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elcome to the 205th Issue of Afro/ Latino Magazine. Here you will find your source for Entertainment, Local Business, and other areas of interest in the Reading, Harrisburg, Pottstown Lancaster Pa area. Afro/Latino welcomes all your Advertising needs. We offer custom Advertising and Graphic work. We offer product placement and helpful ideas to make your business grow. Utilizing our Extensive Network of Websites, Print Publication, Promotional Tools and Events is a great way to increase your exposure and drive traffic to your business. Afro/Latino is also a great way to make all of your Personal Announcements such as Birthdays, Anniversaries, Reunions, Weddings, Birth Announcements and much more! We are much more than an Advertising Magazine.. We publish helpful and knowledgeable information to empower our communities. So, when it comes to making the choice for your Advertising...Stick with the Magazine that is in your Community and about your Community

For Advertising: 484 484--256 256--7258 Bienvenido a los afro / hispano Quiero darle las gracias por echar un vistazo a nuestra revista, si tiene alguna pregunta acerca de la publicidad en nuestra revista o sugerencias con respecto al contenido, por favor llรกmenos al 484-256-7258 yle ayuda, Gracias

Look Us Up On Line , Afrolatinomag.com, EE--mail LCSERL@AOL.COM, Earl Lucas Facebook


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Although cocaine makes people feel more alert and on top of things in the moment, it can leave users vulnerable to a much slower brain in the long run. A new study shows that chronic use ages key parts of the brain at an accelerated rate. The findings were published online April 24 in Molecular Psychiatry. Regular cocaine users often experience early cognitive decline and brain atrophy, and the new findings show how these users are, indeed, actually losing gray matter in their brain much faster than people who don’t take the drug. “As we age we all lose gray matter,” Karen Ersche of the Behavioral and Clinical Neuroscience Institute at the University of Cambridge and co-author of the new study, said in a prepared statement. But, she noted, “chronic cocaine users lose grey matter at a significantly faster rate, which could be a sign of premature aging.” Ersche and her colleagues used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the brains of 60 people ages 18 to 50 who used cocaine habitually and 60 healthy people of similar ages and IQs who did not. They found that on average, healthy individuals who didn’t use the drug lost about 1.7 milliliters of grey matter annually, whereas cocaine users were losing closer to 3.1 milliliters each year. Cocaine users lost much more gray matter in the prefrontal and temporal regions—which help control memory, decision-making and attention—than non-users did. The find brings a new insight into “why the cognitive deficits typically seen in old age have frequently been observed in middle aged chronic users of cocaine,” Ersche said. Even after the researchers excluded the 16 people from the cocaine group who also had alcohol problems, the trend of accelerated brain mass loss held up. Of the estimated 21 million cocaine users worldwide, about 1.9 million lived in the U.S. as of 2008. And the largest segment of U.S. users were people ages 18 to 25—some 1.5 percent of whom said they had used cocaine in the past month,. “Young people taking cocaine today need to be educated about the long-term risk of aging prematurely,” Ersche said. But she and her colleagues also noted that the results also underscore the extra cognitive needs that middleaged and older adult drug users seem more likely have in addition to their addiction problems.

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The Supreme Court said the Voting Rights Act of 1965 relies on 40-year-old data that don't reflect racial progress and changes in U.S. society. This is a developing story. Check back with MSN News for updates. The Supreme Court says a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965 cannot be enforced until Congress comes up with a new way of determining which states and municipalities require close federal monitoring of elections. The justices said in a 5-4 ruling Tuesday that the law Congress most recently renewed in 2006 relies on 40-year-old data that don't reflect racial progress and changes in U.S. society. Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act requires that certain jurisdictions with a historical connection to civil rights violations — mostly in the South — must get federal approval, in advance, before making any changes to their voting laws or procedures. The court, split on ideological lines, did not go as far as striking down Section 5 of the law, known as the preclearance provision, which requires certain states to get federal approval. But a majority did invalidate Section 4 of the act, which sets the formula for states covered by Section 5 and was based on historic patterns of discrimination against minority voters. "Congress did not use the record it compiled to shape a coverage formula grounded in current conditions," conservative Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority. "It instead re-enacted a formula based on 40-year-old facts having no logical relationship to the present day." Although Section 5 is technically left intact, it is effectively nullified, at least for the near future, as Congress would now need to pass new legislation setting a new formula before it can be applied again. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, reading from the dissent, said, "The sad irony of today's decision lies in its utter failure to grasp why the Voting Rights Act has proven effective. Thanks to the Voting Rights Act, progress once the subject of a dream has been achieved and continues to be made. In my judgment, the court errs egregiously by overriding Congress' decision."

The March on Washington is on August 24, 2013.The cost is $30.03/person. The bus will leave from 3rd and Washington by the parking garage at 6:30am and will leave Washington around 6-6:30pm. They should pack a lunch and bring some water with them. A donation will be taken on the bus to tip the bus driver.The first 47 who pays their money will be guaranteed a seat. All checks must be made out to me (Lyra Talarico) at 22 Hardwood Lane, Mohnton, PA 19540.This is not a fundraiser, I am not trying to make money off of this the cost of the bus is equally divided among us.They should get their seats reserved early. Afro/Latino

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Afro/Latino Magazine Issue 205