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MARCH 2012 / VOLUME 6 / ISSUE 03

NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC ANALYSIS Should GCC firms springboard to the wider region?

INTERVIEW The man behind the UAE’s oldest, largest practice

LEARNING CURVE Inside Capital Gate, Abu Dhabi’s pioneering leaning tower by RMJM for ADNEC


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MARCH | CONTENTS

MARCH 2012 VOLUME 6 ISSUE 03 2

FRONT

Top stories in the world of architecture including the world’s tallest tower in Baku

12 THE BIG PICTURE With new high-rises springing up, Doha’s skyline is always changing

6 PROJECT A round up of the latest project news from MENA and the rest of the world

14 ANALYSIS

20

OPINION Hisham Youssef says the reliance on foreign experts will remain at an all time high

Should GCC fi rms target opportunities in the wider Middle East?

22

FEATURE

34

COVER STORY

MEA discovers the mindboggling spaces inside Capital Gate

Can modular design save time and money, while still allowing freedom for designers?

46

CASE STUDIES

58

THE WORK A detailed reference section covering the projects MEA has looked at in recent

64 LAST WORD

Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Towers, an Islamic foundation in Dubai and Foster + Partners’ latest scheme

62

CULTURE Cool products, clever ideas, and some of the latest gadgets in the design world

Tom Bower, Middle East MD for WSP, on Saudi, BIM and future opportunities

www.designmena.com | 03.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

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FRONT | MARCH

12,500

Number of glass panes on Abu Dhabi’s Capital Gate (p34)

BAKU REVEALS WORLD’S TALLEST TOWER DESIGNS Kilometre-high Azerbaijan Tower could trump both Burj Khalifa and Kingdom Tower

185

A developer in Azerbaijan has unveiled plans to build the world’s tallest building, eclipsing Dubai’s 828m-tall Burj Khalifa by a full 27%. Property company Avesta said its 185-storey 1,050m superscraper, tentatively named the Azerbaijan Tower, would form part of a chain of 41 artificial islands in the Caspian Sea, with construction scheduled to start in late 2013. The tower would also surpass the Kingdom Tower, the 1,000m+ building set to begin construction in

2

TOTAL NUMBER OF STOREYS

The tower will be part of a chain of artificial islands.

Jeddah in the first quarter of this year.Last month, Jeddah Mayoralty gave the official goahead for the tower. The superscraper will house a business centre at the heart of the Khazar Islands project, to be located 15 miles south of the Azerbaijan capital Baku. According to one online report, an official application for the Azeri project had yet to be made to the State Committee for Construction and Architecture.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

The committee’s deputy chairman Dovlatkhan Dovlatkhanov, told financial newswire Fineko, “As far as we know, the investor has already hired an architect, who has designed the initial sketch of the project.” Dovlatkhanov remarked that the building is “technically feasible” and that “more detailed information will be provided after the fully developed project has been reviewed by specialists of the State Committee and the Ministry for Emergency Situations’s evaluation committee.”


MARCH | FRONT

US$1BN

6,000

Schools needed in Saudi Arabia

Total value of Etihad Towers (p46)

(p22)

Broadway y Malyan braced for Abu Dhabi redundancies The Abu Dhabi office of Broadway Malyan is considering making up to six redundancies, following the completion of several of its major projects in the region. A ‘review’ of the Abu Dhabi operations is taking place, despite

The firm designed schools for ADEC.

the recent approval of the practice’s masterplan for a new 680 hectare waterfront community on Yas Island . Ian Apsley, director of Broadway Malyan, said: “We are currently consulting with six members of permanent staff over possible redundancies as part of a review of our Abu Dhabi-based operations.” Apsley revealed that the Abu Dhabi team expanded by 50% over the last 18 months and has now completed projects such as Al Bandar, as well as concept masterplans for Yas Island and the 10×10’ project in Iraq and seven schools for the Abu Dhabi Education Council (ADEC).

DESIGNMENA.COM • 25 essential iPad apps for interior design students • In Pictures: Islamic foundation HQ in Dubai • Summertown completes phase 2 fit-out for Siemens in Jebel Ali • Philippe Starck’s design firm Yoo signs Manila deal • Broadway Malyan braced for Abu Dhabi redundancies

WEIRD PROJECT OF THE MONTH A 33-storey waterfront complex in Guangzhou, inspired by a ‘lucky’ golden coin, has received criticism in the Chinese and international media. Once completed later this year, the brash building will be used as a warehouse, public information space and research centre.

Siemens’ Masdar HQ wins Future Office Award Siemens’ Middle East Headquarters at Masdar City, designed by Sheppard Robson, won the MIPIM Architectural Review Future Office Award. Currently under construction, with completed due at the end of 2012, the building is pitching for LEED Platinum status. Commenting on Siemens’ project, the judges said: “This is a thorough investigation of the design of large floorplate space in an extreme climate, with a well explained proposition emerging. “The ambition for a LEED Platinum rating means the project will be followed by many designers

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26%

Sheppard Robson picks up gong.

and clients with great interest,” the jury added. Now in its tenth year, the MIPIM Architectural Review Future Project Awards celebrate innovative thinking for projects in the pipeline. The awards take place during the MIPIM commercial property market in Cannes each March.

ELSEWHERE

26%

CHINA AND ASIA

8% UK

16%

24%

NORTH AMERICA

MIDDLE EAST

www.designmena.com | 03.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

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FRONT | MARCH

60 SECOND INTERVIEW PEOPLE

Abu Dhabi partner honoured by AIA

Hadid will work in the city of her birth.

Hadid to design Iraq central bank HQ Star architect Zaha Hadid signed an agreement to design the headquarters for the Central Bank of Iraq, at a ceremony in London, UK. Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) will immediately begin the design process to develop a symbol for Iraq, on the shores of the Tigris River in Baghdad. ZHA will lead the construction team which includes Adams Kara Taylor, Max Fordham, Newtecnic, DEGW, Gross Max, Davis Langdon, Arup, Warringtonfire, Winton Nightingale and A2. Hadid said: “I am deeply touched that I have been asked to design the new headquarters for the Central Bank of Iraq. “I was born in Iraq and I still feel very close to it. I feel very privileged to be working in Iraq on a design of such national importance,” she added.

2022 will contribute to a 10% growth in th the the hos region’s hospitality and tourism ssector.” HASSAN AL THAWAD THAWADI, secretary secreta gene general of the Qat Qatar 2022 Su Supreme C Committee

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Steven Nilles, partner in charge of Goettsch Partners’ Abu Dhabi office has been elevated to the elite College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Nilles specialises in the technical design of high-rise buildings and has worked on projects throughout the UAE, Saudi Arabia, USA, China, the Czech Republic, Germany and Poland. The fellowship programme recognises architects that have made a significant contribution to the profession, with just over 2% of AIA’s 80,000 members receiving the top honour. Goettsch Partners has offices in Chicago, Shanghai and Abu Dhabi. Five other architects from the firm received AIA fellowship in the last year.

IBRAHIM MOHAMMED AL JAIDAH, MD, ARAB ENGINEERING BUREAU

How is buisiness for AEB? “The biggest challenge for us at AEB is being able to cope with demand. There is a lot of work coming in for us. I think we get more exposed to projects because we are a local firm, and we are also active in many different sectors, such as transport.”

How would you describe Doha’s architecture? I believe that a new school of Arab architecture has emerged that is driven by sigs nature architects from around the ery y world. Doha is very o much a paradise for ll a as sstudents d n architects, as well that are studying the subject.

What will Doha be like in 2022? “I’m dreaming that, by the time of the World Cup in 2022, Doha will be a beautiful, state-of-the-art city in terms of transport and sustainability. It will have all the facilities of a modern city. Yet, crucially, it will also maintain its identity.”

Nilles is among the top 2% of members.

The whole environment in s improved. Doha has The city will develop into one of the best orld, and in the world, what we are doing port of the is in support ion.” 2030 Vision.” Atkins Middle dle East chief executive RICHARD ICHARD BARRETT

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

People think sustainability and being costconscious are not ot two things you can do simultaneously, sly, but I do not think nk they are mutually ly exclusive.” TIM BOWER, WSP Middle East Managing Director


FRONT | MARCH

MENA PROJECT SNAPSHOT 2

3

1

1 LEBANON

2 ABU DHABI

3 SAUDI ARABIA

Allies & Morrison reveals Beirut district

Midfield terminal awaits main contractor

Space-age mall set for KSA’s Al Ahsa

UK-based Allies and Morrison has revealed its design for District//S, a high-end complex on the edge of Beirut’s historic centre. It contains 22 new buildings with 109 apartments and a network of pedestrianised public spaces – a piazza, a sunken garden and a series of lanes with cafes, shops and galleries. Buildings are clad in stone and feature large timber shutters – a response to the traditional Lebanese balconies and shutters.

The Midfield terminal complex at Abu Dhabi International Airport is awaiting the appointment of a contractor to start construction. Ground works have already commenced on the project, designed by US-based firm Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF). The terminal was approved last month by the emirate’s executive council. It features large, unimpeded internal zones for passengers with long-span arches supporting a 50m-high roof.

UK consultancy Capita Symonds has unveiled its futuristic mall design for Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia. Revealed on World Architecture News, the 121,000m2 proposed development will contain three levels with key anchor stores at either end and a ‘lifestyle street’ that connects to the existing urban fabric. The project features a sweeping glazed roof with traditional Arabic patterning. It is due for completion in 2014.

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FRONT | MARCH

GLOBAL PROJECT SNAPSHOT

1 2

3

1 CHINA

2 SINGAPORE

3 UGANDA

Jagged library design proposed for China

Libeskind showstopper set for March opening

Plans unveiled for Africa’s tallest tower

Hong Kong and Shanghai-based 10 Design has drawn up a striking proposal for a library in Dalian, China. With a site area of 45,400m2 and a gross floor area of 55,400m2, the mass is shaped by views into the site and out towards the sea and mountains. The façade of the library is a dark grey brass that will change colour over time, but will have a natural resistance to the marine conditions and harsh weather.

A huge waterfront residential complex, designed by star architect Daniel Libeskind, will open in March in Singapore. Situated at the entrance to historic Keppel Harbor, Reflections at Keppel Bay is the architect’s largest residential project and first in Asia. The 20-acre site comprises 1,129 luxury apartments divided among six high-rise towers and 11 low-rise villas. No two floors are the same in shape and size.

A 222m-tall tower has been proposed for the Ugandan capital Kampala, which would make it the tallest tower in Africa. Designed by UK-based consultancy Capita Symonds, the 60-storey tower will contain more than 100,000m2 of office and retail space for up to 12,500 people. A public plaza at the entrance will create a new centre for events. The project is currently under review by the Ugandan government.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


FRONT | MARCH

GLOBAL PROJECT SNAPSHOT 1

3

2

1 TAIWAN

2 USA

3 CHINA

Calatrava to pen dramatic university project

Florida votes on crownshaped pier

SOM wins Beijing mixeduse mega scheme

Acclaimed Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava was recently commissioned to design a building complex for Taiwan’s Yuan Ze University. The project will consist of a performing arts centre, an art and design school and a memorial to the university’s founder. Located at the centre of the complex, the performing arts building is defined by a dramatic curving roof that evokes traditional Taiwanese architecture.

LA firm Michael Maltzan Architecture has won a competition to redesign St Petersburg Pier in Florida. The practice’s crown-shaped design, The Lens, will now face the vote of the St Petersburg City Council. If successful it will be created in conjunction with the public over the course of the year. The Lens was deemed to be the most practical and cost-effective design gained the support of the public, with 68% in favour of the design.

US giant SOM has won an international competition to design the Beijing Bohai Innovation City master plan, a mixed-use urban district in the Chinese capital. The firm’s proposal envisages an environmentallyfriendly district along the high-speed rail line. The scheme will deliver 1,760 ha of mixed-use development, with a focus on providing a premier headquarters in the rapidly growing Bohai Rim region.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


FRONT | MARCH

THE BIG PICTURE

Doha skyline Staff photographer Lester Ali has captured the constantly evolving skyline of Doha, with its dramatic waterside setting. A solitary figure admires the view, which consists of Jean Nouvel’s cucumber-shaped Burj Qatar, the vase-like Tornado Tower and several future landmarks concealed by construction cranes and scaffolding.

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MARCH | FRONT

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NEWS ANALYSIS | HOT MARKETS

DANGER ZONE ANALYSIS

Should GCC ďŹ rms target the recovering markets in North Africa and the wider Middle East? Oliver Ephgrave investigates

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HOT MARKETS | NEWS ANALYSIS

I

n the wake of the global financial crisis, and the resulting project slowdown in Dubai, many big architecture firms use their UAE offices as staging posts for jobs elsewhere in the GCC. Yet should these UAE offices target opportunities in the wider region, such as the unstable but development-needy nations of Iraq, Libya and Egypt? Steven Miller, regional manager of Perkins Eastman, believes this is already the case. “I’m willing to bet that every firm that counts, that’s sitting in the UAE, is looking at all of the MENA region,” he asserted at the recent MEA roundtable discussion. For Perkins Eastman, a specialist in healthcare, one of the key markets is Iraq. Miller explained: “Iraq put out 40 design-build hospitals last year. They gave them to about 12 Iraqi trading companies that are licensed. They have got the money and the need, but the problem with the country is the management side of all of the public ministries.” Miller’s comments are supported by a Q1 2012 infrastructure report by Business Monitor International (BIM), which noted Iraq has US$124bn of projects currently underway or in the pipeline. It warned, however, that cracks are showing in the country’s business environment, “as weak bureaucracy threatens to undermine progress in projects.” Yet the report underlined the inherent strength of the Iraq market. “A huge project pipeline supported by infrastructure and housing projects has resulted in our strong growth outlook for Iraq’s construction industry. There is even further upside to this figure if the cabinet’s US$37bn infrastructure programme is approved by the country’s government,” it stated. According to Miller, it’s important to make alliances with Turkish contractors in order to break into the country. “Iraq is doesn’t have the Bin Ladens or the El Seifs, so they are going to the Turks. It’s a great way to

Phil Dalglish, Buro Happold (left); Steven Miller, Perkins Eastman (right).

get in. Everything we do in Iraq we do with Turkish contractors. We have just closed the deal for a 750-bed hospital in Baghdad. The Saudi guys that are financing it understand the cost and the business model,” he opined. However, Phil Dalglish, director for Buro Happold, said Iraq is viewed with trepidation at his firm. He added: “Iraq is very much a mystery market for us — it’s still very much infrastructure and huge housing developments. Some of the projects are being developed from this area — from Abu Dhabi developers. That’s an interesting connection.” Dalglish said this is also the case in Libya. “The Qataris and Abu Dhabi developers want to influence what is going on. There are going to be developers pushing that way because there are better opportunities.” According to BMI’s Libya Infrastructure Report 2012, reconstruction of the war-torn country is estimated to cost between US$200bn and US$480bn over ten years. This is creating “huge potential opportunities for construction companies,

many of whom are competing to get a head start and curry favour with the new Libyan leaders.” It noted that social infrastructure is a priority: “Reconstruction priorities will include public and social infrastructure that provide crucial services, such as healthcare, education, electricity and water supply. Repairing transport infrastructure will also be crucial to getting the economy back on track.” Nigel Craddock, design manager for Stride Treglown, believes it will take time before Libya offers real opportunities. “I was living in Libya for six months and I know that it’s got a lot of potential. Yet this year is about positioning yourself. I don’t think anything meaningful is going to come out of Libya until they start governing,” he said. Yet Miller replied: “You’ve got to start positioning yourself, because it’s a very small society. If you’re not in, you won’t get in. There’s only six million people in the whole country. He continued: “In Libya, we are already getting invited. Between the

“I’m willing to bet that every firm that counts, that’s sitting in the UAE, is looking at all of the MENA region. Steven Miller, regional manager, Perkins Eastman

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NEWS ANALYSIS | HOT MARKETS

French and the Americans, I’ve never seen governments be so proactive in getting professionals into Libya. They are getting visas and everything. The US government has already had three trade missions just to do with architects. They put us into groups of specialism. The French were there right after the last bomb was dropped.” Dalglish added that, similar to Iraq, Libya is viewed with caution at Buro Happold. “Libya is one of those markets where as a business we’re happy to look at the opportunities, but only if they pay us our million pounds first. “The amount of work we have to do to profit on that million is substantial. A lot of firms are thinking that. There’s absolutely no transparency there and the contracts are not worth the paper they are written on. Unless you are getting paid outside the country and you know where the funds are coming from,” said Daglish. Another consideration for western architects in Libya is the language barrier, according to Craddock: “The language is critical — it was the only place I’ve lived where I really had to learn Arabic.” Miller agreed the language is a challenge for English speakers. “The language there is tough. If you speak to people in English, they’ll answer you in Italian or French. There’s no consistency other than the Arabic language,” he added. Aside from Libya and Iraq, Miller points towards opportunities in Morocco and later down the line, Egypt. For Morocco, BMI forecasted a GDP growth of 3.9% per year from 20112016, underpinned by the country’s expenditure on infrastructure. However, BMI’s short-term outlook for Egypt is far less optimistic. A November 2011 report on the country stated: “The government is struggling to meet immediate demands and the banks are unwilling to lend to infrastructure projects while political uncertainty persists.”

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Commenting on Perkins Eastman’s North African workload, Miller said: “We’re doing five monster projects in Morocco. I am going out of my mind. I’m sharing that western part of the MENA region directly with my counterpart in New York. It’s too much.” Dalglish questioned whether it is better to serve North Africa from Europe or the Middle East. “We are looking at North Africa, but we’re doing it from Europe rather than the Middle East. I question whether there is legitimacy in basing yourself in the Middle East and spring-boarding to these countries.”

Nigel Craddock, Stride Treglown.

Miller retorted: “The legitimacy is due to a similar culture and the language. But when I’m in Morocco I feel that I’m closer to France than Dubai. All our drawings have to be in Arabic

The reconstruction of Libya could cost US$480bn over ten years.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


HOT MARKETS | NEWS ANALYSIS

and French. We have a translating ďŹ rm in Paris. Every company has to decide how they are going to deal with it.â€? Stride Treglown’s Craddock added: “With Libya, they want to bring in international architects and all of their knowledge - it really doesn’t matter if they’ve come from Europe or the Middle East.â€? Another reason for conducting North African business from the GCC, according to Miller, is the presence of the movers and shakers in the area. “If you’re here [in the GCC] you can do the business with the guys that count — the people that write the cheque are in this region,â€? he remarked. Craddock agreed: “I know from working with Qatari Diar that they have huge investments in Libya employing architects and contracting companies from Dubai. It’s interesting the way the money is ying around the system. You can be an architect in Dubai working for a Qatar sovereign wealth fund on a project in Libya. That’s the way the world works.â€?

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17


COMMENT | EDITOR’S LETTER

PIE IN THE SKY EDITOR’S LETTER

Baku seems to have forgotten that big can be beautiful

GOT A COMMENT? If you have any comments to make on this month’s issue, please e-mail oliver. ephgrave @itp.com

T

his month’s big news, quite literally, was the report that Baku is planning to trump the Burj Khalifa and the Kingdom Tower with the 1,050m-tall Azerbaijan Tower. Baku is certainly on the rise, in more ways than one. The largest city on the Caspian Sea is experiencing a resurgence in its oil economy and has mounted a bid to host the 2020 Olympics, up against the likes of Istanbul, Tokyo, Doha and Madrid. In the short-term it has several projects and events in the pipeline, including a new airport terminal designed by Woods Bagot and a flash stadium, Crystal Hall, by German fi rm gmp. This year, the arena will

stage the much-loved but oft-ridiculed Eurovision Song Contest. It appears, from the efforts being made on the ground, that the Azerbaijanis are taking the Eurovision rather seriously. Yet Baku’s proposal for the world’s tallest tower is far more significant than its hosting of a dodgy singing competition. The brainchild of developer Avesta, the 185-storey Azerbaijan Tower would form part of a chain of Dubai-style artificial islands in the Caspian Sea, with construction scheduled to start in late 2013. Looking back through history, the buildings that have held the world’s tallest crown have possessed

The Azerbaijan Tower is gunning to reach 1,050m.

Looking back through history, the buildings that have held the world’s tallest crown have possessed something special.”

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

something special, or interesting at the very least. The Eiffel Tower is an enduring symbol of romance, the Empire State Building is an art deco classic, the Petronas Towers is a distinctive form and the Burj Khalifa is, well, incredible in so many ways. So what does Azerbaijan Tower offer? One user on skyscrapercity. com commented that it looks like a giant lipstick. I’d say it looks more like a humongous space shuttle with a bad paint job. Either way, it’s certainly not beautiful or interesting. Instead it is clunky and nondescript. Yes, it’s over 1km in height, but that doesn’t mean that style and panache has to go out the window. The Burj Khalifa showed the world that extreme height can be elegant. The intricacy of Adrian Smith’s tower is captivating, and this will surely be replicated in the upcoming 1km-tall Kingdom Tower in Jeddah, penned by the same architect. Granted, the Baku scheme is only a concept drawing, and the fi nal design may look markedly different. But we can only hope for some really drastic revisions. One also has to question the validity of the scheme. Is it a real project, or a publicity stunt for the developer? As yet, the consultants have not been announced and it was reported that no official application for the project has been made to the State Committee for Construction and Architecture. There’s a chance it will turn out to be pie in the sky.


COMMENT | HISHAM YOUSSEF

FOREIGN LEGION OPINION

The Middle East needs international consultants

Hisham Youssef AIA, is project director at Gensler and a founding board member of the American Institute of Architects’ Middle East Chapter.

A

s with any emerging and developing economy, the GCC has attracted many foreign consultants to lead and assist in the development of master planning visions and architecture of the region. Traditionally, as emerging markets developed, the dependency on foreign expertise grew less, as the local knowledge base increased. The local professional industry matured, and quickly learned best practices brought in by foreign consultants. This, coupled with a supply of local graduates, allowed a once emerging

market to establish its own industry. In the GCC however, due to the unique demographic mix of local indigenous population and foreign nationals, we are not likely to see the end of foreign consultants for some time. Indigenous populations in the GCC, with the exception of Saudi Arabia, account for approximately 15-20% of the total population. With architectural and other related educational programmes still in their nascent stages, and the graduate volume of professionals far fewer than needed to cope with the staggering amount of projects across

Clockwise from top-left: Adrian Smith, Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, Jean Nouvel

With architectural and other related educational programmes still in their nascent stages, the reliance on foreign experts will remain at an all time high.”

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

the region, the reliance on foreign experts will remain at an all time high, and continue for some period. The majority of these foreign experts reside only temporarily, mostly for the duration of a single project, and in many cases on a rotational basis. It is perhaps not difficult to see how continuity in knowledge retention and best practices can be lost. Perhaps, the formation of several quasi-governmental professional bodies of industry leaders and educators, charged with leading project co-ordination with the foreign firms, with the intent to elevate the experience and knowledge base of the local industry, would be a way forward. This initiative would co-ordinate with regional agencies charged with the development of masterplanning visions for various countries/cities, to ensure a cohesive local approach. The intent is not to direct, regulate, or influence design. Instead, it should absorb and build a regional body of experience and knowledge of best practices to establish a regional approach for how design and execution of projects shapes the cities where we live. This would be a much needed resource to make up for the deficit in graduate numbers, and provide local access to information. With the sheer budgets proposed for development in the region, we will surely continue to see a great influx of overseas professionals, but with a local initiative that stores knowledge, the region stands a better opportunity to shape its future.


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FEATUR FE FEATURE TURE E|M MODULAR ODU LA OD LAR R DESIGN D SIGN DESI GN

BRICK BY A method that saves time and money while letting architects’ imagination run free?

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MODULAR DESIGN | FEATURE

P

BRICK

Devina Divecha investigates the idea behind modular design

erhaps inspired by LEGO, modular design is a concept that is emerging in the Middle East region. In architectural terms, it refers to a form of prefabricated building, made up of numerous modules or sections built in a remote facility, which is then delivered to the final site where it is put together. This concept has already gained a foothold in developed countries such as the US and Australia, although more so in regional areas than cities. According to Nigel Craddock, design manager, Stride Treglown, developed countries tend to have established and refined construction processes and the required manufacturing lines which enable modular construction to be a viable option. “Here in the UAE, I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s fast catching on, but it is definitely something which is becoming more relevant to more architects and projects. As contractors and manufacturing processes here evolve and refine their operations, the scope and resources for offering modular buildings as a construction alternative will grow,” he remarks. Miceál Sammon, founder, chairman and CEO, Sammon Group, says that clients worldwide continue to look for innovative solutions that add more to their projects in terms of programme and value, without compromising on aesthetics. “Designers and contractors have been at the forefront in responding to this demand, and Sammon has been at the forefront in offering clever and concise solutions globally. The concept is particularly relevant in the delivery of educational and healthcare infrastructure. For this reason, and given the significant demands across the MENA region, Sammon has already seen modular design being considered on a regular basis, for example with Saudi Arabia’s immediate requirement of 6,000 schools.” The consensus is that in the current market, new building types are still emerging, with an increased focus on

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FEATURE | MODULAR DESIGN

Schools designed by Sammon Group in KSA.

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cost and sustainability. There is also a demand for roll outs of substantial volumes of repetitive — though not necessarily identical — buildings at low cost, according to Craddock, who adds it is inevitable modular design is being discussed more. He warns against the confusion between the two different concepts of ‘modular design’ and ‘prefabricated buildings’. The latter is typically meant to be low-cost labour accommodation blocks or standardised infrastructure utility buildings. Craddock adds modular design is more than just a simple prefabricated building delivered to site, or a series of prefabricated bathroom pods or kitchens; rather it is about the intelligent interface of a set of repetitive and well-designed parts. “On the contrary, at Stride Treglown we are looking at modular construction for a number of clients in the educational sector where there is demand for well-designed, flexible,

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FEATURE | MODULAR DESIGN

A special needs school (top) and Centric Healthcare Centre by Sammon Group (below).

cost effective and sustainable buildings,” he continues. But with the concept of ‘building blocks’ as it were, is the creativity of the architect affected? A question often asked is how inventive or innovative architecture can be with modular design. The experts say it’s entirely possible and doesn’t restrict creative thought. Craddock quotes Pablo Picasso, who had said: “I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it”, and says any architect who shies away from modular design because they think it is a hindrance to creativity, needs to spend more time understanding its potential to better serve clients. “Apart from missing out on commissions, architects are probably missing out on a good opportunity to get creative and learn something new,” he opines.

Sammon agrees and adds modular design is not at all restrictive. “The skill is in how the modular elements gel together to produce a cohesive and useful building. Architects and designers, by nature, have to be resourceful and innovative, especially when presented with a challenging brief.” Craddock says modularisation offers much more versatility in design than simple prefab buildings; this depends on the size of the

modules, which in-turn affects the versatility and the scope for flexibility and variation. “For modular design you really need to reduce the building down to what we refer to as ‘a kit-of parts’,” he adds. Stride Treglown has developed a school model, called Elhaam, which uses modular construction for blocks of classrooms. It exploits the benefits of modular construction through its kit-of-parts (the basic elements of structure, frame, walls,

6,000 SCHOOLS NEEDED IN KSA

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MODULAR DESIGN | FEATURE

windows and fi xtures) that when combined together provide flexible school designs when cost, time and quality are key issues for the owners. “Circulation, orientation, lighting, colour and applied texture, as well as choice of finishes, are all key elements in success with modular design. There is more than adequate scope to draw on the architect’s creativity,” adds Sammon. While modular design affords architects leeway with their imagination, does it have other benefits? “Time is money!” says Sammon, and continues: “Modular design saves serious time in terms of programme, cutting down on site costs, eliminating waste and having an intensity in the pre-planning phases to ensure perfect co-ordination of MEP services on site.” Craddock, while in agreement, cautions against the over-use of this idea:

“In our experience, when working with the right contractors, manufacturers and suppliers, modular design can, without question, save both time and money over traditional construction methods, but it has its place and is neither applicable nor relevant in all projects.” Modular design has primarily been used to ensure quality is delivered across multiple units and to minimise construction time on site. Cost savings can be delivered if volumes are appropriate. Citing Stride Treglown’s own projects in this way of thought, Craddock adds the modular element of the Elhaam School model helps reduce design time, provides real flexibility and should help to lower cost. He says if sufficient volume was being procured — for example through the delivery of a number of these schools for a government education department — the increasing cost and time savings and quality control improvements could be realised.

Additional benefits of modular design include reliable quality control because of production occurring in factory conditions; elimination of waste over traditional construction methods, which helps in terms of sustainability; reduced time on site, which can lead to a faster ROI for the client; cost saving relative to volume delivered; and increased flexibility. Sammon adds the method also provides programme certainty, which is easier for an end-user to sell to a commercial entity who needs to be trading at a certain time, or to a school which needs to open at the start of an academic year. In addition, the fact that it’s possible to practically service remote sites is also something Stride Treglown has found important. Sammon has used modular designs with Irish Rapid Build Schools since 2007, a healthcare facility in Newbridge, and with rural schools and kindergartens in Saudi Arabia.

A school in Ireland by Sammon Group.

Circulation, orientation, lighting, colour and applied texture, as well as choice of finishes, are all key elements in success with modular design. There is more than adequate scope to draw on the architect’s creativity,” Miceál Sammon, founder, chairman and CEO, Sammon Group

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FEATURE | MODULAR DESIGN

Stride Treglown’s affordable schools model is an example where environmentally sensitive clients want sustainable buildings which are affordable, flexible, and delivered within a tight programme. “The fact that there are number of clients which fit this profile, and particularly government bodies which require the potential for volume ‘roll-out’ and wish to capitalise on the benefits of repetition, means that modular design very much has a place,” says Craddock. He believes Elhaam presents an appropriate architecture for contemporary schooling in the region and will deliver a flexible, cost-effective and sustainable learning environment for the children. The firm is currently delivering several training facilities in the UAE; a number are located in remote island sites accessible only by boat. Modular construction is playing a significant part in helping to effectively deliver those faciliESTIMATED REDUCTION ties. It has also been IN CONSTRUCTION heavily involved in COSTS WITH ELHAAM are looking at similar modular design and the SCHOOLS building types, i.e. prefabrication of building student accommodation, elements in the UK for a but also where flexibility is number of years, largely in stukey,” he adds. dent accommodation projects where Challenges in using this kind of offsite modular ‘pods’ play a huge role architecture come with the territory, in the construction process. but can be overcome. “I think one of “We have started to see more the key challenges is working within interest in the GCC from clients who

30%

Renderings of the Elhaam School model by Stride Treglown.

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Construction of a school in Ireland by Sammon Group.

the aesthetic limitations, but that’s where the architect’s creativity needs to come in and why it’s important to establish the degree and scope of modularity employed in the design,” says Craddock. It is also critical to work with the right contractor and to have an open line of communication, since the fact that there is so much off-site work can be quite disconcerting. Sammon thinks the main challenge is in selling the concept to clients and even some designers, who have a traditional mind-set and are perhaps afraid to veer away from the tried and trusted methodologies. “This is fast changing thankfully, as clients make programme demands that cannot be met utilising traditional methods of build,” he concludes.


SAS INTERNATIONAL | ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

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SAS International’s metal ceiling solutions have a lifespan in excess of 25 years.

consideration to provide enhanced occupant comfort. These acoustic ceiling systems can make a significant contribution to a comfortable environment to learn and work in. Good acoustics are essential to ensure the correct levels of privacy, speech intelligibility and sound quality are maintained throughout the building, and as a result will improve personal wellbeing. What sets them apart from competitors’ products? SAS International’s metal ceiling solutions have a lifespan in excess of 25 years with only very basic maintenance. They provide building tenants

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INTERVIEW | AHMET SAFFARINI

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AHMET SAFFARINI | INTERVIEW

HOME GROWN THE INTERVIEW

Oliver Ephgrave meets the CEO of the UAE’s largest local practice, Eng Adnan Saffarini

A

lthough its name may not be known to many western architects, Eng Adnan Saffarini (EAS), is one of the largest and oldest architecture companies in the GCC. With 550 members of staff, including 150 architects, it came third on our recent architecture Power List, behind KEO and Atkins. There’s a good reason for this army of employees — the company has designed a staggering amount of buildings, particularly in Dubai. Sitting in his office in the company’s Deira practice, CEO Ahmet Saffarini reels off a lengthy list of projects that are either completed or under construction — many of them recognisable landmarks. “We did the Princess Tower and the Elite Tower in Dubai Marina, Armada Tower in Jumeirah Lake Towers, Al Yakub Tower — the clock tower on Sheikh Zayed Road,” he says, barely pausing for breath. When asked how many schemes the company has completed, he replies: “We don’t count our projects.” Saffarini explains the background of the company: “It was established by my father, Adnan Saffarini, in Jordan in 1961. Our family moved to Dubai in 1967 and he started his own office here. After that we expanded to all

the other emirates and we now have seven offices.” The company has branched into other countries in the GCC and beyond. “The company is getting bigger day by day. We have offices in Jordan, Qatar; we’ll soon have one in Saudi Arabia, and we also have one in Kenya and Tajikistan. We approach the outside market, not only the local.” He elaborates on his role at the practice. “I’m an architect myself and the CEO of the company. I have brothers and they are civil engineers, so I take charge of the architecture side and the development of the company. We have many different fields in the company — architects, civil engineers, MEP, computer, supervision, surveying. We have all the specialisms.” High rise design is perhaps the company’s most renowned building specialism. “We designed the tallest residential tower in the world — Princess Tower in Dubai Marina. It’s very slender in proportion to the height, which is 414m. We designed it as a tube building — there were no columns in the middle, just an outside and inside shell. “This meant that the developer [Tameer] was able to change the size of the apartments during construction, according to market demand.”

Saffarini adds that the company has long been a specialist in high rise buildings. “In the 90s, we did the Number One Tower. At the time it was the highest building on Sheikh Zayed Road at twenty something floors. It is still famous today.” Other high rises in the company’s portfolio include the 380m-tall Elite Residence, a neighbour to Princess Tower in Dubai Marina, as well as the sail-like forms of the Armada Tower complex in Jumeirah Lakes Towers and the twin Angsana Hotel & Suites towers on Sheikh Zayed Road. Another longstanding area of expertise is in the villa typology. He continues: “We do many villas — this was our starting point, doing domestic work. Saffarini points at a space-age Dubai villa, built some 30 years ago. “When we did it, people said ‘who is going to live in a glass house?’ This was a change in the style of Dubai. People started looking at glass as a material. I think this was a good example,” he says. “As consultants, we tried to use new materials. First it was glass — although it is energy restrictive, it is very durable for the weather here. Then we used paint, then cladding. Number One Tower used a metallic coating — it was the first to do so in Dubai. It was a good exercise.”

From our point of view, the best market is Dubai and Abu Dhabi and the emirates. We have good rules and regulations and the infrastructure is almost complete.”

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INTERVIEW | AHMET SAFFARINI

Saffarini adds that it’s important to have niche specialisms, in order to gain an edge on competitors. “Everybody can do residential buildings, even office buildings. In 2012 our focus is on sustainable specialised buildings. We are trying to compete in the new market.” A more recent specialism is hospitals, as Saffarini explains: “We recently entered the healthcare market — we did the Saudi German hospital in Dubai, as well as hospitals in Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi and Ajman. We got accreditation from HAAD [Health Authority Abu Dhabi]. This was very limited for consultants — it was very difficult to get. “There is demand for hospitals. If you don’t compete and present yourselves as a specialised consultant then you won’t get opportunities.” Another new area of focus for the company is Building Information Modelling (BIM). Saffarini explains: “We had the recession and this is the time to rearrange your house, to upgrade. We started using BIM - it involves investment but in the rush you will not be able to do it. “It is difficult to do use AutoCAD on complicated, signature projects. The second thing is that you find many mistakes in your drawings due to the lack of co-ordination - with BIM the coordination is automatic. It also helps a lot with detailing and it speeds up the process. We consider it to be an advanced type of approach for us, especially in complicated buildings.” “Now we are using BIM for the new hospitals and we plan to use BIM for more projects, especially specialised ones. For our branches outside the UAE, we were thinking of training

the staff to use BIM as their software rather than AutoCAD. I think more and more companies will use BIM.” Refreshingly, Saffarini is positively beaming about the UAE market. “From our point of view, the best market is the Emirates. We have good rules and regulations — the infrastructure is almost complete. It is easy to do things and you can bring in any expertise. I contradict anyone that says otherwise.” He continues: “Even with this situation [the recession], this is the best market. We have the best landscape, the best airport, best taxis and an easy way of life.” When asked whether the UAE still offers opportunities for architects, he replied: “For sure, new opportunities are coming up in Dubai and Abu Dhabi. This type of country will

We had the recession and this is the time to rearrange your house, to upgrade. We started using BIM - it involves investment but in the rush you will not be able to do it.”

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always have opportunities. Until now we have been living off the jobs we get in UAE, not from outside.” Remarkably, the company’s huge portfolio was achieved without any promotion, as the firm is “not allowed to do marketing”. So what is the secret to EAS’s success? Saffarini believes it is partly down to word of mouth. “Jobs come — everybody knows us. We offer the complete package.” He also states that the firm is competitive. “If people go for us then they don’t have to use other consultants, and this saves money. One of the good things we do is trimming the construction cost. Most of our projects are completed without a change in the budget. This is important for clients. “Secondly, you have to give the client a good product. You have to remember that for the client, the building is their building. If you get the developer’s trust, he will recommend you to other people. When you trust something you will believe in it. It’s like having a Mercedes Benz car you know you can trust it.”


AHMET ROB SAFFARINI WATSON | INTERVIEW

PORTFOLIO: Eng Adnan Saffarini

NUMBER ONE TOWER, DUBAI Number One Tower was one of the first high-rises on Sheikh Zayed Road, constructed in the early 90s. The project contains furnished apartments with balconies on the solid element of the

PRINCESS TOWER, DUBAI

‘number one’ on the façade.

Officially the tallest residential tower in the world, the 107-storey Princess Tower soars 414m over Dubai Marina. The tower was built using a concrete tube structural system, with steel floor beams and a metal deck topped with three-inch-thick concrete.

HISAH AL HABTOOR VILLA, DUBAI Built in the early 1980s, this villa was the first project to introduce glass as a major façade element in the UAE. The material was embraced to create a solid-void effect.

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COVER STORY | CAPITAL GATE

THINKING DIAGONALLY Oliver Ephgrave discovers the diagrid and the mind-boggling spaces inside ADNEC’s Capital Gate, the leaning tower of Abu Dhabi

The façade contains 12,500 panes of glass, all different in shape and size,

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F

or sheer audacity and notoriety, Capital Gate is perhaps Abu Dhabi’s equivalent of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai. Although not nearly as tall, Capital Gate’s 18-degree lean is known throughout the globe, courtesy of a Guinness World Record, and

its sculpted form has made it the landmark tower of Abu Dhabi since it topped out in November 2009. Yet until the recent opening of the Hyatt hotel, the internal spaces of the mind-boggling building have remained a mystery. Thankfully, the structural pyrotechnics are not just confined to the exterior.

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Upon entering the hotel’s doubleheight lobby on the 18th floor, one notices something quite remarkable: a formidable network of criss-crossed steelwork that dramatically sprouts in the middle of the space. These huge steels belong to the diagrid structure that makes the building stand up. The large area beyond


CAPITAL GATE | COVER STORY

— occupied by hotel guests on their laptops — is actually cantilevered. The diagrid system, also used on London’s ‘gherkin’ tower and Abu Dhabi’s Aldar Headquarters, is a steel grid with diagonal support beams. Capital Gate’s diagrid has 728 elements, all unique, which are stacked and welded together. It is the world’s

first fully asymmetric diagrid. This structural complexity is clearly evident in every room, space and detail in the building. “There are 12,500 panes of glass in the facade, and not one is the same. In addition, no floor plate is the same,” explains Desiree Graesslin, marketing communications manager, Hyatt

Capital Gate Abu Dhabi. Capital Gate was developed by Abu Dhabi Exhibitions Company (ADNEC) to form the centrepiece of the huge Capital Centre project. As well as the Hyatt hotel, the tower also contains 15,000m2 of commercial office space. It was designed by Scotland-based firm RMJM.

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COVER STORY | CAPITAL GATE

Jeff Schofield, associate at RMJM, explains the concept behind the form. “The tower’s curvaceous shape draws strongly on the sea and desert — two elements that have great resonance in Abu Dhabi. “The building’s form is meant to represent a swirling spiral of sand, while the curved canopy, known as the ‘splash,’ which runs over the adjoining grandstand and rises up on one side of the building, creates a wave-like effect given the building’s proximity to the water and the city’s sea-faring heritage.” “The daring form of Capital Gate is due not only to its lean, but also to its funnel shape; it widens as it spirals upwards and outwards. It leans in such a way as to set up a tension with the neighbouring high-rises on the ADNEC site. In architectural terms, Capital Gate is designed to contrast with its surroundings in order to distinguish itself as a landmark.” Despite its need to contrast with the surrounding towers, Capital Gate’s design needed to consider the historic National Day grandstand, built in the 1960s. Lee Morris, design director for ADNEC, explains: “On the original design, the splash formed the entire roof of the grandstand. The grandstand is very important - it’s the THICKNESS OF INTERIOR UAE equivalent of a listed building,” he TUBES AT THE LOWER says, peering down at LEVELS the structure. “The solution we see now is more of a ‘needle’. It’s a lovely structure — a very clever piece of engineering as it is supporting the splash. The needle shoots out the other end as a cantilever and provides a physical link with the grandstand.” Morris adds the core was built at an angle to accommodate the lean. As the floors were poured, the building’s centre of gravity moved and pulled the core straight so the whole building moved when under construction.

600MM

Capital Gate features a stunning internal atrium.

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TECHNAL | ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

Technal adds beauty with Luméal Bahrain-based Technal Middle East (TME), part of the France-based international architectural aluminium systems supplier Technal, is promoting in the Gulf region its Luméal series of sliders that boasts slimmer frame profiles in an efficient system. Launched on the international market over the past year (2011), Luméal enhances the aesthetics of modern buildings with its sleek and minimalistic appearance while boosting their thermal and acoustic performance. The concealed-opening slider has only 68 and 77 mm of visible aluminium frames – which means around 35 per cent less of visible profiles – resulting in a higher glazed area and hence better views to the exterior. This slim design gives eight to 14 per cent more glazed area according to the applications, resulting in a solar factor (Sw) of 0.48. In addition, the window is basically integrated behind the wall and the number of visible profiles has been reduced from four to two. “Technal is the pioneer in developing concepts that offer elegance, performance and functionality,” says Hesham Kameshki, marketing and business development manager of TME. “Luméal is a product with a unique new concept that aims to revolutionise the architectural aluminium segment. It offers a versatile solution that is cost effective and ensures higher performances.” The system allows new opening configurations by combining the fixed part and sliding part, with a very slim central meeting stile (76 mm). “Luméal’s concealed opening sash concept totally moves away from the traditional sliding pocket window to create new fixed-sliding combinations,” he says. “It is, therefore, possible to produce dissymmetrical one leaf plus fixed frames, with a large section fixed and an opening section the size of a door without increasing the amount of visible aluminium mass. Additionally, Luméal can also be used to manufacture large sliding applications, up to 4.5 m in length by 2.75 m in height with two or three rails and a maximum weight load of up to 250 kg per leaf. It can accommodate a glass thickness ranging from 24 to 32 mm, which is unique.” As such, the system Inaccessible can be employed to multipoint lock

Upright central meeting stile creative concept

various applications: as a window or a patiodoor, two leaf; one leaf with one fixed panel; asymmetrical opening and fixed frames; two leaf with one fixed panel; six-leaf three-rail; four-leaf; two-leaf with two fixed-panels; and dissymmetrical opening and fixed frames.

performances of Uw equalling 1.4 W/sq m K for a two-leaf patio-door. During winter, it offers the benefit of a higher glazing surface with greater brightness, while during summer; the best solutions associate Luméal and solar protections, such as horizontal sun breakers, in order to reduce the solar summer contribution and energy savings (energy consumed by airThe patio-door conditioners). threshold allows “It has an air-water-wind easy access performance of A4-E5AVB3, and conforms to the air permeability criteria for BBC-labelled (a French accreditation for a low energy consumption building) buildings with a C4 class; it has a water tightness meeting 7a class; and wind load conforming to B3 class,” Kameshki states. Furthermore, using concealed opening technology, the system boasts the acoustic performance that far exceeds that of conventional-design sliding windows. This can be up to 37 dB (Ra, Tr) for a one-leaf, one fixed panel patio-door or 36 dB (Ra, Tr) for a two-leaf patio-door. In terms of security, Luméal has a locking mechanism that is integrated in the fixed frame, which is unique. “In a traditional slider, the locking mechanism is inside the sash and is visible; and it has a multi-point lock accessible from the outside. But in the Luméal minimal sash, the system of the locking mechanism is integrated in the fixed frame that is not accessible from the exterior. This limits the risk of break-ins,”

All applications are offered with concealed drainage, which is unique. Luméal’s sliding bay comes with multiple advantages, says Kameshki. “It is slimmer, more efficient, and its patio-door threshold allows easier access to physicallychallenged people, while conforming to regulations and maintaining tight sealing.” According to the application, the lock striker plate can be fitted on the exterior only and, where necessary, on the interior, he says. Luméal’s exceptional performance is comparable to that of a casement frame, according to Kameshki. The Luméal exterior attraction - sleek looks with many other benefits It offers thermal

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CAPITAL GATE | COVER STORY

RMJM’s Schofield also points to the atrium as a key space within the Capital Gate tower. “Architecture is about space making, and we made every effort to express the uniqueness of Capital Gate in its interior spaces. For instance, due to Capital Gate’s funnel shape, the upper half of the tower widens to create an atrium at the hotel guest room floors. “This space is perhaps the most surprising discovery the visitor makes inside the building.”

Schofield elaborates on the main challenges from RMJM’s side. He adds: “Coordinating the technical aspects of the building was the most challenging part of developing the leaning forms and spaces. The structure was developed in terms of constructability as well as stability.” He continues: “The façades were carefully designed to express the organic form of the building. Because it has an asymmetric shape, no two rooms are the same, and this presented additional coordination issues.”

Schofield reveals his personal responsibilities on the tower: “As a sustainable architect, I strove to integrate the double façades, the metal splash shading, the vegetated roofs and other sustainable aspects into the building fabric. “From the beginning of the project, we integrated these interdependent systems into Capital Gate, and the constant challenge was to maintain the spontaneity of the original concept as we developed the architectural design.” One part of the scheme that received a late redesign was the groundfloor lobby, a stripped down space dominated by a huge contemporary chandelier by Czech supplier Lasvit. ADNEC’s Morris remarks: “The elliptical theme you see now was only brought in seven months before opening. The original design was stripped back to make it much more open and relaxed. It uses simple, quality components. The marble floor is from Italy.” He adds that the ceiling was reinforced to take a load of 5.5 tonnes from the chandelier. Morris remarks: “There was the concern that the late redesign of the lobby would mean that the it wouldn’t fit with the mood of the other spaces, but I think that the team did a good job. It was a challenge getting it done in that short space of time.” Another design change, albeit much earlier in the process, was the entry level of the building. When site work commenced, it was discovered the site contains a major utility pipe for the whole of Abu Dhabi city. The government subsequently wanted the building to be six metres away from the pipe for health and safety reasons, so the basement had to be pulled back and the entire building was lifted 2.5 metres off the ground. “It is better in some ways — it elevates the building and the entrance,” adds Morris. Yet the discovery of this utility pipe would surely not have been welcome,

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COVER STORY | CAPITAL GATE

This building could not have been done 10 or 12 years ago. It took a lot of skill and commitment from the team and the client.” Lee Morris, design director, ADNEC

BUILDING CREDITS

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Owner and developer

Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company (ADNEC)

Architect and main consultant

RMJM

Project manager

MACE Int.

Main contractor

Al Habtoor Engineering Enterprises

Steelwork subcontractor

Eversendai

Glass facade installation

Waagner-Biro

Landscape architects

RMJM Strata

Interior designers (hotel)

RPW

Interior designers (office)

RMJM ID

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

considering the multitude of challenges already posed by a leaning and twisting building. As Morris flicks through a wad of plans, it’s incredible to see how the floor plate changes so dramatically as the building rises. Morris also states that there were headaches for the positioning of the MEP riser shafts. Despite the myriad complexities, the building is finished to a very high standard, with simplicity ahead of exuberance. The steelwork is barely touched, with a simple matte finish to retain its raw, muscular appeal. Another success is the Hyatt fit-out, designed by London-based firm RPW. Unlike many hotels in the region, the interiors are understated and elegant; the architecture is left to do the talking. “It’s clearly an amazing structure built using some of the world’s most advanced construction techniques, but the tower’s appeal goes beyond being and architectural and engineering marvel,” remarks Schofield. Morris adds: “This building could not have been done, 10 to 12 years ago. The biggest challenge was that it had never been done before — it took a lot of skill and commitment from the team and the client.”


your vision, our engineering SAS International, the world’s leading manufacturer of metal ceilings, partitioning and doors, room comfort systems and architectural metalwork has opened a dedicated office and warehouse in Dubai Investment Park 2. For over 30 years, SAS has supplied many prestigious projects in the Middle East, including the stunning new Aldar HQ. Involved at early design stage, SAS works with specifiers, contractors, M&E engineers and clients to deliver concepts through to installation. SAS International manufacturing facilities, accredited to ISO9001 & ISO14001, rank amongst the most modern and fully equipped in the world; our project experience and manufacturing knowledge ensures efficient design solutions meet performance, aesthetic and budget criteria.

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metal ceilings partitioning | doors room comfort architectural metalwork


COVER STORY| CAPITAL GATE

CAPITAL GATE Technical drawings supplied by ADNEC

FACADE ELEVATION This elevation illustrates the various elements of the scheme. The sinous leaning tower is connected to the historic National Day grandstand by a curved canopy known as the ‘splash’. The drawing also illustrates the tower’s 18 degree lean and the fact that the tower widens as it spirals upwards and outwards.

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CAPITAL GATE | COVER STORY

HOTEL FLOOR This plan depicts a hotel floor (level 20). The internal atrium is visible to the right of the elliptically-shaped core.

OFFICE FLOOR Compared to the plan above, the floor plate has shifted dramatically to the other side of the core. This drawing depicts the second floor.

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PROJECT QATAR BREAKING NEW GROUND, BOOK YOUR SPACE TO BE A PART OF QATAR’S MASSIVE CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS


ETIHAD TOWERS | CASE STUDY

CASE STUDY | ETIHAD TOWERS

ETIHAD TOWERS

Architect: Design by Innovation (DBI) Location: Abu Dhabi CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT

THE CONCEPT

Completed in November 2011, this mixed-use project in Abu Dhabi comprises five towers, plus an interconnecting podium, developed by Sheikh Suroor Projects Department (SSPD), and includes the Jumeirah Etihad Towers Hotel. It contains three residenTOTAL VALUE OF tial buildings, with 885 PROJECT apartments, a commercial office tower, a shopping mall, restaurants and cafés and the UAE’s largest banqueting hall. The tallest tower reaches 305m and is the city’s second tallest building.

Designed by Australia-based firm Design By Innovation (DBI), the form of the towers is said to be inspired by the white billowing sails of traditional Arab dhows and the curved blade of the Arabic sword. The Jumeirah hotel recently won the World’s Leading Hotel Award at the World Travel Awards held in Doha, Qatar. DBI managing director Warren Coyle described the building: “It is a very sculptural form, and the owner really liked that iconic style. He wanted a landmark and a statement, so we set out to give it to him.”

US$1BN

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CASE STUDIES

AL MIZHAR VVILLA Architect: AK Design Location: Dubai

PROJECT UPDATE

AL HAMRA TOWER

412M

TOTAL HEIGHT OF THE TOWER

Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait

SARAYA BANDAR JISSAH Architect: GAJ Location: Oman

SIDRA VILLAGE

1,165

NUMBER OF FLATS IN THE VILLAGE

58

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

Architect: Allies & Morrison Location: Doha, Qatar

TOZEUR RESORT

Designed esigned by US giant SOM SOM, Al Hamra Tower is a sculpted concrete skyscraper in Kuwait, valued at US$950m. The commercial complex contains offices, a health club, rooftop restaurant and a high-end shopping mall with an IMAX cinema complex and food court. Standing at 412m, it claims numerous heightbased records such as tallest building in Kuwait, tallest ‘sculptural’ tower and tallest stone-clad structure.

Designed by GAJ, Saraya Bandar Jissah is a luxury resort and community nestled within a sheltered bay where mountains meet the Gulf of Oman. Residential units and recreational facilities are located within the valleys while two luxury hotels sit adjacent to the beach. With views of a lagoon system, wadis and mountains, the housing units are oriented to follow the contours and minimise impact on the landscape.

This walled community on the outskirts of Doha will provide 1,165 flats for the nursing staff of the new Sidra hospital, as part of the Education City development. The scheme will contain a small mosque, community and leisure facilities, restaurants and cafes. Developed by Mazaya for enduser Qatar Foundation, Sidra Village is integrated within the existing street pattern.

Architect: GAJ Location: Tozeur, Tunisia

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF UTAH

3,900M2

AREA OF EXTERIOR COPPER PANELS

Architect: Ennead Architects Location: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

AL SHAQAB EQUESTRIAN ACADEMY

8,000

SPECTATOR CAPACITY OF THE ARENA

Architect: Leigh & Orange Location: Education City, Qatar

Designed by UAE based AK Design, Al Mizhar Villa is a contemporary play on the traditional courtyard houses of the Gulf region. The constraints of the long, narrow site led to the form of two ‘living tubes’ sliding past each other to create a central landscaped courtyard. The northern tube contains family-oriented functions while the bedrooms are housed in the southern tube.

Runner-up in the Hospitality & Leisure category at the 2011 Middle East Architect Awards, this boutique 63-key resort in Tunisia comprises a destination spa, a banqueting and conference centre and a cultural village. Other facilities include local craft studios, retail outlets, restaurants, nightclubs as well as an Arabian Nights outdoor dining experience and an outdoor amphitheatre.

This scheme, which opened in November 2011, provides a home for the Natural History Museum of Utah, as well as housing research facilities for undergraduates and graduates at the University of Utah. The building was designed by Todd Schliemann of New York-based Ennead Architects. He was supported by Ennead partner Don Weinreich in association with David Brems and John Branson of Salt Lake City’s GSBS.

One of the largest show horse facilities in the world, this equestrian complex covers a total area of 800,000m2. Centred around a 350m long performance arena with a double facing grandstand, it also caters for the training and breeding of Arabian horses. Officially completed in September 2011, it is being continually expanded. Leigh & Orange provided master planning, architectural design, interior design.

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LIKE WANT NEED | CULTURE

LIKE WANT NEED

GAME THE MODERN ARCHITECTURE GAME NEXT Architects

(IMAGE IN FOLDER: © NEXT ARCHITECTS)

7M

COST OF THE V VILLA ILLA

CULTURE | LIKE WANT NEED

THE WORK

THE WORK

THE WORK | PROJECT UPDATE

PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

58/60

Following the first edition launched in Holland in 1999, this revised English version is designed for a broad and international group of architecture enthusiasts. Test your knowledge of the greatest architects, their famous buildings and legendary quotes, with over 1,000 questions about architecture from the 20 th and 21 st centuries. The board game is created and produced by NEXT architects.

CULTURE

FURNISHINGS OTTAWA DINING COLLECTION Karim Rashid for BoConcept To be released in March 2012, Karim Rashid has designed a complete dining collection with BoConcept. From cups, rugs and lamps to dining table, chairs and sideboards, the collection pays homage to the time he studied design in Ottawa, Canada. It’s unusual for star designer Rashid to produce an entire collection for a company — he typically only creates one piece of furniture at a time. The Ottawa collection is said to reflect contemporary urban living and includes a table, Ottawa chair, room divider, sideboard, fingerprint rug, Ottawa pendant, Ottawa table lamp, vases, dishes and cups.

BATHROOM AXOR STARCK SHOWER Philippe Starck for Hansgrohe

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Philippe Starck’s work for Hansgrohe has a new addition. The single-jet Axor Starck manual shower provides sustainable showering; thanks to the EcoSmart technology, the water flow is limited to nine litres per minute, without impairing the quality of the experience.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 03 3 .12 | www.designmena.com www.designmena.co esignm esig sig sign ig gnm

MATERIALS ALBEMARLE WALLPAPER COLLECTION Cole & Son Named after an infamous bohemian club opened in London in 1874, the Albemarle wallpaper collection by Cole & Son evokes the glamorous and poetic era of the 18th and 19 th centuries. Each of the nine designs references a cultural icon or gem of the time. The pictured design, Coleridge, is re-coloured in chalky ground shades of stone, white, ochre and camel, with highlights of china blue, leafy green and sooty charcoal. It is available in five colourways.

APP 3DON ARCHITECTURE By 3DOn Ltd The 3DON ARchitecture app helps architects, planners and building professionals envisage their proposals in a true context. It uses augmented reality to place 3D models in position from GPS data supplied by the user. With different modes like ‘Preview’, ‘Walk’ and ‘On Site’, users have an easy way to review projects and Google SketchUp models. Free to download, the app currently works on iPhone models from 3GS onwards. Users can also pay £9.99 for unlimited model uploads for a whole year.

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CULTURE

www.designmena.com | 03.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

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ETIHAD TOWERS | CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT Completed in November 2011, this mixed-use project in Abu Dhabi comprises five towers, plus an interconnecting podium, developed by Sheikh Suroor Projects Department (SSPD), and includes the Jumeirah Etihad Towers Hotel. It contains three residenTOTAL VALUE OF tial buildings, with 885 PROJECT apartments, a commercial office tower, a shopping mall, restaurants and cafés and the UAE’s largest banqueting hall. The tallest tower reaches 305m and is the city’s second tallest building.

US$1BN

46

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | ETIHAD TOWERS

ETIHAD TOWERS Architect: Design by Innovation (DBI) Location: Abu Dhabi CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT Designed by Australia-based fi rm Design By Innovation (DBI), the form of the towers is said to be inspired by the white billowing sails of traditional Arab dhows and the curved blade of the Arabic sword. The Jumeirah hotel recently won the World’s Leading Hotel Award at the World Travel Awards held in Doha, Qatar. DBI managing director Warren Coyle described the building: “It is a very sculptural form, and the owner really liked that iconic style. He wanted a landmark and a statement, so we set out to give it to him.”

www.designmena.com | 03.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

47


ETIHAD TOWERS | CASE STUDY

THE DETAILS Naturally, the shape of the towers provided several challenges. SSPD projects director Sami Al Khuwaiter explained: “We had to look at everything from at least four angles, as the curved shape of the

building meant that each floor slab was different. Therefore the interior fit-out had to be adjusted accordingly, floor by floor.” An observation deck, at 300m, anticipated

for completion at the end of March 2012 will be operated by Jumeirah. The hotel also contains a 1,800m2, 9m-height ballroom, capable of accommodating 1,000 dinner guests.

305.3M HEIGHT OF TALLEST TOWER

THE SITE Covering over 500,000m2 on Abu Dhabi’s waterfront in the Al Ras Al Akhdar district, the scheme is close to the city’s attractive Corniche, the landmark Emirates Palace hotel and other tall buildings such as the 268m-tall Nation Towers, which are nearing completion. The five buildings are oriented to capitalise on views of the Gulf and surrounding area, including the lush grounds of Emirates Palace. Etihad Towers also features a 34,919m2 landscaped area with water elements that cover a total area of 2,626m2.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


29 - 31 MAY 2012 JEDDAH CENTRE FOR FORUMS AND EVENTS KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA

www.indexksa.com

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is welcoming INDEX for the first time The MENA region’s largest interiors and design exhibition is coming to Jeddah in May 2012! View the best international furniture, textiles, lighting, kitchen & bathroom and outdoor design products under one roof over 3 days. INDEX Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 2012 will be an unrivalled showcase of international design excellence for the Kingdom’s interior designers, architects, fit out contractors, consultants and developers from the interior design industry community who are working on the country’s most prestigious projects. Register to visit now at www.indexksa.com

Organised by

Co-organised by

Endorsed by

Venue


AMAF HEADQUARTERS BUILDING | CASE STUDY

AMAF HEADQUARTER BUILDING Architect: Lacasa Location: Dubai

CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT Lacasa won fi rst prize in a competition design for the headquarters of Islamic foundation, Awqaf & Minority Affairs Foundation (AMAF). Accordingly the design language of the, so far, unrealised project uses Islamic patterns and motifs. Functioning as an office complex, the building has been designed to provide flexible spaces that can be divided freely as per the tenant’s request. The AMAF headquarters portion of the offices itself was located in a way that layouts are arranged easily and flexibly, and with privacy and smooth service provisions.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | AMAF HEADQUARTER BUILDING

THE SITE Having analysed the solar orientation of the building, a combination of vertical screens and horizontal sun visors were incorporated into the design. “This allowed for a contemporary Islamic pattern to act both as a sun screen for Western sunlight and also to subtly symbolise a spiritual veil over the façades,” added principal designer Ihab Nayal. He added: “Addressing the BUILT UP AREA spaciousness of the site, a courtyard layout was conceived in an abstract and contemporary approach.”

111,184M2

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AMAF HEADQUARTERS BUILDING | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT Lacasa’s design attempted to disguise the enormous scale of the building. “The fi rst challenge was to break it down in scale to correlate well to the city and human scale and avoiding the creation of an ‘urban monster’,” added Nayal. He continued: “The subtle deconstructive language helped to bring 2 character without losing the overall coherence of GROSS FLOOR AREA the design. Glass sprouts out dynamically from the stone masses, opening and morphing the shells.”

62,036M

THE DETAILS Regarding the details, the ratio between glass and solid was also important. Nayal added: “This was considered to create a desirable balance between transparency for the offices on one hand, and a more urban permanency expressed in the usage of natural stone.” Another challenge was the multidisciplinary nature of the project — the AMAF headquarters required a separate entrance from the other office spaces, a food court needed outdoor access and also distancing from the other programmes, and the brief also called for a nursery, gymnasium and auditorium.

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


All the leading hospitality solutions in one place

The Hotel Show is the sole networking, supply and sourcing event for the hospitality industry in the Middle East and North Africa region, showcasing all the very latest launches and products. • • • •

20,000 sqm 420 exhibiting brands 11 national pavilions 93 visiting countries

• • • •

Prestigious Middle East Spa Awards NEW Middle East Hotel Awards Over 14,800 hospitality professionals Over 45 exhibiting countries

Register today and benefit from fast track entry www.thehotelshow.com/register Platinum Sponsor

the hotel show 15th - 17th MAY 2012 DUBAI WORLD TRADE CENTRE


Photography: Nigel Young

AL HAMRA TOWER JAMESON HOUSE | CASE STUDY

JAMESON HOUSE

54

Architect: Foster + Partners Location: Vancouver, Canada CASE STUDY

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


JAMESON HOUSE | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPTS The concept involved retaining the façade of the B-listed Royal Financial Building and the internal restoration of the A-listed Ceperley Rounsfell Building. Contrasting with the flush façade of the offices, the residential floors curve outwards in four wide bays, staggered to allow daylight to reach neighbouring buildings and oriented to provide uninterrupted views of the landscape. The flexible plan supports a variety of apartment types. Two-storey penthouse apartments and landscaped roof terraces are located at the top.

138 NUMBER OF

APARTMENTS

THE DETAILS The design was developed in response to the local climate, seasonal sun paths, prevailing winds, humidity levels, air temperatures and precipitation rates specific to Vancouver. Foster + Partners’ in-house engineering group — formerly PHA Consult — was involved from the outset. This integrated approach to environmental engineering and architectural design led to innovations such as chilled floors and a mechanised valet parking system, which reduces the number of parking levels and associated excavation, lighting and ventilation requirements.

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Do you need another reason to be there? Access to $Billion of project spend Meetings with important decision makers and influencers Regional media and public showcase for your company

2 0 1 2

The Annual Gulf International Expo for Construction

Cost effective way to reach potential new clients Convenient meeting place for clients from Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

So see you at gulfBID 2012 Organiser

24 – 26 April 2012 Hall 1 Bahrain International Exhibition & Convention Centre

Supporting Organisations

To book your stand and for further information contact the organiser at info@hilalce.com

Official Magazine

Official Business Portal

Media Partners

Supporting Journal

T: +973 1729 9123 +973 1729 3131 www.gulfbidexhibition.com


PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

THE WORK PROJECT UPDATE

AL HAMRA TOWER

412M

TOTAL HEIGHT OF THE TOWER

Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait

SARAYA BANDAR JISSAH Architect: GAJ Location: Oman

SIDRA VILLAGE

1,165

NUMBER OF FLATS IN THE VILLAGE

58

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

Architect: Allies & Morrison Location: Doha, Qatar

Designed by US giant SOM, Al Hamra Tower is a sculpted concrete skyscraper in Kuwait, valued at US$950m. The commercial complex contains offices, a health club, rooftop restaurant and a high-end shopping mall with an IMAX cinema complex and food court. Standing at 412m, it claims numerous heightbased records such as tallest building in Kuwait, tallest ‘sculptural’ tower and tallest stone-clad structure.

Designed by GAJ, Saraya Bandar Jissah is a luxury resort and community nestled within a sheltered bay where mountains meet the Gulf of Oman. Residential units and recreational facilities are located within the valleys while two luxury hotels sit adjacent to the beach. With views of a lagoon system, wadis and mountains, the housing units are oriented to follow the contours and minimise impact on the landscape.

This walled community on the outskirts of Doha will provide 1,165 flats for the nursing staff of the new Sidra hospital, as part of the Education City development. The scheme will contain a small mosque, community and leisure facilities, restaurants and cafes. Developed by Mazaya for enduser Qatar Foundation, Sidra Village is integrated within the existing street pattern.


7M

Architect: AK Design Location: Dubai

COST OF THE VILLA

TOZEUR RESORT Architect: GAJ Location: Tozeur, Tunisia

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF UTAH

3,900M2

AREA OF EXTERIOR COPPER PANELS

Architect: Ennead Architects Location: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

AL SHAQAB EQUESTRIAN ACADEMY

8,000

SPECTATOR CAPACITY OF THE ARENA

Architect: Leigh & Orange Location: Education City, Qatar

Designed by UAE based AK Design, Al Mizhar Villa is a contemporary play on the traditional courtyard houses of the Gulf region. The constraints of the long, narrow site led to the form of two ‘living tubes’ sliding past each other to create a central landscaped courtyard. The northern tube contains family-oriented functions while the bedrooms are housed in the southern tube.

Runner-up in the Hospitality & Leisure category at the 2011 Middle East Architect Awards, this boutique 63-key resort in Tunisia comprises a destination spa, a banqueting and conference centre and a cultural village. Other facilities include local craft studios, retail outlets, restaurants, nightclubs as well as an Arabian Nights outdoor dining experience and an outdoor amphitheatre.

This scheme, which opened in November 2011, provides a home for the Natural History Museum of Utah, as well as housing research facilities for undergraduates and graduates at the University of Utah. The building was designed by Todd Schliemann of New York-based Ennead Architects. He was supported by Ennead partner Don Weinreich in association with David Brems and John Branson of Salt Lake City’s GSBS.

One of the largest show horse facilities in the world, this equestrian complex covers a total area of 800,000m2. Centred around a 350m long performance arena with a double facing grandstand, it also caters for the training and breeding of Arabian horses. Officially completed in September 2011, it is being continually expanded. Leigh & Orange provided master planning, architectural design, interior design.

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THE WORK | PROJECT UPDATE

AL MIZHAR VILLA


PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

THE VERTICAL MEDINA Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Location: King Abdullah Financial District, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

THE URBAN CROSSING

2

24,678M TOTAL AREA OF THE SITE

337

TOTAL NUMBER OF APARTMENT UNITS

Architect: Aedas Location: Shanghai, China

MAYSAN RESIDENCES Architect: DWP Location: Abu Dhabi

EKO ATLANTIC CITY Architect: MZ Architects Location: Lagos, Nigeria

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MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com

The Vertical Medina is a mixed-use scheme in Saudi Arabia. It uses the traditional Arab medina city form – with its interlocking alleyways and courtyards — to create a ‘vertical network’ with residential, office and retail components. Clad in limestone from local sources, the project is slated for completion in late 2012. The top six floors has a total area of 18,000m2 and the lower seven floors has a total area of 21,000m2.

Aedas’ “boutique urban” project in Shanghai provides office and retail components, as well as a gallery, conference centre and a water promenade plaza. It is conceived to be a landmark hub with a strong civic presence and a vibrant mix of commercial and public elements. The Urban Crossing is also capable of hosting multiple major events.

Currently in the design development phase, Maysan Residences is a pair of striking residential tower buildings in the Al Najmat district of Reem Island, Abu Dhabi with an expected completion date of 2013. Designed by dwp, the project aims to achieve a 2 Pearl Rating with Estidama. The roof structure contains solar energy technology while the tower forms are devised to minimise the exposure to excessive heat gain.

This ambitious new city in Nigeria responds to coastal erosion and aims to relieve pressure on the congested city of Lagos, which is currently inhabited by 15.5 million people. Estimates of urban use predict Eko Atlantic City will be home to a quarter of a million people when complete. MZ Architects is the urban planner for the new city and will also be responsible for a number of towers in the scheme.


CULTURE | LIKE WANT NEED

LIKE WANT NEED CULTURE

FURNISHINGS OTTAWA DINING COLLECTION Karim Rashid for BoConcept To be released in March 2012, Karim Rashid has designed a complete dining collection with BoConcept. From cups, rugs and lamps to dining table, chairs and sideboards, the collection pays homage to the time he studied design in Ottawa, Canada. It’s unusual for star designer Rashid to produce an entire collection for a company — he typically only creates one piece of furniture at a time. The Ottawa collection is said to reflect contemporary urban living and includes a table, Ottawa chair, room divider, sideboard, fi ngerprint rug, Ottawa pendant, Ottawa table lamp, vases, dishes and cups.

BATHROOM AXOR STARCK SHOWER Philippe Starck for Hansgrohe Philippe Starck’s work for Hansgrohe has a new addition. The single-jet Axor Starck manual shower provides sustainable showering; thanks to the EcoSmart technology, the water flow is limited to nine litres per minute, without impairing the quality of the experience.

62

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.12 | www.designmena.com


LIKE WANT NEED | CULTURE

(IMAGE IN FOLDER: © NEXT ARCHITECTS)

GAME THE MODERN ARCHITECTURE GAME NEXT Architects Following the fi rst edition launched in Holland in 1999, this revised English version is designed for a broad and international group of architecture enthusiasts. Test your knowledge of the greatest architects, their famous buildings and legendary quotes, with over 1,000 questions about architecture from the 20 th and 21 st centuries. The board game is created and produced by NEXT architects.

MATERIALS ALBEMARLE WALLPAPER COLLECTION Cole & Son Named after an infamous bohemian club opened in London in 1874, the Albemarle wallpaper collection by Cole & Son evokes the glamorous and poetic era of the 18th and 19 th centuries. Each of the nine designs references a cultural icon or gem of the time. The pictured design, Coleridge, is re-coloured in chalky ground shades of stone, white, ochre and camel, with highlights of china blue, leafy green and sooty charcoal. It is available in five colourways.

APP 3DON ARCHITECTURE By 3DOn Ltd The 3DON ARchitecture app helps architects, planners and building professionals envisage their proposals in a true context. It uses augmented reality to place 3D models in position from GPS data supplied by the user. With different modes like ‘Preview’, ‘Walk’ and ‘On Site’, users have an easy way to review projects and Google SketchUp models. Free to download, the app currently works on iPhone models from 3GS onwards. Users can also pay £9.99 for unlimited model uploads for a whole year.

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63


LAST WORD | TOM BOWER

Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: 00 971 4 444 3000 Fax: 00 971 4 444 3030 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai & London ITP BUSINESS PUBLISHING CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Managing Director ITP Business Karam Awad Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell Editorial Director David Ingham EDITORIAL Senior Group Editor Stuart Matthews Editor Oliver Ephgrave Tel: +971 4 444 3303 email: oliver.ephgrave@itp.com Reporter Devina Divecha Tel: +971 4 444 3502 email: devina.divecha@itp.com ADVERTISING Sales Director, Construction Group Yazan Rahman Tel: +971 4 444 3351 email: yazan.rahman@itp.com Sales Manager Luke Jones Tel: +971 4 444 3715 email: luke.jones@itp.com Business Development Manager, Saudi Arabia Rabih Naderi Tel: +966 1 2068697 email: rabih.naderi@itp.com STUDIO Group Art Editor Daniel Prescott Senior Designer Christopher Howlett

QUALITY CONTROL THE LAST WORD

Tom Bower, Middle East MD for WSP, on the Middle East, BIM and future opportunities

PHOTOGRAPHY Chief Photographer Jovana Obradovic Senior Photographers Isidora Bojovic, Efraim Evidor Staff Photographers Lester Ali, George Dipin, Juliet Dunne, Murrindie Frew, Lyubov Galushko, Verko Ignjatovic, Shruti Jagdeesh, Stanislav Kuzmin, Mosh Lafuente, Ruel Pableo, Rajesh Raghav PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION Group Production & Distribution Director Kyle Smith Deputy Production Manager Matthew Grant Production Coordinator Nelly Pereira Distribution Manager Karima Ashwell Distribution Executive Nada Al Alami CIRCULATION Head of Database & Circulation Gaurav Gulati MARKETING

There has always been a degree of interest in the Middle East from the UK.

Probably more than any other Western country. We retain architectural services but architecture is not our main focus.

WSP is what we would call a technical consultancy. Our primary role is technical, engineering and environmental consultancy. Qatar and Saudi Arabia simply present some great project opportunities.

The projects are of a large scale and technically challenging, and that is a very good thing for the industry.

Head of Marketing Daniel Fewtrell Marketing Manager Michelle Meyrick ITP DIGITAL Director Peter Conmy Internet Applications Manager Mohammed Affan Web Designer Meghna Rao ITP GROUP Chairman Andrew Neil Managing Director Robert Serafin Finance Director Toby Jay Spencer-Davies Board of Directors K M Jamieson, Mike Bayman, Walid Akawi, Neil Davies, Rob Corder, Mary Serafin Circulation Customer Service Tel: +971 4 444 3000 Certain images in this issue are available for purchase. Please contact itpimages@itp.com for further details or visit www.itpimages.com Printed by Atlas Printing Press L.L.C. Dubai

We believe BIM is going to be a step change in the design of projects and business process.

This is something we have focused on, and we are actually seeing more clients taking it up. In the wider Middle East, we are seeing clients showing quite a bit of interest.

If there are two issues that clients are particularly interested in, it is sustainability and BIM.

Subscribe online at www.itp.com/subscriptions Audited by: BPA Worldwide Average Qualified Circulation 5,132 (July – Dec 2011) Cover image SOM | Hedrich Blessing ©Nick Merrick The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the reader’s particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

I think that 2011 was a better year than our previous two, which you can say were the post-boom years.

We are encouraged and defi nitely optimistic about 2012.

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Published by and © 2012 ITP Business Publishing, a division of the ITP Publishing Group Ltd. Registered in the B.V.I. under Company number 1402846.


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Middle East Architect | March 2012