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THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE www.CentreCountyGazette.com

Hatching a plan Free seminar spreads information about the proper way to raise chickens./Page 10

April 5-11, 2012

Volume 4, Issue 14

FREE COPY

Egg hunt will benefit cancer fight By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

TIM WEIGHT/The Gazette

MAKING STRIDES: Participants in the Walk With Me fundraiser, sponsored by Easter Seals Central Pennsylvania, strolled through the Penn State campus on March 31. See additional coverage, Page 16.

STATE COLLEGE — Talk about getting bigger and better. The MOGS Motorcycle Club had 4,000 eggs for its annual Community Easter Egg Hunt and BBQ in 2011. This year, they've added a few eggs. Try 4,000 more. “We wanted to make it an even better event,” said MOGS president Doug “Thor” Marlow. “We're tryEMILY WHITEHEAD ing to raise money and have some fun. But we always try to help someone in need.” This year, all proceeds from the event will go to Emily Whitehead, a 6-year-old from Philipsburg who is battling acute lymphoblastic leukemia. She has been undergoing treatments in Philadelphia and probably will not be able to attend the egg hunt.

Cancer fight, Page 6

Area groups join forces for youths

Realtors optimistic for 2012 By HARRY ZIMBLER

By CHRIS MORELLI

For The Gazette

editor@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — In the wake of the sex abuse scandal involving former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, parents are becoming more aware of what's going on in their children's lives. They're starting to ask more questions. And, according to Centre County Youth Service Bureau CEO Andrea Boyles, that's a good thing. “Parents are more aware,” Boyles said. “They're more nervous about their kids' relationships with adults. We get lots of calls from parents who ask questions like, 'Is it normal for my son to text with his coach? What's normal?' Things like that.” Taking a unified approach to the issue of sexual abuse, a number of groups in Centre County launched a collaborative effort to increase public awareness, increase risk reduction, strengthen a mandated reporting system and enhance services to victims. The recently formed Child Safety and Protection Collaborative consists of members from the YMCA, Youth Service Bureau, United Way and Women’s Resource Center under the direction of Centre County Judge Bradley P. Lunsford. “We're trying to make sure that Centre

Youths, Page 6 Police logs ......................... 3 Obituaries ......................... 5

CHRIS MORELLI/The Gazette

AT THE HELM: Andrea Boyles leads the Centre County Youth Service Bureau.

YSB continues to serve and grow By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — When it comes to serving children, youth and families in Centre County, the Youth Service Bureau stands as a front-line resource. At the helm of YSB is CEO Andrea Boyles. As YSB continues to grow and serve more families, Boyles is busier than ever before. “We look at ourselves in three divisions,”

Opinion ............................ 7 Education ..................... 8, 9

Lifestyles ................... 10-13 Centre Spread ........... 16, 17

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Boyles said. “There's community-based prevention — those are programs designed to keep kids from needing greater services down the road. We also do family services. The third arm of what we do is residential.” To completely understand what exactly these programs do, it's important to take a closer look at each division.

YSB, Page 6

Realtors, Page 6

Sports ........................ 19-21 Arts & Entertainment .... 22

$10 haircuts at Amy’s Fine Cuts, 145 W. High St., Bellefonte. 814-353-3360. Damon’s Easter Buffet from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 8. www.Damons.com

The outlook for the Centre County real estate market in 2012 appears positive as the industry shows significant signs of recovery following rough years in 2010 and 2011. “Our best years ever were 2005 to 2006,” said Chuck Gambone, broker and principal of Gambone, Songer and Associates Realty. “In this region we closed on 1,800 properties, including lots, land, houses and more. In 2011, that number had dropped 30 percent, so we’re not impervious to a longer recession. 2010 and 2011 were nightmare years in Centre County real estate.” According to Derek Canova, president of the Centre County Association of Realtors, the recession that hit hard nationally in 2008 was late in arriving in Centre County. “(Sales) in 2010 and 2011 were sluggish,” he said. “Home sales decreased each year, though the average price of housing held up.”

Save the Date .................. 23 What's Happening ......... 25

Happy Valley Minigolf Easter Funday, Saturday, April 7. www.happyvalleyminigolf.com

Business .................... 28, 29 Classifieds ....................... 30

Give your business great exposure every week. Contact The Center County Gazette at (814) 238-5051 for more information about front page advertising.


PAGE 2

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

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Front and Centre HEALTHY DEBATE: Joel Mathis and Ben Boychuk offer differing views on President Obama’s health care mandate. Page 7

REASON FOR THE SEASON: Columnist Amy Debach-Confer explores the origins of Easter traditions. Page 14

SLICK PRODUCTION: The Bellefonte Area High School drama club is preparing to stage the popular musical “Grease” this month. Page 9

FORE!: Along with the arrival of spring comes robins, crocuses and — of course — golfers. Find out the best spots for teeing off. Page 20

ART OF THE MATTER: The Art Alliance has scheduled its second annual “Kids Love Art” program and exhibit to shine the spotlight on young artists. Page 22

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APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 3

POLICE LOG From staff reports

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP

Assault charges filed State Police at Rockview report that they have filed simple assault charges against a 19-year-old Howard man. He allegedly struck a 17-year-old male. The incident occurred at 5:15 p.m. on Monday on Merrill Lane in Liberty Township.

STATE COLLEGE

N.Y. man faces DUI, drug charges A New York man was charged with DUI and drug offenses on March 28 while stopped at a gas station on East College Avenue, according to police. Ariel Edwards, 23, of St. Albans, N.Y., was arraigned on six misdemeanor counts and was placed in jail on $50,000 bail. According to State College police, they responded to Sheetz at 2000 E. College Ave., after receiving reports of a vehicle driving erratically around 7:45 a.m. Edwards was found to be under the influence of a controlled substance and refused to submit to a blood test, police said.. Inside the vehicle, police said they found marijuana and more than two dozen stolen credit cards.

Counterfeiting investigated Two Penn State students may face felony forgery charges after police allege that they designed counterfeit $1 and $5 bills on their computers and used them as real currency, according to State College police. Police did not identify the students because they have not been formally charged. Over the weekend, employees at the College Avenue McDonalds reported to police that counterfeit money was used. When police responded to the call, one of the suspects was still in the restaurant. University police originally responded to the counterfeit reports. State College police also reported that someone used a counterfeit $20 at the Snappy's convenience store, located at 200 E. College Ave. on March 29. Police did not indicate whether they believe the incidents are related.

Driver crashes stolen truck State College police are investigating the theft of a delivery truck. On Saturday at approximately 1:30 a.m., a 1997 Chevy was reported stolen from the 500 block of East

Waring Avenue, police said. The keys were left inside the vehicle. Later, an on-duty officer saw the truck at Sheetz, 2000 E. College Ave. The officer gave chase, but the driver crashed the truck into some trees and an electrical pole at Spring Creek. The driver of the truck then ran away from the scene. The investigation continues.

Details released State College police have released several details about an investigation of a suspicious male who may have tried to enter the back door of a residence. At approximately 9 p.m. March 30, a man tried to enter a house on the 2600 block of Pennbrook Lane, according to police. A female resident and her 6-year-old daughter saw the man try to enter the residence. He is de-

scribed as white, 6 feet tall with an average build and wearing a white T-shirt. Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 814-234-7150.

touched her in a guest room at the Nittany Lion Inn. The investigation continues.

Sex assault reported

A laptop was stolen from a residence at 433 Orlando Ave. at approximate-

A sexual assault was reported to the Penn State Police on Tuesday, 14 months after the incident occurred. Police said a woman reported that in February 2011 a man known to her indecently

Laptop stolen

ly 1:30 p.m. Monday. State College police did not release a value for the laptop and could not confirm that the theft was connected to other recent thefts in the Highlands Area. Several thefts have occurred involving computers and cash.

CORRECTION POLICY The Centre County Gazette corrects errors as soon as they are brought to our attention. Please contact us at editor@ centrecountygazette.com to report a correction.


PAGE 4

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Art show recognizes kids’ creativity early childhood learning programs in Pennsylvania. All artwork in the show will remain on display at the municipal buildSTATE COLLEGE — On April 2, colorful ing until the end of April. An online gallery craft stones glued to construction paper, will be available to those early childhood water-colored paper towels and tree bark programs who participated in the art excovered with acrylic paint filled the lobby hibit, as well as local municipalities, to of the State College Municipal Building for promote the understanding of young child the opening reception of the Smart Start issues. Centre County annual Children’s Art Show. Smart Start Centre County, a non-profit The event, sponsored by *ndulge and organization that focuses on educating the The Honeybaked Ham Co. and Café, was public about early childhood health, care held in celebration of the Week of the and education, initiated the art show Young Child, a week devoted to focusing about 15 years ago as a way to honor the public attention on the needs of young creative efforts of local young children and children. their early childhood teachers. The exhibit also honored the 10th anLocal daycares and early childhood edniversary of Keystone STARS, a state-funducation centers were sent invitations to ed program set on supporting and recogparticipate in the art show. nizing the continued efforts to improve Kelly Johnson, the project manager for Smart Start, said prior to the first open reception held last year, art was collected and put on display in local business. The artwork, created by children ranging from infants to 5-year-olds, has no guideline from Smart Start and is only limited by the children’s imagination. “Every year we try to get more variety to showcase the creativity of young children,” Johnson said. Numerous creativity outlets were on display for art show goers, including pieces from Our Lady of Victory Preschool’s “Positive and Negative Spaces,” a work in which children painted over top of tape and then drug painting tools across the $SULOa‡3OD\KRXVH7KHDWUH surface, and the Child Care 814-863-0255 < www.theatre.psu.edu Center at Hort’s Hildebrant Learning Center’s “Butterfly P E N N S T A T E Garden” sculpture made up &ROOHJHRI$UWV of shredded Sheetz bags, DQG$UFKLWHFWXUH water bottles, aluminum

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foil, newspaper and paper plates. Attendees of the art show said they were impressed by the amount of inspiration and imagination conveyed through the children’s artwork. Connie Schulz, a family outreach specialist for the State College Area School District, said she feels it is important for young children to participate in art programs. “It is a wonderful form of expression. Art gives children the opportunity to express their feelings. Looking at children’s art lets me reminisce about my own children, who are now both adults,” Schulz said. Because of her work with children at Schlow Centre Region Library, librarian Anita Ditz knew it was necessary to visit the art show. “The imagination the art show is concrete. If you don’t give children the final answer to something, they can make something 10 times better. Children’s art lets you see the wonder in things through their eyes” Ditz said. Both Schulz and Ditz said they believe that being artistic helps to make young children more intelligent and imaginative. Beliefs like this are exactly what those involved with Smart Start are after.

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“We thought the reception was a good way to make the idea of young children’s art and creativity more public,” Johnson said. Siwei Liang came to the show to see a piece titled “Bead Box” created by his daughter, Shirley, 3, and other 3- to 5-yearold children from the Bennet Family Center. But upon entering the building, he was immediately surprised by the level of creativity of all the artwork on display in the lobby. “The pieces are very wonderful. Some of these children will keep their gifts forever. I know with my daughter, sometimes she doesn’t know what she is drawing until she is done. Her imagination lets her do that. Then she will tell me it’s a bird or the ocean. That’s creativity,” Liang said. For Johnson, Liang’s appreciation for the artwork is what makes the show a success. “For people who don’t work with young children, they might not think about them, especially here in the municipal building. It’s nice to see the creativity of children,” Johnson said. “We want to show that it is much more than cutting and gluing. It’s more than crafts. It’s an expression of much more.”

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"RECYCLED RAINBOW" was created by the group Rooftop Roots at the Child Care Center at Hort Woods; it was made of bottle lids, feathers, paperclips, pom poms and paper.

STATE COLLEGE — Work to improve safety and ease traffic congestion continues on Whitehall Road and University Drive (state Route 3018) in State College. The three-mile project stretches from state Route 26 to Atherton Street. Once the project completes in the fall of 2013, travel along state Route 3018 will be smoother, less congested and more efficient. Activity this week includes removal of the concrete island at the Atherton Street intersection, instal-

lation of drainage items near the Research Drive intersection, and cutting and trimming of trees throughout the project. Drivers may encounter flaggers at various locations between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Overall work includes roadway-widening, addition of a center left turn lane, addition of marked bicycle lanes, new traffic signals, drainage improvements, waterline relocation and roadway paving. All work is weather and schedule dependent. HRI, Inc of State College is the contractor on this $10.3 million project.

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Joe Paterno memorial DVD on sale From Gazette staff feports STATE COLLEGE — The Paterno family is selling DVD copies of the tribute to Joe Paterno that was held at the Bryce Jordan Center on Jan. 26. Cost of the DVD is $19.95 plus shipping and handling. Orders of “A Memorial For Joe” can be placed online at www.forjoe.com. All proceeds go to Pennsylvania Special Olympics. “The next step for our family is the establishment of the Paterno Foundation,” Diana Paterno Giegerich said. Paterno died on Jan. 22 at 85 following a brief battle with lung cancer. The DVD is the entire service, which was called “A Memorial For Joe.” It features speeches by six of his former players, Penn State students and Nike CEO Phil Knight.

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APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

OBITUARIES M. Irene Kone Hambright M. Irene Kone Hambright, 88, of Bellefonte, died March 28, 2012, surrounded by her family in her room filled with love. She was born, April 10, 1923, in Harrodsburg, Ky., a daughter of the late McKinley and Martha B. Anness. On Oct. 22, 1945, she married Robert Kone of Burnham, Pa., who died Nov. 18, 1960. In 1967 she married Jake Hambright, who died Aug. 26, 1989. She is survived by four daughters, Sherry Horn (Rick), of Cogan Station; Martha (Martie) Kone Capparelle (Tom), of Bellefonte; Jane Kone (Jim Lynch), of Howard; and Tracey Leitzell (Alan), of Bellefonte; a stepson, Joe Hambright (Barb) of Florida; one sister, Rosa (Sherman) Votaw, of Valdosta, Ga.; a brother, McKinley Anness Jr. (Margaret), of Harrodsburg, Ky.; eight grandchildren; 11 greatchildren; and one greatgreat-grandson.

She was preceded in death by a sister, Nancy Martin, of Harrodsburg, Ky.; an infant son in 1948; a grandson, Ray North Jr., in 1986; and a great-granddaughter, Nicole, in 1984. She was a member of St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, State College, and was active in the church’s Circle Six and Friendship Class, and she was a member of a Bible study and prayer group. A public visitation and funeral service was held on Saturday, March 31, 2012, at Wetzler Funeral Service Inc. 206 N. Spring St., Bellefonte, with Pastor Rick Wilson officiating. Burial was at Birch Hill Cemetery in Burnham. Memorial contributions can be made to either St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 109 McAllister St., State College, PA 16801 or Home Nursing Agency Healthcare, 450 Windmere Dr., Suite 100, State College, PA 16801.

Phyllis N. Ream Phyllis N. Ream, 83, of Bellefonte, went home to be with her Lord on Monday, April 2, 2012, at Centre Crest Nursing Home. Born May 7, 1928, in Bellefonte, she was a daughter of the late Emery O. and Mildred (Tierney) Holderman. She was married to Norman D. Ream, Sr., who preceded her in death on Feb. 10, 2000. Phyllis attended the Bellefonte Area High School. She was very proud that she received her GED when she was in her 50s. She had been employed at Penn State University in the food services department. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Bellefonte. She is survived by her children: Norman D. Ream Jr. (Peggy), of Deatsville, Ala., David A. Ream (Barb), of Bellefonte, and Pamela J. Mulfinger (Don), of Bellefonte; six grandchildren: Staci, Katelen, Alex, Jessica, Jeffrey, Megan; and four great-grandchildren. She is also survived by

three brothers and two sisters: Janet Tressler (Bill), of Springdale, Ariz., Beverly Wilson (Jim), of Bellefonte, Donald Holderman (Phyllis), of Bellefonte, Jon Holderman (Suki), of Huntsville, Ala., and Marlin Holderman (Jane), of Bellefonte. In addition to her husband and parents, she was preceded in death by her son, Jeffrey, and brother, Charles. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, April 7, 2012, at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church, 539 Jacksonville Road, Bellefonte, with Pastor Greg Shipe officiating. Burial will follow in Meyers Cemetery, Benner Township. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Phyllis's memory to the First Baptist Church, 539 Jacksonville Rd., Bellefonte, PA 16823. Online condolences may be made to the family at www.wetzlerfuneralhome.com.

Chris Ramish Chris Ramish, 48, of Bellefonte, passed away Thursday, March 29, 2012, at Mount Nittany Medical Center. Born in Bellefonte on August 5, 1963, he was a son of the late Philip A. Ramish and Mary Jane (Hendershot) Ramish, who survives in Bellefonte. Chris was a 1981 graduate of Bellefonte Area High School and received an Associate Degree in Liberal Arts from Penn State University. He served in the United States Marine Corps, and was employed as the manager of Benner Springs for the Pennsylvania Fish Commission. He was a member of the Faith

United Methodist Church in Bellefonte, and was a committee member of Boy Scout Troop #34. He loved motorcycles. Along with his mother, Chris is survived by his two sons: Vincent and Nicholas Ramish, both of Bellefonte; two brothers, Andy (Tracy) Ramish, of Bellefonte, and Philip T. (Bonnie) Ramish, of Bellefonte. A funeral service was held April 2, 2012, at Faith United Methodist Church with the Rev. Andrew Morgan officiating. Burial with full military honors followed in Centre County Memorial Park, College Township.

Carl G. Ream Carl G. Ream, 83, of Pleasant Gap, passed from his life on Wednesday, April 3, 2012, at Mount Nittany Medical Center. Born Nov. 9, 1928, in Spring Township, he was a son of the late Harold R. and Ethel F. (Lyons) Ream. He was a 1947 graduate of Bellefonte Area High School. Immediately upon graduation from high school, he enlisted in the United States Air Force and served his country for 20 years. He retired from the United States Postal Service on March 31, 1986. He was an active member of American Legion Post #0867 and also was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #1800. He was honored by the American Legion for 60 continuous years of membership and served in the honor guard for patriotic holidays and related events. Carl still enjoyed gardening and working around his house. He was an avid reader and amateur historian of the Second World War, as well as other U.S. conflicts. He loved to read comics. He was preceded in

death by his brother, Norman D. Ream, his two sisters, Ruby M. Rose and Emeline E. Corl, and a nephew, Jeffrey Ream. He is survived by several nieces and nephews: Thomas P. Rose, Terry L. Corl, Deborah K. Corl, Norman D. Ream, Jr., David A. Ream and Pamela J. Muffinger. There will be a public visitation held on Friday, April 6, 2012, from 10 until 11 a.m., the time of the service, at Wetzler Funeral Service Inc. in Bellefonte. Funeral services will immediately follow visitation with the Rev. Kevin Shock officiating. Burial will follow in Meyer Cemetery, Benner Township. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his name to St. Mark Lutheran Church at 160 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap, PA 16823, Pleasant Gap Fire Company at 475 Robinson Lane, Pleasant Gap, PA 16823, or the American Legion at 453 S. Main Street, Pleasant Gap, PA 16823. Online condolences may be made at www.wetzlerfurneralhome.com.

James L. Robinson James L. Robinson, 81, of Bellefonte, passed away Friday, March 30, 2012, at Mount Nittany Medical Center in College Township. Born on Aug. 18, 1930, in Bald Eagle Township, Clinton County, he was the son of the late Charles L. Robinson and M. Catherine (Womelsdorf ) Robinson. On Oct. 30, 1954, he married Caroline Wettstein, who preceded him in death on Feb. 16, 1979. He attended the Yarnell School System. James drove for Davidson Brothers Trucking Co. for over 50 years. He was a member of the American Disabled Veteran Association and the State College American Legion Post #245. James was a veteran who served in the United States Army. For his service he received the United Nations Service Medal and Korean Service Medal with one Bronze star. He is survived by four daughters: Lois Reed, of Whitehall, Linda Flick (Harold), of Howard, Joyce Robinson, of Pleasant Gap, and Cathy Robinson, of Philadelphia; two sons:

Dennis Robinson (Cindy), of Centre Hall, and Tim Robinson (Dori), of Plano, Texas; one sister, Sylvia Kitchen, of Beech Creek; and two brothers: Russell Robinson (Marian), of Milesburg, and Paul Robinson (Charlene), of Bellefonte. Also surviving are seven grandchildren: Melanie Doll, Christie Doll, Jeremey Reed (Jemilia), Jeremy Rose, Tyson Robinson, Jaime Moore (James), Danielle White (Dave Arbogast); and two greatgrandchildren. In addition to his parents and wife, he was preceded in death by four sisters and one brother. Funeral services were held at the Wetzler Funeral Home with Pastor Rob Tevis officiating. Burial with full military honors were at Zion Union Cemetery, Walker Township. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Mount Nittany Medical Center Foundation at 1800 E. Park Ave., State College, PA 16803. Online condolences may be made at www.wetzlerfuneralhome.com.

PAGE 5

PSU trustees seek openess By GENARO C. ARMAS Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE — Keith Masser was busy enough running his 4,600-acre potato farm before his schedule got even tighter the past couple months. In January, he became the vice chairman of Penn State’s Board of Trustees. He likened the time he’s put into the leadership position to that of a second full-time job. Masser and other board leaders are working to foster openness and ease tensions on a campus on the mend from the scandalous aftermath of child sex abuse charges against retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who was arrested last fall. Eight of 10 boys he is accused of abusing were attacked on campus, prosecutors allege. The trustees remain a target of criticism from vocal alumni watchdog groups angered by what critics have called the board’s rash decision to fire longtime coach Joe Paterno, days after Sandusky was charged. Masser hopes increased interactions with students, faculty and other university groups are helping repair the rift. Board leaders recently met with some of the groups as part of an ongoing listening tour. “A key component is accessibility,” Masser told The Associated Press in an interview this month. “We’re making ourselves accessible to them,” he said. “It creates transparency and openness, which is relieving some of the tension.” The board has begun an internal investigation of the Sandusky case led by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, but some critics have complained about a lack of transparency that they say has raised questions about trustees’ motivations. “We’ve heard it all. We got grilled in some of these listening groups,” Masser said before a recent trustees meeting in Hershey. Masser assumed his post in January, when banking executive Karen Peetz was also elected chairwoman after their predecessors stepped down. “The biggest issue is keeping the difference between the Sandusky matters and the crisis ... and keeping focused on the future,” Peetz said. “A lot of what we’re working on ... is to keep us focused on the future. That’s an incredibly important role for the trustees as we deal with what’s current, but we focus on where we go.” Peetz has stressed three themes early in her tenure: changes in the board’s committee structure related to governance; a continued focus on “justice for the victims”; and increased transparency. The listening tours appeared to have quelled dissatisfaction among some members of one interested group, the University Faculty Senate, which in January had voted down a largely symbolic vote of no confidence in the board by a 2-to-1 margin. The measure sought to chastise the board for its handling of the scandal. There are lingering concerns among some faculty about the independence of Freeh’s investigation, said dairy and animal sciences professor Daniel Hagen, the Faculty Senate chair who is also a member of the investigations committee. Overall, though, Hagen has said, Peetz and Masser have stressed openness with the faculty. The Faculty Senate has also established a committee to look at the functions and responsibilities of the trustees in interacting with various university constituencies. That report is due May 31. Freeh’s report is also expected to be ready later this year. Peetz also points to the formation of a new trustees committee focused on outreach as a way to increase communication. Skeptics remain. One watchdog group, Penn Staters for Reforming the Board of Trustees, has said its mission is to amend the school’s charter to change the structure and functioning of the board. Trustee candidate Joanne C. DiRinaldo, an educator and researcher, said this week the board has shown “from my eyes, incremental baby steps. I would like to see more drastic attempts with transparency.” She suggested potential changes in bylaws that govern rules of confidentiality of dissent on the board, and to open up trustees meeting to public participation.

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PAGE 6 Cancer fight, from page 1 “What a wonderful thing they're doing,” said Emily's father, Tom. “We were really hoping that Emily could make it, but it's not looking that way. It's been hard. She's really not allowed to go outside. She's allowed some private sessions in the playroom here, but that's about it.” According to her father, Emily is in day 60 of her treatments. Originally, she was being treated in Hershey but was moved to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The third annual Community Easter Egg Hunt and BBQ is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday at Spring Creek Park in State College. In addition to the 8,000 eggs, there will be food for sale, Tshirts, raffle tickets, games and prizes. The goal is simple: raise as much money as possible. “We don't get involved with different charities, really. We usu-

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE ally find a family in need and make sure that all of the money goes directly to that family. That way, we know the donations are staying local,” Marlow explained. This year's egg hunt will be divided into two age groups — one for walkers to age 6; the other for children ages 7 through 13. If you're concerned about attending because the event is run by a motorcycle club, don't worry. “It's a familyfriendly event,” Marlow said. “When I formed this club, I wanted to rewrite all of the stereotypes about bikers. Bikers are real men, real family men. We are just trying to help real families.” Those entering the park Saturday will have an opportunity to

YSB, from page 1

COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION Big Brothers Big Sisters is a large part of YSB's community-based prevention division. The program ensures that children have positive adults in their lives by providing quality, one-to-one mentoring relationships between youth and caring adults. Each year, YSB helps approximately 400 youth through the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. In addition to Big Brothers Big Sisters, YSB also offers several other programs. “We have drop-in centers in Bellefonte and Snow Shoe. There's also street outreach — we go into five different neighborhoods once a week every week and we set up shop in the kids' community,” Boyles said. Street outreach is a service designed to keep youth off the streets and engaged in their neighborhoods. Street outreach staff take a positive youth development approach, which aims to build competencies and leadership skills in kids. “Our staff goes in once a week. They take the van, they take supplies. They do fun stuff with the kids, they do prevention activities to make sure kids know who we are in case they need help,” Boyles said. YSB also provides drug, alcohol and tobacco prevention services. Simply put, it tries to heighten awareness of drug and alcohol related dangers and their impact on the community. “We do programs in the schools, health fairs, things at the mall, all of those activities,” Boyles said.

FAMILY SERVICES YSB also offers programs designed to serve families. One such program is family reunification, which uses an inhome, family-focused approach in order to secure a safe and permanent home for children who have been separated from their families due to abuse, neglect, dependency or delinquency issues. “We work with kids who are in a group home … we try to get them back home. We do parent education in homes. Usually, it's referred by the county, sometimes referred by a hospital,” Boyles said. For example, a new mother may not have the support system she needs at home, she said. At that point, YSB may be asked to step in.

RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS YSB residential programming includes a youth shelter, a five-bed therapeutic home that provides immediate assistance to runaway, homeless or displaced youth. “We have a runaway shelter and three group homes,” Boyles said. The homes feature youth workers who are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to care for youth in the home, answer crisis calls and open the door to youth in need of shelter. If the youth doesn't need a place to stay, counselors are available to simply talk.

ADDITIONAL SERVICES With The Second Mile facing an uncertain future, Boyles said that YSB is

purchase food tickets. The tickets can then be swapped for hot dogs, hamburgers, chicken or side dishes at one of the pavilions

at the park. There will also be raffle tickets for sale. For $5, ticket buyers will have an opportunity to win a large tattoo from SteamPunk Ink in State College. There were also be several live

prepared to step in and help youth who are in need of services. “I think the key for every community across the commonwealth is to look at what The Second Mile provided,” Boyles said. “Here, we asked the question 'What is The Second Mile doing here in Centre County that is a direct service to kids?'” Boyles came up with the following answers. First and foremost, there was Friend Fitness mentoring program, another program simply called Friend and summer camps. “Friend Fitness, in our eyes, is a natural fit with Big Brothers Big Sisters. We can easily create a site-based Big Brothers Big Sisters program to absorb those kids and their matches,” Boyles said. Last year, Friend Fitness served 27 children in Centre County. This year, the program is expected to serve 10 kids. “We're talking about a small number of kids, relatively speaking,” Boyles said. The Friend program involved children going to Penn State's campus. There, they'd meet with current students to do monthly activities. According to Boyles, she is uncertain as to how many Centre County residents took part in the Friend program. “We wouldn't do it exactly the way they did it, but we would certainly be able to add a prevention site on campus if that was a need,” she said. The Second Mile summer camp program enrolled nearly 50 county residents in 2011. “The thing we really feel is critical is summer camp. Over the last few months, we had already been approached by some folks here and in Clinton County. Once again, looking at the numbers, we are moving forward with two weeks of camp — one week boys, one week girls,” Boyles said. The camps will be offered to youth in both Centre and Clinton counties.

LOOKING AHEAD It's no secret that YSB relies heavily on volunteers and donors. The volunteers help with programs like Big Brothers Big Sisters. Donor gifts make an impact for obvious reasons. So far in 2012, YSB has held its annual Spring Fling rummage sale, which raised nearly $7,000 for Big Brothers Big Sisters. Bowl for Kids' Sake was held in Lewistown. YSB's biggest fundraising event, the “On the Fly” fly fishing tournament, is scheduled for May 14. Wayne Harpster and his family host that event, which raised nearly $70,000 last year. “We are almost sold out in terms of teams, but we always welcome more sponsors,” Boyles said. Another big event is the Last Cruise, which will be held at the PA Military Museum in Boalsburg on July 28. “We are really pushing hard to make that even more of a family-friendly event this year,” Boyles said. “We're going to have a big kids' zone. All of the activities will be 100 percent free to families.” In addition to all of the cars and motorcycles that grace the event, there will be a bounce house and dunk tank. Children will also be able to tour a fire truck and school bus. “We really want to make it a great day,” Boyles said.

APRIL 5-11, 2012 bands at the event, with local band Pure Cane Sugar headlining. “They're a great band. They've really helped us,” Marlow said. The MOGS are getting help from other sponsors including the State College VFW, Rex Energy and Hoss's Steak and Sea House. The event was a huge success last year and Marlow is hoping for a repeat on Saturday. “It really is a great day, a great event,” Marlow said. “This is 100 percent about the family we're helping.” The House of Hope Church in Houserville also is pitching in. According to Ralph Poorman, a layman at the church, partnering with the MOGS wasn't met

with acceptance by the congregation — at first. “Shock and dismay,” Poorman said with a laugh. “But then people realize that you're doing some good. It's not exactly two groups you'd think would work together, but it's been great.” By partnering with the MOGS, both groups have benefited. “They help us, we help them,” Poorman said. “It's something out of the ordinary. It's very unique.” According to Tom Whitehead, the response from the community has been nothing short of amazing. “It's been overwhelming, really,” he said. He and his wife, Kari, are staying at a Ronald McDonald House in Philadelphia while their daughter receives treatment. “We've heard from so many people in the community. We get emails and messages. Emily probably gets six to 10 packages a day.”

Youths, from page 1 County has the strongest possible services available for victims when something happens,” Boyles said. “Half of the group is looking at that … how we can do a better job of making sure that the police, the social service people and the medical people are all working together in a significant abuse case.”. The collaborative has employed Darkness to Light, a national program designed to empower adults through awareness. It is a 2½hour educational program to prevent, recognize and react responsibly to childhood sexual abuse. “It's a training for the average person in the community to better understand how to talk about things with kids and with adults to try to protect kids,” Boyles said. According to Boyles, the goal is to train 5 percent of Centre County. “We'd like to accomplish that over three years,” Boyles said. The program is designed not just for professionals or those working with kids. This is a program designed for everyone in the community. “In our culture, we're afraid to ask questions because we don't want to insult anyone. One of the things you'll learn is that it's OK to ask questions,” she said. “If your kid

wants to take piano lessons for example, and you have questions, it's OK to ask the questions. And if you don't like the answers, then it's OK to find the next piano teacher. “You ask questions like 'Can I drop in? Is there a window? Is the door closed? Is it always the two of you?' It's questions that are critically important to protect kids. As a society, we tend to shy away from those questions,” Boyles said. By getting the Darkness to Light program out to 5 percent of the community, the goal of the collaborative is to educate the community. “That's what we want to do in Centre County … ask those questions because we want to protect our kids,” Boyles said. Boyles is hopeful that more area businesses and community members get on board in the near future. “It's a 2½-hour commitment, that's all,” Boyles said. “The folks who have gone through it have really enjoyed it. They feel like they learned a lot.” The Darkness to Light program is just a piece of the puzzle, though. “There's so much to be learned here,” she said. “I hope that as a community, we learn it.” For more information, call (814) 237-5731.

Realtors, from page 1 But both Canova and Gambone said they are optimistic about 2012. “I am busier now than I was at this time last year,” Canova noted. “I’m already dealing with inspections. Commercial real estate is harder to track but I think we are seeing an increase because lending is easier to secure. In 2009 and 2010 lending was tough to get.” “We are seeing a bit of a rebound,” said Gambone. “The confidence levels of buyers were not high in 2011. The confidence of buyers is growing. This is partly because the job market is starting to look better.” The difficulties in securing funding for real estate led many to lease homes, driving lease rates up. “Now, people are returning to buying again,” said Gambone. In 2005 and 2006 when the region’s real estate market was strong, a home typically spent 70 days on the market. That number has increased modestly to 90 to 100 days. Data from the Multiple Listing Service — an organization that provides real estate brokers with market profiles and other services — shows that the median price of a home in the State College market has gone up steadily despite the economic slowdown. That price hovered around the $264,000 mark this past quarter. “What forced prices up, especially in the State College Area School District, was that a lot of higher priced homes — $500,000 and up — were sold for less than their value,” Gambone explained. “If you bought just before the recession and had to sell during it, you took a big (financial) hit. Builders and Realtors all thought the recession was going

to be shorter.” Despite their optimism, Gambone and Canova see challenges ahead. “There are two things that we face. First, it’s the ability for buyers to get financing. It has been tougher to get a loan. Second, we need houses that first-time buyers can afford, as well as lower income housing for local workers. Living in the Centre Region, in particular, is not easy to afford,” said Canova. “Affordable housing is still an issue,” said Gambone. “It seems to me that the only way (affordable housing) it’s going to happen is with a public/private program, a real push for a large number of homes. You almost need the land to be free.” Keeping the cost of a home around $170,000 would be difficult at best. Even a modest home of 1,500 square feet, priced at a $80 per square foot, would result in a price tag of $120,000. That does not include the land to build on. A lot for such a house is likely to cost $60,000. “That leaves no profit for the builder or marketing expenses,” Gambone said. The question that remains to be answered about 2012: Is current growth a blip on the screen or will there be a continuing recovery? “I want to see an increased number of showings that lead to pending sales,” said Gambone. “We are starting to see that, which leads me to think we are heading in the right direction. The early spring has helped.” “If we see solid economic growth and no major company closings or major layoffs, the real estate market the real estate market will follow,” Canova said.

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OPINION

APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE 403 South Allen Street, State College, PA 16801 Phone: (814) 238-5051 Fax: (814) 238-3415 www.CentreCountyGazette.com PUBLISHER Rob Schmidt

MANAGING EDITOR Chris Morelli

COMMUNITY EDITOR Sandie Biddle

SALES MANAGER Don Bedell ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Vicki Gillette Debbie Markel Kathy George BUSINESS MANAGER Aimee Aiello AD COORDINATOR Bikem Oskin GRAPHIC DESIGN Beth Wood

CONTACT US: To submit News: editor@centrecountygazette.com Advertising: sales@centrecountygazette.com The Gazette is a weekly newspaper serving Centre County and is published by Indiana Printing and Publishing Company. Reproduction of any portion of any issue is not permitted without written permission. The publisher reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement for any reason.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Borough leadership offers clear vision I am responding to Mr. John Skerchock’s letter regarding the borough’s redevelopment plans for the three parcels between High and Lamb Street bridges, and adjacent to Spring Creek. In 2004, the borough adopted a multi-municipal comprehensive plan that identified the area as having potential for redevelopment and recommended rezoning to allow a variety of business and residential uses. Unfortunately, the Bush House burned to the ground in February of 2006. The property can’t be redeveloped until the flood plain issues are addressed. In 2007, the borough adopted new zoning regulations to comply with the comprehensive plan adopted in 2004. In 2009, a Land Use Planning and Technical Assistance Grant was awarded to the borough, and a professional economic development study, with public input, was completed. The study indicated that the waterfront area could sustain a small boutique hotel, along with space for first-floor retail and residential uses. The study also identified measures to address the flood plain issues. In June of 2010, the borough received word that it would be receiving a $3 million dollar grant to address the flood plain issues so that the three parcels could be redeveloped. In 2011, the borough heard presentations from three development groups, all proposing a mixed-use redevelopment of the parcels, including a hotel, retail and residential space. The borough has not used local real estate tax monies for the project. The borough has planned for and researched the potential for redevelopment and is confident that a successful project can be completed. To see what a little vision, planning and hard work can do, all anyone has to do is look across the street to Talleyrand Park and the new expanded area. This treasure didn’t always sparkle like it does today. Ralph W. Stewart Manager Bellefonte Borough

Editorial policy We invite comment, rebuttal or the expression of your own thoughts about matters you deem of public importance. We invite stories and photos about our community and its people. All submissions must be of the writer’s own creation and include contact information, which may be held upon request. The Gazette reserves the right to edit any submission. Att: Editor, The Gazette, 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801; email to: editor@centrecountygazette.com; fax to: (814) 238-3415.

Unless labeled as a Gazette editorial, all views on the Opinion page are those of the authors.

PAGE 7

Reputation of ground beef may have been slimed forever WASHINGTON — What’s in a name? Ask the manufacturers of a perfectly acceptable product that pretty much went unnoticed until the television folks and the Internet nuts got hold of it. Now it probably is a lost business. The product, of course, is an all-beef additive to other beef that has for years been used to bulk up and lean down the daily diets of this nation’s hamburger-crazed citizens. Everything was going well and unnoticed Email: Dan K. until someone reThomasson at called that what thomassondan@aol was being mixed .com. in with the ubiquitous patty had been labeled “pink slime” by some obscure government official years ago. Now, would you permit your children to eat, or would you personally eat — anything that included pink slime, no matter how much the government authorities and nutritionists assured you it was not only safe but actually replaces some fat in your ground beef? Of course, you wouldn’t — and grocery stores, hamburger joints and just plain moms reacted by immediately removing, or demand-

DAN K. THOMASSON

ing its removal, from possible human consumption. But what is pink slime? Well, when I first heard Diane Sawyer promo a report on it on ABC’s “World News,” I thought she was touting coverage of another presidential campaign dustup like so many this political season — a verbal shot at Mitt Romney by Newt Gingrich or vice versa. Or perhaps one aimed at Rick Santorum by both. Imagine how I felt when I discovered that much of my life I have been eating this stuff whenever I wolfed down a cheeseburger, a burrito or some other ground beef product. OMG, I told myself, my insides must look the shade of a baby’s bottom. Would I ultimately take on the hue of a flamingo? Then I realized that my doctors hadn’t said anything the couple of times they had been in there. Besides, I’ve been off burgers for a while. On further examination, I discovered that what I and millions of my fellow Americans had been blissfully enjoying was just scraps of beef and connective tissue with the fat removed and treated to eliminate any chance of contamination like E. coli pathogens and such. The USDA not only approved pink slime, it didn’t require its mention on a package label — which, of course, is not the case with true additives such as grains and other filler. Was that delicious Wimpy or White Castle or summer-grill specialty with the main ingredient insinuated with

(I guess I have to say it) pink slime a true all-beef delicacy? It not only was, it was probably better for you, according to the people who are supposed to know these things and protect us from the demons of adulteration. The governors of big-time cattleproducing states have taken up the cudgel for the industry that produces the target of so much consternation. But the chances this will do any good are small, given major grocery chains’ stampede to disavow it and pledge that their product is a thing of purity. The same is true with fast-food purveyors. That ban is likely to hold, unlike the scare about apples and, at one time or another, most products that make up our daily menus. Why? Well, that’s pretty obvious. Whatever caused the order to toss the cranberry crop overboard years ago wasn’t called pink slime — which clearly has become the “yuck” factor of all time. The worst-case scenario for this panic is that another industry may be in danger of biting the dust, and who knows how many jobs may be ground up in the process? I hope there can be other uses for pink slime. Meanwhile, we can all be assured when we head for the grocery store to stock up on the supplies for our backyard outings, we will be serving burgers that may not be as good for you as the one you remember buying at Mickey D’s. A burger by any other name tastes as sweet — or does it?

Is health mandate right for country? The Supreme Court last week heard a legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act — the health care reform law better known as “Obamacare.” The justices may choose to strike down its order that every U.S. citizen buy health insurance or pay a penalty. And they could strike down the entire law, which features a number of other features. Will the law survive? If not, what’s next?

JOEL MATHIS Here is the cure for what ails Obamacare — good old-fashioned socialized medicine. Many Republicans will tell you that’s exactly what Obamacare is. They’re wrong. The program — as conceived — is a last-ditch effort to save private health insurance companies in America. It’s also perfectly designed to make everybody feel like their rights are being tromped upon: Tea party movement conservatives can feel like their freedom is being trampled by making them Joel Mathis, buy a product joelmmathis@ they’d probably gmail.com, is a buy anyway; lefty writer in Occupy Wall Philadelphia. Streeters can harrumph because that money goes straight to big corporations that they hate. Nobody is happy, except for a few upper-echelon insurance executives. Maybe we’re better off if the Supreme Court strikes the law down. And I say that as a liberal, one who favors universal health insurance. The insurance mandate was a half-step toward that goal. Let’s take the full step: Single-payer health insurance, run and administered by the

JOEL MATHIS

government, with no private-sector middlemen to add costs and reap profits from taxpayers. Certain conservatives will still complain about the constitutionality of such a program, but most — even ones who think an insurance mandate is unconstitutional — will admit the government can make you pay taxes. Others will haul out the old lies about “death panels” or being forced to wait years for a cataract surgery that never comes. Don’t listen to them. We already have government-run health insurance in America. It’s called Medicare. There are no death panels. It receives higher customersatisfaction marks than private health plans. And over the decades, Medicare spending has grown at a slower rate than private health spending. Universal coverage. Lower costs. Higher satisfaction. Single-payer health coverage is far better than letting poor Americans die because they couldn’t afford insurance. Obamacare is the first step. It shouldn’t be the last.

BEN BOYCHUK Remember when Democrats were so certain that Obamacare was such a great idea that they blithely dismissed any questions about the law’s constitutionality? “Are you serious? Are you serious?” a disbelieving House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., replied in 2009 to a question from a reporter who asked, “Where specifically does the Constitution grant Congress the authority to enact an individual health mandate?” Justice Anthony Kennedy was dead serious when he asked the government’s top lawyer, Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, essentially the same question this week. “Assume for the moment that this (mandate) is unprecedented, this is a step beyond what our cases have allowed,” Kennedy said. “If that is so, do you not have a heavy burden of justification?” Verrilli replied that Congress has the authority under the

Constitution’s “necessary and proper clause” to coerce every American into the insurance market, but Kennedy and his conservative colleagues sounded skeptical, to say the least. What Congress has attempted with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is unprecedented in our history and unlimited in scope. If the federal government can mandate health insurance, it can mandate just about anything. The law needs to go. But what should replace it? Not “socialized medicine.” The problem with the single-payer fantasy is it makes promises the government cannot keep. The health care budget is not unlimited. Government would make choices about your health care based not on what you need, but how much a procedure costs. If you are old or you have a rare or malignant illness, you’re out of luck. In truth, that’s becoming the case more and more under our existing system, which is why reform remains essential. One Republi- Ben Boychuk, can proposal bboychuk@cityjournal.org, is would scrap the associate editor of current, ineffi- City Journal. cient system with one that would give individuals and families a refundable tax credit between $2,500 and $8,000 a year to buy their own insurance. Such a system would “subsidize the core insurance that everyone should have,” argues John Goodman, president of the National Center for Policy Analysis, but “it would not subsidize all the bells and whistles, as the current system does.” And the best part: It wouldn’t be coercive.

BEN BOYCHUK


EDUCATION

PAGE 8

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Penns Valley sixth-graders conduct survival, team-building exercises By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

SPRING MILLS — Jake Hockenberry was a lucky young man. He was uninjured in the plane crash, and was able to slide his classmate Alex Witherite, who had a broken leg, onto a blanket and drag him safely away from the smoldering wreck. Other survivors were not so lucky — they suffered broken bones, head wounds

and even blindness in the crash. They had to be helped to safety. No, there was not a plane crash in Penns Valley, but if there had been, this group of sixth graders at the Penns Valley Elementary and Intermediate School would have been prepared. They are students of teacher Kathy Kapinus, and have been studying survival and conducting team-building exercises for several weeks. On the morning of March 26, six teams

of four students each met in the school gymnasium, where each team was given a group of items they could utilize to get their team members to a safe zone, several yards away from the crashed plane. Items included blankets, magazines, a piece of tubing (perhaps part of a handrail) and other items one might find on an airliner. The students were randomly assigned injuries, and one member of each team was to be uninjured and able-bodied. They had to stay in character for the entire exercise, meaning that broken limbs could not be used. Some members had to remain unconscious. The children rose to the occasion with great ingenuity and efficiency. For example, one team splinted a broken leg was splinted with magazines and some cloth. A blinded passenger (wearing a blindfold) was still able-bodied, and, with some verbal instruction from another team member, helped to drag an unconscious companion to safety. The teams had 20 minutes to complete the exercise, but finished the job in less than 10 minutes. “We’ve been doing team-building activities, and our three focus words are resourcefulness, adversity and endurance,”

Kapinus said. “It’s a very independent unit where we (adults) oversee, rather than lead.” After all the students were in the safe zone, Kapinus conducted a discussion with the students regarding the rescue techniques used, and how they organized their groups to accomplish their rescues. The students were then dispersed to various locations around the gym to write in their journals, describing their efforts and feelings during the exercise. Student Emma Heckman’s assigned injury was a broken right arm. “They made a sling out of a blanket and wrapped it around my neck. It held my arm in a 90-degree angle so I could only use my left arm,” Heckman said. Heckman said she tried to help others using only her left arm, but found it difficult, being right-handed. “I’m really glad we didn’t have an unconscious person — that would have been a lot harder,” she said. She felt that she and the others had learned a lot about working together as a team in this exercise. “It was fun,” she said, “but probably wouldn’t be fun in a real situation.”

SAM STITZER/The Gazette

A “BLIND” VICTIM helped a team member with a broken leg get to the safe zone.

Senior leads school in recycling award

SAM STITZER/The Gazette

“BLINDED” PASSENGER prepares to help drag an unconscious girl on a blanket, while another student’s head wound got bandaged.

Penns Valley students compete in county reading competition By KRISTEN ALBRIGHT For The Gazette

Submitted photo

PHILIPSBURG-OSCEOLA Senior High School finished fifth in Pennsylvania in the School vs. School Division of the Recycle-Bowl National School Recycling Competition. The school recycled more than 7,000 pounds of material in the one-month-long competition and was awarded a $500 check from Greenstar Recycling for their efforts. Senior Matt Schuster was in charge of the recycling efforts as part of his senior project.

SPRING MILLS — The Penns Valley Intermediate Reading teams placed second and third in this year’s Interscholastic Reading Competition held at Bald Eagle Area High School. Students were asked to read books from a required list. On the day of the competition, they were asked

questions about each book. Students competed against other teams from across Centre County. The Book Battlers took home a second-place trophy and the Penns Valley Pirates earned a thirdplace trophy. The Book Battlers were represented by Payton Walker, Mathew Immel, Maddy Myers, Olivia VanAmburgh, Grace

Shawver, Jason Ticknor, Samantha Ticknor, Millena Dorman, Eli McClellan, Anna McFeely, Brianna Hawkins and Katie Schafer. The students on the Penns Valley Pirates team were Ashley Griffith, Justine Bressler, Maddison Fye, Lane Redin, Alyssa Boob, Branston Peese, Eli Wheland, Max Engle, Brandon Schuster, Emma Heckman, Michael Statham and Jessye Smith.


APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 9

At Bellefonte, ‘Grease’ is the word this spring From Gazette staff reports BELLEFONTE — This April, the Bellefonte Area High School Drama Club will perform “Grease,” the popular musical about Sandy, Danny and all their pink lady and greaser friends at Rydell High. Audiences are sure to sing along with the music that was made popular by the film that featured John Travolta and Olivia Newton John. “Although people are most familiar with the film, the musical is even more charming,” says drama club advisor and English teacher Elizabeth Heidt. “Grease” will be performed at 7 p.m. April 12-14 at Bellefonte Area High School, 830 E. Bishop St. Tickets cost $9 for adults, $7 for students and $4 for children under 12. Director Shaun McMurtrie, a math teacher at the high school, selected the musical. “‘Grease’ is the type of show that spans generations. Parents and grandparents get to be nostalgic about their high school days and students realize that their current trials and tribulations aren’t all that different from those ‘wonderful bygone days’,” McMurtie said. Heidt is excited to showcase some of

Bellefonte’s talented students. “We had such a hard time casting this show because we had so many great performers to choose from,” she said. “Ultimately we cast 30 student actors and 10 high school musicians.” Meredith LeRoy, Bellefonte’s choir and orchestra director and the show’s vocal director, has also been impressed with the talent she has seen. “The soloists all sound fantastic, and the chorus is very strong. The audience should be prepared to leave the performance with several of the songs from the show stuck in their head,” LeRoy said. BAHS band director and the show’s conductor, Jay Zimmerman, understands the importance of fine arts programs in public high schools and works to keep these programs at BAHS. “As the Fine Arts Department coordinator, one of my goals was to do a musical production every year,” he explained. “Performing in a musical brings together all the talents we possess in the arts: singing, dancing, acting, and playing instruments along with all the technical demands of lighting, electronics, scene design and construction. It is truly a collaborative effort that demands the best of our students

Bald Eagle students attend chorus festivals

Submitted photo

BELLEFONTE AREA High School will perform “Grease” as its spring musical. The Pink Ladies, from left: Julia Laufer, Melissa Hilder, Rebecca Busichio, Courtney Foley, Elizabeth Catchmark, Emily Martel, Lydia Munnell and Alyssa Hamaty. and the staff. It has been a pleasure working with all of them and I am sure audiences will all enjoy the final product.” English teacher and choreographer Erin Harclerode also enjoys working as a part of

the musical team. “The cast of ‘Grease’ continues to exceed my expectations for the type of choreography high school students, some of whom have no dance experience, can absorb,” she said.

Megan Schaper earns top honor for work with food nutrition By JULIE MILLER For The Gazette

Submitted photo

BALD EAGLE Area High School students attended the Pennsylvania Music Education Association District 4 Chorus led by guest conductior Dr. Lynn Drafall Jan. 25-28 at Penns Valley Area High School. Back row from left: Dale Haagen, Maggie Mehalko and Clifford Smolko. Front row from left: Lexi Holderman, Kaitlyn Laird, Josh Koleno and Doug Turner. Mehalko and Smolko qualified for the PMEA Region III Chorus, held March 7-10 at Tyrone Area High School. Mehalko also qualified to attend the PMEA All-State Chorus April 18-21 in Lancaster.

BB gun championship expected to draw crowd From Gazette staff reports SPRING MILLS — The Penns Valley Shooting Team will host the 2012 Pennsylvania BB Gun State Championship Match at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, April 7 at the Penns Valley Area High School, 4545 Penns Valley Road Spring Mills. There are 17 teams with seven shooters per team plus guests scheduled to compete. The public is welcome. After the match, an educational safety and shooting test will be held at 9:15 a.m. John Wert founded and coached the shooting team in 1988. A few years later

Lynn McCool joined Wert and they still volunteer their coaching. The Spring Mills Fish & Game donates space for practices, meetings and fundraisers. The team members are from the Centre County region and range from age 8-15. They are taught proper gun safety and handling, while the live-fire portion of the program works to develop expert shooters skills in the four positions. The Penns Valley team is sponsoring a concession stand and a raffle during the event. More than 300 people are expected to attend the event.

Submit Photos Of Events To ... editor@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — State College Area School District’s director of food service, Megan Schaper, was selected as the 2012 School Nutrition Association of Pennsylvania’s Director of the Year. She was recognized for her hard work, innovative ideas and dedication to the school nutrition program. In addition, her commitment to improving the district’s food service program according to everchanging trends, dedication to staff development and school and community involvement were highlighted. Schaper serves as the president-elect for the Cen-Clear Chapter of the School Nutrition Association, is highly involved in the Pittsburgh regional food service directors organization and also serves as the regional representative for SNPA. She will be presented with her award at the annual conference in Hershey in August. Known for her attention to detail and consistent work to improve the quality of food served to the students, this award is important in its recognition of not only her work, but that of her entire staff.

Submitted photo

MEGAN SCHAPER was selected as the 2012 School Nutrition Association’s Pennsylvania Director of the Year. “Winning this award is really nice, but the fact that my staff felt that I deserve to be nominated for it is what is especially meaningful to me,” Schaper said.

Send School News To ... editor@centrecountygazette.com Wynwood House at Penns Valley Personal Care Community 122 Wynwood Drive Centre Hall, PA 16828 814.364.9770 Our Pledge: We hope you, too, will find our services and programs a welcome addition to this community and region. We strive for professional and personal excellence, and promote the health and well-being of every resident.

CALL US FOR A TOUR OF WYNWOOD HOUSE The Basic Rate Includes: • All meals and snacks • All utilities • 24-hour security • Outstanding activities program • Health and medication monitoring

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For more information on residency requirements at Wynwood House, contact: Susan Romanini, Director, 814.280.3551 Vincent Romanini, Assistant Director, 814.206.8000


LIFEstyles

PAGE 10

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Area business hosts chicken seminar By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

SPRING MILLS — E & L Supplies, along state Route 45 near Spring Mills, sponsored a chicken seminar on March 31. E & L owner, Julie Smith, brought in two chicken experts to conduct an informative presentation of everything anyone needs to know about raising chickens. About 20 people attended. Mike Flanagan, from the Williamsport area, discussed housing requirements for chickens. Flanagan has owned as many as 48 chickens, including two roosters named Rocky and Bullwinkle. He started with just a few chickens, but gradually added more. “Chickens are an addiction,” he quipped. Flanagan’s chickens live in a 16-by-16foot barn he calls “Cluckingham Palace.” He recommends that a chicken coop should provide at least 2 square feet per bird, although some large commercial barns only provide a 1-square-foot area. He emphasized the importance of lighting with heat lamps, which the chickens gather around for warmth. Ventilation is important to dry out the droppings. If the droppings stay wet, the ammonia level in the air gets high, causing respiratory problems for the chickens, and strong odors that annoy humans. Flanagan cleans the barn regularly and composts his chickens’ manure, which makes excellent

fertilizer for his garden. Hens begin producing eggs at about 18 months of age, with or without the service of roosters. They stop laying eggs at about 8 years old, and can live 10 to 15 years. Flanagan recommends washing the eggs before consuming them to remove harmful bacteria. The chicken pens should be bordered with strong fencing to keep out predators which include raccoons, skunks, foxes, coyotes and even feral cats. Flanagan passed out a packet titled Backyard Chickens 101, containing a wealth of information for seminar attendees. He recommends starting out with no more than six to 12 chickens to keep things manageable. Following his presentation, Flanagan fielded many questions from the seminar attendees. The second presenter was Cindy Robinson, a representative of Purina Mills. “If it’s an animal that eats, we feed it,” Robinson said. Robinson wasn’t kidding — they even sell Alligator Chow. She noted that all the ingredients used in Purina’s feeds are of human quality. From start to finish, the feeds must meet 200 quality control standards. “The chicken segment of our business is the largest, fastest growing segment right now. Everybody wants to have chickens,” Robinson said. Purina makes feeds for chickens from peeps to adults, all with no animal fats or

SAM STITZER/The Gazette

MIKE FLANAGAN addresses the group on housing for chickens. proteins and no added hormones. Robinson recommended changing feeds as the chickens grow to provide the proper nutrition for the different phases of their lives.

Robinson answered many questions following her presentation, giving specific recommendations to several seminar attendees.

Recently rescued dogs puts strain on PAWS From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE — In the last two months, Centre County PAWS has taken in many animals with urgent medical needs such as canine heartworm, severe skin infections or orthopedic needs. Despite the generosity of local veterinarians and the expertise of the PAWS medical team − who keep expenses as low as possible – the recent intake of a high number of dogs with serious medical needs has put a strain on the medical budget. Donations for the On the Mend Medical Fund are needed to continue the life-saving work. “When Centre County PAWS takes in an animal, that animal is truly rescued and is given a new start to life. For some of our

animals that means providing essential medical care that is above and beyond routine care. Our non-euthanasia philosophy means that we give each animal the medical care they need and deserve,” said PAWS shelter manager Lisa Bahr. The recent animals rescued by PAWS have come from local animal shelters where they would otherwise be destroyed, because the shelter is unable to provide medical care, and from families that were not able to meet the medical needs of the animal. Donations to the On the Mend Medical Fund can be sent to Centre County PAWS, Attn: On the Mend Medical Fund, 1401 Trout Rd., State College, PA 16801 or via the PAWS website www.centrecountypaws.org by clicking on a heart next to an animal’s name who is in need of care.

Submitted photo

DENISE ZELNICK was installed as the new Exalted Ruler of the Bellefonte Elks Lodge during a recent ceremony. She is shown receiving the gavel from outgoing Exalted Ruler Dale Moore.

JACK BECHDEL, left, was recently selected as the Elks Lodge Exalted Ruler during a recent ceremony at the Bellefonte Elks Club. Bechdel is very active in the support of veterans, is wellknown in the Scouting community, volunteers with Special Olympics and the Elks. Pictured with Bechdel is Exalted Ruler Dale Moore.

Schlow to celebrate National Library Week By WENDY KLEMICK For The Gazette

STATE COLLEGE — April 9-13 is National Library Week and kicks off a month of celebration with crafts from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. every weekday at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. The April book club at Schlow supports the seventh annual Pe n n s y l v a n i a One Book, Every Young ZACHARIAH OHORA Child Literacy Initiative, the statewide program that highlights the importance of early literacy development in preschoolers. One Book, Every Young Child encourages activities in every facet of learning. This year Centre County children will all be reading the 2012 selection, “Stop Snoring,

Bernard!” by Zachariah OHora. Children will have the opportunity to develop their literary skills and connect Bernard and his fuzzy story to science, math, physical health and many other subjects. Bernard is an otter with a problem. He snores, and therefore needs to find a place in the zoo where his snoring will not bother any of the other animals. His sleeping adventures are sure to engage young readers. Schlow Centre Region Library April Book Club Wake Up and Read will get children in the Bernard reading spirit. Children can register online at www.schlowlibrary.org/children, where they can set a goal for the number of books they want to read in April and create a log of all the books they have read in order to earn a prize. Children can also keep track of their progress on sticker charts, as well as help decorate the Allen Street window. Meet the author, Zachariah OHora, at 6:30 p.m. May 2 at Schlow. A free signed copy of the book will be available while quantities last. For more information, visit www.paonebook.org.

Submitted photo

Cancer society provides transportation service From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE — The American Cancer Society helps Centre County residents with cancer through its Road to Recovery program. Road to Recovery provides cancer patients with free rides to and from treatments and related medical appoint-

ments. In some cases patients may not feel well enough to drive themselves or may not have friends or family that can help. Trained volunteer drivers provide the rides using their own personal vehicles or American Cancer Society vehicles. To arrange a ride, call 800-227-2345.


APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Novelist Robert Day to speak at Penn State UNIVERSITY PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Robert Day, novelist, essayist, poet and author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Last Cattle Driveâ&#x20AC;? will deliver a talk at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 5 in the Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art, University Park. The Penn State English Department will sponsor Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appearance. The talk titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bar Art: John Sloanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s McSorleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Old Ale House Paintings, a Vargas Girl behind the Bar at Ruby Redâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in New Orleans, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;The Luncheon of the Boating Party on the Kansas Prairie,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Manetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2122;A Bar at the Folies-Bergère in Parisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201C; plus e.e. cummings, Bob Dylan, and Joseph Mitchell â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A Travel Memoir with Pictures.â&#x20AC;? Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel was a Bookof-the-Month Club selection. His short fiction has won a number of prizes and citations, including two Seaton Prizes, a Pen

Faulkner/NEA prize and Best American Shortstory and Pushcart citations. He is the author of two novellas, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In My Stead,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Four Wheel Drive Quartet,â&#x20AC;? as well as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Speaking French in Kansas,â&#x20AC;? a collection of short stories. His nonfiction has been published in the Wa s h i n g t o n Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, Forbes FYI, Modern Maturity, WorldLiterature Today and American Scholar. Day, a member of the Prairie Writers Circle, has had his essays reprinted in numerous newspapers and journals nationwide. Recent book publications include â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Should Have Come by Waterâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; poems â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Committee to Save the Worldâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; literary non-fiction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Words Make a Life,â&#x20AC;? BkMk Press will publish a collection of his short fiction, in September 2012.

PSU participates in national energy-efficient car competition By EBUN ADEWUMI For The Gazette

UNIVERSITY PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; After months of designing and simulating hybrid concept designs, the Penn State Advanced Vehicle Team hosted an event March 28 to publicly reveal its final vehicle design for the national competition known as EcoCAR2: Plugging In to the Future. The team had been anxiously awaiting its chance to publicly reveal the design they had chosen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different from the ideas weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve used in the past, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking forward to finally telling the community about it,â&#x20AC;? co-team leader Luke Shepley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very practical, and I think the public will be excited to see where the vehicle technology of the future is heading.â&#x20AC;? EcoCar2 is a three-year competition between colleges with the goals of encouraging innovation and training the next generation of engineers in the automotive, energy and technology sectors. Student engineers must redesign and re-engineer a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu into a unique hybrid that increases gas mileage, decreases emissions and maintains consumer acceptability. The PSU AVT team is made up of mostly students with majors such as mechanical engineering, energy engineering, computer science and public relations. This spring semester 20 freshmen interested in the engineering field were also welcomed into the Penn

Penn State Advanced Vehicle Team

RICK PRICE, executive director of the Pittsburgh Region Clean Cities, addresses the crowd at the March 28 event, the Penn State EcoCar2 car behind him. State EcoCar2 team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a part of the electrical group as a freshman is the kind of the experience that I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get anywhere else,â&#x20AC;? said Bassam Al-Othman, a freshman from Kuwait. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m considering petroleum engineering to be my major, and EcoCAR 2 is going to give me the chance to go back home and work in the energy sector.â&#x20AC;? Some of the other schools participating in the EcoCar2 event are

Tree trimming in Highlands From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dincher and Dincher, a contractor for State College Borough, has begun trimming trees throughout the Highlands Neighborhood. The work will continue until it is complete or Dec. 15, 2012. The contractor will be working at various locations (weather permitting) and will not be closing the street during the trimming. The contractor will be at specific locations for brief periods of time. Pedestrians and motorists are asked to use caution in these areas. For more information, call (814) 234-7140.

Submitted photo

MEMBERS of the Centre County Dairy Promotion team participated in the Salute to the Military Child Family Fun Fair held March 25 at Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Snider Agriculture Arena. The event was put on to connect local military and civilian families. The dairy promotion team gave temporary tattoos to the children with cartoon characters of milk, cheese and yogurt. They also handed out many other promotional items. Pictured, from left: Heather Wasson, Gretchen Little and Halee Wasson.

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PAGE 11

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Embry-Riddle, Ohio State University, Virginia Tech University and the University of Washington. The first-year competition will be held this May in Los Angeles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are thrilled to host such a unique event in this area,â&#x20AC;? said Penn State EcoCAR outreach coordinator Allison Lilly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By discussing energy awareness in the community, we want to show that every person can make a difference in cleaner transportation.â&#x20AC;?

Red Cross responds to need after local fires From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; American Red Cross volunteers were on the scene for three Centre County fires in the last week, the most recent being at Juliann Woods. The Red Cross will assist the family with disaster-related needs. In addition, the Red Cross provided canteen services for the first responders on the scene. A financial gift supports the lifesaving mission of the American Red Cross in the community, across the country and around the world. Call 800-RED CROSS (800-7332767). Contributions may be sent or dropped off at the Centre Communities Red Cross Office, 205 E. Beaver Ave., Suite 203, State College, PA 16801. Internet users can make a secure online contribution by visiting redcross.org or www.redcross-scpa.org.

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PAGE 12

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

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$19,987 2012 AUDI S5 “PRESTIGE E PACKAGE” G FLA AW WLESS LOCAL TRADE WITH 5,000 MILES, SPORTS DIFFERENTIAL TIAL L PA ACKAGE, N SIGMA A INLA AY YS CARBON

$59,900 2003 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB 4X4 LOCAL L 1 OWNER TRADE WITH LOW MILES ALL L THE POWER FEATURES, TOW PACKAGE, A TERR TERRIFIC CONDITION

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LEA AT THER INTER INTERIOR, ALL THE POWER FEA ATURES T INCLUDING CLUDING ROOF F & SEAT, 3RD SEAT

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 13

Women dance for baby with brittle bone disease By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

CENTRE HALL — In Centre Hall, they were dancing for a cause. Ten-month-old Tessa Watson of Centre Hall has osteogenesis imperfecta, more commonly known as brittle bone disease. She was born with hip dysplasia (misalignment). Doctors noticed small fractures in her thigh bones, and even broke one of Tessa’s ribs in normal handling in the hospital nursery. This disease is a lifelong affliction for Tessa, as there is no known cure. Tessa’s parents, Mike and Kennette Watson, drive Tessa to the DuPont Children’s Hospital in Wilmington, Del., every eight weeks for three days for an intravenous infusion of Pamidronate, a drug which will strengthen Tessa’s bones. These 350-mile round trips and treatments have imposed a large financial burden on Tessa’s parents, so Krista Winkelblech of

Centre Hall decided to do something to help the Watsons by organizing a Kumbathon fundraiser for Tessa and her parents. Kumba is a dance/fitness activity based on the popular Zumba program, but with various moves added and choreographed by event organizer, Krista Winkelblech (The K in Kumba stands for Krista). Kumba combines elements of gymnastics, calisthenics and modern dance into an aerobic workout which builds physical fitness. The Kumbathon was held in the basement of the American Legion Hall in Old Fort on March 31. It was a nonstop marathon of dance and exercise from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. The music was rock, pop and dance styles, played through a portable stereo from Krista’s iPod. A total of 20 women and girls each paid a $10 entry fee to participate. When the money was counted, the total was actually more than $400, thanks to many donations

March of Dimes event seeks walk participants From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE — On May 6, hundreds of families and business leaders will join together in the March of Dimes’ annual March for Babies — the nation’s oldest walk fundraiser honoring babies born healthy and those who need help to thrive and remembering those who did not survive. This year’s State College and surrounding area ambassador family is the Myers family. Lydia and Andy Myers were so excited to become pregnant and looked forward to growing their family. At 32 weeks, eight weeks early, she delivered baby Eva. Eva spent 14 days in the neonatal intensive care unit before being released just in time for Christmas. Today, Eva is a vibrant one-year-old and the Myers family is dedicated to making sure every parent has the same happy ending. Registration begins at noon with the walk kicking off at 1 p.m. Participation in March for Babies will provide a memorable and rewarding day for the whole family including team photos, face painting, games for the kids, radio broadcasts and more. To register for an event in your community, visit www.marchforbabies.org. or call the March of Dimes at (814) 696-9691. Funds raised by March for Babies in Pennsylvania help support prenatal wellness programs, research grants, neonatal intensive care unit family support programs and advocacy efforts for stronger, healthier babies. Currently, the March of Dimes is investing more than $99 million nationally and $3.8 million in Pennsylvania in research and programs. The most urgent infant health problem in the U.S. today is premature birth. It affects more than half a million babies each year, including more than 17,000 in Penn-

Submitted photo

EVA MYERS is one of many babies in Centre County helped by the March of Dimes. When she was born, she spent 14 days in the neonatal intensive care unit before being released.

For The Gazette

If you have ever stood on the top of a mountain and looked out over a clear, clean, awe-inspiring world, you are going to enjoy David Holsworth’s first book, “Fate Worse Than Death/Grace Better Than Life.” Holsworth started climbing mountains as a hobby while a student in Colorado. What started as a pastime soon developed into a full-time passion. He kept looking for the most difficult mountains and his passion took him from Colorado to the ice walls of Alaska and eventually to the gigantic mountains in the Himalayans. Along the way, he married and became a father. Marriage and fatherhood did not lessen his love of the dangers of conquering impossible peaks. He felt that the worse that could happen is that a fall could kill him or maybe he would have an accident that would disable him. Death was not something to fear. It seemed that fate had something else in mind for the author. It was not a mountaineering accident that put him in a wheelchair; it was the debilitating disease,

SAM STITZER/The Gazette

MIKE AND KENNETTE Watson with their 10month-old daughter, Tessa. have to stay at a motel,” she said. “This money will really help.”

PAWS ADOPT-A-PET TJ, a middle-age orange tabby male with a white belly and chest, hopes his Easter basket this year will include the keys to a new forever home. Quite the easy-going guy, TJ wouldn’t mind a home with children or other cats. He would also be great with house guests, since he greets anyone who comes to PAWS and likes nothing better than to curl up beside a visitor on the cushioned bench in his room. TJ loves to play, which is good since this big fellow is hoping to lose a couple of pounds. If you can open your home to super-friendly TJ, stop by PAWS, 1401 Trout Rd., State College or read more about him at www.centrecountypaws.org/ cats/.

Send Community News To ... editor@centrecountygazette.com

sylvania. In November, the March of Dimes issued its annual premature birth report card on premature birth, giving the nation a C and Pennsylvania a C. Babies born too soon are more likely to die or have disabilities. The March of Dimes is committed to reducing this toll by funding research to find the answers to premature birth and providing comfort and information to families who are affected. To join in, visit marchforbabies.org, or call (814) 696-9691 to sign up as an individual; to start a corporate, family/friends team; or to donate to help babies be born healthy. The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com or nacersano.org.

Local author writes first book By PAT PARK

over and above the $10 entry fees. Kennette Watson participated in the Kumbathon, and her husband, Mike, stopped by near the end with Tessa. He carefully lifted Tessa out of her car seat. “You can’t lift her under her arms, or you’ll break a rib,” he said. Tessa faces a life of being extremely careful. Most normal childhood activities pose a serious risk of broken bones for her. The doctors have ruled out participation in cheerleading and sports such as soccer or softball for Tessa. However, Kennette said the doctor told her “Tessa could be an Olympic-class swimmer if she wants.” Swimming poses minimal risk of bone fractures. Kennette hopes that Tessa likes the water. Kennette thanked the Kumbathon participants for their generosity and help with their expenses. “There’s a Ronald McDonald House at the hospital, but if it’s full, we

multiple sclerosis. Holsworth’s early years of climbing show us an arrogant young man. His need to take chances seldom included any consideration for the feelings of his family and friends. His growth from that young man to the mature man of faith is honestly recorded in “Fate Worse Than Death/Grace Better Than Life.” Holsworth and his wife, Deb, along with Sue Lance, a paraplegic due to spina bifida, have been instrumental in starting the Alliance Disability Outreach Group at their church. The group hosts social events like bowling and picnics for quadriplegics. If mountaineering is of interest to you, Holsworth has given a good accounting of some of his climbs. He includes a glossary of mountaineering terms and an index of locations mentioned in the book. The book will also be of interest to those who enjoy an inspirational story of how a man found his faith and, through that faith, a reason to keep on living. Pat Park is a frequent contributor to The Gazette. Read more of Pat’s reviews on her website: patsopinionatedview.blogspot.com

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Exploring the origins of Easter traditions The Easter season, is for many, a special time of the year. The holiday not only reminds us that spring is here, it is, for some, a time to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Easter is a celebration of a life and is supposed to be a religious holiday. However, there are other Easter traditions that don’t seem to have a thing to do with the religious holiday. Starting after Valentine’s day, one can find store shelves filled with cellophane grass, multi-colored plastic eggs, giant chocolate bunnies, machine manufactured toys and tiny baskets in which these items are deposited. When and how did this sacred time of year become filled with traditions revolving around a bunny and plastic eggs? Checking with Wikipedia, failed success.com and phancypages.com, it was found that the non-religious East-

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er symbols really do make sense. The origin of these traditions comes from centuries-old spring celebrations. Schoolchildren sing these familiar words near Easter: Here comes Peter Cotton tail, hopping down the bunny trail, hippity hoppity Easter’s on its way. They don’t question how or why a rabbit could bring goodies. That’s just the way it is. The rabbit has become a symbol of Easter because they are extremely fertile. Rabbits and hares mate and give birth to large litters in the early spring – age-old symbols of the increased fertility of the Earth at the vernal equinox (first day of spring). Paired with Easter, rabbits are now associated with the rebirth or resurrection. Easter is celebrated in different ways around the world. In the United States, the Easter bunny goes back hundreds of years, to the old world. Some claim, although this lore is not well supported, that the rabbit and egg symbols originated with the pagan festival of Eastre. The goddess, Eastre, was worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons through her earthly symbol, the rabbit. The Easter bunny has its origin in pre-Christian fertility lore. The Germans actually initiated the Easter rabbit symbol in America. The Easter rabbit was first mentioned in German writings in the 1500s. In the 1800s, the first edible Easter bunny, made of pastry and sugar, was made there. The egg has also become an Easter symbol. Easter egg rolling, dying eggs, egg hunts, receiving eggs in a basket or eating them on Easter – the egg is a symbol of fertility, as are the chicks that hatch from them. It is thought that many ancient cultures used eggs during their spring festivals.

In Eastern Christianity, both meat and dairy, including eggs, are still prohibited during Lent. The consumption of eggs may resume after the strict Lenten fast. Eggs were then given as a gift to children. They continue to be a staple of Easter meals, whether pickled or as deviled eggs. In 2000, Americans spent nearly $1.9 billion on Easter candy. The consumption and giving of Easter candy and gifts goes back hundreds of years. It was originally believed to have begun with the tradition of hot cross buns and baked pretzels. Hot cross buns became the traditional breakfast of Good Friday and its design, consisting of twists, resembled arms crossed in prayer. Pretzels share this “crossed arms” design. The tradition of pretzels and hot cross buns, tied to the religious aspects of Easter, eventually died out. Now, jelly beans are egg shaped and the infamous marshmallow peeps are the “new” hot cross bun. The lily is another symbol of spring and the Easter holiday. The white trumpeted flower is referred to as the Easter lily. This flower was a reminder to Christians of how Jesus came back to life. The Easter lily is displayed in many church services and is a symbol of the purity of the Virgin Mary. This Easter, remember these traditional, original and symbolic meanings when giving or receiving your Easter basket (originally considered as a nest for the bunny bearing gifts), while sitting on the Easter bunny’s lap, or devouring candy or deviled eggs. With each bite of that chocolate bunny, which is statistically eaten most often from the ears down, remember that Easter and spring are a time of renewal, resurrection and rebirth.

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APRIL 5-11, 2012

April 5 ■ Living Last Supper “Living Last Supper,” a live portrayal of Leonardo da Vinci's painting, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 5 at Fairbrook United Methodist Church in Pennsylvania Furnace. Childcare will be available.

■ Easter Flower Sale The Reliance Fire Company in Philipsburg is having an Easter flower sale from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at the bingo building. Indoor and outdoor plants are available. For more information, call (814) 8575320.

April 6 ■ Easter Musical The Halfmoon Christian Fellowship Church will present an Easter musical, “The King Is Coming,” at 7 p.m. April 6. This musical is filled with classic songs and hymns to be enjoyed by all. The church is on Rte. 550 east of Stormstown, 1776 Halfmoon Valley Rd.

■ Easter Flower Sale The Reliance Fire Company, 319 N. Centre St., Philipsburg is having an Easter flower sale from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at the bingo building. Indoor and outdoor plants are available. For more information, call (814) 8575320.

■ Good Friday Service The First Baptist Church of Bellefonte, 539 Jacksonville Rd., is having a Good Friday service at 7 p.m. Friday, April 6. For more information, call (814) 3555678.

April 7 ■ Bellefonte Easter Egg Hunt The Bellefonte community Easter egg hunt is at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 7 at Tal-

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 15

leyrand Park in Bellefonte. It’s free for kids 12 and under. The hunt is sponsored by Bellefonte clubs, churches and businesses.

■ Underwater Egg Hunt The State College YMCA, 677 Whitehall Rd., will host its annual Underwater Egg Hunt from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 7. Prizes will be awarded and flotation devices will be provided for non-swimmers. Space is limited due to safety, so pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, call (814) 237-7717 or email rcarroll@ymcaofcentrecounty.org. The event is free and open to the community.

■ Easter Egg Hunt Fairbrook United Methodist Church, 4201 W. Whitehall Road, Pennsylvania Furnace is having an Easter Egg hunt at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 7.

■ Easter Egg Hunt & BBQ The MOGS Motorcycle Club and the Houserville United Methodist Church present the third annual community Easter egg hunt and BBQ from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, April 7 at Spring Creek Park in Houserville. The egg hunt beings at 1:30 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public.

■ Centre Region Easter Egg Hunt Centre Region Parks and Recreation’s annual Easter Egg Hunt will be held at Orchard Park, near the corner of Bayberry Drive and Blue Course Drive, State College. Prize baskets will be provided by members of the State College Rotary Club. The hunt will begin at 2 p.m. sharp so please arrive in time to meet the Easter Bunny. Rain or shine. The hunt is for children up to 9 years old. Free to the public.

April 8 ■ Easter Dinner You are invited to a free Easter dinner noon-1 p.m. Sunday, April 8 the Pleasant

Gap United Methodist Church, 179 S. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Deliveries are also available to shut-ins. For more information or to make reservations call (814) 359-3011 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday or leave a message. Reservations are not necessary.

■ Easter Sunday Service The First Baptist Church of Bellefonte, 539 Jacksonville Road, is having an Easter Sunrise Service at 7 a.m. Sunday, April 8 in the pavilion behind the church, followed by Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. and Easter Worship at 10:45 a.m. in the sanctuary. For more information, call (814) 3555678.

■ Easter Sunrise Service/Breakfast The Houserville House of Hope UMC is having an Easter sunrise service at 6:30

a.m. Sunday, April 8. A free breakfast will follow worship. For more information, call (814) 8085730 or email pastor@hosuervilleumc.org. The church is at 1320 Houserville Rd.

■ Easter Sunday Activities St. John’s United Church of Christ in Boalsburg will host a sunrise service at 7 a.m., an Easter egg hunt at 9:15 a.m. and an Easter worship service at 10:30 a.m. The church is at 218 N. Church St., Boalsburg.

■ Easter Services Grace Lutheran Church, 205 S. Garner St., State College will hold the following services: sunrise worship: 6:30 a.m., Easter breakfast: 7:30 a.m., worship: 8 a.m.; worship: 9 a.m.; worship: 10:30 a.m.; worship: 6 p.m.

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CHILDREN SCRAMBLE for eggs at the Bellefonte Community Easter Egg Hunt in 2011.

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PAGE 16

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

CENTRE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Setting the pace APRIL FOOLS 5K

WALK WITH ME

TIM WEIGHT/The Gazette

CARRIE RYAN, CFO, U.S. Rep. Glenn Thompson and The Nittany Lion pose with the Honorary Ambassadors to kick off the walk. From Gazette staff reports KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

THE SWIFTEST runners surged to the front of the pack during the April Fools 5K. Prizes were awarded to the top three runners, both male and female, and to the top two runners in each of seven age groups. People of all ages, even babies in strollers, participated in the 5K run and walk.

Walk With Me, a 1.5-mile walk/wheel took place March 31. The walk began at 220 N. Burrowes St. in State College. The walk/wheel benefited children and adults with disabilities served by Easter Seals Central Pennsylvania. Beta Theta Phi hosted the walk by offer-

ing their facilities as the site where the walk began and ended. Despite cool and damp weather, this was the largest attendance ever with more than 180 registered walkers. Event manager Elizabeth Wainright reported Team Annie held the top position this year, raising more than $2,000 of the total $11,940.

KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

ROZ ROSSMAN, Christine Monaco and Tony Monaco ran in the April Fools 5K on April 1, hosted by the Centre County Chapter of the Penn State Alumni Association to benefit a scholarship fund for Penn State students from Centre County. The Monacos began running a year ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything to do with supporting a worthy cause like this, we're ready to help out,â&#x20AC;? said Tony Monaco. They also run the Coaches Vs. Cancer 5K run. He said the April Fools 5K was a preamble to the Pittsburgh Half Marathon they plan to run in May.

KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

TODD BANEY, race director for the April Fools 5K, gave the runners last-minute instructions. The race began in front of the Joe Paterno statue at Beaver Stadium, and attracted all ages of runners and walkers, including families with children and babies in strollers.

TIM WEIGHT/The Gazette

MITCHELL CASE and his dad, Dr. Dustin Case, get some last minute pep from the Nittany Lion.


SPREAD

APRIL 5-11, 2012

RELAY FOR LIFE

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 17

HOUSE WALK 2012

KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

TIM WEIGHT/The Gazette

LARGE RISING luminaria were lit and released into the evening sky one by one.

CARSON GILBERT, left, Jennifer Gilbert, Tanya Hockman and Andrea Crews are members of Team Cole participating in House Walk 2012 for Habitat for Humanity at Medlar Field in Lubrano Park. Hockman said: “The house that's being built is for one of my cheerleaders in the State College Little Lions. She Facebooked me to tell me.” She said this event will also help them prepare them for the three-day Susan G. Komen benefit walk in the fall.

KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

RELAY FOR LIFE team members passed home plate on their first lap around Medlar Field at Lubrano Park. KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

THE AMAZING RACERS were the First National Bank team for House Walk 2012. Pictured, back row, from left: Bill Polkinghorn, Pete Nastase, Ginny Woodring and Nick Lingenfelter; front row, from left: Maddie Polkinghorn, Linda White, Lauren White and Mike White. Nastase is on the board for Habitat for Humanity of Greater Centre County. White said: “We're having a battle of the banks going on.” It was a competition between First National Bank and Nittany Bank. The winner of the competition will get a trophy featuring colorful tennis shoes.

KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

SPEAKER JAY PATERNO posed for photographs with many Penn State students after the Relay for Life opening ceremony, including Joselyn Barrios (left) and Cally Prutting. During the ceremony, he gave a speech about coach Joe Paterno's battle with cancer and thanked participants for continuing that fight through Relay for Life. Paterno read Dylan Thomas's poem, “Do not go gentle into that good night,” and quoted social activist and tennis player Arthur Ashe, “True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass others at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others at whatever cost.” The late coach was honored several times during the Relay for Life.

KAREN DABNEY/The Gazette

THE WEEKEND rain saturated Medlar Field, so Habitat for Humanity of Greater Centre County decided to have the House Walk 2012 on the stadium concourse instead of out on the baseball field.


PAGE 18

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

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SPORTS

APRIL 5-11, 2012

PAGE 19

Penn State’s Taylor captures Hodge Trophy By BRYAN VAN KLEY Special to The Gazette

UNIVERSITY PARK — For only the third time in the 18-year history of college wrestling’s top award, a sophomore has won the Dan Hodge Trophy. Penn State’s NCAA champ David Taylor was named the 2012 Hodge winner. Only his college coach, Cael Sanderson, and Iowa’s Brent Metcalf, ever received the honor as a sophomore. Sanderson won the award in 2000 after winning his second NCAA title for Iowa State. The former Cyclone went on to win the Hodge two more times and is the only three-time Hodge winner. Taylor’s trail of domination through the 165pound weight class ended on March 17 in St. Louis, Mo., with his first NCAA title. He put on a offensive show in the finals with a 22-7 technical fall over Brandon Hatchett of Lehigh. Leading up to the finals, Taylor reeled off four straight pins to cap off one of the most dominating collegiate seasons of all time. In building his 32-0 record on the year, the Ohio native pinned 15 opponents, had nine tech falls and had six majors. And he also helped lead Penn State to their second straight NCAA team title in convincing fashion. “I really appreciate the award. It’s definitely something I’ve looked forward to for along time,” Taylor said of winning wrestling’s version of the Heisman Trophy. “When I was kid, every time WIN Magazine would come, I would go through it. It always listed the previous winners and I just wanted to be on that list. The best wrestlers ever were on that list. To be a part of that list is just very special. I just feel very honored. I want to win two more.” When Sanderson was asked about his star pupil, he said he could talk about Taylor “forever in regards to what he means to the program”. He said what makes Taylor so unique in comparison to other great athletes is his almost childlike approach towards competing and pursuing the lofty goals he has set. “He’s a great kid who has a passion for the sport. His actions speak pretty loudly with the way he competes, the look on his face and what he says in interviews,” Sanderson said. “It’s just like a little kid. They dream about what they want to be, but then once they get into it they try not to lose it. You have to keep the same

TAMI KNOPSNYDER/Special to The Gazette

PENN STATE’S David Taylor, a sophomore, captured the prestigious Hodge Trophy for his efforts during the 2011-12 season. Taylor defeated Lehigh’s Brandon Hatchett to win the 165pound NCAA title. (child-like) mentality so you don’t get into that afraid-to-lose mode. That should be a motivator vs. something that causes you to tighten up. A lot of that comes from loving the thrill of battle.” Taylor won the award presented annually by WIN Magazine and Culture House Books because of his dominance this season. In his 32 wins, there were only two bouts where he didn’t score bonus points. In a Dec. 9 dual, Taylor downed eventual NCAA runner-up Brandon Hatchett, 8-5. And in a mid-January dual with Iowa, Taylor downed Iowa’s Michael Evans, 9-4. Amazingly, 12 of his 15 pins came in the first period. Taylor said domination every match is a goal of his. “This year my goal was to have zero decisions. The first decision against Hatchett I was upset with myself. My goal was to go out and dominate everyone I wrestle. That’s just how I think about it,” the former four-time Ohio state champ from St. Paris Graham High School said. “David Taylor has brought something very special to the entire sport,” said Culture House Books’ Mike Chapman, founder of the award. “His enthusiasm, coupled with his vast array of skills, make him one of the finest examples of college wrestling that I have seen over the past four decades. This season was nearly perfect in all respects. It is a pleasure to watch him compete.” Taylor got involved in the sport when he was five because his parents, Dave and Kathy, knew they needed an outlet for their ’high energy’ son. The now-college-sophomore

retold the story about his mom calling his dad to tell him she was signing their son up for the sport when Dave, Sr. was away on a road trip. David has been relentless about improving and seeking out the best coaching and competition ever since. Taylor and his dad would frequently drive an hour and a half one direction a couple times a week after school and on weekends for club practices or for extra weight-training sessions. The Taylor family, including sister Alex, 19, made all kinds of trips around the country for David’s tournaments. David said his family and their sacrifices is a big reason for his success. DT, as many refer to him, is already getting compared to his coach who became the sport’s first undefeated four-time Division I NCAA champ. “There’s only ever going to be one Cael Sanderson. I’m just trying to do things like him, but also develop my own style. I want people to talk about me in the same way they talk about Cael in regards to dominating. If you’re going to be compared to someone, that’s a pretty good person to be compared to,” he said. Sanderson, now having coached the Nittany Lions to two straight team titles, said he’s honored people are comparing him to his 21-year old sophomore. “I didn’t dominate anywhere near like what David Taylor is dominating...a technical fall in the finals and four pins. He’s certainly technically superior (to me at that age),” Sanderson said. “If someone compares him to me, that’s an honor. I’d say ‘Really,

that means a lot to me.’” Sanderson said that mindset of domination and truly aspiring to greatness is what drives Taylor to win. Sanderson said Taylor picks PSU assistant Casey Cunningham two to three times a week as a workout partner in practice. Cunninghman was an NCAA champ in 1999, and is known for being very mentally and physically tough. “You’re either partly crazy or you really want to win,” Sanderson said of Taylor wanting to work out with Cunningham. “His confidence comes not from what he says, but in what he does. If he gives up a takedown, it doesn’t phase him at all. If you’re going to beat David Taylor, you’re going to have to score 20 points because he’s going to score at least 20 points.” Sanderson said Taylor has that elite-level mindset of thriving off of being in the big matches and rising to those occasions. And that mindset is tied back to the goals he’s set for himself and the work he’s put in to see them accomplished. “When I was younger, I dreamed of being a fourtime state champ, a fourtime national champ and winning the Olympics. I’ve always had goals like that and dreamed big. I’ve looked at it as if you’re going to set goals, you need to set them high. That’s the way that I kept motivated and hungry for the sport,” Taylor said. So where could Taylor’s career go from here? He obviously has two years left in State College. In addition to gunning for two

Taylor, Page 21

New Penn State coach takes time to show he cares If there was any doubt about that first-year Penn State football coach Bill O’Brien was going to be actively involved in the community, that was erased during his first couple of months on the job. O’Brien gained a bunch of new fans a couple of weeks ago, when he showed up for the Centre County Down Syndrome Society’s dance party on a Friday night at Bellefonte High School. The new coach brought assistant coach Larry Johnson and several players with him. The thing that struck me was the fact that this wasn’t a rush-in, rush-out appearance. During my 20plus years as a newspaper reporter, BILL O’BRIEN I’ve seen that one too many times. You know the routine: A player or coach makes an appearance at a charity event, signs a few autographs, shakes a few hands and is out the door. That wasn’t the case with O’Brien. He stayed for quite some time, actually. During that time, he signed anything and everything that fans handed him. You name it, he signed it. There were hats, footballs and T-shirts. He even signed one young boys’ cast and chided the youngster about being dressed head-to-toe in Florida Gators’ gear. The thing that struck me about O’Brien was that he’s genuine. He got a little emotional as he talked about his son, Jack, who has lissencephaly, a rare brain malformation. If there’s one thing I took away from my 15-minute conversation with him, it’s that he’s a father and husband first, a football coach second. And quite frankly, that’s the way it should be. When the dance began, one of the Chris Morelli is the youngsters got down on the floor and editor of the Centre attempted to breakdance. It wasn’t the County Gazette. He prettiest of breakdances, but hey, the can be reached at kid was trying. And O’Brien couldn’t editor@centre help but smile. It was like he didn’t countygazette.com want to leave. “I just like to get out and meet people in the community,” O’Brien said. “That’s just the way I am.” Being a head coach of a college football program, especially with one with a rabid fan base like Penn State, it’s important for the head coach to get out, be visible in the community and get to know the fans. Some coaches get it, some don’t. O’Brien clearly gets it. Appearing at the dance wasn’t enough for O’Brien. After meeting just about everyone there, he extended an invitation. “We’d love to have you over, if you just call and come over to one of the practices,” he said. “Come on over, watch a practice, watch these guys run around and hit each other a little bit.” We really don’t know much about O’Brien when it comes to his football philosophy. We do know this — he’s eager to get started. Spring practice began last week, and O’Brien was eager to see his squad on the field. “We’re looking forward to it. We’ve had a good winter, and these guys are ready to go out and start hitting each other,” O’Brien said. “These are fun guys to be around and fun guys to coach. They have a lot of pride in being Penn State football players and I have a lot of pride in coaching them.” O’Brien took a couple of hits last week when former Maryland quarterback Danny O’Brien chose to transfer to Wisconsin rather than Penn State. He’s a player who would have stepped in and made an immediate impact. Now, coach O’Brien will likely have to choose a starter from Matt McGloin, Rob Bolden and Paul Jones. None of those quarterbacks will be mistaken for Tom Brady anytime soon. Also last week, Ryan Switzer, a standout running back from West Virginia, verbally committed to North Carolina over Penn State. Word is that O’Brien and his staff coveted Switzer, but his high school coach swayed him from Penn State. O’Brien seems to be the kind of guy who doesn’t let much get to him. Chances are that he will keep moving forward as his team prepares for the Blue-White Game on April 21. In the meantime, don’t be surprised if you bump into him at a charity event. That’s just the kind of guy he is.

CHRIS MORELLI

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PAGE 20

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

With arrival of spring, thoughts turn to golfing For most, the beginning of spring usually means the appearance of the first robin or the first crocus flower jutting through the soil after a long winter sleep. But for golfers of the Centre Region, the first sign of spring is when one drives by a golf course and the pins are in! That m e a n s spring has officially arrived. With that thought in mind, the following is a cost breakdown for the six facilities within the Centre Region. Of the six, Centre State John Dixon writes a Hills, weekly golf column College Elks and Nittany for The Centre are considCounty Gazette. He can be reached at ered private jwd1@psu.edu. clubs while Penn State, Skytop Mountain (formerly Freestone) and Toftrees are open to the public.

JOHN DIXON

Centre Hills Country Club (www.centrehillscc.com) Pro: Jeb Boyle, 25th year. Telephone: 238-0161 Located: Off Branch Road in State College The 6,461-yard, par-71 layout has a course rating of 71.9 from the Blue tees and 70.4 from the White with the women’s rating at 76.0. The course slope is 136 and 132, respectively, and 134 for the

Taylor, from page 19 more NCAA titles and two more Hodge Trophies. He also wants to follow in the footsteps of his coach and be an Olympic champ. Taylor hopes to get a wild-card spot to wrestle in next month’s Olympic Trials in Iowa City, Iowa, on April 20-21. However, he’ll have the reigning 163-pound World champ in Jordan Burroughs in his weight class. Burroughs was the 2011 winner of the Hodge Trophy. For the first time in the history of the award, both the Hodge Trophy winner and runner-up were from the same team as Ed Ruth finished second in the balloting. Ruth was dominant at 174 all year. At the NCAAs, he

women. Centre Hills also maintains a nine-hole course off the Mount Nittany Expressway and is under the direction of Ken Miller. For membership information, which includes yearly food assessment and an initiation fee, contact the club office at 238-0111. Boyle’s staff this season includes, Chet Zuchelli, Steve Campbell, Ken Miler, Gary Dillon and PSU intern Adam Charles. The manager of golf course operations is Chip Fogleman and the course superintendent is Gabe Menna. The club manager is Lisa McDonald. Elks Country Club (http://www.elks1600.org) Pro: Aaron Palen, 2nd season. Telephone: 466-6451 Located: Between Routes 45 and 322 near Boalsburg. The 6,427-yard, par-71 layout has a course rating of 71.4 and a course slope of 130. The White tees are 6,190-yards, 70.6 and 130 while the women’s layout is 4,801-yards, 69.4 and 120. The cost for a full family membership for a husband and wife with unlimited use of the golf course and access to all available tournaments is $2,100. A full new family membership is $1,450 and are Elks Lodge members. An individual membership is $1,3500 while a new membership is $1,150. A full summer junior membership is $425. For further information on these packages contact the Elks office at 466-7231. Palen’s staff consists of Jeremy Crawford and Josh Dollar. The course superintendent is Dave Williams and the club manager is John Chiusano.

Nittany Country Club (www.nittanycc.ning.com) Pro: Scott Frey, 3rd season Telephone: 383-2611 Located: Mingoville off Route 64 northeast of Zion. The 9-hole course layout consists of different tees for the front side and backside and measures 6,014 yards for men and 5,094 yards for women with course ratings of 69.2 and 69.4 for men and women, respectively. The slope ratings are 116 and 114, respectfully. The cost for unlimited golf access for one family member is $1,000. Unlimited golf access for two adult family members of $1,450. Additional family members between 12 and 18 is $250 each. Family memberships are capped at $1,950 per year. The course is open to the general public until Memorial Day and after Labor Day. The cost for 18 holes is $25 and $20 for cart usage. Nine holes is $16 and $14. An annual cart pass is $585 while daily use is $16 for 18 holes and $12 for 9 holes. Assisting Frey this season is Dave McKinley and Joe Worrick. The course superintendent is Jim Dobson while Linda Workman is the club manager. Penn State Golf Courses (pennstategolfcourses.com) Pro: Joe Hughes, 12th season. Telephone: 865-4653 Located: West College Avenue, State College The White Course is a 6,102yard, par-72 layout with a course rating of 69.4 from the White tees with a slope rating of 127. From the ladies tees the length is 4,974

reeled off two pins, a technical fall in the semis and put up an impressive 13-2 major decision over Stanford’s Nick Amuchastegui in the finals. Ruth only failed to score bonus points in four of his 31 wins on the year, and had ten pins and six technical falls. PSU’s third NCAA champ, Frank Molinaro, finished fourth in the voting behind Cornell’s three-time NCAA champ in junior Kyle Dake. Dake had a respectable 12 pins and three techs at 157 pounds. Only 13 of Dake’s 35 opponents on the year kept him from scoring bonus points. Molinaro’s 2011-2012 resume at 149 pounds included four pins, seven techs, 11 majors and 11 decisions. He is Penn State’s lone senior.

yards with a 68.5 rating and a 117 slope. The Blue Course measures 6,305-yards from the White tees at a par-72 with a 70.4 rating and a 128 slope. Penn State has also Blue tees from 6,686 yards (72.3/134) and Black tees of 7,214 yards (75.2/138) for the seriously long-ball hitters. Ladies tees are 5,075-yards with a rating of 69.7 and a slope of 126. Memberships consist of public $1,315 and $795 for additional family members, faculty/staff $1,200 and $700 and Penn State students $690. Also available for Penn State students is Spring ($150), Summer $280), Late Summer ($155) and Fall ($205) memberships. Cost for junior golfers is $450. PGA Pro Joe Hughes’ course management consist of Brian Short (PGA), Steve Eskey, Steve Wager, Ryan Baer and Nick Godfrey. The course superintendent is Rick Pagett assisted by Don Chester and Scot Martell. The office manager is Patty Nellis. Skytop Mountain Golf Club (www.skytopgolf.com) Pro: TBA Telephone: 692-4249 Located: On Skytop Mountain Road between Port Matilda and State College on old Route 322. From State College the course is on the right 3.5 miles past the Grays Woods exit. Formerly Freestone Golf Course, Skytop Mountain Golf Club is now a division of MatchPlay Management Corp. under the direction of president Garry McShea and vice president Rich Brennan. The course superintendent is Michael Stine with the

remaining staff to be in place this week. The 18-hole course layout is 6,535-yards, par-72 from the Blue tees with a course rating of 71.4 and a slope of 129. The White tees are 67.6/127 and the ladies tees 66.2/118. The cost for a family membership is $599. Management is currently repaving cart paths, clearing brush that will add several major enhances to the layout of the course. Additional information on the progress will appear in future columns. Toftrees Golf Resort & Conference Center (www.toftreesgolf.com) Director of Golf: Tom Katanick, 15th season Pro: Derrick Strub Telephone: 234-8000 Located: Off the Mount Nittany Expressway at the Toftrees/Woodycrest exit. The 7,107-yard, par-72 layout has a course rating of 74.8 and a slope of 140 from the Black Tees, 73.4/139 Blue tees at 6,756 yards, 71.7/137 White tees at 6,378 yards and 72.2/125 from the 5,320-yard ladies tee. Spring golf rates are $39 Monday-Thursday, $34 after 1 p.m. Weekend rates are $49 and $44 after 1 p.m. Toftrees has several golf, pool, tennis, social members and resort packages available. For further information, contact the pro shop. The course superintendent is Lew Morgan while Tyler Butts is the assistant course manager. JD Coccia is the assistant club professional.

Another Cornell champion and Hodge finalist, senior Cam Simaz, came in fifth in the voting for the Hodge with his title at 197. Iowa junior Matt McDonough was sixth after his second title in three consecutive trips to the NCAA finals at 125. Taylor is the second Nittany Lion to win the award as Kerry McCoy won the honor in 1997. Criteria for the award include: a wrestler’s record, number of pins, dominance on the mat, past credentials, quality of competition and sportsmanship/citizenship and heart. Bryan Van Kley is a writer for winmagazine.com.

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LACROSSE COACHES — St. Joseph’s Catholic Academy will play lacrosse for the first time this season. The coaches are Penn State students. Jim Ciccone, left, and Jayson Jackson, right, will coach the squads. Both Ciccone and Jackson were involved with lacrosse teams at a pair of Penn State’s branch campuses.

The Bellefonte Area School District Board of School Directors will hold the Regular Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, 2012, in the Multi-Purpose Room at the Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science & Technology, 540 North Harrison Road, Pleasant Gap.


APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

BEA’s Taylor making his move in national wrestling rankings By ERIC KNOPSNYDER Special to The Gazette

Jake Taylor said he doesn't look at the national high school wrestling rankings very often. He might want to the next time Intermat or other sites post their rankings. There's a good chance the Bald Eagle Area junior will vault into the top 20 after his performance at the Flonationals event at Drexel University in Philadelphia last weekend. Taylor went 5-0 to win the 170pound title, knocking off top-seeded Zach Nevills of California – who is ranked 10th nationally by Intermat – on the way to the championship Taylor started his run with a 17-5 victory over Hieronym Chamblee of Kentucky, then added another major decision, this one 13-4 over Wisconsin's Mason Baumgartner. A 5-1 victory over North Carolina's Parker VonEgidy set up his semifinal bout with Nevills, who is a Stanford recruit. The 3-1 victory was a big one for Taylor. “Yeah, it was,” he said. “I felt like I

could have been a little more offensive in that match. I don't know if that would have changed the outcome at all, but it was a big win for me.” After facing opponents from all over the map, Taylor got a familiar foe in the finals in Connor Moran. Taylor beat the Solanco senior 5-1 in the consolation finals of the PIAA Class AAA Wrestling Championships last month. “I wrestled him once last year and for third this year at states,” Taylor said. “I definitely knew what was coming. I lost to him last year and beat him this year.” He might have known what was coming, but it didn't mean it was easy. He beat Moran 4-1 in double overtime. He also wasn't stunned to see Moran in the finals of a national event? “It was a little neat,” he said. “I don't know that I'd say surprising. Pennsylvania's a tough wrestling state and he's a tough wrestler, so I wasn't surprised to see him in the finals.” The performance could open even

Lucas earns recognition from Associated Press UNIVERSITY PARK — Penn State sophomore guard Maggie Lucas capped of an outstanding sophomore campaign by taking home Associated Press AllAmerica honorable mention accolades. She is the first Lady Lion to garner AP honors since Tyra Grant was also an honorable mention selection in 2010. This is the 15th time that a Lady Lion has earned AP AllAmerica honors since the award began in 1995. Lucas is the fourth Penn State sophomore to claim AP accolades, joining Angie Potthoff (1995 honorable mention), Kelly Mazzante (2002 - 2nd team) and Tanisha Wright (2003 - honorable mention). Lucas garnered first team All-Big Ten honors after finishing third in the conference in scoring at a 19.5 per game clip. She is just the fourth different Lady Lion to score more than 600 points in a season with 642 tallies on the year. It is the sixth time in program history a player has surpassed the 600-point mark in a season (Mazzante; three times, Suzie McConnell; 1987-88, Susan Robinson; 1989-90). Her 642 tallies are the fifth-most in a season in Penn State history

and are the second-most by a sophomore. She is also Top 10 in the league in free throw percentage (.886 - 3rd), three-point field goal percentage (.410 3rd) and three-pointers made (2.5 - 2nd). The Narberth, Pa. native has become more than just a threepoint threat for the Lady Lions. Lucas has found her way to the free throw line nearly twice as many times as she did last season and has relied less on the three-ball. The sophomore set personal marks for points (642), free throws made (156), assists (91) and rebounds (154). Her 88.6 percent mark from the free throw line is tied for the third-best mark in single-season school history. The Feb. 21 Big Ten Player of the Week became the third sophomore in school history (Mazzante and Robinson) and 34th player overall to reach 1,000 points with a three-pointer in the second half at Minnesota on Feb. 5. Lucas reached the milestone in just 58 games, which is 11th-fastest in Big Ten history. She resides 25th on Penn State’s career scoring list (1194), third in three-point field goals made (194) and first in free throw percentage (.881).

more doors for Taylor, who went 38-2 this season, winning District 6 and Northwest Regional titles before finishing third at the state tournament. “I felt like I wrestled a pretty good tournament and I'm looking to improve on what I did,” he said. Taylor said he plans to wrestle in college, and winning a prestigious event like Flonationals could help get noticed. “I'd like to think so,” he said. “There were a lot of college coaches at the tournament. Depending on how they wrestled, it may help me.” Even though the high school season has just ended, Taylor doesn't plan to make off much time. He'll be back on the mat almost immediately. “I wrestle a lot in the summer – a lot of freestyle tournaments and and some time in the room,” he said. He's hoping to land a spot in the national freestyle tournament in Fargo, N.D., later this year. “I definitely want to try and qualify for Fargo this year,” he said. That would give him a chance to impress both the college coaches and those who do the national rankings.

PAGE 21

Penns Valley captures basketball title at BEA tourney

Submitted photo

THE BEA sixth-grade girls basketball team took second place. From Gazette staff reports WINGATE — Bald Eagle Area High School was the site of the first-ever Sixth Grade Girls’ Basketball Tournament, which was held on March 23 and 24. A total of seven teams took part in the tourney. The teams that participated were: Central Mountain, Penns Valley, Mountoursville, Philipsburg-Osceola, Nittany Valley Blue, Nittany Valley White and host Bald Eagle Area. In the championship game of the tourney, Penns Valley defeated BEA.

State College Knights of Columbus

Russell, Curry receive honors for volleyball The Penn State men’s volleyball team (18-3, 11-0 EIVA) picked up this week’s EIVA weekly awards. Freshman Aaron Russell (Ellicott City, Md.) was named the EIVA Offensive Player of the Week, while redshirt freshman Connor Curry (Newport Beach, Calif.) earned Defensive Player of the Week honors. This is the fourth honor of the season for Curry and the first for Russell. The awards bring Penn State’s total for the season to eight. The pair guided Penn State to two EIVA wins over the weekend against Princeton and George Mason to remain undefeated at 11-0 in league play. Russell registered a .686 attack percentage for the weekend after pounded 26 kills with only two errors in 35 swings. He aver-

aged 2.89 kills per set, while also contributing seven total blocks for 31.5 points. Against Princeton, Russell was second on the team with 13 kills on .722 hitting. He also had an ace and two blocks. Against the Patriots of George Mason, Russell tied for first on the team with 12 kills on .647 hitting and also put up five total blocks. Curry was the starting libero for the Nittany Lions against the Tigers and Patriots. Against Princeton, Curry had a career-high 21 digs and had zero reception errors in 36 attempts. On March 31 versus George Mason, Curry tied for first on the team with 11 digs and again had zero reception errors in 13 attempts. Curry averaged 3.56 digs per set for the weekend.

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SUPPORTING THE COMMUNITY WITH DIABETES EVENTS Mount Nittany is committed to providing a full range of diabetes services to the community to help people with diabetes – and their loved ones – better manage their health. Attend our upcoming diabetes events, featuring: • Life with Diabetes series. Every Tuesday in April (April 3, April 10, April 17, April 24) from 6-8:30 p.m. Pre-registration is required. To register or for more information, contact Heather Harpster at 814.231.7194. • Diabetes Support Group. April 12 from 6-7 p.m. For more information, contact Amy Leffard at 814.231.7095. Each of the events is being held at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 East Park Avenue, State College.

Submitted photo

THE BELLEFONTE BUCKS, a U-10 travel team from Bellefonte, placed third in the Indoor War Tournament in Palmyra. Kneeling, from left: C.J. Funk, Nick Fisher, Conner Grey, Colton Burd and Nick Catalano. Standing: Seth Shuey, Ben McCartney, Mason Grey, Mathew Reese and Ben Macafee.

For a full schedule of upcoming April community events, visit mountnittany.org/events. © 2012 Mount Nittany Health System


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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Art Alliance exhibit will showcase talents, creativity of area children From Gazette staff reports Area school art teachers have invited art students in third, fourth and fifth grade to participate in the Art Alliance’s second annual “Kids Love Art” program and exhibit. The purpose of the program is to recognize students who love art and to encourage them to pursue their talents. The students come from local school districts including Bald Eagle, Bellefonte, Penns Valley and State College. Several charter schools in the area are also involved. Students with their families and friends will attend a reception in their honor from 6-8 p.m. Friday, April 13 at the Art Alliance, 818 Pike Street, Lemont. The event is open to the public to meet the talented young artists and see their works, as well meet some local artists who are members of the Art Alliance. The exhibit hours will continue Saturday, April 14, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, April 15, noon to 5 p.m. For more information about the program and exhibit, contact Dee Stout deestout15@yahoo.com.

Submitted photo

THE ART ALLIANCE will host the second annual “Kids Love Art” exhibit. Pictured are some of the pieces children had on display last year.

Play about aspiring actors Got talent? Auditions hits stage at The State to be held for rising stars all across Happy Valley By PAT PARK

For The Gazette

From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE — Open auditions for the second annual “Happy Valley’s Got Talent” show will be 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, April 14 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, April 15 at Indigo - Night Club, 112 W. College Ave., State College. Pianists audition will be separate from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturday only at the State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. All types of performers from vocalists to dancers to comics are invited to audition in four age categories. The 12 best acts will advance to the finals and compete for cash prizes. This benefit show is patterned after the nationally televised show “America’s Got Talent.” The four categories are: ■ Future Fame Division (12-15 years old) ■ Rising Stars Division (16-20 years old) ■ Prime Time Division (21-39 years old) ■ Local Legends Division (40 and older) The finals will be 7 p.m. Saturday, April

28 at the State Theatre. New this year, there will be a 2 p.m. family-oriented matinee. While the afternoon show will not be judged, kids in the audience will vote for their overall “Kids Choice” winner in each category. Also new this year will be a live auction at the evening show, including a day of sailing on the Chesapeake, a trip to a Steelers game, and gourmet dinner for eight, with all proceeds going to support Tides. This year’s judges include Sue Paterno, State College Mayor Elizabeth Gorham and radio personalities Jeff Brown from 93.7 The Bus and PJ Mullen from B94.5. Veterinarian Fred Metzger will again host the show, which is being produced by local playwright and show producer Jerry Sawyer. There is no fee to participate, and all performers are asked to register online at www.tidesprogram.org, prior to the audition. Registration will be possible on the days of the auditions if space allows.

Red Cross blood drives scheduled MONDAY, APRIL 9 ■ 1-7 p.m. — PSU/Brill Hall, McKean Rd. **OSC Fight for Life. Jersey Mike’s Sub in the canteen

TUESDAY, APRIL 10 ■ 10 a.m.-4 p.m. — Red Cross Donor Center, 135 S. Pugh St., State College. Honey baked sandwiches in the canteen ■ 12:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. — Bald Eagle Community United Methodist Church, 111 Runville Rd., Wingate. Pizza Mia in the canteen ■ 1-7 p.m. — Knights of Columbus, 850 Stratford Dr., State College ■ 10 a.m.-4 p.m. — PSU/HUB - Alumni Hall, Pollock Rd. **OSC Fight for Life. Jersey Mike’s Sub in the canteen

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 ■ 1-7 p.m. — Howard Fire Hall, 14 Walnut St., Howard. Pizza Mia in the canteen ■ 1-7 p.m. — PSU/East Halls, Findlay

Commons, Bigler Rd. Day 1 of 2. **OSC Fight for Life. Jersey Mike’s Sub in the canteen

THURSDAY, APRIL 12 ■ 1-7 p.m. — Ferguson Township Lions Club, 424 West Pine Grove Rd., Pine Grove Mills ■ 1-7 p.m. — PSU/East Halls, Findlay Commons, Bigler Rd. Day 2 of 2. **OSC Fight for Life. Jersey Mike’s Sub in the canteen **OSC indicates a blood challenge with Ohio State. All presenting donors will receive coupons for Appalachian Outdoors and McLanahans. ** Mudd Run indicates that all presenting donors will receive a discount coupon for registration to participate at the Hard Core Mudd Run at Tussey Mountain on Sept. 8 and 9. One lucky donor will receive a free registration worth $100. (The Hard Core Mudd Run is a six mile obstacle course run on foot.)

Live theatre really only needs a play, actors and an audience. When the play is well written, the actors solid and the audience appreciative, magic can happen and the experience stays with the participants long after the theatre lights go out. “Circle Mirror Transformation” written by Annie Baker, directed by John Hruschka and produced by the Next Stage is that type of an experience. You have four chances to experience the play: Friday through Sunday, April 6 to 8 at The State Theatre. Visualize an acting class with one teacher, Marty, and four students. The class consists of the teacher’s husband James, Theresa, an attractive young woman who has had some acting experience, Schultz, a young, recently divorced man, and a 16-year-old girl, Lauren, who wants to learn to act. Through brief scenes, the class exercises slowly reveal the fears, truths and hidden feelings of not only the students, but of the teacher as well. The audience watches characters reveal layers of themselves, as well as relationships that develop and fall apart. Director Hruschka has paced the show perfectly. From the quiet opening, through the angry scenes, to the tranquil ending when each person accepts who he is, the audience stayed connected to the characters. The cast consists of two regulars, Caitlin Osborn (Marty) and Tom McClary (her husband James). We have come to expect great performances from these two veteran

actors. Tom has perfected the “puzzled/bewildered look” so it always comes as a surprise that he can do angry scenes so well. Lauren Strauss (Theresa) and Sebastian Arroyo (Shultz) are new names. Both of them have the ability to appear perfectly cast in their parts, as if there is no “acting” involved. They also each had an opportunity to show tender moments that were very believable. High school sophomore Julia Laplante (Lauren) is not a new face, but one that the area definitely should be watching. Through her facial expressions and body language we watched an insecure little girl mature before our eyes. Theatre goers have learned to expect the unexpected from the Next Stage. If you have not found this group and you enjoy meaningful theatre, you have this weekend to check out “Circle Mirror Transformation,” winner of the 2010 Obie Award for The Best New American Play. The play is scheduled for the State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Tickets are $16, students and seniors $14. Tickets are available at the ReMax Box Office, open weekdays 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., call (814) 272-0606 or visit http://thestatetheatre.org.

If you go Friday, April 6: 8 p.m. Saturday, April 7: 2 and 8 p.m. Sunday, April 8: 2 p.m.

Community announcements ■ Reservations accepted for summer arts camp The Art Alliance is now accepting registrations for summer art camps for children and teens, which begin in June and run through August. Full details and registration form are available at www.artalliancepa.org. ■ Campground hosts needed Bald Eagle State Park is looking for campground hosts for the spring and summer of 2012. If you or someone you know may be interested, please call the park office (814) 625-2775 for more information. ■ Beauty parlor volunteers needed The Centre Crest beauty parlor is in need of volunteers to help around the shop. No experience is necessary. Please

call Karen at (814) 355-6777 for more info. ■ Auction items needed At 6 p.m. on May 4, the Pleasant Gap Area Lions Club will hold its annual spring charity auction at the Central PA Institute of Science & Technology to raise funds for scholarships and other community charities. Ronald S. Gilligan will be the auctioneer. Please make donations available for pick up before April 13 so they can compile a list for Gilligan’s website. Consider donating any new items, gifts or services suitable to auction. Call one of these Lions members: David Walker (814) 383-4248, Terry Horner (814) 359-3311, Perry Courter (814) 359-2546, Randy Kern (814) 355-5946 or mail your response to the Pleasant Gap Area Lions Club c/o David Walker, 151 Hancock Road, Bellefonte, PA 16823.


APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 23

Save the date Future items continued on The Gazette website, www.centrecountygazette.com.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LIVE IN HD! Massenets’ Manon Noon Saturday, April 7 The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. The performance will be broadcast, classical, live simulcast, opera et opera video concerts. Duration is four hours and eight minutes with two intermissions. Admission is $22 adult, $20 senior, $18 student and $15 children. Call (814) 272-0606.

PENN STATE’S MUSIC AT PENNS WOODS Easterly Chamber Players 7 p.m. Thursday, April 12 Downsbrough Community Room, Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College The Easterly Chamber Players will perform on clarinet, flute and harp. Concerts are free and open to the public.

GOSPEL SING 7 p.m. Friday, April 13 Fellowship Bible Church, 263 Reeder Road, Spring Mills The concert features The Needhams from Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Fellowship Bible Church located off route 144 near Potters Mills. Visit www.theneedhams. com or call (814) 422-8640.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LIVE IN HD! An Opera Luncheon 11 a.m. Saturday, April 14 Upper Studio, The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College Guest Speaker, librettist Jason Charnesky will speak, “A Love Story Ripped from the Headlines.” Admission for the luncheon is $25. Call (814) 272-0606.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LIVE IN HD! La Traviata – Verdi 1 p.m. Saturday, April 14 The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Duration is three hours and seven minutes with one intermission. Admission is $22 adult, $20 senior, $18 student and $15 children. Call (814) 272-0606.

ESSENCE OF JOY

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE LIBRARY CONCERTS

2 p.m. Sunday, April 15 Worship Hall, Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, Allen Road, PSU campus The 20th anniversary Essence of Joy concert is presented by Penn State School of Music.

Nittany Wind Quartet 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 29 Centre County Library & Historical Museum, 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Featuring Anne Sullivan, harp; Diane Toulson, flute; Cathy Herrera, flute, and Susan Kroeker, flute. Admission is free.

AFTERNOON OF MUSIC 2 p.m. Sunday, April 15 Penns Valley Area High School Auditorium, 4545 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills. The musical concert will feature the Penns Valley Men’s Chorus, the Little German Band, the Brush Valley Community Choir, the Coburn Brass Band and others. Donations are welcomed to support the Guy H. Rachau Excellence in Music Scholarship Fund.

BLUE AND WHITE CONCERT 8 p.m., Saturday, April 21 Schwab Auditorium, Pollock Road, University Park Presented by the Penn State School of Music the Penn State Glee Club’s will perform at the annual Blue and White Concert. The concert will include a variety of repertoire, from the Baroque to Broadway, a duet by J. S. Bach and works by Morten Lauridsen and Byron Adams. Featured will be the Hi-Lo’s. Ticket at the door cost $12 for adult, $4 for students; tickets purchased up to April 20 are eligible for a 40 percent discount. Tickets available at the Eisenhower Ticket Center, (814) 863-0255 or 1-800ARTS-TIX or at www.cpa.psu.edu.

BRUSH VALLEY COMMUNITY CHOIR SPRING CONCERT 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22 Madisonburg United Methodist Church, Madisonburg. Call (814) 237-3687.

“BYE, BYE BIRDIE” 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 26 through Saturday, April 28 Bald Eagle Area High School Auditorium, 751 South Eagle Valley Road, Wingate. The Bald Eagle Area Drama Club’s performance of “Bye Bye Birdie.” Tickets go on sale April 16-19 and during the week of show from 3:30-5:30 p.m. outside high school auditorium. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $8 for adults, $5 for students and children and will be available at the door.

“CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN” 7 p.m. Friday, May 18; and at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19 State College Area High School South Auditorium, 653 Westerly Parkway, State College Class Act Productions presents “Cheaper by the Dozen.” A movie based on the true story of Frank Gilbreth, pioneer of industrial efficiency and father of 12 children. The comedy is for all ages. Tickets are general admission and cost $10 adult, $5 child 16 and under, $40 for a family of six or more people.

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT THE LIBRARY CONCERTS Easterly Chamber Players 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 20 Centre County Library & Historical Museum, 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Featuring Paula Amrod, piano; Brent Register, oboe/English horn; Diane Toulson, flute; and Smith Toulson, clarinet. Music by Alec Templeton, Poulenc, Tryvge Madsen. Admission is free. Compiled by Sandie Biddle

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PAGE 24

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

T N E M IN A T R E %NT 3CHEDULE

,IVE

April 5 through April 11

Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7 Sunday, April 8 Wednesday, April 11

Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7 Wednesday, April 11

Thursday, April 5 Saturday, April 7 Sunday, April 8 Thursday, April 12

PIZZA MIA, 106 N. SPRING ST., BELLEFONTE, (814) 355-3738

Sterling Moon Family Band Evil City String Band, 8 p.m. Easter Brunch, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Harold Taddy + Dan Collins

DJ Cup Cake, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Boner, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Cup Cake, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Boner, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Team Trivia, 9 to11 p.m. Karaoke, 11 p.m. to 2 a.m.

DJ Fuego, 10 p.m. DJ Cashous, 10 p.m. Jason & Greg Acoustics, 10 p.m.

KILDAREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IRISH PUB, 538 E. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE (814) 272-0038

Kat and Natalie of Pure Cane Sugar, 7:30 p.m. Troy Breon, 9 p.m. Jason Thomas, 8 p.m. Stressbusters Karaoke, 8 p.m.

Thursday, April 5 Friday, April 5 Saturday, April 6 Tuesday, April 10 Wednesday, April 11

Table Ten, 10 p.m. DJ, 10 p.m. Ken Volz, 8 to 10 p.m. DJ, 10 p.m. Pub Quiz with Bebey, 9 p.m. Ken Volz, 9 p.m.

BAR BLEU & BAR-B-QUE, 112 S. GARNER ST., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-0374

MOUNTAIN VALLEY DINER, 850 S. EAGLE VALLEY RD., WINGATE (814) 353-1221

Thursday, April 5 Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7

Tuesday, April 10

Royal Benson, 10:30 p.m. Lowjack, 10:30 p.m. Ted McCloskey & The Hi-Fiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 10:30 p.m.

THE BREWERY, 233 E. BEAVER AVE., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-2892 Thursday, April 5 Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7 Sunday, April 8 Tuesday, April 10

Emilyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Toybox, 10 p.m. Brew Devils Lowjack, 10:30 p.m. Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. Ken Volz, 10:30 p.m.

2Twenty2, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Open Mic Night with Tommy Wareham Low Jack, midnight to 2 a.m. Table Ten, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. The Nightcrawlers, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Tuesday, April 10 Wednesday, April 11

Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7 Wednesday, April 11

THE AUTOPORT, 1405 S. ATHERTON ST., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-7666 Thursday, April 5

Jazz Brunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

INFERNO BRICK OVEN & BAR, 340 E. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-5718

Sucker Punch, 10:30 p.m. G211, 10:30 p.m.

Sunday, April 8 Monday, April 9

ELK CREEK CAFĂ&#x2030; AND ALEWORKS, 100 W. MAIN ST., MILLHEIM (814) 349-8850

Thursday, April 5 Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7 Tuesday, April 10 Wednesday, April 11

Scott Mangene, 8 p.m. to midnight Tommy Wareham, 6 to 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. to midnight Tommy Wareham, 8 p.m. Ted and Molly, 8 p.m. Tommy Wareham, 7:30 p.m.

THE ARENA BAR & GRILL, 1521 MARTIN ST., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-8833 Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7

Sunday, April 7

THE GINGERBREAD MAN, 130 HEISTER ST., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-0361

AMERICAN ALE HOUSE, 821 CRICKLEWOOD DRIVE, STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-9701 Thursday, April 5

THE DELI RESTAURANT, 113 HIESTER ST., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-5710

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Parlor Pickers

Friday, April 6

THE RATHSKELLER, 108 S. PUGH ST., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-3858 Thursday, April 5 Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7

Friday, April 6

Saturday, April 7

Lowjack Lite, 8 to 10 p.m. Maxwell Strait, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Noah and Domenick, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ted and the Hi-Fis, 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Table Wars, 7 to 10 p.m. My Hero Zero, 10:30 p.m. to 2a.m.

Team Trivia, 7 p.m. Mr. Hand, 10:30 p.m. Table Ten, 10:30 p.m.

RED HORSE TAVERN, 104 N. MAIN ST., PLEASANT GAP, (814) 359-2082 Friday, April 6 Thursday, April 12

David Wayne and Rubber Band Man, 9 to 11 p.m. Irish Jam, 7 to 9 p.m.

THE SALOON, 101 HEISTER ST., STATE COLLEGE, (814) 234-0845 Thursday, April 5 Friday, April 6 Saturday, April 7 Sunday, April 8 Monday, April 9 Tuesday, April 10 Wednesday, April 11

My Hero Zero, 10:30 p.m. Velveeta, 10:30 p.m. Mr. Hand, 10:30 p.m. Atomic Supersonic, 10:30 p.m. Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Karaoke, 10:30 p.m. Hotdog Cart, 10:30 p.m. Table Ten, 10:30 p.m.

ZENOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB, 100 W. COLLEGE AVE., STATE COLLEGE (814) 237-4350 Friday, April 6

THE PHYRST, 111 E. BEAVER AVE., STATE COLLEGE Thursday, April 5

Karaoke with Ken Yeaney, 6:30 to 9 p.m.

Ms Melanie & the Valley Rats, 5 p.m. AAA Blues Band, 7 p.m. Spider Kelly, 10:30 p.m.

Compiled by Abigail Miller Schedules subject to change. Call the venue for details. The Gazette is committed to providing you with a complete listing of upcoming live entertainment in Centre County. If your establishment provides live entertainment and would like to have it listed free in The Gazette, just e-mail your entertainment news to editor@centrecountygazette.com.

Centre Region Parks and Recreation announces this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opportunities FRIDAY, APRIL 6 Line Dancing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call (814) 231-3076. Centre Region Badminton Club â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Meets from 7-10 p.m. at the Easterly Parkway Elementary All Purpose Room, 234 Easterly Parkway, State College. Call (814) 234-1039.

SATURDAY, APRIL 7 Annual Easter Egg Hunt â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Starts at 2 p.m. at Orchard Park, 1106 Bayberry Dr., State College. The Easter Bunny is scheduled to visit and members of the State College Rotary Club will provided prize baskets. The event is rain or shine for children up to 9 years old. Free to the public.

TUESDAY, APRIL 10 Senior Hiking Group â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 9 a.m. walks at

$

various locations in and around State College. Free to the public. Call (814) 231-3076. Line Dancing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; No experience or partners needed. Dance at 7 p.m. at Mt Nittany Residences, 301 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. Admission is free. Knee High Naturalist Program, Natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Needs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The programs are for children ages 3 to 6. Children can learn about and explore the Millbrook Marsh. Programs are one hour and include indoor and outdoor activities. Parents are encouraged to stay. Meet at 10:30 a.m. or at 12:30 p.m. at the Millbrook Marsh Nature Center barn, 548 Puddingtown Road, College Township. Registration fee is $6.50 for residents and $9.75 for non-residents. Advanced registration required by visiting www.crpr.org or calling (814) 231-3071. Gentle Yoga â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Classes meet at 1 p.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. The fee is $64 for residents and $96 for non-resi-

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dents. Advance registration required by visiting www.crpr.org or calling (814) 2313076.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 Senior Center Blood Pressure Screening â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nittany Home Health Service will sponsor the event at 10:30 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. The event it free. Knee High Naturalist Program, Big Skies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The programs are for children ages 3 to 6. Children can learn about and explore the Millbrook Marsh. Programs are one hour and include indoor and outdoor activities. Parents are encouraged to stay. Meet at 10:30 a.m. or at 12:30 p.m. at the Millbrook Marsh Nature Center barn, 548 Puddingtown Road, College Township. Registration fee is $6.50 for residents and $9.75 for non-residents. Advanced registration required by visiting www.crpr.org or calling (814) 231-3071.

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Line Dancing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call (814) 231-3076. Centre Region Badminton Club â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Meets from 7-10 p.m. at the Easterly Parkway Elementary All Purpose Room, 234 Easterly Parkway, State College. Call (814) 234-1039.

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Line Dancing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; No experience necessary or partners needed. Dance at 10:50 a.m. at the Centre Region Senior Center, 131 S. Fraser St., Suite 1, State College. Admission is free. Call (814) 231-3076. Singles (Coed) Volleyball Club â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Meets at 6:30 p.m. at Park Forest Elementary School, 2181 School Drive, State College. To become a member, call Gloria Eisenbraun (814) 238-5973.

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APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 25

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HAPPENING To be included in Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happening, submit your events by Wednesday one week prior to publication to editor@centrecountygazette.com. Please see our website at for the complete Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Happening calendar, including additional future events.

ARTS CRAFTS AND SALES April 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Yard and Bake Sale There will be a Relay for Life yard and bake sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 14 at the Centre Hall Lions Club on E. Church St. Baked goods, chili, soup, hot dogs and gently used items will be available. Sponsored by CH Relay for Life team: Generations Decking Cancer. Contact Wanda Hockenberry (814) 364-9515 or Sherri Cramer (814) 5715989. May 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charity Auction The Pleasant Gap Lions Club charity auction of new items starts at 6 p.m. May 4 at CPI, 540 N. Harrison Road, Pleasant Gap. Auctioneer is Ronald S. Gilligan. Food will be provided by the Pleasant Gap Lioness Club. Visit www.rgilliganauction.com. May 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Garden Fair & Plant Sale A regional Garden Fair and Plant Sale hosted by the Penn State Extension Master Gardeners of Centre County will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 19 at Ag Progress Days site, 2710 W. Pine Grove Road., Pennsylvania Furnace. The Garden Fair will feature 20+ vendor booths, exhibits and demonstrations, gardening talks and a composting workshop. The Pasto Ag Museum will be open free tours and features a new gardening history exhibit. The plant sale comprises thousands of potted plants including perennials, annuals, herbs, houseplants and vegetables. Vendors will also sell trees, shrubs and organic vegetable plants. Ferguson Lions Club will be selling breakfast and lunch. Parking and admission are free. Visit www.extension.psu.edu/centre/programs/master-gardener/mastergardener-plant-sale.

DINING AND TAKE OUT April 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pork Loin Dinner New Hope Lutheran Church, 119 Cobblestone Court, Spring Mills, will serve a pork loin supper from 4:30-7 p.m. April 14. Eat-in or take-out. April 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; All-you-can-eat Breakfast Bellefonte Knights of Columbus Council #1314 will hold their monthly all-you-can-eat breakfast from 8 a.m. to noon April 15 at the Council Home on Stoney Batter. The menu includes eggs to order, sausage, bacon, pancakes, French toast, waffles, home fries, sausage gravy and beverages. Cost is $6 for adults, $3 for children 12 and younger and free for children 7 and younger. April 21 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chicken BBQ Logan Fire Company No. 1 is hosting a chicken barbecue starting at 10 a.m. April 21. Meals are $8 each and $6 for a half portion. All proceeds go to Logan Fire Company No. 1, 120 E. Howard St., Bellefonte. May 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chicken BBQ Logan Fire Company No. 1 is hosting a chicken barbecue starting at 10 a.m. May 12. Meals are $8 each and $6 for a half portion. All proceeds go to Logan Fire Company No. 1, 120 E. Howard St., Bellefonte. Sept. 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chicken BBQ Logan Fire Company No. 1 is hosting a chicken barbecue starting at 10 a.m. Sept. 8. Meals are $8 each and $6 for

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COMPETITIONS FOR CHARITY EDUCATION AND LIFE MATTERS April 9 Reservations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Veggie Garden Discussion Join the Halfmoon Garden Club at Way Fruit Farm for a group discussion on how to get the most out of a vegetable garden, from how to get started to combating pests. This informal discussion is from 7-9 p.m. April 12 at Way Fruit Farm CafĂŠ, 2355 Halfmoon Valley Road, Stormstown. Light refreshments served. RSVP by Monday, April 9 to Barb (814) 883-1337 or barb.fleischer@gmail.com. April 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Career Day and Open House South Hills School of Business & Technology is holding a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Career Day and Open Houseâ&#x20AC;? from 8:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday, April 11 at their locations in State College, Altoona, Lewistown and Philipsburg. Explore various Associate Degree career options at all South Hills Schools by sitting-in on classes, speaking with instructors and current students and discussing financial aid options. Free lunch. Register online www.southhills.edu or call 888-282-7427. April 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Spring Outdoor Festival Appalachian Outdoorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2012 Spring Outdoor Expo is from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. April 14 at 123 S. Allen St., State College. Banff Mountain Movie Festival will begin at 7 p.m. April 14 and 15 at the State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. The Outdoor Expo will take place in conjunction with the first-ever State College Spring Festival. Allen Street will close to house the event. April 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Seminar, Calories and Health Mount Nittany Medical Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family Medicine Seminar Series presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Calorie Restriction and Healthâ&#x20AC;? from 6-7:30 p.m. April 19 at Galen and Nancy Dreibelbis Auditorium at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 Park Ave., State College. To register contact Jessica Bird at jbird@mountnittany.org or call (814) 234-6738. May 18 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; GED Graduation The CIU # 10 Development Center for Adults is holding a graduation ceremony at 7 p.m. May 18 at CPI, 550 W. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. GED diplomas will be awarded to graduates from Centre, Clinton and Clearfield counties.

FUNDRAISERS AND SOCIAL EVENTS April 13-14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ice Show The Penn State Ice Rink will present its 29th Ice Show at 7:30 p.m. April 13 and 14. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skating on Broadway,â&#x20AC;? is a musical tour of Broadway shows. The ice show will feature skaters from the Ice Rink professional figure skating staff, Penn State Ice Rink programs, the Student Figure Skating Club and local skating clubs. Tickets cost $12.50 for adult, $10.50 for youth, senior citizen and Penn State students. Tickets are available at the Penn State Ice Rink or by phone (814) 865-4102.

KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STUFF April 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nature Program for Small Children Bring your youngster to Bald Eagle State Park, Howard, for an interactive program designed for children aged 3-5. Each month a new topic will be explored through crafts, stories, short walks and nature games â&#x20AC;&#x201C; inside or out. Dress for the weather. The event is from 10-11:30 a.m. Thursday April 5 and will continue the first Thursday of each month June through December. Pre-registration required. Call the Park Office (814) 625-2775. Meet at the Environmental

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April 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Faith Centre 6th Annual Walk/Run The Sixth Annual Walk/Run of Faith will begin at 10 a.m. April 14 at the Bellefonte Middle School, 830 E. Bishop St., Bellefonte. The course is 5 kilometers in length, beginning and ending at the school. New for this year is the 10-Kilometer King of the Hills Challenge. The event benefits the Faith Centre Food Bank and the Pet Food Pantry of Centre County. Register online at www.faithcentre.info, email Nicole Summers at nsummers@faithcentre.info or call (814) 355-0880 April 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dog Jog for Pets Come First The annual Dog Jog to benefit Pets Come First is April 28 at the Grange Fair Grounds, Gate 2 in Centre Hall. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., the 5K Race is at 10 a.m., 1.5K Walk/Fun Run at 11 a.m., and the pet fair and silent auction are from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Racers with and without dogs are welcome. Visit www.petscomefirst.com. April 18 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spelling Bee Ron and Mary Maxwell Community Spelling Bee is at 6 p.m. April 18 at Foxdale Village Auditorium, 500 E. Marylyn Ave., State College. Foxdale Village is hosting this spelling bee to benefit the Mid-state Literacy Council. Community teams sponsored by community businesses will compete for the trophy and prizes. Call Amy Wilson (814) 238-1809. April 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Multi-Vendor Bingo A Relay for Life team presents multi-vendor bingo (Miche, Scentsy, Tastefully Simple, Pampered Chef and others) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; doors open at noon, games begin at 2 p.m. April 29 at the Milesburg Community Center, 1290 Runville Road. Advance tickets $15 through Kathy (814) 357-5852 or $20 at the door. Refreshments available. May 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; March for Babies March of Dimesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; March for Babies holds registration at noon with the walk kicking off at 1 p.m. May 6 at Medlar Field at Lubrano Park, University Park. It is the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest walk fundraiser honoring all babies. It is a family event, including team photos, face painting, games for the kids, radio broadcasts and more. To register, visit www.marchforbabies.org or call (814) 696-9691. May 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 5K Run/Walk in Lemont The inaugural End of the Mountain 5K Run/Walk is at 9 a.m. with the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race beginning at 10 a.m. May 19 from the Lemont Village Green. It is a USA Track and Field Certified Course â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Certification Code PA11043WB. Visit the race website, http://www.lemontvillage.org/home/endof-the-mountain-5k-run-walk and register online at http://www.active.com/5k-race/lemont-pa/1st-annualend-of-the-mountain-5k-run/walk-2012. Lemont was first known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;End of the Mountainâ&#x20AC;? due to its location at the base of Mount Nittany. The village was laid out in 1870 by Moses Thompson and renamed Lemont, Anglicized French for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mountain,â&#x20AC;? by his son, John I. Thompson. Compiled by Sandie Biddle

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PAGE 26

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Group meetings The Gazette will publish the regular meeting dates and times for all Centre County social and service groups, organizations, clubs, etc. that have membership open to the public. To be included in the weekly listing send information by Wednesday one week prior to publication to editor@centrecountygazette.com or mail 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801. Adult Bible Study and Kids Program are 7 p.m. Wednesdays, offering practical help from the Bible and a fun and productive time for kids. Visit nittanybaptist.org or call (814) 360-1601. ALIVE Teen Club meets Sundays, First Baptist Church, 539 Jacksonville Road, Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-5678 or www.fbcbellefonte.org. Alzheimer’s Support Group meets at 6:30 p.m. every second Tuesday in the Mount Nittany Dining Room at The Inn, Brookline, 1950 Cliffside Drive, State College. Call Anne Campbell (814) 234-3141 or Janie Provan (814) 2352000. Ancient Mystic Order of Samaritans meet at 7:30 p.m. the fourth Thursday every month at I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall, 756 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Antique Truck Club of America, Keystone Chapter meets at 3 p.m. on the third Sunday of July and November at the Milesburg Bestway Travel Center, Rte. 150, I-80 exit 158. Call (814) 360-4177 or antiquetruckclubofamerica.org. AWANA Club is at 6 p.m. every Sunday at the First Baptist Church, 539 Jacksonville Road, Bellefonte. Activities and Bible lessons will be held for children ages 3 to sixth grade. Materials provided. Call (814) 355-5678 or visit www.fbcbellefonte.org. Bald Eagle Grange #151 meets at 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of every month at the Grange Hall in Runville. Bald Eagle Watershed Association meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Wednesday at the Milesburg Borough Building, 416 Front St., Milesburg. Visit www.baldeaglewatershed.com Bald Eagle Area Class of 1962 meets for breakfast 9 a.m. the first Saturday of the month at the Mountain Valley Diner, 805 S. Eagle Valley Road, Wingate. Call Sandy (814) 387-4218. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1964 meets for breakfast 9 a.m. the forth Saturday of the month at the Bestway Restaurant, Rte. 150, I-80 exit 158, Milesburg. Dinner will be at 5:30 p.m. on the third Friday of the month at the Bellefonte Moose, 125 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call Sue (814) 6252132 or bea.1964@yahoo.com. Bald Eagle Area Class of 1965 meets for dinner at 5:30 p.m. the last Friday of each month, Bellefonte Moose, 125 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call Bob (814) 383-2151. Bellefonte High School Class of 1956 meets for dinner at 6 p.m. the second Friday of each month, Bellefonte Moose, 125 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call Kay (814) 3592738. Bellefonte High School Class 1967 meets for breakfast at 8:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month, Sunset West, 521 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. The location is subject to change. Call Vic (814) 360-1948. Bellefonte Elks Lodge meets 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of each month, Bellefonte Elks, 120 W. High St., Bellefonte. Bellefonte Encampment #72 and Ridgeley Canton #8 meets 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month, Windmere Hall, 454 Rolling Ridge Drive, State College. Bellefonte Historical Railroad Society meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of each month, Train Station, Talleyrand Park, Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-1053 or bellefontetrain.org. Bellefonte Kiwanis Club meets at noon Tuesdays at the Moose Club, 125 N. Spring St., Bellefonte. Call Richard King, (814) 355-9606. Bellefonte Sunrise Rotary Club meets 7:30 a.m. Fridays, Diamond Deli, 103 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call Debbie Rowley (814) 880-9453. Bellefonte Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1600 meets 8 p.m. the second Thursday of every month, Post Home, Spring Street, Bellefonte. Bellefonte Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1600 Ladies Auxiliary meets 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month, Post Home, Spring Street, Bellefonte. Better Breathers Support Group meets 2 p.m. the third Thursday every month, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 359-3421. Business Networking International meets 7 a.m.

54th Annual Bellefonte Kiwanis Panc ake Day

Tuesday u y, May M 1, 2012 11am-1pm and 4pm-7 Undine’s Lamb Lamb bertt Hall ber Ha on Blanchard d Street

Thursdays, Celebration Hall, 2280 Commercial Blvd., State College. Members share ideas, contacts and business referrals. Fee is $10 for room and breakfast. Call Kelly Swisher (814) 280-1656. Boy Scouts of America BSA Troop 66 meets at 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Pleasant Gap United Methodist Church, 179 S. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Email Scoutmaster Bill Weaver at standinten@aol.com. Brain Injury Support Group meets 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 359-3421. The Business of Art Workshop meets 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month at Sozo Institute of the Arts, KeyCentre building, 1224 N. Atherton St., State College. The workshop is free for writers, artists and other creative people. Call Will Snyder at (814) 880-9933 or info@sozoart.org. Centre County Real Estate Investment Club meets 7 p.m. the third Thursday of every month, 1609 N. Atherton St., State College. Call (814) 280-5839. Centre Hall Lions Club meets 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month and at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month, Centre Hall Lions Club Building, 153 E. Church St., Centre Hall. Centre Pieces Quilt Guild meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, Mt. Nittany Middle School Cafeteria, 656 Brandywine Drive, State College and 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 11, Brookline Village, Windsong Building, Conference Room, State College. The program will be a round robin of quilting techniques by guild members. Visitors welcome. Call (814) 466-6121. Centre Region Model Investment Club meets 6:30 p.m. on second Monday of the month, Mazza Room, South Hills Business School, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College. Call (814) 234-8775 or email cr20mic@aol.com. The Compassionate Friends Group meets 7 p.m. every second Monday, Bellefonte Middle School, 100 North School St, Bellefonte. The support organization is for families following the death of a child of any age, any cause. Bereaved parents and adult family members welcome. Call Amanda (814) 321-4258 or Peg (814) 355-9829. Circle of Hope, a support group for special-needs children and families, meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at Tyrone Public Library, 1000 Pennsylvania Ave., Tyrone. Call Angie (814) 386-1826 or alavanish@live.com. Diabetes Support Group meets at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12 at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Contact Amy Leffard at aleffard@mountnittany.org or call (814) 231-7095. Grief Support Group meets 6 p.m. every first Wednesday, Centre Crest, 502 E. Howard St., Bellefonte. Call Anne Boal (814) 548-1140. Hearing Loss Association of America meets 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month, Foxdale, 500 E. Marylyn Ave. State College. Learn the latest technology available for hearing loss. Halfmoon Garden Club meets the first Thursday of the month. Membership is open to Halfmoon Township residents. Call Alice McGregor (814) 692-7396, almcgregor@comcast.net or Susan Kennedy (814) 6925556, susank81@gmail.com. I.O.O.F. Centre Lodge #153 meets 7:30 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month, I.O.O.F. Lodge Hall 756 N. Main St., Pleasant Gap. Junior Rockhounds meets 6:45 p.m. third Wednesdays, Room 116, Earth and Engineering Sciences Building, University Park. Call (814) 867-6263 or visit nittanymineral.org. Keystone Guild of the Watchmakers Association of Pa. meets 1 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month, Bull Pen Restaurant, Washington Avenue at 1st Street, Tyrone. Call George at (814) 238-1668. “Life with Diabetes” meets at 6 p.m. every Tuesday in April at the Galen and Nancy Dreibelbis Auditorium (Entrance D), Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. “Life with Diabetes” is a four-day education series on managing diabetes for yourself or a loved one. Contact Amy Leffard at aleffard@mountnittany.org or call (814) 231-7095. The Milesburg Lions Club meets 7 p.m. first Tuesday and the third Wednesday every month, Milesburg Center across from Uni-Mart. Multiple Sclerosis Support Group meets 6 p.m. every third Tuesday, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation

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Hospital, Outpatient Entrance, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. The support group is affiliated with the National MS Society. Call (814) 359-3421. Nittany Knights Barbershop Chorus meets 7:15 p.m. every Monday, South Hills School, State College. Men who like to sing are welcome. Visit www.nittanyknights.org, or call Bill (814) 355-3557. Nittany Mineral Society meets 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesdays, Room 114 Auditorium of the Earth and Engineering Sciences Building, University Park. Call (814) 8676263 or visit nittanymineral.org. Nittany Valley Woodturners meet every first Thursday, the woodworking shop, State College Area High School, South Building, 650 Westerly Parkway, State College. Email Reg@MarketValueSolutions.com or visit www.NittanyValleyWoodturners.org. The Nittany Valley Writers Network meets for an earlyrisers breakfast at 7 a.m. every third Wednesday, The Waffle Shop, 1610 W. College Ave., State College. The Nittany Valley Writers Network Social meets at 5:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month, The Autoport, 1405 S. Atherton St. State College. Parent Support Group for Children with Eating Disorders meets 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Call Kristie Kaufman (814) 466-7921. Penns Valley Area Class of 1962 committee is planning the 50th class reunion from Penns Valley Area High School for Sept. 29, 2012. Interested class members should contact Ruth Ann Williams, Carol Colestock, Jean Brown, Tom and Lois Runkle, Susan Foster, or Carol Billett. Penns Valley Grange #158 meets 7:30 p.m. the second Thursday of every month, Grange Hall, Railroad Street, Spring Mills. Pleasant Gap Rotary Club meets at 6 p.m. every Thursday at the Oaks, 220 Rachel Drive, Pleasant Gap. Sacred Harp Singing meets from 7-8:30 a.m. the second and fourth Mondays at the University Mennonite Church, 1606 Norma St., State College. Visit www.StateCollegeSacredHarp.com. The Snow Shoe Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first and fourth Wednesday of every month, at the Moshannon Community Center, State Rte. 144, Snow Shoe. State College Downtown Rotary Club meets noon Thursdays, Damon’s, 1031 E. College Ave., State College. State College Elks Lodge meets 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays, State College Elks Country Club, Rte. 322 and 45, Boalsburg. State College Lions Club meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Thursdays of the month at Damon’s , 1031 E. College Ave., State College. State College Rotary Club meets 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Nittany Lion Inn, Faculty Staff Lounge, 200 W. Park Ave., University Park. State College Sunrise Rotary Club meets 7:15 a.m. Wednesdays, Hotel State College, 106 S. Allen St., State College, above The Corner Room. Stroke Support Group meets 1 p.m. last Tuesday of every month, HealthSouth Nittany Valley Rehabilitation Hospital, 550 E. College Ave., Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 3593421. TRIAD, a public safety group for senior citizens, meets each second Thursday in various locations. Call Helen Evans, chair, (814) 237-8932. The April 12 meeting is at 8:30 a.m., Centre LifeLink EMS, 125 Puddingtown Road, State College. It is a public forum on crime scene processing presented by Detective John Aston. Trout Unlimited, a non-profit conservation organization, meets 7:30 p.m. every first Thursday, Comfort Suites Hotel, 132 Village Drive, State College. Women’s Mid Day Connection Luncheon featuring “Zoom, Zoom, Zumba” will meet at 11:45 a.m. April 10 at the State College Elk’s Country Club, Business Route 322 at Rte. 45, Boalsburg. Call Margo at 355-7615. The Women’s Welcome Club of State College meets 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month, Oakwood Presbyterian Church, 1865 Waddle Road, State College. Call Kathi (814) 466-6641. Zion MOPS and Beyond meets 9:30 a.m. Thursdays, 7 p.m. the third Thursday of each month, 3261 Zion Road, Bellefonte. The group is for moms with children of all ages. Childcare provided. Call (814) 383-4161. Compiled by Sandie Biddle

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APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Pink moon, other events set at park FRIDAY, APRIL 6

■ Pink Full Moon Watch Watching the Pink Full Moon rise above the lake while sitting around a campfire and learn why from 8-10 p.m. at Boat Launch #2, West Side Road, Philipsburg. Drinks and snacks will be served. Please bring a chair or blanket to sit on. The fee is $3 per person.

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

■ Bog Treasures Stroll on the boardwalk while discovering the plants and animals that live there from 2-3 p.m. at Boat Launch #3, West

Side Road, Philipsburg. ■ Snake Search Answer questions about snakes and win prizes from 4-5 p.m. at the Environmental Learning Center, 5662 Black Moshannon Road, Philipsburg. ■ Seasonal Pool Exploration Take a short hike to a seasonal pool; learn what it is and what kinds of animals visit them from 6-7 p.m. at the Park Office, Beaver Road, Philipsburg. For accommodation due to a disability, please call the Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks at 888-727-2757.

Bald Eagle State Park offers events in April TUESDAY, APRIL 10

TUESDAY, APRIL 17

FRIDAY, APRIL 13

TUESDAY, APRIL 24

■ Bald Eagle Bird Walks A walk through Bald Eagle State Park to watch for migrant birds that pass through the park will meet from 8:30-10 a.m. at the park office, 149 Main Park Road, Howard. These walks will explore local hotspots to see what birds are passing through or have returned for the summer. Walks are open to everyone. Call (814) 625-2775. ■ The Butterfly Guy, Rick Mikula Rick’s Mikula will present a slide program of butterflies he has found on his rainforest tours from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Inn Multi-purpose room, 149 Main Park Road, Howard. Admission is free, but pre-registration is required by calling the park office at (814) 625-2775.

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16. Residual oil

4. Blaze 8. Sea eagles 10. Tails in Italian 11. Monocot genus 12. Mother or father 13. The Jungian inner self

17. Signs up for school 18. Furniture for daily meals

23. Guy (slang)

5. Models of ethical behavior

23. Coleoptera insects

6. Harangues

24. The color of blood

7. This (Spanish) 9. Springfield Area Mobile Intensive Care 10. Sang at Christmas door to door 12. Partly or nearly blind

25. Slipped by 26. Of she 27. A short musical passage 28. CNN’s founder Turner 29. Radioactivity unit

14. Posterior pituitary gland hormone

30. Exculpation defense

15. American Nurses

31. Walking back and forth

Association (abbr.)

32. Come forth from 33. Oxalis

2. Sultanate of NW Borneo

17. The 7th Greek letter

34. A soft twilled fabric of silk

3. Importune

19. Strives to equal

4. Forelimb

20. Toff

36. The two large chest muscles

24. Get free of 25. Snakelike fish 26. Adult female bird 27. Formal window coverings

21. Extinct flightless bird of New Zealand

34. Break into small pieces

22. Lower limb

35. “l836 siege” of

Sudoku #1

■ Bald Eagle Bird Walks A walk through Bald Eagle State Park to watch for migrant birds that pass through the park will meet from 8:30-10 a.m. at the park office, 149 Main Park Road, Howard. These walks will explore local hotspots to see what birds are passing through or have returned for the summer.

PUZZLE #2 SOLUTION

1. Baseball stat

15. Covered with gold

■ Bald Eagle Bird Walks A walk through Bald Eagle State Park to watch for migrant birds that pass through the park will meet from 8:30-10 a.m. at the park office, 149 Main Park Road, Howard. These walks will explore local hotspots to see what birds are passing through or have returned for the summer. Walks are open to everyone. Call (814) 625-2775.

PUZZLE #1 SOLUTION

CLUES ACROSS

PAGE 27

Sudoku #2

Fun By The Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!


BUSINESS

PAGE 28

Business After Hours scheduled for April 12 From Gazette staff reports Aprilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business After Hours for the Chamber of Business and Industry of Centre Count is a celebration of Nestlerode & Loyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 75th Anniversary. It will be held from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on April 12 at Centre Hills Country Club, 153 Country Club Lane in State College. There is limited parking at the club, so car pooling is encouraged. Cost is $5 per member, $20 per prospective member/ guest. There will be complimentary chair massages from â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Step Beyond Massage Therapy.â&#x20AC;? There will also be plenty of food and beverages. The hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres featured will be crab cakes, shrimp cocktail, baconwrapped scallops, tandori chicken, tomato bruschetta and more. Cocktails, wine and

beer will be available. Door prices include gift baskets from Kenlee Spa and McLanahanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; gift certificates from Jezebelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boutique, Clothes Mentor; and a 16x20 gallery wrap from the UPS store at the Colonade. Michael Roberts Silver Scissors, A Step Beyond Massage Therapy and Gentle Touch Electrolysis donated a spa day package. Grand prize is a third generation iPad.

AFTER HOURS IN BELLEFONTE The Bellefonte Intervalley Area Chamber of Commerce is holding its Business After Hours from 5:30 to 7 p.m. April 18 at Northwest Savings Bank, 1127 Zion Road, Bellefonte. For more info, contact the chamber (814) 355-2917 or bellefontecoc@aol.com.

APRIL 5-11, 2012

Entrepreneurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sought UNIVERSITY PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Ben Franklin TechCelerator @ State College is looking for the best and brightest entrepreneurs from Centre, Blair, Mifflin and Clearfield counties to fill six vacant seats in its upcoming eight-week boot camp training program for business startups. The program will take place from 3-4:30 p.m. April 24 and continues for eight weeks. Those chosen to participate will receive up to $1,000 toward professional service fees â&#x20AC;&#x201C; legal and accounting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and will have the chance to compete for $10,000 to get the business off the ground. Business mentoring from Ben Franklinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Transformation Business Services Network and Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Small Business Development Center staff will be available at no cost. During the boot camp, entrants will hear from successful entrepreneurs, business support professionals and even private and institutional investors on how to develop a solid, fundable business plan. Entrants will come away from this experience with a list of best practices, lessons-learned and a comprehensive toolbox that will help them start a techbusiness. TechCelerator @ State College, 200 Innovation Boulevard, State College is

a partnership among several of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development providers that offers budding entrepreneurs designated space, loan and investment programs, business support, mentoring services and entrepreneurial training all housed in one location. Call David Jordan with the Penn State Small Business Development Center at (814) 865-1862, email daj7@psu.edu or visit www.techceleratorstatecollege.org.

Nordin wins award from National Weather Service From Gazette staff reports WASHINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The National Weather Service has named Mr. Wilbur â&#x20AC;&#x153;Budâ&#x20AC;? Nordin, of Clarendon, Pa., as the recipient of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edward H. Stoll Award,â&#x20AC;? for outstanding volunteer service in the Cooperative Weather Observer Program. U.S. Rep-

resentative Glenn Thompson presented the award on April 4 at the NWS station in State College. The Edward H. Stoll Award, which is named for the first COOP volunteer presented the award, is given to observers who have served for over 50 years. The first award was presented by President Jimmy

Carter, at the White House, in 1976. Mr. Wilbur Nordin has provided daily precipitation readings for the National Weather Service from the Sheffield 5W Station since 1961. The National Weather Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooperative Observer Program has given scientists and researchers continuous observa-

tional data since the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inception more than a century ago. Today, some 11,000 volunteer observers participate in the nationwide program to provide daily reports on temperature, precipitation and other weather factors such as snow depth, river levels and soil temperature.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Enviro MANAGEMENT GROUP, LLC

Pest Control & Radon Mitigation

--//-/$:1&$ $5(6(59,&(

PA# 078036

Lawnmowing & Trimming Personalized Quality Assured

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)XOO\,QVXUHGÂ&#x2021;)5(((VWLPDWHV    

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Brian Johnstonbaugh Owner

ASPHALT PAVING SPECIALIST 2E ESIDEN SID ID DE ENTI TIIA IAL AL#O OMM MMERC RCIAL R CIA IAL3E ER R VI VIIC CES

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Fridays through April 27 11:30am to 5:00pm

Asphalt Paving â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

NITTANY VIEW BOARDING KENNEL

Site Preparation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stttor S orrm or mwa mw mw wa ate te err Ma Mana ana nag agemen gem ement, t, Exc Ex xca cava vatiion, on, n, Sttone on e S Su u ubbase bba ba s e In In nstallation sta tall lla lation an nd dG Grrra rading adi diin ng ng

B Best t Qualit Q lit t ty and Servic a ce

E F EE FR S ATES T MAT E TI ES

81 14-3 4-3 -35959 9-3 9 -3 346 34 3462 462 62

&5, & 5,,9). 5, ). .3 352 52%$ %$s() ()#,IC IC CE ENSE0! 0!  

  % %#OLL LLE EGE GE!VE "ELL LLEFO FFON ONTE TE

Proceeds beneďŹ t our food bank & community. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thank you

Winter Indoor Farmers' Market

Drrriive D ve ew wa way ays, yyss, P Pa arrk a rk kiin ing ng LLo ots tss,, Roa oads o ads ds, s, Recrea Re ecre reati tiion on A on Areas, Ar reas, re s, S Siiid ide d de e ew walks wa w alk lks kss,, Repair Re ep e pair irrss an nd d Re Resurfacing esur urrffa facin ing ng

F

110 W 110 W.. High Hiig igh g St SSt.. Belleefo Bellefonte, effoonte, PA PA 355 355-2238 5 -2223 2 8

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Cell: (814) 280-8994

50% Off ff Easter Items It Thurss., A Thurs., Apr. 5 and a Sat., Sat at Apr. 7 Closed Frid day ay, y, Apr. 6

Lobby, State College Municipal Building 243 S. Allen St., State College Supported by Spring Creek Homesteading Springcreekhomesteading.wordpress.com

1212 Purdue Mountain Road Bellefonte, PA 16823 (814) 355-4963

Established 1974

RENT TO OWN

Full Service Salon Men, Women, & Children

10.00 Haircuts

Amy, Jenna, Suzanne

Red Oak Lane, Spring Mills

814-422-0398

Appointments Available! Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 9-7 Wednesday & Friday ............. 9-5 Saturday ......................... 7:30-1

Feathers Now Walk Ins Welcome!! Available!

$

7EST(IGH3TREETs"ELLEFONTE

814-353-3360

REPLLAACEMENT WINDOWWSS SIDING KITCHEN & BATH ADDITION

Dining Room in Rear

MON, N, TU TUE UE, E, WE WED ED & TH THUR Larg rge 1-Top Topp oppin ing ng Pi Piz izz zza za 7 Buck ckks! s

Yees We Do Mob Mo obi bilile le Ho Hom ome mes es To Tooo!

CALL 814-422-0398 -422-0398

For Yo our Free In Home Estimate GREAT GR G REEA EAT AT PRICES PPRI PR RIIC CEESS

LUNCH CH BUFFE FFFE FET

We can arrange â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rent To Ownâ&#x20AC;? on any property for sale by any broker, owner, bank or others. John Petuck - Broker (814) 355-8500

7EST(IGH3TREETs"ELLEFONTE 0!

TURKEY TURK TUR TU RKEY KEY HU H HUN HUNTERS! UNTE UNT TERS TER RS! S!

TROUT TROU TRO TR OUT UT FIS FISH FI FFISHERMAN! ISHE HER ERM RMA MA AN! AN! N Fishing & Fly Fishing supplies, trrout lurres, e rods Flytech Neopreen Waaders w/Felt ...................... $74.99 Fishing Vests e .............................................. $15.00 & up New/Use Fly Fishing & Spinning Combos $ 9.99 & up George Harvey Tied Flys ............................ $ 1.50 each English Toorel Tied Flys ............................... $ 1.00 each

M-F M -F 12-6

Sat Sat phone: 814-548-0088 web: www www.hunterswarehouse.net w.hunterswar .hunter . ehouse.net 12-4 hunterswarehouse@comcast.net email: hunterswarehouse@comcast.net

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All prices subject to availability and order AVI, V might have to o order

2.9%

125 N. Allegheny St., Suite 1, Bellefonte, PA

GREAT GR G REA EAT EAT PR PPRI PRICES RIIC CEESS

Rem. 870 Super Mag Camo Turkey .... $469.99 Rem. 870 12Ga Express Mag ............... $319.99 Mossberg 12Ga or 20Ga ...................... $229.99 Mossberg 835 Ulti-Mag ........................ $339.99 Mossberg 930 Tuurkey 12Ga Semi ....... .$529.99 BUY UY SELL TRADE CONSIGN CCOONSIGN ONSIGGGNN

W HORIZONS NEREAL ESTATE CO.

The Company With The Discount Commission

WE BEAT ALL RETAIL PRICES STATEWIDE

Mark A. Newman, DC 817 Willowbank St. Bellefonte, PA 16823 814-355-4889


APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 29

DEED TRANSFERS The following property transactions were compiled from information provided by the Centre County Recorder of Deeds, Joseph Davidson. The Gazette is not responsible for typographical errors. The published information is believed to be accurate; however, the Gazette neither warrants nor accepts any liability or responsibility for inaccurate information. RECORDED MARCH 19-23, 2012 BELLEFONTE Christopher L Murrell to Richard L. Murrell and Susan L. Murrell, 401 E. Lamb St., Bellefonte, PA 16823, $90,000. BENNER TOWNSHIP Dean E. McCloskey and Pamela G. McCloskey to Raymond E. Sowers Jr. Revocable TruSt., Paula C. Sowers Revocable TruSt., Raymond E. Sowers Jr. and Paula C. Sowers Trustee, 590 Millgate Rd., Bellefonte, PA 16823, $295,000. Berks Construction Co. Inc. to Christopher Miller and Melissa Miller, 154 Chicory Ave., Bellefonte, PA 16823, $320,000. Amberleigh LP to Eric M. Michielli, 136 Dorchester Lane, Bellefonte, PA 16823, $184,000. Willie Kelty Jr. and Colleen M. Kelty by sheriff to US Bank Association and Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, 211 N Front St., Harrisburg, PA 17101, $7,155.55. College Township IDA to Walter P Hwozdek and Mildred Hwozdek, 107 S Outer Drive., State College, PA 16801, $1. BOGGS TOWNSHIP Alecia Schaeffer and Jason P. Schaeffer to Jamison H. Harter and Danielle L. Harter, 99 Askey Road, Howard, PA 16841, $157,000. COLLEGE TOWNSHIP Roland S. Carney and Gina N. RussoCarney to National Residential Nominee Services, 1800 JFK Blvd., Suite 300, Philadelphia, PA 19103, $210,000. National Residential Nominee Services to Edward H. McFadden and Beatrice T. McFadden, 132 Julian Drive, State College, PA 16801, $210,000. CURTAIN TOWNSHIP Steven S. Nolt and Julia S. Nolt to Dennis Breckbill and Susan Breckbill, 411 Pennsgrove Road, Lincoln University, PA 19352, $330,000. FERGUSON TOWNSHIP Jerry L. Steffy and Jayne A. Steffy to Jeffery S. Dover, 1954 Harvest Circle, State College, PA 16803, $154,900. Roger H. Ford and Pamela H. Ford to Pamela H. Ford, 2301 Oakwood Circle, State College, PA 16801, $1. Johnson Farm Associates, Thomas F. Songer and S&A Homes Inc. to Anatoli Loutsik and Irina Loutsik, 9599 Thistle Ridge Lane, Vienna, VA 22182, $188,597. Pamela A. Maynor and Pamela A. Corwin to Pamela A. Corwin, 141 Harvest Run Road South, State College, PA 16801, $1. Franklin H. Stover and Patricia B. Stover to Christopher P. Stover, 1111-C W. Arron Drive, State College, PA 16803, $1. Kimberly Marian Hernandez to Andrew L. Angle and Katherine E. Garren, 477 Park Lane, State College, PA 16803, $244,000. Michael J Degenhart and Carmella A. Mulroy-Degenhart to Michael J Degenhart, Carmella Mulroy-Degenhart and Carmella A. Mulroy-Degenhart, 110 Toftrees Drive, State College, PA 16801, $1. GREGG TOWNSHIP Arron S. Brown to Davis S. Fultz, 514

Stephenson St., Duryea, PA 18642, $104,500. HAINES TOWNSHIP Fred D. Boob and Karen D. Boob to Donn G. Fetterolf, Elva G. Fetterolf, David C. Fetterolf and Michele Briggs, 126 Red Power Drive, Aaronsburg, PA 16820, $200,000. HALFMOON TOWNSHIP Richard L. Horner to Nathan A. Valchar, 43 Peggy Circle, Port Matilda, PA 16870, $196,000. HOWARD TOWNSHIP Donna K. Corl, Linda R. Watkins and Sandra F. Miller to Sandra F. Miller, 232 Shirlyn Drive, Howard, PA 16841, $1. LIBERTY TOWNSHIP Jeffery L. Vonda Estate, Belinda A. Resides Co-Executor and Gloria J. Kyle Co-Executor to Chad J. Klock, 59 Chee St., Barnesville, PA 18214, $45,000. MILES TOWNSHIP Katie S. Stoltzfus to Eli S. Stoltzfus Jr., P.O. Box 19, 102 Leasure Lane, Madisonburg, PA 16852, $1. PATTON TOWNSHIP Jeffery A. Hartzwell and Brian J. Kimler to Edward P. Dankanich and Monica Dankanich, 2605 Primrose Lane, York, PA 17404, $177,500. David A. Powell to Davis A. Powell and George T. Powell, 177 Stanford Drive, Bellefonte, PA 16823, $1. David P. Claus and Jennifer E. Claus to Aaron B. Synder and Jennifer Kotch, 182 Ghaner Drive, State College, PA 16803, $204,900. Marjorie S. Newell Estate and William M. Mertens Executor to William M. Mertens, 1106 Westerly Parkway, State College, PA 16801, $1. Amy J. Lawrence and Amy J. Hawbaker to Amy Lawrence and Mark Lawrence, 444 Amblewood Way, State College, PA 16803, $1. Daniel R. Hawbaker and Grace S. Hawbaker to Ross D. Defibaugh, 201 W. Clearview Ave., State College, PA 16803, $89,000 Lawrence L. Larson and Ann M. Larson to Manish Kumar and Anu Mathew, 665 Stoneledge Road, State College, PA 16803, $350,000. PENN TOWNSHIP William Russell Kerstetter to Jonathan R. Foust and April D. Sikes, 4838 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills, PA 16875, $140,000. PHILIPSBURG BOROUGH Helen Gill Estate, Helen O. Gill Estate and John R. Gill Executor to Gertz Properties LLC, P.O. Box 40, Fleming, PA 16835, $40,000. Keith M. Folmar and Pennie D. Folmar to Clayton R. Hetrick and Jill R. Hetrick, 200 N. Third St., Philipsburg, PA 16866, $170,000. Joseph E. Sabol and Nancy L. Sabol to Jason T. Yurky, 337 N. 9th St., Philipsburg, PA 16866, $100,000. RUSH TOWNSHIP Patricia A. Hensal to Melissa S. Walker and Cindy R. Johnston, 133 Hillside Road, Philipsburg, PA 16866, $$1. SNOW SHOE TOWNSHIP Raymond C. Smith Jr. and Judith D. Smith to Terry L. Corl and Sherri L. Corl, 6293 Brush Valley Road, Rebersburg, PA 16872, $85,000. SPRING TOWNSHIP Molly Elizabeth Wheeler and Gary Lucas Wheeler to Denise S. Yeager, 570 N. Michael St., Saint Marys, PA 15857, $205,900. STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH Henry W. Meyer and Ruth G. Meyer to

PA PA AT TRICIA A A. LOSE Elec le ec ctr tro ro on nic ic c Filing Filin ng

640 Bu Buds uds Aly B Bellef ll fonte Bellefonte HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 12-7 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat. 9-3

PLEASE CALL FOR APPOINTMENT

Exceptional Craft Beers

 Join The Brewers Club And Receive Discounts On Drinks Merchandise and Growler Fills

 Put a Team Together And Join Us For Wednesday Quizzo Night



Casual Pub Menu Sundays $1 Off All Pints From 3:00 - 8:00

www.gamblemill.com 814 355 7764 160 Dunlap Street Bellefonte PA

HANDYMAN MAN SERVICE SER RVICE V

(814) 1 353-0696

TA TA AX X SE ER RV RV VIC IC CE

$130,000. TAYLOR TOWNSHIP Mary L. McNelis to Patricia A. McNelis and Pamela A. Supenia, 1255 Logan Ave., Tyrone, PA 16686, $1. WALKER TOWNSHIP Steven E. Bennet and Tabatha S. Bennett to Craig P. Benner and Tiffany J. Benner, 482 Nilson Road, Bellefonte, PA 16823, $218,900. James F. Sanders and Patricia A. Sanders to Christopher W. Sanders, 322 Borealis Way, Bellefonte, PA 16823, $155,000. WORTH TOWNSHIP Laurie S. White and Sharon L. Pletcher to Sharon L. Pletcher, 848 E. Mountain Road, Port Matilida, PA 16870, $1. Sara L. Johnson by sheriff and Sara Leann Johnson BY to First National Bank of PA, 4140 E. State St., Hermitage, PA 16148, $4,177.03.

Gregory G. Halpin and Elisha Clark Halpin, 637 E. Irvin Ave., State College, PA 16801, $236,000 Corey J. Hamilton and Lori M. Hamilton to Jay P. Searles and Joann C. Vender, 1090 Saxton Drive, State College, PA 16801, $232,000. Kamilla Way to Kamilla Way, Ralph W. Way, Andrew Way, Ingrid Way-Thompson and Ericka C. Way, 128 Waypoint Circle, State College, PA 16801, $1. Majorie S. Newell TruSt., William M. Mertens Trustee to William M. Mertens, 1102 Westerly Parkway, State College, PA 16801, $1. Menas B. Khachatourian to Mark C. Bigatel and Paula M. Bigatel, 200 Linden Circle, Centre Hall, PA 16828, $130,000. Edward Fishery and Irene Fishery to Mark C. Bigatel and Paula M. Bigatel, 200 Linden Circle, Centre Hall, PA 16828,

BUY UY ONE NE LUN UNCH U N NC CH O OR R DIN IINNER NN NN NE ER GET E T ON NE E LU UNCH NCH OR DIN IINNER N N ER AT 1/2 PRRICE ICE Sun., Mon., Tues., Tu ues., Wed. Wed. e ONL ONLY! O Y! Must Pre esent Coupon, Dine in Only

814 3 359-2082 359-208 59-208 82

A FULL SER SERVICE VICE CONSTRUCTION COMP COMPANY PANY SERVING CENTRE CO. SER VING C ENTRE C O. FOR OVER 25 YRS. s3PRING#LEAN5P s-ULCHING s'UTTERS s(AULING s'ENERAL #ONTRACTOR

s,ANDSCAPING s-OVING(ELPERS s0RESSURE 7ASHING s2OOlNG s#ONCRETE

s0AINTING s3IDING s$RIVEWAY3EALING s"ASEMENT#LEAN /UTS s2EMODELING

s$ECKS s4REE4RIMMING s"RICK"LOCK 3TONE s)NSURANCE*OBS s2OOF#LEANING

We W e have a professional for your needs! n YOU N NAME AME IT T-W WE ED DO O IT IT! T!

0!&ULLY)NSURED353-8759 0 !&ULLY)NSURED353-8759

104 N. Main Street, Pleasant sant Gap PA 16823-5157 HOURS: Mon. - Th hu. 11am - 11pm, p , Fri. - Sat. 11am - 12a 2 m, S Sun. 12am 2 -9 9pm

1401 Benner Pike Bellefonte, PA 16823

Market M arket k

(814) 23 237-4578 37-4578

Seed Potatoes, Onion Sets, Candy Onion Plants, Perre ennials, and Early Spring Bedding Plants Available

HOURS: HOU URS: RS M

; Closed Sunday S


PAGE 30

APRIL 5-11, 2012

HE C CENTRE ENTRE C COUNTY OUNTY TTHE

GAZETTE

Placing A Classified Ad? Call By Noon Monday To Run Thursday • All Ads Must Be Prepaid

238.5051

PHONE... 814.

classifieds@centrecountygazette.com

REAL ESTATE PACKAGE

EMPLOYMENT PACKAGE

4 Weeks 8 Lines + Photo only

$

76

COUNTRY 5 min. from town. This 3 bdrn home sits on 1/2 acre with open living room, dining room, and kitchen. Three car garage. Bellefonte area. Asking $250,000 firm. Ph. 814.222.333.

FREE HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CLEANING SERVICES Offering cleaning services for your home weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly. I have several years of experience and enjoy domestic work. Call me at (717) 437-3138 for more details! Now Hiring Part-time Waitresses for lunch shifts (11-5) or dinner shifts (5-10) at Kimchi Korean Restaurant. Please stop by our restaurant in person. Visit our website www. kimchistatecollege.com

for directions.

Personal Trainers One on One seeks committed, career oriented individuals to join our team of Professional Personal Trainers. Full and part-time available. Please e-mail your resume and cover letter to adam@oneononefit.com

Preschool Teacher for Christian childcare center. Early Childhood degree preferred.Please call (814) 237-1245 for more details or email: plower@stpaulsc.org

pressmen Wanted for web offset printing. Full time, benefits. Experience on a Goss Urbanite or Harris V-15 helpful. Looking for quality control and ability to work well with others. Shifts vary and weekend work is also required. Send resume to:

Box 2466 c/o The Indiana Gazette P.O. Box 10, Indiana, Pa 15701

GARAGE SALE

P L E H TED WAN

HOUSES FOR SALE

2 Weeks 12 Lines

$

60

or 4 Weeks

ACTION ADS

GARAGE SALE PACKAGE

MOVING sale. Thurs, Fri, Sat. 9a,-4pm.7341 Manor Heights, Bellefonte. Toys, tools, antiques, furniture, kitchen appliance, Bayou Fitness Center, lots of book, lawn furniture, dishes, girls clothes, fax machine, Computer desk, CD racks, stereos, fans, heaters, bikes, much more. No early birds

HELP WANTED DISPATCHER for trucking company., Must have experience. Good phone and computer skills. Willing to work in fast paced office. Medical benefits available, plus 401K. Please send resume and probable salary requirements to: P.O. Box 012, Bellefonte, Pa. or fax to 814.000.1111.

$

105

1 Week 12 Lines

$

75

18

Total value of all items for sale must be under $2,000 • Must have price of item for sale in ad • Run up to 6 lines for 3 weeks • PRIVATE PARTY ONLY • No early cancellation refunds Real Estate, Rentals, Auctions, Financial, Services/Repairs. Garage Sales, Pets, Bulk (firewood, hay, etc.) not eligible. No other discounts or coupons apply.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

MACHINERY & TOOLS

SPORTS EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

WANTED TO BUY

P/T JOB Assist a home bound elderly neighnor with every day (non-medical) activities. Call and talk it over! HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE (814) 238-8820

responsibilities of a camp counselor Art Projects Include: • jewelry making • paining with acrylics & water colors • pottery • candle making • tie dying (of course!) candle making • mosaics • anything else you can think of!

First Aid & CPR training included. An in-person interview is required. To learn more about out camp watch our PROMOTIONAL VIDEO to download our staff application visit our web site and contact

RIDING MOWER, Simplicity, 13 hp hydro and electric start. $600. 5 hp Rototiller $100. Wheel barrel, new medic tire. $75. (814) 355-3729

GOLF CART: 2008 YAMAHA G-Max 48 volt, electric. Folding windshield. Golf bag cover. Hunter Green. Ex condition! Charger included. $2500 (814) 237-3701

HOUSEHOLD GOODS

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

WANTED TO BUY: CASH PAID for old mens and womens clothing and accessories including shoes, hats, purses, and costume jewelry from the 1800’s-1980’s. Please call Lisa (814) 353-8586

Jud Millar. info@ smasummers.com

Applicants should have the following qualifications: • experience instructing art to kids or teens • passionate about creative arts • willing to lead other activities when not teaching art • experience working with teens • have a positive outlook on life • be excited about the prospect of getting paid to “play” for the summer • be 21+ years old • have a valid driver’s license

SPECIAL SERVICES

FREEZER, 8 Cubit foot, upright. $100. Gas Grill, automatic ignite, $50. 10 Beer Sign Lights, $20. ea. (814) 355-3729

LEAF BLOWER, Gasoline, new. $75. Two 55 Gallon plastic garbage cans with lids, $30 ea. 2 gasoline push mowers, 1 almost new. $50 ea. (814) 355-3729

WHAT are you waiting for? Place your Gazette classified as today. Phone (814) 238-5051.

Stone Mountain Adventures is a residential co-ed camp for 12-16 year olds located in central Pennsylvania near Penn State University. We are currently hiring a Creative Arts Instructor & Camp Counselor, responsibilities include: • planning creative art projects • ordering inventory • managing 8 campers during a creative arts activity • leading other camp activities • sleeping in the cabins with kids at night • sharing in the general

Internships Available. All camp counselors/instructors must live at camp. Contracts run from 6/15 to 8/20.

MUSICAL & STEREO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Landscape fully insured. Call for free quotes! Mowing, Trimming, Mutch. Spring Clean Up! Call (814) 355-1799 or (814) 876-0093 Will go the extra mile for your yard.

CLOTHING VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS OUTFIT: Includes skirt, shawl, hat, gloves and purse. Fits 36” waist to 44” waist. Green $150 for set (814) 355-2811

VIOLIN, BOW & CASE: Violin , FNIAA Inscription Ex condition. $500. Bow $55. Case $65. Includes pitch pipe & resin. All for $600 (814) 383-2748

Yamaha M500S upright piano, only 7 years old in like-new condition, Sheraton Mahogany finish, original owner, includes bench. Located in Boalsburg. (814) 466-7893

QUILTS 5 Full size bed quilts hand made by my grandma. $150.00 a piece OBO. Also for sale 2 full size bed hand crocheted covers. $150.00 a piece OBO (301) 264-3966

Will pay top dollar for your junk vehicles. (814) 441-7330

DESCRIPTION brings resuts. Use adjectives in your classified ads.

BOATING NEEDS 14’ JON BOAT: 2 seats & trailer, Johnson 9.9hp motor. All new: Minn Kota trolling motor, optimax battery, oars, fuel tank, etc $1200. (814) 308-9008.

Some ads featured on statecollege.com


APRIL 5-11, 2012

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 31


PAGE 32

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

APRIL 5-11, 2012

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