regional conferences of the American Choral Directors

Association. The choir’s performances have fostered new conversations in response to the group’s approach to tone, style and programming.

34    F l o r i d a

Music Director


9:15 pm University of Miami Frost Wind Ensemble Tampa Convention Center, Ballroom A

Robert Carnochan, Director

Jason Albert, Maroa Dix & Doug Phillips, Coordinators The Frost Wind Ensemble actively commissions and performs new music as well as standard repertoire. The rich history of the FWE includes conductors Frederick Fennell, Alfred Reed and Gary Green. The ensemble’s mission is to connect students with leading musical minds of our time, resulting in notable collaborations with Andy Akiho, John Corigliano, David Maslanka, Joe Alessi, Ricardo Morales and Hila Pittman. The

FWE is proud to boast former members who now hold positions in symphony orchestras and military bands and as collegiate faculty throughout the United States and around the world.

2019 FMEA Student Conference Experience

T

he purpose of the Florida Music Education Association’s

Student

Conference

Experience is to expand access to the annu-

al conference to students throughout the state. Participating students will interact with amazing clinicians and educators, college

Hotel Information

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore (800) 315-2621

Ask for the “FMEA Student Experience Group.”

representatives and incredible performing

Bus transportation for the

experiences they can take back and share

students and their chaperones

is also an excellent opportunity to ensure

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore to the convention center. All student

FMEA conference.

in this hotel block only. Directors do not need to stay in this block.

groups. These students will have memorable

student conference experience

with their high school music programs. This

will be provided from the

your school has student representation at the

conference experience students and chaperones must reserve rooms

More details are available at http://floridamusiceducation.org/conference/student-experience/. Any questions should be directed to Michael Antmann (michael.antmann@ocps.net), coordinator of the FMEA Student Conference Experience.

December 2018

35


Friday Mini-Concerts Tampa Convention Center, Lobby Stage

Spruce Creek High School 12 O’Clock Jazz Band

Melissa Nelson, Coordinator

3:15 pm–3:45 pm

Robert Bosma, Director

Melissa Nelson, Coordinator

John Rosbottom, Director 11 am–11:30 am

Oakridge Middle School Jazz Band

The Spruce Creek High School 12 O’Clock Jazz

Band is the premier jazz ensemble of three jazz

The Oakridge Middle School Jazz Band is the premier

groups at the school. The bands regularly per-

band performing ensemble at Oakridge Middle School. This

form at school concerts and community events, and have

tion to the band is by audition. The OMS Jazz Band performs

Festival and at their host event, the Lakeside Jazz Festival.

group is composed of seventh and eighth graders, and selecmusic of significant historical

performed at the UNF Jazz Festival, the UCF Orlando Jazz

importance, focusing primarily on swing, Latin and funk/

rock styles. The band regular-

ly performs at school functions and performance assessments and throughout the Southwest Florida community.

Under the direction of Mr. Bosma, the SCHS 12 O’Clock Jazz Band was selected as one of 12 bands nationally to perform at the prestigious Swing Central Jazz Festival in Savannah, Georgia, in 2016.

Claire Grellier, Director

Four Play clarinet Lakewood High School Strings of Sparta

Melissa Nelson, Coordinator

Jacob Merrett, Director

Melissa Nelson, Coordinator 12:30 pm–1 pm

The Lakewood High School Strings of Sparta is an auditioned guitar ensemble composed

of juniors and seniors. Students must have

two years of guitar experience and complete an audition process to join the group. Most of the members began their musical studies

when they entered high school, though some did begin earlier. Students perform in a wide

variety of musical styles, and they have performed at events across the Tampa Bay area.

36    F l o r i d a

Music Director

5 pm–5:30 pm

Four Play clarinet is a crossover group composed of four

young women who share a common passion for music. Four Play clarinet seeks to combine virtuosic classical training with

a passion for pop and electronic music, pushing the instru-

ment in a new direction that explores all of its

unconventional possibilities. The group has

also created a music education

accelera-

tor program, the Four Play clarinet project,

designed to encourage the practice of a musical instrument.


ComponentNews

FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION

Jason Jerald, President

H

appy holidays and warm greetings!

during the FMEA Conference will only

Zabanal. In the midst of all the exciting

winter break, please make sure you have

CBAA. The new teachers training session

to offer, please make an effort to connect

As you prepare for a well-deserved

registered for the 2019 FMEA Professional

Development Conference. FMEA is proud to celebrate its 75th conference this year!

The preregistration deadline is Decem-

ber 7. Plan to attend the President’s Concert on Wednesday evening to enjoy

Dr. André Thomas as the keynote speak-

er as well as a presentation on Let’s Get

tion. As we finish the first half of this

Langland. Again, please be sure to visit

year, I wish you the best in your perfor-

the FOA website for further information.

mances.

We hope you will gain great ideas

Barnes, Kasia Bugaj, Emmaleigh Carr,

the Preconference, which will feature

can be gained through casual conversa-

Judy Evans, Jennifer Haber and Donald

Anderson School of the Arts Chamber

Don’t forget to also consider attending

amazed by the incredible wisdom that

will be presented by lead adjudicators

to take back to the classroom from our

Orchestra directed by Brian Griffin.

with your fellow teachers. I’m always

will be held Wednesday, January 9, and

exciting performances from outstanding ensembles including the Douglas

sessions and concerts the conference has

be for new teachers seeking to become a

The old idea of a composer suddenly having a terrific idea and sitting up all night to write it is nonsense. Nighttime is for sleeping.

FMEA conference session presenters: Gail David Cruz, Keith Dodson, Alex Jimenez,

– Benjamin Britten

Shannon Lockwood, Lisa Loucks, Shelby

Have a safe and restful winter break.

Montgomery, Robin Morris, Kristin Pfeifer Yu, Laurel Yu and John-Rine

Take time for yourself and your family.

Rock’n: Rock Orchestra. We are very excit-

ed about our 2019 all-state conductors: Mr. Steven Amundson, Dr. Eugene

FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Joella and Ms. Andrea L. Meyers. We

Stacie Rossow, DMA, President

Dowdy, Dr. Robert Gardner, Dr. Laura hope you will have time to witness our conductors and ensembles as they prepare for their performances.

Our new MPA adjudication sheets will

roll out in the 2019 concert MPA season.

The sheets can be found on our website (myfoa.org). Please take time to review

these sheets with your students. As a reminder, our adjudicator approval train-

H

appy December! As we begin to wrap up this semester, I would like to

again encourage you to spread the word about this component organiza-

tion. I have heard from several people in the last few weeks that they did not know this association exists. Please, tell your colleagues, even if they are not “music education” faculty because, in reality, we all are—the applied teachers,

the ensemble directors, the administrators … we are all facing the same challenges. And together, we may be able to forge a stronger path for our students.

As I write this, I have just returned from the Fall Conference. It was a fabulous

ing has been revised. Only those adju-

day speaking with so many very enthusiastic music education students (and a

sheets and our lead adjudicators will be

education in Florida. I had the privilege of speaking with them about their future

dicators who have trained with the new called upon to adjudicate for MPAs after this year. This process is now referred

to as becoming a component board approved adjudicator or CBAA. Anyone

seeking adjudication approval will not be voted on by their district or the executive

few other majors) who are excited and very optimistic about the future of music

educational plans and was so happy to see they understand that learning and development do not stop when they receive their undergraduate degree. Some know they want to pursue a graduate degree and others are very happy about

future professional development, but whichever path they choose, they will be wonderful educators. That is a testament to you, my colleagues.

As you organize your conference plans, please make sure to carve out time for

board, but can self-nominate if all the

the board meeting. Not only do we need to come together at this time when the

the FOA website to review these require-

gize our role in Florida music education. Additionally, this is an election year for

initial requirements are met. Please visit ments. All adjudicators will be required

to go through the training before being

placed on the approved list. Training

voices of professors need to be heard, it is a time for us to talk about and strate-

us. If you are interested in becoming more active, please speak with me. I look forward to seeing you all throughout the conference.

December 2018

37


ComponentNews

FLORIDA COLLEGIATE NAFME

Jennifer Luechauer, President

2018 FCNAfME Fall Conference Provides Weekend of Networking/Professional Development by Katherine Attong-Mendes

T

Fall

continued support of FCNAfME

and 29 at Florida Southern College

supervisors began their ses-

he

2018

FCNAfME

and our Fall Conference. The

Conference held October 28

sion with suggestions for our

in Lakeland, Florida, was a week-

resumes,

end filled with networking and

applying

for

jobs

and potential interviews. Our

professional development for the

underclassmen members then

future music educators of Florida.

participated in a question-and-

Attended by more than 100 mem-

answer session with some of the

bers, the conference saw our larg-

supervisors while the juniors

est turnout in years, with 11 col-

and seniors were able to meet

leges and universities represented.

with supervisors one-on-one and

The theme of the conference was Success in Your First Year, and all

ask them specific questions. Mr.

sessions presented on topics about

Douglas

McCullough,

which we future music educators

assistant director of athletic

The first session, presented

percussion at the University of

bands and director of marching

need further knowledge.

by Mrs. Jeanne Reynolds, preK- Three students, David Ramos (FSU), Nick Seier (FSU), Miami, gave a session on work12 performing arts specialist for and Mavel Morales (University of Miami) presented on ing with parent booster groups in school music programs. Pinellas County Schools and Advocacy within your community and beyond. FMEA

government

relations

Using personal anecdotes from

chairwoman, discussed how to build an

State College and FMEA immediate past

his decades of teaching experience, he

Unique, Self-Care) culture in your class-

and in the Future. He explored different

ing a booster club, as well as solutions

APLUS (Artistry, Positivity, Lesson Plan,

room, a vital topic for first-year teachers to explore. Mrs. Reynolds discussed the

whys of music education and asked all

members to write on a piece of paper why we are compelled to be teachers and music educators. We then hung up our

various reasons around the room and were given the opportunity to read every-

one’s reason for joining this profession. She finished her session with concrete

ways we can create this positive and APLUS classroom environment when we

president, was titled Music Education Now

ways that music education has had to evolve in recent years to keep up with

ever-changing technological advances

and the increasing diversity of our classrooms as opposed to 30 years ago. It is

our responsibility as teachers to continue

ent. Mr. McCullough will also present a session at the 2019 FMEA Professional

Development Conference on developing student leaders within your ensemble.

Dr. Stacie Rossow, assistant professor

and associate director of choral and vocal

session was engaging, motivating and

shared some valuable information with

cation for all our students. Dr. Southall’s

hilarious—he had the whole room laughing along with his jokes.

We are so thankful to Mr. Scott Evans,

visual and performing arts supervisor in

Southall, director of bands at Indian River

the Florida music supervisors for their

38    F l o r i d a

for the many problems they can pres-

providing access to a quality music edu-

are teaching.

Our keynote session, led by Dr. John

detailed the positive aspects of establish-

Orange County and FMSA president, and

Music Director

studies at Florida Atlantic University, us regarding graduate degree programs.

She explained the differences between master’s degrees that are available at most

universities, and what each one entails.

This session was informative and filled an information gap that many under-


whom we can advocate, and provided our members with practical methods of advo-

cating for music education at a state level. Some examples he gave were tabling at

your local mall and playing music for people passing by, as well as getting

involved with the FMEA Advocacy Day

at the Florida Capitol. David Ramos then spoke about all the resources you can

find on the NAfME website for advocacy

FMEA President-Elect Dr. Steve Kelly discussing the importance of being involved in FMEA and the conference in January. graduate students have. We discussed

ber that not all students will be called to

each degree program is designed to meet

arts programs and encourage students to

different needs. Doctoral

students

Ryan

Aguirre

and Braeden Ayres from Florida State

for LGBTQ students and even specific scenarios and issues that can come up with students. Ryan and Braeden will be

at the 2019 FMEA Conference presenting on a similar topic.

Wrapping up the first day of our con-

ference, Mr. Joseph Luechauer, music curriculum specialist K-12 in Broward

County, gave a truly inspiring session on the importance of uniting the fine arts for advocacy purposes. He elaborated

advocate for our FCNAfME chapters at school. She shared examples of inter-

esting events other schools had done,

Mr. Bernard Hendricks, chairman of

areas with lower-income students, and

sexuality, legal precedent and doctrine

Morales presented on how we can

and performing arts.

situations with LGBTQ+ students in the terminology and concepts of gender and

Be Ready and Be Heard. Finally, Mabel

be involved in some form of the visual

the FMEA Multicultural Network, gave

music classroom. They discussed various

the three Bs of advocacy: Be Informed,

music. We need to help support the other

University gave an extremely informa-

tive session on how to navigate different

in the upcoming election. He stressed

Luechauer urged the members to remem-

when might be the “right time” to decide to complete a graduate degree, and how

as well as documents to help members

such as Southeastern University’s chapter study times, University of Miami’s

a session focused on teaching music in

#IStandForMusicEducation week and

Florida Atlantic University’s music theory

how to build a culture that includes and

tutoring sessions.

involves the community and the school.

The success of our 2018 FCNAfME Fall

Mr. Hendricks taught members to explore

Conference would not have been possi-

He encouraged us to visit other schools

support of Mr. Michael Parks, visiting

the community in which we are teaching.

ble without the gracious assistance and

and to drive around the city and learn

assistant professor of music education

more about the demographics of our

and chapter advisor at Florida Southern

schools. The more educated we are on

College, and his chapter executive board

the area we’re teaching, the better we

and members Additionally, we would

can relate and connect to our students.

like to thank Dr. Steven Kelly, FMEA

We discussed the important fact that

president-elect, for attending the confer-

music education should be accessible and

ence and for his continued support of

available for all students, and that we as

FCNAfME.

teachers must make this possible through

We are so pleased and inspired by

whatever means necessary.

our 2018 FCNAfME Fall Conference

a song to a video of students paint-

ence was led by the FCNAfME Advocacy

immense support from the Florida Music

people attend this concert where they

University of Miami, David Ramos from

on the Broward All County Band and Art Exhibition, where the band performs

ing/sculpting/crafting. More than 1,000 are exposed to two types of fine arts

programs. This collaboration strengthens our voice as fine arts educators, which

resonates with our administrators. Mr.

The final discussion of our confer-

attendance and speakers, as well as the

Committee; Mabel Morales from the

Education Association. If you are inter-

ested in attending next year’s conference

Florida State University and Nicholas

or are interested in what the Florida

Seier from Florida State University.

Collegiate members are up to, please

Nicholas Seier started off the session

visit our website, flnafmecollegiate.fl

by defining what advocacy is and with

musiced.org, for more details.

December 2018

39


ComponentNews G

reetings,

FCNAfME

members

FLORIDA COLLEGIATE NAFME

Shelby R. Chipman, PhD, Advisor

Our conference last month was

and all. The FCNAfME chapters

an opportunity for members of the

Jennifer Luechauer (FSU), FCNAfME

laborate, for students to learn strategies

are engaged in amazing work this year. president, along with other collegiate

board members worked to ensure a rewarding Fall Conference held in Lakeland, Florida, on the campus of

Florida Southern College, October 28-29,

2018. They have also been diligent in

securing powerful sessions for the 2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference in Tampa, January 9-12.

FCNAfME, FMSA and FCMEA to colfrom educators who have impacted music and for music supervisors and collegiate music educators to provide resources to

assist college students who are pursuing higher education. This conference was received very well and included great

«« Success in Your First Year «« Music Education Now and in the Future «« Parent-Booster Groups «« The Arts Connect Us «« Music for All «« Advocacy Presentations «« Meet the Music Supervisors «« Breakout Sessions Our

2019

FMEA

Professional

diversity and dialogue with participating

Development Conference will be filled

our conference included:

legiate students’ learning. We invite

constituents. Some of the topics during

with opportunities for furthering col-

FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION

Cathi Leibinger, President

g. j: having meanin mean•ing•ful adificant, relevant, important, Synonyms: sign rposeful worthwhile, pu purpose useful quality or or t n ta or p im s, having a seriou ingful” s rich and mean ve li r ou g in ssed ak “m not directly expre is at th g in h et m so communicating

I

t is with utter disbelief that I look at my calendar and realize how close we are to the midway point of the school year. This is year number 30 for me, and each one seems to go by faster than the last. I know that everyone is in that same, somewhat

frenetic pace as we start looking ahead to holiday concerts, solo/ensemble, jazz and concert MPA season and even recruitment for the 2019-20 school year. We rush around to get so much done, but the to-do list just seems to get bigger. It is easy to get bogged down in the details of what we do; I challenge everyone to get back to the why of what we do.

At the 2018 FBA Summer Conference, Allan McMurray, our keynote speaker, led attendees on a guided rehearsal through

An American Elegy by Frank Ticheli. He told the story of how the piece came to be and the meaning behind certain musical elements presented. When the rehearsal ended, there were tearful eyes, raw emotions and the sense that we had just recon-

nected to our young musician selves who at some point decided we never wanted to live a day without music. We understood that we had participated in something meaningful. In the words of Hans Christian Andersen, we remembered that “when words fail, music speaks.”

In a world of fear and uncertainty, I challenge you and your students to make some beautiful and meaningful music every

day. It could be as simple as a beginning trombonist finally finding second position or an intermediate clarinetist finally

understanding how all those pinky keys work. Both are indeed beautiful things, to be sure. In addition, as you work with

your students to play what is on the page, work even harder to play what is not on the page. Create a musical environment that encourages emotional as well as musical growth. I truly believe that what we do matters, but why we do it is more important than we can even imagine.

40    F l o r i d a

Music Director


FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION

Rosemary Pilonero, President

everyone to attend our sessions that will

«« Our Business Meetings «« An Advocacy Session «« Music Supervisors Dialogue «« Special Collegiate Sessions and more

include:

The arts, especially music, are import-

ant and viable means within the curriculum for educating students in our

schools. It is imperative that we continue

“I

t’s the most wonderful time of the year!” This festive time of year is also a very busy time for music educators. We are all in the midst of planning and

performing holiday events, but let’s try to take a moment and enjoy it. These are

the special times when our students shine and we are gifted with opportunities

to share with our school families what we do every day in our classrooms. After all of the rehearsals, it’s now show time!

The FEMEA Executive Board has been busy preparing for our own big show

to ensure that music is explorative and

time in Tampa. This year’s all-state season has been extra busy due to our addi-

engaged in attending and listening to

director, Jennifer Sullivan, who took care of much of the organization, regis-

that parents, as well as students, are concerts. We should develop strategies with community outreach programs that

will help offset budget cuts that can potentially harm music’s existence. Look for model programs in your area that emphasize process over product.

In closing, music completely trans-

forms a child`s mind and opens up end-

tion of Northern and Southern Regionals. Special thanks to our FEMEA executive tration, fees, online processing and paperwork for these premiere events. I am happy to report that they were a wonderful success! In Northern Regional, there

were 30 students in the choir and 38 students in the Orff ensemble. In Southern Regional, there were 98 students in the choir and 43 students in the Orff ensemble.

By creating these ensembles, we were able to give 209 students a very special and

unique experience. Congratulations to the students and teachers who participated in these events!

Thank you to our talented conductors: Barbara Sullivan Mansfield (Northern

less possibilities to his or her learning

Choir), Eldean Hagans and Le Ann Hasker (Northern Orff), Lu Anne Leone

develop each student’s individual focus

appreciate everything you did to make this such a positive and memorable expe-

potential. As music teachers, we must of study and be reminded of the impact

that music provides to students who enter the classroom prepared to learn.

I strongly urge each chapter to develop

(Southern Choir) and Sandy Lantz and Gretchen Wahlberg (Southern Orff). We rience for the students. I would also like to give special thanks to our district

chairpersons for all of their diligent work in making these events run smoothly and processing paperwork in such a timely manner.

Now that Regionals are completed, we focus on Tampa. Our all-state coordi-

activities and projects through work-

nators, Robert Todd and Holly Mullenix, have been working tirelessly to ensure

dent government association, organiz-

students and teachers! I know that both groups will have stellar performances

ing with your administration and stuing chapter meetings, hosting speakers/

panelists, developing portfolios, hosting recitals/festivals, increasing chap-

ter growth, establishing communication with faculty and staff and other service organizations, serving at middle/high

schools, fund-raising and thinking out of

a positive experience for our all-state students. Congratulations to the all-state

under the direction of Dr. Kelly Miller (Chorus) and Michelle Przybylowski and

Cyndee Giebler (Orff). Be sure to attend both concerts, which will be held in TCC Ballroom A. The All-State Elementary Chorus will perform Thursday at 1:45 pm,

and the All-State Orff Ensemble will perform Friday at 1:30 pm. If you have not yet taken the plunge to have students audition for these honor groups, this would be a perfect opportunity for you to see them in action.

Please be sure to vote for our next FEMEA president-elect. We have two out-

the box with new initiatives that support

standing candidates, Ashley Peek and Joani Slawson. Voting will be done online,

component is also reaching out to those

be held for FEMEA Districts 1, 3, 5 and 7.

music on your campus. The collegiate Florida colleges/schools that are current-

and results will be announced on Saturday in Tampa. Online elections will also If you have not already secured permission to attend the conference, I encour-

ly not active. If there are schools that

age you to ASK. The worst that can be said is NO, but the best could be YES, so

how to become active, please contact me

Best wishes for a joyous holiday season, and I look forward to seeing everyone

would like additional information on at shelby.chipman@famu.edu.

Best wishes for continued success.

you have nothing to lose by making the request. in Tampa!

December 2018

41


CommitteeReports

DIVERSE LEARNERS COMMITTEE Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD Chairwoman

2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference Sessions: Addressing Diversity in the Music Classroom

T

his month I would like to preview the following 2019 FMEA sessions and the speakers who will present on these important topics of diversity and inclusion. Last month I previewed two of the disability topics: Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder

and Students With Behavioral Challenges. Other diversity session topics covered at the conference will be developmental disabilities, LBGQT and culturally responsive teaching. I hope to see you there! All-Star Lessons: Music Fun From Your First Year

Working With Students Who Have

Paul and Lorraine McLaughlin

Lee Commander

Daytona Beach, Florida

Friday, January 11, 2019

1:45 pm–2:45 pm

Tips, resources and strategies to help instrumen-

All-Star lessons and activities you can transfer from the class-

band programs. This session will include how to design lessons,

that work, including all students from pre-K to adult. Bring

useful resources and video examples.

Improvisation ideas that spark creativity.

Transporting LGBTQ

Teaching Music to Students With

Concert Attire and More

Alice Hammel

Braeden Ayers & Ryan Aguirre

Friday, January 11, 2019

Friday, January 11, 2019

Students with ASD have unique learning needs. They may

This presentation will focus specifically on the accommoda-

cation and behaviors. Strategies for use in meeting those needs

other out of the classroom situations. This topic has left many

Teaching Gen Ed/ESE and Beyond

Disabilities in the Band Classroom

RJ Longstreet Elementary School,

Leon High School, Tallahassee, Florida

Thursday, January 10, 2019

1:30 pm–2:30 pm, TCC 3

TCC, 5

tal music teachers better serve learners who have disabilities in

room to the stage. Learn arranging and scoring techniques your principal instrument, and see how you can be a star.

develop materials and adapt instruments. It will also include

Students: Overnight Trips,

Autism Spectrum Disorder

With LGBTQ Students

James Madison University

Florida State University

11:45 am–12:45 pm, TCC, 9

2:45 pm–3:45 pm, Waterside, Meeting Room 1

display a range of challenges affecting social skills, communi-

tions of LGBTQ students during overnight trips, concerts and

in music settings will be emphasized during this presentation.

educators without answers on how to handle these delicate sit-

The Artistry of Culturally Responsive Teaching

all students.

Pinellas County Schools

Music Class With the “Bad” Kids

11:45 am–12:45 pm, TCC 5

Hickory Tree Elementary School,

is more than black and white.

Friday, January 11, 2019

some of the most challenging schools in Pinellas County are

Are you having trouble connecting with stu-

ally funded Elevate ARTS grant share their successful strategies

will provide tips and lessons on how to build relationships with

academic gaming, interactive sample lessons and digital assess-

building, leadership skills and empathy, all while incorporating

Lisa Lehmann & Jeanne Reynolds

uations. We will provide attendees with tools to be inclusive of

Friday, January 11, 2019

Steve Reid

Culturally responsive teaching

St. Cloud, Florida

Learn how music teachers in

4 pm–5 pm, TCC 3

finding success with diverse populations. Teachers in the feder-

dents in your class who have challenging behavior? This session

for creating culturally responsive classrooms with the use of

at-risk students and how to have conversations on character

ment tools to build relationships in their classrooms.

music.

42    F l o r i d a

Music Director


EMERGING LEADERS COMMITTEE

RETIRED MEMBERS COMMITTEE Cynthia Berry, Chairwoman

Mary Palmer, EdD, Chairwoman

W

F

hat the world needs now is …

MEA will host our 75th Professional

a cadre of strong leaders for

Development Conference, January

music and arts education. Leaders

9-12, 2019, at the Tampa Convention

in our schools, in our communities

Center. The home page

and in our governing bodies are making a difference in what’s possible and are

of the FMEA website

guiding others toward what’s valuable and essential. Leadership is a relative word

lists the specifics of the

and can relate to someone who leads masses of people as well as to someone who

conference,

leads only a handful.

future

If you’re a leader or you’re interested in leadership, please join FMEA emerging

dates.

and established leaders at the January FMEA Professional Development Conference.

including

conference

This convention is

Get acquainted with the FMEA Emerging Leaders program and with each other at

a wonderful way to get r e a c q u a i n t e d

our Coffee and Conversation time (Thursday, 7:45 am–10:15 am). Everyone is welcome

with old colleagues and to meet new

… and past Emerging Leaders are encouraged to join us.

ones, to get recharged and reconnected.

Don’t miss our popular PechaKucha (Japanese for “chit chat”) session in which

With more than 250 clinic sessions and

each speaker has only five minutes and 20 slides to share a “big idea” (Friday,

concerts offered, there is sure to be some-

2:45 pm–3:45 pm). We could liken the format to Ted Talks on steroids! Ten of our

thing of interest for everyone.

current FMEA Emerging Leaders, from all levels and areas of K-12 music instruc-

I have had the opportunity to take a

tion, will share ideas/practices that could rock your world. These presenters will

look at the titles and descriptions of the

cause us to think about the continuum of music education and how to expand our

clinics offered this year. Each component

professional relationships in meaningful ways.

has quite a variety of selections. Clinics

«« Jessica Barker (Duval County) will spell s-u-c-c-e-s-s “on a cart.” «« Pablo Elias-Rodriquez (Osceola County) has a band within a band that allows students to explore playing secondary instruments. «« Cristina Hernandez (Palm Beach County) looks at the perceived tension between “teaching to the test” and developing artistry in music making. «« Christina Johnson (Palm Beach County) shares a long-term lifeline for new teachers. What’s her secret? «« Find out how Mary Johnson (Brevard County) makes every student a welcome learner in her classroom. «« Andrew Bajorek (Osceola County) focuses on navigating the usual hurdles in order to achieve deeply meaningful goals. «« Karista MacRostie (Palm Beach County) might ask What’s in a name? She shares tips on arts education as an important component in her STEM school. «« John Weatherspoon (Palm Beach County) will share “artistry in motion” as he guides us to feel the “flow” of meter in music. «« Tami Williams (Broward County) will “get techie” to align with the 21 century! «« Danielle Wright (Polk County) will share how “sticky notes” contribute to a

in artistry, sight reading, student teach-

having you join us!

few colleagues and learn something new.

Here’s what’s happening:

ing, string vibrato, time management,

literature choices, diversity, score study, body mapping for the musician, jazz, students will special needs, musical composition, pedagogy, Orff techniques, guitar,

recorder and assessment are among the listings. There is always something new to discover.

The 22 all-state groups and other per-

forming ensembles include everything

from elementary choirs to college ensem-

bles. Each of the general sessions will include internationally known guest

speakers and a variety of musical performances.

Remember that retired FMEA mem-

st

bers receive free registration to the conference—but you must register.

We hope to see you this year. Even if

positive learning environment.

you can just come and visit for the day

Whether you are a seasoned or an emerging leader, we are looking forward to

or the afternoon, you are sure to see a What could be better?!

December 2018

43


CommitteeReports

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

Carolyn Minear, Chairwoman

A

s a member of your professional organization, a core benefit

is participation in the annual FMEA

Professional Development Conference.

We are fortunate that Florida has one of the largest and most prestigious con-

ferences of its kind. The primary focus of this event is to enhance your musical

and pedagogical knowledge as well as to promote collegiality and collaborative

exchange. How can you take full advantage of this growth opportunity? Below

in advance, between sites and within

attending concurrent sessions. Plan

ence experience.

glance review of 250+ sessions and

have learned. Be curious: choose at

the conference locations. Make a first-

are some tips to maximize your confer-

events and make a tentative schedule based on your core choices.

PREPARATION: Make a plan to avoid the stress and time required at

«« School: Arrange for leave, make sub

the last minute.

plans and take care of all required

student and parent communication

«« Personal: Are you registered? Are housing and transportation secured? «« Professional: Map out the many venues now, prior to holidays and breaks.

PARTICIPATION: Make intentional choices to grow your musicianship

«« Sessions: It is impossible to attend

and pedagogy.

all sessions, even within your area of expertise. One way to maximize your learning is to divide and con-

quer with a colleague or colleagues

a time to meet and share what you

least one session outside of your comfort zone to explore. Be willing to

adjust your tentative schedule in the

«« Rehearsals and Performances: Observe moment.

all-state rehearsals within your area

and beyond. The conductors are nationally noted artists, so surround yourself with excellence in teaching

and musicianship and reflect on how you can transfer their knowledge and

2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference & All-State Concerts

Featuring more than 300 exhibitors sharing information, products and ideas

t s e t a e r g e h t f Vis i t one o perience s! learning ex

44    F l o r i d a

Music Director

EXHIBIT HALL HOURS Thursday: 12 noon-6 pm Friday: 10 am-6:30 pm Saturday: 9 am-1 pm


MULTICULTURAL NETWORK Bernard Hendricks, Chairman

skills to your setting. Fill your soul by

attending performances and all-state

D

ecember is upon us, meaning that winter concerts, holiday celebrations,

«« Exhibits: When you attend the exhib-

events presents another great opportunity for all of us to show off the diversity

its, be curious! Chat with the vendors

in our programs and in our communities. As you are preparing for these joy-

able to chat with you. They can assist

the forefront. Be careful when it comes to programming literature that is appro-

goals for your school program. Grad

areas about which you may feel a little timid. Have fun and enjoy the season!

Instruments? Materials? Furniture?

Florida’s collegiate NAfME students from all over our state at their annual fall

concerts.

performances and parades are just days (or hours) away. Each of these

who have paid for their space to be

ous events, make sure you continue to keep your performance fundamentals at

you with your short- and long-term

priate for your students’ playing ability. Ask colleagues for input, especially in

school? Summer study? Repertoire?

On another note, last month I had the opportunity to address several of

«« Connections: This is your conference, Technology? It’s all there!

conference in Lakeland. I’m really excited and encouraged about the future

so plan a specific time to connect

knowledgeable, energetic and eager to join the workforce here in our state. My

conference is for you. Reconnect

with one of our colleges and/or universities and to take the time to befriend a

reach out to new colleagues. Attend

I believe that if we extend a hand to them, they will be encouraged to stay in

celebration times (preferably during

the music is one part of the profession, but the relationships we build with stu-

the crowds or make reservations in

I wish all of you a very blessed and relaxing holiday season. Make sure you

of music education in the state of Florida. These young people are talented,

with your students; the rest of the

encouragement to all of us who are out there working is to make a connection

with colleagues you treasure and

future music educator. These young people are willing and ready to learn, and

school receptions, plan meals and

our great state and have long, illustrious careers just like many of you. After all,

non-standard meal times to avoid

dents, families and colleagues is what really makes music education so special.

advance!), chat with the persons sit-

get that quality family time, and I look forward to seeing everyone in Tampa

ting near you during sessions and

come January.

feel free to approach leaders who are

«« Gratitude: It requires thousands of delighted to share.

hours to plan and implement this

many-faceted conference. The vision and work required is an act of love. Thank the FMEA staff for the count-

less hours required on logistics, the state and component board members for their vision and service and the hundreds of colleagues who

volunteer their time and talents in large and small ways. Finally, the

poet Robert Burns reminds us that the best-laid plans can go awry and

require flexibility in the moment. As

challenges arise, breathe deeply and remain solutions-oriented. Think of ways to improve the conference experience for all. Join your colleagues in

planning and participating in future conferences. See you in January!

December 2018

45


46    F l o r i d a

Music Director


December 2018

47


ResearchPuzzles for music teachers

What helps us quickly remember a melody and notate it?

D

ictation class. I can still remember my college theory professor playing a melody on the piano and my efforts at notating it correctly, and that was over 45 years ago. What was your strategy?

Nathan Buonviri,1 in an article recently released online, confirms some of his prior research in this

area.

He used what is called a “within subjects” design to examine three strategies. Undergraduate music

majors (N=44) completed dictation for nine melodies under three conditions: Condition 1 (“You must RESEARCH COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN

Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami

not make any audible sounds as you complete each example”); Condition 2 (“You are welcome to make

any audible sounds that may help you complete the examples accurately”); and Condition 3 (“Sing [the melody] back aloud on any syllable you wish, and then write it in the blank measures”). He varied

the presentation order of the conditions to eliminate potential biasing for treatment order. Students’ answer sheets had two notated measures of chord progressions followed by two blank measures of musical staff for each exercise. Dictations were scored for pitch and rhythm accuracy (2 points per beat, 16 points per melody, 48 points per condition).

Buonviri used a repeated measures analysis of variance to compare the mean scores of the three

This on-going

column seeks

to stimulate

awareness of

research issues for

FMEA teachers

and researchers.

conditions. Students’ mean score performances in Conditions 1 and 2 (silence and audible sounds)

were statistically equivalent, and these mean scores were higher than in Condition 3 (singing).

Buonviri also scored students’ singing. Few students (n=8, 18%) were able to sing all three melodies accurately during Condition 3. This result highlights the often-noted disconnect between perception

and production. Students’ singing performances had more inaccuracies than their written dictations, but these two skills were somewhat related, according to his Spearman rank-order correlation calculation (rs =. 44).

So, singing back the melody seems to have impaired dictation performance. Both skills rely on some

form of short-term memory for melody, and apparently, singing back does not necessarily reinforce

that memory. Buonviri notes that prior research about students’ vocal and instrumental backgrounds is inconclusive—vocal majors are not necessarily better at dictation.

Making some sound can help; 36 of the students (82%) made audible sounds, “humming the tonic

and members of the tonic triad, softly whistling or humming at the speed of their writing hand, and

spot-checking pivotal notes within the melody with their voice as they notated” (p. 7). And staying quiet is equally effective.

These results suggest that instructors could encourage a variety of approaches, as long as the tactics

don’t disrupt other students. Perhaps kinesthetic strategies could help (e.g., right-hand valve combinations for brass players or left-hand fingering for string players), though Buonviri did not explore this kind of strategy. Endnote

1 Buonviri, N. O. (2018). Effects of silence, sound, and singing on melodic dictation accuracy. Journal of Research in Music Education, OnlineFirst, https://doi.org/10.1177/0022429418801333

Email your questions and feedback to d.coffman1@miami.edu with a subject heading Research Puzzles. Your questions, if selected for publication, will remain anonymous.

48    F l o r i d a

Music Director


F L O R I D A M U S I C E D U C AT I O N A S S O C I AT I O N OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE BOARD President..............................Kenneth Williams, PhD 3610 Beauclerc Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 521-7890; kenwms@fmea.org Past President........................John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College 3209 Virginia Ave.; Fort Pierce, FL 34981 (772) 462-7810 johnsouthall@fmea.org President-Elect....................... Steven N. Kelly, PhD College of Music, FSU 128 Housewright Bldg.; Tallahassee, FL 32306-1180 (850) 644-4069; Fax: (850) 644-2033 skelly@admin.fsu.edu FBA President.................................. Cathi Leibinger Ransom Everglades School 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; president@fba.flmusiced.org FCMEA President..................... Stacie Rossow, DMA Florida Atlantic University 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-4230; srossow@fau.edu Florida Collegiate NAfME President.......................Jennifer Luechauer Florida State University, 2220 Sandpiper Street Tallahassee, Florida 32303 (954) 643-1149; jll14e@my.fsu.edu Florida Collegiate NAfME Advisor................. Shelby R. Chipman, PhD FEMEA President.......................Rosemary Pilonero The Villages Elementary of Lady Lake 695 Rolling Acres Rd.; Lady Lake, FL 32159 (352) 751-0111; rosemary@femea.flmusiced.org FMSA President......................................Scott Evans Orange County Public Schools 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; scott.evans@ocps.net FOA President........................................Jason Jerald Blake High School 1701 North Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33607 (813) 272-3422; jason.jerald@sdhc.k12.fl.us FVA President.................................Thomas Jomisko Manatee High School 902 33rd Street Ct. W.; Bradenton, FL 34205 (941) 714-7300; jomiskot@manateeschools.net Member-at-Large....................................Ted Shistle Douglas Anderson School of the Arts 2445 San Diego Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32207 (904) 346-5620; shistlet@duvalschools.org EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Historian/Parliamentarian Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793 kdsanz@fmea.org Executive Director...............Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD Hinckley Center for Fine Arts Education 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793 kdsanz@fmea.org

FMD Editor-in-Chief......... Mark A. Belfast, Jr., PhD Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5104; mabelfast@seu.edu FSMA President...........................Craig Collins, EdD College of Arts & Media, Southeastern University 1000 Longfellow Blvd.; Lakeland, FL 33801 (863) 667-5657; cscollins@seu.edu FMEA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSONS Awards............................................... Debbie Fahmie Fine and Performing Arts Resource Specialist Osceola District Schools (407) 870-4904; fahmied@yahoo.com Budget/Finance, Development........................Kenneth Williams, PhD 3610 Beauclerc Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 521-7890; kenwms@fmea.org Committee Council.......................... Debbie Fahmie Fine and Performing Arts Resource Specialist Osceola District Schools (407) 870-4904; fahmied@yahoo.com Conference Chairman...........John K. Southall, PhD Indian River State College 3209 Virginia Ave.; Fort Pierce, FL 34981 (772) 462-7810; johnsouthall@fmea.org Contemporary Media...............David Williams, PhD University of South Florida 4202 E. Fowler Ave., MUS 101; Tampa, FL 33620 (813) 974-9166; davidw@usf.edu Diverse Learners.................Alice-Ann Darrow, PhD Florida State University Music Education and Music Therapy 123 N. Copeland; Tallahassee, FL 32306 (850) 645-1438; aadarrow@fsu.edu Emerging Leaders....................... Mary Palmer, EdD 11410 Swift Water Cir.; Orlando, FL 32817 (407) 382-1661; mpalmerassoc@aol.com FMEA Corporate & Academic Partners...Fred Schiff All County Music 8136 N. University Dr.; Tamarac, FL 33321-1708 (954) 722-3424; fredallcounty@aol.com Government Relations.............Jeanne W. Reynolds Pinellas County Schools, Administration Bldg. 301 4th St., SW, P.O. Box 2942; Largo, FL 33779-2942 (727) 588-6055; reynoldsj@pcsb.org Multicultural Network..............Bernard Hendricks Ocoee High School 1925 Ocoee Crown Point Pkwy.; Orlando, FL 34761 (407) 905-3009; bernard.hendricks@ocps.net Professional Development............. Carolyn Minear carolynminear@fmea.org Research.................................Don D. Coffman, PhD University of Miami d.coffman1@miami.edu Retired Members................................Cynthia Berry 1341 Dunhill Dr.; Longwood, FL 32750 (407) 310-1254; cberry1314@gmail.com Secondary General Music........................Ed Prasse Leon High School 550 E. Tennessee St.; Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 617-5700; prassee@leonschools.net

Student Leadership............................. Ian Schwindt Titusville High School 150 Terrier Trail S.; Titusville, FL 32780-4735 (321) 264-3108; schwindt.ian@brevardschools.org

Executive Director........................ Jennifer Sullivan 1750 Common Way Rd., Orlando, FL 32814 (321) 624-5433; slljenn@aol.com

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE

President.................................................Scott Evans Orange County Public Schools 445 W. Amelia St.; Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 317-3200; scott.evans@ocps.net

Exhibits Managers........... Byron and Bobbie Smith 4110 Tralee Rd.; Tallahassee, FL 32309 (850) 893-3606 fmeaexhibits@fmea.org Local Co-Chairman.................................... Ted Hope Hillsborough County Public Schools School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us Local Co-Chairwoman.................Melanie Faulkner Hillsborough County Public Schools School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4461; melanie.faulkner@sdhc.k12.fl.us FLORIDA BANDMASTERS ASSOCIATION President.......................................... Cathi Leibinger Ransom Everglades School 2045 Bayshore Dr.; Miami, FL 33133 (305) 250-6868; president@fba.flmusiced.org Past-President...................................Jason Duckett Bartram Trail High School 7399 Longleaf Pine Pkwy.; St. Johns, FL 32259 (904) 343-1999; pastpresident@fba.flmusiced.org Executive Director................................ Neil Jenkins Florida Bandmasters Association P.O. Box 840135; Pembroke Pines, FL 33084 (954) 432-4111; Fax: (954) 432-4909 exec@fba.flmusiced.org FLORIDA COLLEGE MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION President.................................. Stacie Rossow, DMA Florida Atlantic University 777 Glades Rd.; Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-4230; srossow@fau.edu Past President........................Patricia Fleitas, PhD pfleitas@fau.edu President-Elect...........................................John Ash ashj@cf.edu FLORIDA COLLEGIATE NAfME President................................... Jennifer Luechauer Florida State University, 2220 Sandpiper Street Tallahassee, Florida 32303 (954) 643-1149; jll14e@my.fsu.edu Past-President............................Michael A. Gabriel Florida State University (561) 762-0016 mgmagabriel@gmail.com FLORIDA ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION President....................................Rosemary Pilonero The Villages Elementary of Lady Lake 695 Rolling Acres Rd.; Lady Lake, FL 32159 (352) 751-0111; rosemary@femea.flmusiced.org Past President.................................... Marie Radloff marie.radloff@ocps.net

FLORIDA MUSIC SUPERVISION ASSOCIATION

Past President............................Angela Hartvigsen ja.hartvig@comcast.net Treasurer.................................................... Ted Hope Hillsborough County Public Schools School Administration Center 901 E. Kennedy Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33602 (813) 272-4861; ted.hope@sdhc.k12.fl.us FLORIDA ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION President................................................Jason Jerald Blake High School 1701 North Blvd.; Tampa, FL 33607 (813) 272-3422; jason.jerald@sdhc.k12.fl.us Past President......................................Valerie Terry vterrymusic@gmail.com Executive Director........................Donald Langland 220 Parsons Woods Dr.; Seffner, FL 33594 (813) 502-5233; Fax: (813) 502-6832 exdirfoa@yahoo.com FLORIDA VOCAL ASSOCIATION President.........................................Thomas Jomisko Manatee High School 902 33rd Street Ct. W.; Bradenton, FL 34205 (941) 714-7300; jomiskot@manateeschools.net Past President.............................Carlton Kilpatrick ckilpat444@gmail.com Executive Director.............................. J. Mark Scott 7122 Tarpon Ct.; Fleming Island, FL 32003 (904) 284-1551; fva.scott@gmail.com Financial Officer..........................................Jo Hagan 8975 San Rae Rd.; Jacksonville, FL 32257 (904) 379-2245; Fax: (904) 379-2260 business@fva.net CENTER FOR FINE ARTS EDUCATION STAFF 402 Office Plaza Dr.; Tallahassee, FL 32301-2757 (850) 878-6844; Fax: (850) 942-1793 Executive Director...............Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD kdsanz@fmea.org Director of Operations............................Valeria Anderson, IOM val@fmea.org Business Manager & Special Projects...................... Richard Brown, CAE richard@fmea.org Technology Director.........................Josh Bula, PhD josh@fmea.org Public Affairs & Communications Coordinator......Jenny Abdelnour jenny@fmea.org Marketing & Membership Coordinator.....Jasmine Van Weelden jasmine@fmea.org

December 2018

49


ExecutiveDirector’sNotes FMEA Executive Director Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

Elections Are Over … Now the Work Begins!

M

usic is in the air throughout December. Holiday performances offer our students, parents and commu-

nities a chance to spread the joy of music and music making. INVITE your school board members and

legislators to hear your fabulous concerts. Elected officials make so many decisions that impact our lives and the lives of our students.

The mission

of The Florida Music

Educators

Association is to promote quality, comprehensive

music education for all Florida students as a part of their complete

education.

Government Relations and Advocacy

Election Day has come and gone, and it certainly wasn’t short on surprises this year. In the coming months,

we will also have a commissioner of education appointed. There are some returning and some newly elected

senators and representatives, as well as school board members. Please introduce yourself to them and become an active constituent.

Now the work begins. The FMEA Executive Committee and advocacy chairperson will join with the Florida

School Music Association (FSMA) and Florida Art Education Association (FAEA) executive committees and

advocacy chairpersons on December 3, 2018, to meet with the Capitol Hill Group to discuss the upcoming 2019 Legislative Session. We will determine our legislative platform and strategies to address this year’s proposed legislation.

Please be diligent and well informed on the upcoming session and the bills that may have an impact on your

classroom. Know your legislators, and volunteer to talk with them on behalf of music education.

The 2019 Legislative Session will run from March to May. Please stay informed; check the FMEA website for

ongoing updates during the session.

ARTISTRY: Teaching and Performing

The 2019 FMEA Professional Development Conference and All-State Concerts are right around the corner! Register now to attend. Don’t miss early registration! 2019 FMEA Preconference

The 2019 FMEA Preconference promises to inspire you in the New Year. Here are some highlights:

Dr. André Thomas, Owen F. Sellers professor of music, director of choral activities and professor of choral

music education, Florida State University, will present the keynote address. Dr. Mark Belfast, associate pro-

fessor of music education and assistant dean of the College of Arts & Media, Southeastern University, and Mr. Kenneth Boyd, director of bands, West Orange High School in Winter Garden, Florida, will conduct a session To Be or Not to Bop: Practical Jazz Techniques Every Director Ought to Know. Dr. Carlos Abril, professor of music

education and director of undergraduate music education, University of Miami, will focus on Movement in the Music Classroom. Ms. Shelby Montgomery, director of orchestras, George Jenkins High School and Lakeland Highland Middle School in Lakeland, Florida, will present Let’s Get Rock’n: Rock Orchestra. Student Leadership

Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser will present sessions for student leaders beginning on Wednesday, January 9, 2019, so

make plans to bring your students to this annual event.

Enjoy the many opportunities to attend holiday concerts in our schools. Please remember to take time to

spend quality time with your family and friends during the winter break. See you in January!

All the best, Kathleen D. Sanz, PhD

50    F l o r i d a

Music Director


December 2018

51


Florida Music Director - December 2018  

Lessons learned from teaching in a low-socioeconomic high school, What helps us quickly remember a melody and notate it, and information abo...

Florida Music Director - December 2018  

Lessons learned from teaching in a low-socioeconomic high school, What helps us quickly remember a melody and notate it, and information abo...