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This Weeks Issue  Afro/Latino Parade & Festival June 11th  Eddie Moran running for School Board Director   Chris Brown: Losing   Health News Living With AIDS 

Issue 168

4/14/2011

From the Publisher… The Longest Running Minority Magazine elcome to the 168th Issue Afro/Latino is also a great way For of Afro/Latino Bi-Weekly to make all of your Personal Advertising: Magazine. Here you will find your Announcements such as Birth484 484--256 256--7258 source for Entertainment, Local days, Anniversaries, Reunions,

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Business, and other areas of interest in the Reading, Harrisburg, Pottstown Lancaster Pa area. Afro/Latino welcomes all your Advertising needs. We offer custom Advertising and Graphic work. We offer product placement and helpful ideas to make your business grow. Utilizing our Extensive Network of Websites, Print Publication, Promotional Tools and Events is a great way to increase your exposure and drive traffic to your business.

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Weddings, Birth AnnounceBienvenido a los afro / hispano ments and much more! Quiero darle las gracias por We are much more than an echar un vistazo a nuestra reAdvertising Magazine vista, si tiene alguna pregunta . We publish helpful and acerca de la publicidad en knowledgeable information nuestra revista o sugerencias to empower our communities. con respecto al contenido, por So, when it comes to making favor llámenos al the choice for your 484-256-7258 Advertising...Stick with the yle ayuda, Gracias Magazine that is in your Community and about your Community

Afro/Latino Team Earl Lucas Publisher / Owner “To see what’s in front of ones face requires a constant struggle”

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Have the Afro-Latino Magazine delivered to your home every other week for only $42.00 for the year, $28.00 for half the year. Call 484-256-7258 or e-mail me @ lcserl@aol.com


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Stage manager Stan Danner gets trimmed to support wife's battle with breast cancer Janet and Stan Danner, photo below, have been longtime Berks Jazz Fest volunteers. Stan is the stage manager at the Scottish Rite Cathedral; Janet is the hospitality coordinator at the same venue. Recently, Janet was diagnosed with breast cancer and has been undergoing a regiment of treatments, including chemotherapy which resulted in the loss of her hair. To be supportive of his wife and everyone battling breast cancer, Stan volunteered to have his "beloved" locks, unbraided, pulled into a long ponytail, cut off and donated to the Pantene Beautiful Lengths program. Stan's donated hair will be used to create wigs for cancer patients. The trimming took place during the intermission of the Ladies of Jazz concert on Saturday, April 2, at the Abraham Lincoln Hotel. A large crowd, which included Janet, watched Stan get trimmed by local barber Bryheem, photo above, of Brotherly Love Cuts, 100 N. 4th Street, Reading. The entire Berks Jazz Fest family wishes Janet and all breast cancer patients all the best in their battle against the disease.

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1102 Nicholls St. Reading Pa

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Carlito’s Way From the earliest days of radio, enthusiasts have come up with ways to listen to and play music in their cars. As early as the 1930s, fitted car radios became available, and by the 1960s, tape players using reel-to-reel equipment, compact cassettes, and then 8-track cartridges were introduced for in-car use. In other words, driving around in a car, blasting your favorite tunes, is part of that "nothing's new under the sun" concept. It was born early in the history of the automobile. Thus, a large aftermarket car audio industry was started to help create the ultimate listening experience, one where a consumer can change or replace the standard audio system for something better or louder. And the competition has been fierce ever since. A stock car audio system refers to the original equipment manufacturer application that the vehicle's manufacturer specified to be installed when the car was built. A large aftermarket industry exists where consumers can, at their desire, replace many or all compo-

nents of the stock system." And the competition has been fierce ever since. For some companies, such as AutoZone, 2801 Perkiomen Ave., the aftermarket car stereo business has slowed to a turtle's speed right now. Angel Otero, manager of AutoZone, said they sell a stereo system every couple of months and blamed the economy for the downturn. "The industry has changed a whole lot," Otero said, referring to the fact that many new cars come equipped with better factory stereos or even mp3 player hookups where all that is needed is an extra cable. "With the purposes of the economy, people just don't want to spend the extra money when all they need is a wire." But some customers still choose to replace their stereo systems, he said. "Some new cars don't come with a CD or cassette player in the radio," Otero explained. "We do carry a few radios with CD or tape players." And some customers just want a louder system with bass. But Carlos Nieves, owner of Carlito's Way Auto Sound & Security, 1102 Nicolls St., said he believes that businesses have to diversify and stay ahead of the changes in order to keep going in today's turbulent business climate. "You have to do your homework," said Nieves, who has been in business for four years. "And you have to figure out what's the best way to get the customer back in." But he noted that it is getting to be more difficult with audio, since it's more expensive and difficult to do the upgrades due to the fact that many dashboards are coming with one-piece molding. "Many newer cars have molding that goes around the stereo and the heater/air conditioning controls," Nieves explained. "Because of that, the costs have nearly doubled." It also can be especially hard when all the other electronic controls, like door chimes and airbag lights, in the car are wired through the radio input, he said. Yet another reason his competition is throwing in the towel. "If they aren't keeping up with the technology, it may be a headache for them," he said. "It may take longer to put in the radio. You really need to know what you're doing." Nieves said he often encourages upgrading the existing audio system - especially in newer vehicles, which come with mp3 players and auxiliary wiring - so he doesn't scare customers away from radio installation. "You keep the factory stuff but upgrade the speakers or go off of the factory radio with an amp," he said, adding that many of his clients have older vehicles which are still inexpensive to upgrade. But with the popularity of the mp3 player, which offers the choice of 500+ songs versus carrying around 5-10 compact discs with a mere 50-100 songs, people are willing to makes the changes. "And sometimes the factory radio doesn't draw sufficient power to listen to," Nieves said. Which is exactly why customer Jay J. Johnson came to Nieves' business. "I'm more or less upgrading from factory [equipment] for better sound and quality," Johnson said. "Factory is fine, but I wanted a louder sound." Nieves said he's thankful his business is pretty strong right now - in part from the fact that people have extra money from income tax returns and in part from the fact that he also sells remote starters and alarm systems. "You have to do your homework and keep ahead of the competition," he said.

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The Nice Guy Vs.The Pushover Nice guys don't always finish last, but pushovers do. There's a big difference in what defines a nice man from one who lets a woman walk all over them. However, thanks to the amazing women who would rather date jerks and be caught up in relationship "excitement," aka drama, men are becoming desensitized to the notion that being a nice guy is even worth it. Public service announcement: Nice guys are still "winning," and being a considerate kind man is still very much appreciated. However, the line between being a pushover and a nice guy is so thin that it's hard to even notice when it's crossed. So let us help you. For starters, a good rule of thumb to determine your status is by asking yourself: as much as I like/love this woman, am I putting her life before mine? If the answer is yes - you're a pushover and you need to fall back quickly. Women will never be attracted to a spineless, passive man who lets a woman walk over all them, wavers on their decisions and opinions, and never takes charge. Pushovers are easy to spot, because usually outside the relationship they operate without a backbone and find it difficult to say "no." Despite a pushover's best intentions to be "nice," in order to get women to respect them they must learn to hone and keep the nice gestures and discard all the boring and predictable gestures that allow a woman to get her way - every time.

Shirea L. Carroll

Afro/Latino

Here are eight ways to help differentiate the pushover from the all-around nice guy. 1. NICE GUYS: Aren't afraid to say, "no" when needed. PUSHOVERS: Are afraid to make a woman upset in any way, even if means not standing up for themselves. 2. NICE GUYS: Compliment a woman. "Your hair looks great." PUSHOVERS: Obsess over a woman. "What type of shampoo do you use, so I can buy it smell you when you aren't around?" 3. NICE GUYS: Will respectfully let a woman know when she is wrong. PUSHOVERS: Will avoid even the most minor confrontations, apologize, and take all the blame even when it's the woman who is at fault. 4. NICE GUYS: Are told by women, "I really appreciate the way you treat me." PUSHOVERS: Are told by women, "I really would appreciate you not being up under me all the time." 5. NICE GUYS: Expect to be treated they way they treat a woman. PUSHOVERS: Accept being treated any kind of way as long as he's with the woman. 6. NICE GUYS: Are persistent and resilient when pursuing a female. PUSHOVERS: Are passive and annoying and do more chasing than pursuing. 7. NICE GUYS: Are told they are "SO nice." PUSHOVERS: Are told they are, "WAY TOO nice." 8. NICE GUYS: Often get the girl and finish first. PUSHOVERS: Often get dumped and knocked out of the race.

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Introducing Maranda Duncan to the Afro/Latino Team

Elton T. Butler Sr. First Black Chief Detective Afro/Latino

The Elks Lodge Baseball team 1965 www.afrolatinomag.com


99 Miit Eclipse Spider $6,495

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Afro/Latino Magazine as a part of the community we are obligated to inform, encourage, motivate, empower and educate our citizens on the facts and de de--myth any and all misleading, negative, untrue and fraudulent information floating in our neighborhoods that are meant to disenfranchise our people..

NO PART OF AFRO/LATINO Magazine may be reproduced without the express written permission from the Publisher. AFRO/LATINO Magazine is a Registered Trade Mark. Thank you. Earl Lucas



Afro/Latino Issue 168