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FRANCESC PASCUAL I TORRENS T 0034 627 902 958 CESCPA@ME.COM CARGOCOLLECTIVE.COM/SOMEHOWDESIGNER

This was a White Cube.

STUDIO GIL NAKAR


I was very impressed by how Tel Aviv bauhaus style buildings look like. I used to relate this kind of architecture with a “white cube” since the examples I know tend to be well preserved and respect the original form that was planned. In Tel Aviv they have a different point of view relating history and architecture which leads to a different respect or consideration about conservation, renovation and intervention. The way they customize the buildings in which they live is a statement about owning the private space. No elements such balconies, carpinteries, facade color, etc, are required to be respected. This generates a texture of altered shapes, colors and differences that change the original shape of what would be a very regular and kind of boring city due to the lack of history. There must be something very social related to the lifestyle of the community like the Bauhaus style, as we know it in Europe, does not fit with Tel Avivians. This general texture defines the city and becomes a rich element of the city landscape and culture. Life inside the buildings can be understood as a slow but continuous explosion. Life damages the white cube and make it useless. After the explosion it becomes the circumference that englobes different units with diffent rithms and functions. But there is also something too devasted in Pinsker 23 that claims for a renovation, asking for a new beginning as life always continues. The work of Baltazar Torres is a great way to explain the explosion as a need of the subject. The human being is frequently forced to deal with architectures that are not suited to their requirements. Torres shows individuals fighting with structures or being adapted to them. This is what Tel Avivians do. Gordon Matta-Clark treats and concieves buildings as indications of cultural complexity and specific societal conditions in an urban fabric. His work is a good parallel with the slow explosion as his work starts in “finished” projects showing that architecture is not static, is always unfinished. Simple cuts make new space without building it. This two examples and others from Dionisio Gonzalez, Bernaud Smilde and André Komatsu helped me to position myself in front of this renovation project learning from the explosion. The only goal at this starting point is not to start from zero. This building requires an evolution instead of a new start. The first step was to sketch a program. As a table of contents i tried to organize domestic activities and their related, or unrelated, domestic areas following as rails elements such public or intimate, loud or quiet, bright or dark, warm or cold and big or small. All of them are conditioned by natural obstructions as the limits of the building or the south and north facade. Once defined both the concept and the program I did a research of referents including art pieces and architectural projects in order to get new ideas and translate them into real shapes before starting to make the plans. Not just the images I selected but also some quotes of the artists become a manifesto of what I want to do with the building. This research helped me to enlarge and fortify the concept. I took from Gordon Matta-Clark the will to construct open and permeable space rather than closed, aestheticised elitist space. Graham Hudson’s work explains how, as buildings go up and down they have potential to be art. He talks about this idea of the unfinished, of architecture yet to be. I tried to do something similar, something that still maintains this potential. The studio Lacaton&Vassal always works in a similar way. They quoted, talking about one project, “It will be beautiful tomorrow”. I love how they program, how randomly everything becomes likely to change. There must be parts of the program left undefined, ready to be changed by users and time. Joris Van de Moortel works with assimilation of very different materials. Using a method he creates “beautiful violent cocktails”. The architectural interpretation of his work leads to an eclectic language which is very interesting in terms of renovation. Nuria Fuster talks about the balance and how fundamental it is to combine brutal and elegant in same scenes while the creative process. After this research I constructed a working model of the structure of the building with a big hole in the middle and parts of the balconies. I painted it black due to comunicate the idea of one unique piece. This piece is what I want to maintain of the existing state. So my concept became an intervention divided by 3 steps: select, erase and insert. Since the program was already sketched I had to define the user, define the materials I wanted to use and start planing at the same time of developing the 3 steps, going back and forth. This first model is an abstract of the two first steps. It shows nothing but what is there now except some parts that have been removed. This two steps generate space without building new one, change previously established relationships, and turn itself into an open, permeable and ready to be intervened building. At this point it just lacked the third step but I needed to define the users and the materials I was going to use. I wanted to concieve the building as a space for a segment of population which is not very new but there is not a lot of architecture designed for their lifestyle and sometimes they have to arrange other options like sharing a “family” flat. They are the Single Professionals, a segment which has been growing for 20 years. They tend to live in cities, usually abroad or considering the chance to do it. Even they could afford to live alone lots of them chose not to do it. So I wanted Pinsker 23 to become a place for this segment. A place for sharing but also a place where you can hide yourself from the outside. So while inserting the program on the plan I needed to think both the first program sketch and the well defined user. Regarding the materials I chosed 5 elements to be inserted and repeated inside the existing-altered piece. Dry white walls to draw and close the new program. U-glass for the exterior perimeter of the kitchen and bathroom. Technal sliding windows to connect the units with the balconies. Steel grating is used to create the extension of the balconies and to make the hole transitable. And white 5x5 tiles for the showers inside the units, wall and floor. The result of the plan is the combination of very public areas, as the kitchen, common spaces or the roof top, with the private units and some spaces in between like the shared balconies which become closed semi public space or the corridors concieved as transit spaces that can become used for any random given need. The movement inside the building is designed to be free and eliptic. This is provided by the existence of stairs in each extreme and the corridors that link them on each floor. What I can not define, and I expect to be the most interesting part, is how final users would redefine and customize the space making it richer, colorful, and alive. As Lacaton&Vassal, I expect it to be beautiful tomorrow.


living (somehow) together Renovation of an old Tel Aviv Bauhaus piece into a sharing based program building.


This is a White Cube.


This is how I imagine the building in its original shape.


Life happens as a slow but continuous explosion from the inside.


Life damages the cube.


This is how I see the building now.


BALTAZAR TORRES


The White Cube does not work anymore. Now it’s time to learn from the explosion.


GORDON MATTA CLARK


BALTAZAR TORRES


DIONISIO GONZALEZ


BERNDAUT SMILDE


ANDRÉ KOMATSU


GORDON MATTA CLARK


Towards a program.


FLATMATE ¶ BUILDINGMATE


less privacy short term comunication sharing tolerance saving new values networking family exposing feelings upscale living tedious respect brothers flows long term randomness hiding feelings malleability temporal amusing bad smells


BRIGHT ROOF WORKSHOP ROOM BAR PATIO

PATIO

LIVING

BALCONY DINING

BAR

LOUNGE KITCHEN STUDIO

COLD

ROOM

SMALL BALCONY

WORKSHOP CLOSET

BATH

TOILET ARCADE LAUNDRY PANTRY WAREHOUSE DARK

CINEMA


escape partying dreaming dancing socializing sleeping laughing

PUBLIC LOUD sheltering

eating

messing playing reading laundry storage

tidying

googling skyping working

WARM BIG

eating resting napping clothing

storage

tidying crying fail

hygiene reading sleeping dreaming praying

laughing messing having sex escape

INTIMATE QUIET


Natural obstructions.


SOUTH

NORTH


Translating the concept into shapes or this is how I want it to be.


“What I find interesting about containment is that it can explode. I do not want to conserve something like beans in a tin can. The work is an assimilation of all kinds of different materials, all relatively innocent, but together they become a beautiful violent cocktail. By using a method, like framing and capturating, I try to get the work in a scream position, in a silent shock. The work has to deal with itself and its environment.� JORIS VAN DE MOORTEL


“All of the pieces are abstractions of something figurative. The work deals with a human relationship with the world we have created. I am interested in making forms that initially appear alien and then reveal something very recogniziable. The works address some of the ways in which we are inept and failable. Often the figurative forms are truncated and incomplete, as a sign of their insufficiency. The notion of ourselves as only partially intact is unnerving and becomes grotesque. The use of motion is central to my work. The movement is very slow and often takes a few seconds to notice. The rate of motion mimics a slow and strenuous inhalation an exhalation.� CHARLOTTE BECKETT


“The balance of Kubrik’s films has always fascinated me; how he can combine in the same scene things seemingly opposite. I think the existence of balance between brutal and elegant is fundamental during the creative process, between separate worlds. I consider domestic space the space where we constantly leave residues and threats about who we are. Our domestic space, our utilities, work tools, habitat, etc, are constantly transforming. Everyday we change the world in a imperceptible way.”

NURIA FUSTER


“Permanence is an illusion. As buildings go up and down they have the potential to be art, abstract and unusable. As floors, windows, handrails, etc. are added - a building becomes safe for human occupancy, and it loses that potential and becomes architecture.�

GRAHAM HUDSON


“The mobile nature of the east and west facades enables the house to change from its most closed to its most open state according to the need and desire for light, transparency, intimacy, protection and ventilation. The inhabitable part of the house can vary according to the seasons, from the smallest (living room and bedrooms) to the largest area, by integrating the entire garden in high summer. Architecture will be straightforward, useful, precise, cheap, free, jovial, poetic and cosmopolitan. It will be beautiful tomorrow.�

LACATON & VASSAL


“The point is to re-elaborate reality using our capacity for recollection. My architectural structures are not peaceful. They are usually precarious, supported by ropes or slightly leaning on the wall. Everything seems to be on the verge of collapse. Their sheltering quality looks dubtuous. They pose a threat to anyone who approaches them.�

JACOBO CASTELLANO


“I am attracted by the fissures desintegration creates on matter. I want the places I photograph to be seen as fragile organisms, as a body. I needed to find a place closely linked to the private life of the individual; an emotional architecture; a space the individual world consider as a natural container of personal development. There was also a relationship between interior spaces and memory. People tend to link our experiences, our relationships and our memories with a specific place, because we need to organize ourselves as related to somewhere. A place is needed for something to become memory.�

ANTĂ?A MOURA


“Existing features like exposed concrete and brickwork have been left intouched while new circulation has been added. It fuses modernism with the city’s storied past.”

NHDRO


“These sculptures began as the purely conceptual idea of attacking a pre-existing artwork to create a new work. Something improved or added to by destruction. I started out with the intention of drilling holes in the face and head of stone-cast sculptural busts, but once they were hollowed out I was surrounded by dust. It occurred to me that another layer of insult to the act would be to remix the stone, and pour and sculpt it back into itself. The pouring mimicked the visceral bodily functions of vomit or a melting of the form. From the destruction creation. �

HARRY BURDEN


“We intended for the places of transition between interior and exterior to become thick boundaries composed of small scale buffer zones or almost-rooms providing the dwelling with a richer variety of spaces.”

LÓPEZ RIVERA


“Abortive building projects are the ‘fruits’ of two to three decades of fruitless chase after a future, an opportunity, desires and dreams in a liberated society, at a time of seemingly limitless economic expansion. Buildings can be aborted, so can projects. Plans may be aborted. so may hopes. Ties between people could be aborted, so could relationships. Life, i guess should not be aborted.”

ANOTHERMOUNTAINMAN


“From the start, the exercise involved defining the intrinsic qualities of individual housing, with a view to adapting them to collective living. Four such qualities seemed to be essential: Quality of use, Circumnavigability, Individualisation, Neighbourliness. Loggias, balconies and landings are all external spaces that extend the useful surface area and provide this invaluable impression of living outdoors.�

KOZ ARCHITECTS


What I want to keep or playing with the structure.


Defining the users.


Rise of Single Professionals aged 18-35 high level of education potent icon of change associated with caracteristic lifestyle more concerned with their careers than in “settling down� unencumbered by personal commitments tied to specific locations available both geographically and temporally ability to put down roots in any area

Inherent Tension conflict between personal and professional life desire to develop / maintain couple relationships both coming from the competing demands of the labour market

Flexible Living Arrangements single-person household becoming very common in young professionals due to the increasingly difficulty of achieving and maintaining couple relationships disengaged from famnily or community life risk of social isolation develop of support networks based on shared interests rediscovery of communal living combatting the possibility of loneliness shared household living traditionally associated with students young professionals are now emerging as a key constitutent of the shared-housing market unrelated persons / peers they often can afford to live alone, yet chose not to do it individuals decide that the benefits of living alone do not justify the expense householders with higher incomes appear to be more attractive housemates ready access to a social life for time-constrained and geographically mobile employees positive impact on the dynamics of their future couple households importance of compromise and the protection of personal space it may be supposed that they gain specific benefits from living in shared households anyway in the majority of cases this is not suposed to be a permanent way of living


Ethel, 35 Brussels, Belgium. Artist living and working in tel aviv long term

Elinor, 24 Zurich, Switzerland. Art History student living and working in tel aviv long term


Sasha, 27

Bryan, 34

Santa Cruz, California.

Los Angeles, California.

Social psychologist

Media consulter

thesis student 4 months

living and working in tel aviv long term

Francesc, 25 Barcelona, Spain. Designer exchange student 6 months


Chosing materials.


The program on the plan.


Open Public Movement

Closed Quite public

Private Units


living (somehow) together Renovation of an old Tel Aviv Bauhaus piece converting into a sharing based program building.

01 BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:50 STUDIO - GIL NAKAR THE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, 2012.


living (somehow) together Renovation of an old Tel Aviv Bauhaus piece converting into a sharing based program building.

02 GROUND FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:50 STUDIO - GIL NAKAR THE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, 2012.


living (somehow) together Renovation of an old Tel Aviv Bauhaus piece converting into a sharing based program building.

03 FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:50 STUDIO - GIL NAKAR THE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, 2012.


living (somehow) together Renovation of an old Tel Aviv Bauhaus piece converting into a sharing based program building.

04 SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:50 STUDIO - GIL NAKAR THE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, 2012.


living (somehow) together Renovation of an old Tel Aviv Bauhaus piece converting into a sharing based program building.

05 TOP - ROOF FLOOR PLAN SCALE 1:50 STUDIO - GIL NAKAR THE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT, 2012.


Model views.


Less is a bore.


BALTAZAR TORRES


PHOTO SELECTION, MODELS CONSTRUCTION, LAYOUT CONCEPT AND DESIGN FRANCESC PASCUAL I TORRENS

References in order of appearance ART WORKS - LEARNING FROM THE EXPLOSION BALTAZAR TORRES, “Cuevas Urbanas - Nuevas Cartografías”, 2004 GORDON MATTA-CLARK, “Conical Intersect”, Paris Bienale, 1975 BALTAZAR TORRES, Spring round series “A tutto gas”, 2007 DIONISIO GONZALEZ, “Buraco Quente II”, 2006 BERNDAUT SMILDE, “Nimbus II”, 2012 ANDRÉ KOMATSU, “AK-47”, 2009 GORDON MATTA-CLARK, “Splitting: four courners”, 1974 BALTAZAR TORRES, Harmful Weeds series “Beehive-Love” detail, 2004 ART WORKS - ARCHITECTURE PROJECTS - TRANSLATING THE CONCEPT INTO SHAPES JORIS VAN DE MOORTEL, “Door”, 2010 JORIS VAN DE MOORTEL, “Dare”, 2010 JORIS VAN DE MOORTEL, “La Grand Verre”, 2009 CHARLOTTE BECKETT, “Coil”, 2009 CHARLOTTE BECKETT, “Curdle”, 2009 NURIA FUSTER, “Gran Via”, 2011 NURIA FUSTER, “Tercer Salto”, 2007 NURIA FUSTER, “Habitación Blanca”, 2006 NURIA FUSTER, “Segundo Salto”, 2007 GRAHAM HUDSON, “International”, 2008 GRAHAM HUDSON, “On/Off”, 2008 GRAHAM HUDSON, “The Ruins”, 2009 LACATON & VASSAL, “Latapie House”, 1993 Floriac JACOBO CASTELLANO, “Serie Corrales”, 2004 JACOBO CASTELLANO, “Desastre”, 2006 ANTÍA MOURA, “Objetos que caen de una habitación vacía”, 2005 ANTÍA MOURA, “7 de Junio”, 2005 NHDRO, “Waterhouse Hotel”, 2009 Shangai HARRY BURDEN, “Breuer”, 2009 HARRY BURDEN, “Reflective Lightning”, 2009 HARRY BURDEN, “Vomitoria”, 2009 LÓPEZ RIVERA, “VPO Sant Andreu”, 2007 Barcelona ANOTHERMOUNTAINMAN, “Lanwei”, 2006 Hong Kong KOZ ARCHITECTES, “Les Nids”, 2008 París

PRINTED IN BARCELONA - AUGUST 2012


This is not a White Cube anymore.

THE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT ISRAEL, DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR DESIGN - SPRING 2012


living(somehow)together