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Claire Whitt, University of Denver, USA “ONE ASPECT OF STUDYING ABROAD that I have found to be quite different from life back at home in the States are my interactions with the locals. Back at home, it seems fairly normal or a part of our cultural to smile at someone passing by on the street or even addressing them personally with a friendly "Hello". Here in Maastricht, Netherlands, I have noticed from my personal experience that it is a bit different. I rarely find someone who smiles at me on the street or even acknowledges that I am there. At first, I was taken aback by this because I automatically thought that passers-by could tell I was not from here and that made me a bit self-conscious. After a while though, I came to realize that it is nothing against me at all. I had become so influenced by the lens that I came over here with from America that I was unable to see past that and realize that anytime something is different, it's not a bad thing at all. In fact, it's a great

learning experience that opens you up to a whole new world that may be different from the one you grew up in, but can become your home in no time.”

Addison Corriher, Duke University, USA “IN THE NETHERLANDS, unlike in the US, biking is safe (no helmets required). It is the safest, easiest way to travel in a Dutch city like Maastricht because there are bike lanes and car drivers are always aware of bikers. Every public building has its own bike rack too. I love this about Holland, because riding a bike is easy and fun and fast. I ride my bike to class, to the store, to the train station, and many other places. In Maastricht, biking is a way of life. When I return to the US, I will definitely miss my bike and the safe, convenient transportation.”

CES Newsletter Fall 2011  

CES Newsletter Fall 2011