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TALENTED FACULTY PRODUCE THOUGHT-PROVOKING WORK As part of an initiative funded by the Dean’s office in 2007, faculty with MacEwan’s School of Communications and Fine Art program have created five enlightening endeavours.

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The first project is a touching story that serves not only as a documentary of an illness, but also as an artwork with a social purpose. Design Studies Motion Image instructor, Bob Lysay, and Fine Art instructor, Agnieszka Matejko, collaborated to produce The Space Between You and Me, an interactive video installation that looks at teens with visible disabilities, and in particular, Tourette Syndrome. Inspired by a mutual acquaintance, a fourteen-year-old girl who recently developed the life-altering syndrome, Lysay and Matejko hope to bring awareness to the disorder and alter attitudes towards those with visible disabilities. Aimed at a younger audience, the installation will be taken directly to high schools and in the process expose teens to video art, modern dance, and installation art. Lysay and Matejko hope the project will change paradigms of illness, specifically neurological disorders.

Next, making its debut this past summer, MacEwan Design Studies faculty Paul Saturley, Constanza Pacher, and Curtis Trent teamed up to debut an exhibit entitled A Vessel and its Cargo. This show looked at the content of photographs and the relationship of subject, photographer, and viewer. Scot Morison and Geo Takach, Professional Writing instructors, created documentaries on longstanding personal interest issues. Morison’s project entitled Ana Falastini, is a one-hour triptych that documents his recent visit to the Palestinian Territories and Israel in search of signs of peace. He has been to the region for extended periods seven times over the past 30 years, and lived in the city of Ramallah on the West Bank with his family for a year in 2000. Takach’s project, Will The Real Alberta Please Stand Up, was inspired by a continued fascination with the history, psychology, and ethos that he says makes

Albertans a bit different from fellow Canadians. The one-hour documentary aims to define the soul of the Wild Rose Province and its place in Confederation. Finally, Fine Art Chair and instructor, Cherie Moses, has produced a powerful audio environment piece called OtterWoman Breathing. The project is based on the dialogues of a former fine art student, Brenda Jones (OtterWoman), with her mother and grandmother. Jones discusses the chronic illness that has taken away some of her breathing capacity, her desire to communicate some wisdom for future generations, her mixed heritage, and how that plays into her thinking. Juxtaposed and interwoven with Jones’ words will also be the story and the history of the First Nations name given to her: OtterWoman. For more information on A Vessel and its Cargo exhibit, visit www.inkriver.com/vessel

1. CONSTANZA PACHER PHOTO; 2. PAUL SATURLEY PHOTO; 3. CURTIS TRENT PHOTO; 4. PAUL SATURLEY PHOTO. ALL PHOTOS FROM A VESSEL AND ITS CARGO EXHIBIT.

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Talented Faculty