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VOL. 233, NO. 39

Friday, October 5, 2018

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Lawsuit challenging school board’s vote dismissed By Philip Sean Curran Staff Writer

The decision by the Princeton Public Schools Board of Education to extend the district’s sendrelationship with Cranbury has survived a legal test. On Sept. 27, a state Superior Court judge sitting in Trenton threw out a lawsuit a Princeton couple filed in a bid to invalidate the vote the board took earlier this year to renew the send-receive agreement until 2030. Joel Schwartz and Corrine O’Hara claimed in their lawsuit that there was a violation of the state’s Open Public Meetings Act

because the board had voted electronically, while “members of the public were neither made aware of how each board member voted nor what the final vote was … .” District administrators said the vote was posted on the screen behind where board members sit in their meeting room. “It was such a ridiculous suit,” Princeton board President Patrick Sullivan said on Sept. 28. “I didn’t ever think it was ever going to amount to anything.” Sullivan pointed to legal costs of more than $10,000 to defend the district against that lawsuit and “thousands more” involving another legal challenge to

the Cranbury agreement that Schwartz and O’Hara brought in September with the state Commissioner of Education. “Mr. Schwartz is spending thousands of the taxpayers’ dollars on frivolous suits that have nothing to do with education, nothing to do with our kids and which have no merit whatsoever,” Sullivan said. Schwartz said on Sept. 28 that he and O’Hara had not decided whether they would appeal the ruling. In a statement, the couple defended their decision to sue. “We respect the judge’s opinion, though we disagree with it,” they said. “We continue to be-

lieve our original cause of action was correct and that transparency in government is essential. If people attending a public meeting are unable to know, in the moment, how their elected representatives vote, why bother to hold public voting at all? “Even the judge said she was unable to comprehend from the video of the June 12 meeting how the members of the board voted,” they said. “No proofs were offered to the court by the board that any member of the public was able to know in the moment how the members of the board voted.” Princeton and Cranbury have

had an agreement since the early 1990s for Cranbury students of high school age to attend Princeton High School, a deal that will last until the end of June 2030 based on the vote the Princeton board took in June. Cranbury will pay Princeton $4.8 million in tuition for some 280 students for the current academic year. Cranbury Board of Education President Karen Callahan said on Oct. 1 that she was “happy the judge dismissed the lawsuit.” “With this now behind them, the Princeton board can continue to focus on the important work ahead with the referendum,” she said.

Counseling services open in new Hightstown location By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

With a snip of the scissors, I.C.A.R.E. of East WindsorHightstown and Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Mercer County opened a new satellite office in Hightstown last week. Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes and mayors Janice S. Mironov of East Windsor and Larry Quattrone of Hightstown cut the ribbon at the new office at 133 S. Main St. on Sept. 26. The location on South Main Street, next to the First Baptist Church, replaces the counseling services office in the former YMCA building at 230 Mercer St. The building was sold and the Family Guidance Center, which had provided counseling services, folded. Jewish Family & Children’s Service stepped in immediately to fill the void. Jewish Family & Children’s Service will provide supportive services aimed at teenagers and young adults who are struggling with mental health concerns. It will help people in need of stabilization and education to work their way through those challenges. It will also offer referral services for substance abuse and acute mental health crises. I.C.A.R.E. of East WindsorHightstown - Initiative for Counseling, Addiction, Renewal and Education - grew out of residents’ concerns about youth death by suicide and also drug and alcohol substance abuse, said David Coates, who is the president of the nonprofit group’s board of directors. I.C.A.R.E. had arranged to provide counseling services through the Family Guidance Center. The group was disappointed when the YMCA building was sold and the Family Guidance Center closed, but there are

many people who made it possible to find a new home and a new provider to offer counseling services, Coates said at the Sept. 26 ribbon cutting ceremony. Coates pointed to Bruce Wood, pastor of the First Baptist Church, which is renting the office space to the counseling service, and to architect Lee Stults for drawing up plans for the new office on short notice. He also praised contractor Joseph Mannino. “When we had questions or concerns, Mayor Mironov had people we could call. I definitely don’t think we would be here, if not for her help. I went to Mayor Quattrone and he encouraged us from Day One, and that matters,” Coates said. Coates also praised Mercer County officials who saw the need for counseling services. Mercer County is funding a grant to pay for Jewish Family & Children’s Service through 2019. “We are so excited to offer services. We want to give help and hope. I know you put your heart and soul into this, and you can expect the same from us,” said Michelle Napell, the executive director of Jewish Family & Children’s Services. Hughes credited Mironov and Quattrone with putting “extra effort into making sure this (new office) gets done.” It is a reflection of a caring community, which is reflected by the mayors and governing bodies of both towns, he said.

Photos by Scott Jacobs

Hitting the court

Hightstown High School’s Avnika Naraparaju (above) and Victoria Velez (below) were among the athletes that participated in the Mercer County Girl’s Tennis Championships that took place at the Mercer County Tennis Center in West Windsor Township on Sept 27.

See COUNSELING, Page 3A

Highway signs to designate East Windsor as the home of 150-year-old turkey farm By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

The Lee Turkey Farm has been a fixture in East Windsor Township for 150 years. Now the whole world will know about the landmark farm on Hickory Corner Road when signs are posted on Route 130 at the northern and southern gateway entrances to East Windsor. Mayor Janice S. Mironov and Township Council members unveiled a prototype of the sign at a special ceremony at the 54acre Lee Turkey Farm on Sept. 29. The farm was established in 1868.

“This is a really exciting opportunity to celebrate the 150th anniversary of this great treasure in our community. Multiple generations have owned and operated this great farm,” Mironov said. Mironov described the farm as “an oasis” in what is predominantly a residential area of the township. Through cooperative efforts involving East Windsor and the Lee family, the farm has been permanently preserved and can never be developed for housing. The farm is a tri-state attraction, Mironov said. Visitors can pick an assortment of fruits and

vegetables themselves at the “pick your own” farm. Turkeys may be reserved and picked up in time for Thanksgiving dinner. “It is a unique landmark in the region. It has really helped to put us on the map. We are so proud to have you here,” Mironov told Dick Lee and his son, Ronny Lee. The younger Lee and his wife, Janet, are the current operators of the farm. “This is a special occasion,” Dick Lee said. “I remember when Hickory Corner Road was a dirt road. My father and I got through the Great Depression. Two neighboring farms were owned by the bank, that’s how

See FARM, Page 3A

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bad it was.” Ronny Lee thanked Mironov and the council members “for this very nice honor (that) was really unexpected,” and he also thanked his father “for letting me do what I love to do, to farm.” Now, Ronny Lee’s son and daughter, Dylan and Charli, work next to their parents. They are the seventh generation to farm the Lee Turkey Farm, which had its genesis when Ronny Lee’s greatgreat-great-grandfather, Clement Updike, bought the farm in 1868. From the 1860s to the 1900s, it was a basic farm. There were

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Friday, October 5, 2018F

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CALENDAR Fri., Oct. 5 Sun., Oct. 14

“American Idiot.” A story of youthful disillusion will be told in the rousing renegade musical “American Idiot,” featuring the music of Green Day, coming to Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC’s) Kelsey Theatre.  Adapted from Green Day’s 2004 concept album, the Pennington Players get ready to turn up the  volume Fridays, Oct. 5 and 12 at 8 p.m.; Saturdays, Oct. 6 and 13 at 8 p.m.; and Sundays, Oct. 7 and 14 at 2 p.m. Kelsey Theatre is located on the college’s West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. A reception with the cast and crew follows the opening night performance on Oct. 5. (Parental advisory: This show is rated R.) Tickets are $20 for all and may be purchased online at www.kelseytheatre.net or by calling the  Kelsey Box Office at 609-570-3333.  Kelsey Theatre is wheelchair accessible, with free parking next to the theater.

Fri., Oct. 5

Zentangle Drawing Class. Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. This is a three-session class held Wednesday afternoons; must  register for all three classes. All supplies provided by The Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. 10 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library  System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register  online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. Hightstown Library Association  Fall Book Sale.  Find literary treasures, movies & music for sale at great prices! Purchases support programs and materials for the liCRANBRY PRESS WINDSOR-HIGHTS HERALD 100 Overlook Center, 2nd Floor Princeton, NJ 08540 609-924-3244 Cranbury Press Windsor-Hights Herald (USPS 683-360) is published every Friday by Packet Media LLC., 100 Overlook Center, 2nd Floor, Princeton, NJ 08540. Periodicals postage paid at Princeton, NJ 08540. Postmaster: send address changes to Cranbury Press Windsor-Hights Herald, 100 Overlook Center, 2nd Floor, Princeton, NJ 08540. Mail Subscription Rates The current Auto Renewal rate is $10.11 and is charged on a quarterly basis. The 1 year standard rate is $50.93. Out-of-country rates are available on request All advertising published in The Princeton Packet is subject to the applicable rate card, copies of which are available from the advertising department. The Packet reserves the right not to accept an advertiser’s order. Only publication of an advertisement shall constitute final acceptance.

brary. Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St., Hightstown. Baby & Toddler Time.  For children ages birth–2.5 years & a caregiver. Join us for singing & rhyming fun followed by play time with the library’s toys. 10:30-11 a.m. Hightstown Memorial Library,  114 Franklin St., Hightstown.

Sat., Oct. 6

Hightstown Library Association Fall Book Sale.  Find literary treasures, movies & music for sale at great prices! Purchases support programs and materials for the library.  Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St., Hightstown.

Sun. Oct. 7 Fri., Oct. 26

Exhibit. A remix is a piece of media which has been altered from its original state by adding, removing and/or changing pieces of the item. This style is mainly seen in music but applies to visual art, as well. When two artists with vastly different styles seek each other out to create a new style of mixed media, only one thing can come from it. For “The Remix,” Omn7 abstract surrealist Glitch Artist Phillip McConnell and expressive pop artist Chris Ernst will collaborate via playing off each other’s unique styles. Each artist will create roughly 5-10 of their pieces to be “remixed” by the other. The artwork is for sale with 20 percent of each sale going to support the Cranbury Arts Council and its programs. Cash or a check made out to the Cranbury Arts Council is accepted as payment. Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, 23-A N. Main St., Cranbury.  Hours: Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.;  Sun., Oct. 7 and Sun. Oct. 21 from 1 to 3 p.m.  For more information, visit www.cranburyartscouncil.org.

Sun., Oct. 7

Antisemitism program. The Beth El Synagogue of East Windsor Israeli affairs committee will present a program titled “Antisemitic Hate Speech and BOTS Epidemic” at 7 p.m. What role do digital social networks play in propagating antisemitism,

Barrett, certified financial planner from AXA Advisors, will host a program focusing on the recent tax reform changes, social  security planning and other financial topics. Get a better understanding of the tax code changes and how they will  affect your income and lifestyle. Jonathan has over 10 years’ experience in the financial industry and attended  both the Harvard and Wharton Schools of Business. 7 p.m. Hickory Corner  Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference  desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. Hightstown Library Association  Fall Book Sale.  Find literary treasures, movies & music for sale at great prices! Purchases support programs and materials for the library.  Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St., Hightstown. Story Time with Miss Liz.  Children ages 2-6 will enjoy stories, songs, Tues., Oct. 9 rhymes & a craft. Siblings Hightstown Library welcome. 10:30-11:15 Association  Fall Book a.m. Hightstown MemoSale.  Find literary trea- rial Library,  114 Franklin sures, movies & music for St., Hightstown. sale at great prices! PurMidweek Math Tutorchases support programs ing Drop in math help for and materials for the li- 1st grade-high school  stubrary.  Hightstown Memo- dents with Peddie School rial Library, 114 Franklin student tutors.  6:30-7:30 St., Hightstown. p.m. Hightstown MemoStory Time with Miss rial Library,  114 Franklin Liz.  Children ages 2-6 St., Hightstown. will enjoy stories, songs, Evening  Guided rhymes & a craft. Siblings Meditation  Come  join welcome. 10:30-11:15 us for guided meditaa.m. Hightstown Memo- tion at the end of your rial Library,  114 Franklin day.  Leave feeling reSt., Hightstown. laxed & rejuvenated.  FaSpanish classes.  Reg- cilitated by library staff ister in person or by call- member Leena, a 11-year ing  (609) 448-1474 for practitioner of Rajyoga any of these 3 classes. Be- meditation.  8-8:30 p.m. ginning Spanish class, 5-6 Hightstown Memorial Lip.m.; Citizenship Exam brary,  114 Franklin St., Review, 6-7 p.m.; and  Hightstown. Learning English with VicMovie Club.  Join our tor, 7-9 p.m. Hightstown great group of cinema fans Memorial Library,  114 as we discuss the newest Franklin St., Hightstown. DVDs and theater releases. Monthly Drop- We talk of screenplay,  diin Blood Pressure rector, music score, what Checks.  Drop in for a we liked, what fell flat, blood pressure check and whom WE would have from our local public cast. If  you enjoy movies health nurse.  6-7 p.m. this club is for you!! 6:45 Hightstown Memorial Li- p.m. Cranbury Public Library,  114 Franklin St., brary, 23 N. Main, CranHightstown. bury. both online and in the real world? We will explore the psychological and political dimensions of the newest frontier in the world’s oldest epidemic. This event is free.  Please call the synagogue office to reserve a seat.  Beth El Synagogue is located at 50 Maple Stream Road, East Windsor, NJ, 08520;  admin@bethel.net, 609-4434454; www.bethel.net. Exhibit event. A reception for the “The Remix” exhibit will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at  Gourgaud Gallery, Town Hall, 23-A N. Main St., Cranbury. For more information, visit www.cranburyartscouncil. org. Movie: “The Other.” Join us for a screening of the classic movie. Rated PG, 108 minutes. A small snack will  be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. No registration is necessary. 2 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Wed., Oct. 10

Saving on Your Taxes! An Overview of the New Tax Reform. Jonathan

Thurs., Oct. 11

East Windsor Offers Free Flu Clinics. 9:30 a.m.  to 3 p.m. Township

Senior Center, 40 Lanning Boulevard. Residents 60 years and older. The vaccinations are by appointment only, by  calling the Township Health Department at (609) 443-4000, ext. 222. Drawing From Your Imagination.  This art class is a three-part series of lessons. Learn to draw your own picture using felt-tip pens with the guidance of local artist Marge Rosen. Materials provided by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. 9:30 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer  County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register online at www.mcl. org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for  assistance. Conversational English as a Second Language.  Join ESL instructor Arthur Spero to learn how to improve  your English language speaking skills, pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar and fluency. Must have some basic  knowledge of English. 7 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County  Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. Hightstown Library Association  Fall Book Sale.  Find literary treasures, movies & music for sale at great prices! Purchases support programs and materials for the library.  Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St., Hightstown.

Fri., Oct. 12

Zentangle Drawing Class. Zentangle is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. This is a three-session class held Wednesday afternoons; must  register for all three classes. All supplies provided by The Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. 10 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library  System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register  online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957. Movie: “Arsenic and Old Lace.”  Join us for a screening of the classic

movie. Not rated, 118 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. No registration is necessary.  2 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138  Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Hightstown Library Association  Fall Book Sale-BAG DAY!  Find literary treasures, movies & music for sale at great prices! $3 per bag! Purchases support programs and materials for the library. Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Baby & Toddler Time.  For children ages birth–2.5 years & a caregiver. Join us for singing & rhyming fun followed by play time with the library’s toys. 10:30-11 a.m. Hightstown Memorial Library,  114 Franklin St., Hightstown.

Sat., Oct. 13

St. David’s Annual Fantasy Auction. Doors open 5:30 p.m. View live and silent auction items as well as “tricky  tray” treasures while enjoying yummy appetizers  and desserts.  Live auction begins at 7 p.m. Credit cards will be accepted. Featured items include: gift cards, themed baskets, wine baskets.  Offerings large and small for all budgets. Come out for a fun night with our delightful  auctioneer Suzanne!  Door prizes and a few surprises are planned. Please join us and bring a friend or two. Admission: $12. St. David’s Church, 90 S. Main St., Cranbury. For more information, call 609-655-4731 or visit www.stdavidscranbury.com. Hightstown Library Association  Fall Book Sale-BAG DAY!  Find literary treasures, movies & music for sale at great prices! $3 per bag! Purchases support programs and materials for the library. Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown.

Mon., Oct. 15

Bytes and Bites: Tech Q&A. Come meet Jay Oliver, our new Technology Specialist, and have a “tasty bite” with coffee or tea. Ask  Jay your tech questions and he’ll find the

See CALENDAR, Page 6A


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Windsor-Hights Herald/Cranbury Press

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Volunteer fire company to host an open house this Sunday By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

East Windsor Volunteer Fire Co. No. 2 will hold an open house on Oct. 7 in conjunction with Fire Prevention Week. The fire station is located at 69 Twin Rivers Drive. Fire Prevention Week will run from Oct. 7 through 13. The Sunday afternoon open house at East Windsor Volunteer Fire Co. No. 2 - also known as Station

46 - will be held from noon to 4 p.m. It will feature safety demonstrations, fire truck rides, tours of the fire station and a chance to meet Sparky, the fire dog. During the week, the fire company will take its big yellow fire trucks to make personal appearances at area schools, including the Ethel McKnight Elementary School on Oct. 10 and the Perry L. Drew Elementary School on Oct. 12.

“The best way to reach the parents is through the children,” said Fire Chief Mario Batista of East Windsor Volunteer Fire Co. No. 2. “The children listen, they understand and they will relay our safety tips to their parents. They always do. They never let us down,” Chief Batista said. The National Fire Protection Association has sponsored Fire Prevention Week since 1922. Fire Pre-

vention Week is observed during the week in which Oct. 9 falls, to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire that began on Oct. 8, 1871 and that caused extensive damage, according to www.NFPA.org. The theme of Fire Prevention Week this year is “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere.” The goal is to encourage people to look around for places where a fire could start, to listen

for the smoke alarm and to learn two ways out of every room in case of fire. “Look” means to look around the house to spot potential fire hazards and take care of them. “Listen” means listening for the smoke alarm, because occupants have only a few minutes to escape. Households should establish a safe place outside of the house where they can meet if they have to evacuate.

“Learn” is about establishing two ways out of every room, and making sure all doors and windows can be easily opened and are not blocked by clutter. Children under 5 years old and adults over 65 years old are most vulnerable for injury or death in a fire, but people of all ages can become victims. The risk of a non-fatal fire injury is highest for those between 20 and 49 years old.

Cranbury History Center will be renamed in honor of local historian By Philip Sean Curran Staff Writer

The Cranbury History Center on South Main Street, Cranbury, will be renamed in honor of the late Betty Wagner, a former township historian who played an active role in her adopted community. The Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society, of which Wagner was a past president, intends to have a rededication ceremony, scheduled for 2 p.m. Nov. 11, at the center.

Members of Wagner’s family and others are expected to attend the event, which is open to the public. Wagner died in May at 100. Friends this week remembered all the East Brunswick native did for the community she moved to in 1971 with her husband, Bill. At the time, she had been working as a librarian for an advertising agency in New York City. “She became very involved in the town,” said Lisa Beach, a member of the society and curator of

the organization’s museum. “She was just tireless. I don’t think she ever was meant to be an activist, but I think that’s what subtly she was, in changing things in Cranbury for the better what she thought.” Wagner belonged to the Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society, served on the municipal Planning Board and got involved in local issues, including fighting to keep a dump from opening in town and to preserve the community’s history.

Counseling

Farm

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“It is a great partnership between the towns and the county, and it will continue for a long time to come,” Hughes said. Mironov said Coates has been the glue that helped facilitate the counseling services, and also told attendees she wanted to thank each and every one for bringing counseling services to the community. “This is really a Godsend. The provider will

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perform in a spectacular fashion,” Mironov said. Quattrone said he saw the need for counseling services and thanked everyone for their efforts. “Call me and I will try to satisfy any need you have,” he told the group. Jewish Family & Children’s Service has office hours Monday through Thursday from 2-7 p.m. To make an appointment or for more information, call 609987-8100.

cows, horses, chickens and pigs. Later, half of the farm was devoted to apple orchards and the rest was set aside for fruits and vegetables. The decision to raise and sell turkeys grew out of Dick Lee’s membership in the 4-H Club’s turkey club. The future farmer joined the turkey club when he was 11 and began to raise turkeys. When Dick Lee re-

Beach said Wagner never craved the spotlight and was quick “to thank others for their work.” “She would never take credit,” Beach said. “I don’t even know how comfortable she would have been with the naming of the history center because she was so selfless.” One of her accomplishments was starting the center, home to archival and other material that help to tell the story of the community. It will now be called the Elizabeth M. Wagner

Cranbury History Center. “We want it to be a town-wide event because we really want people to be aware of all that Betty has done for the town,” Beach said of the rededication ceremony. Wagner, born on Oct. 22,1917, celebrated her 100th birthday last year. “I just lived every day to its fullest as I could see it,” she said in an interview last year. “I did things as I saw they needed to be done. I like doing things for others, primarily.”

She died in May. Township officials intend to declare Nov. 11 as Betty Wagner Day in Cranbury. For Beach, Wagner accomplished so much in her life. “She’s always been a good friend and mentor to me all the years I’ve known her,” Beach said. “I don’t know if we will see the likes of her again, unfortunately.”

turned home after military of years, the bank loan was strawberries. It was the service in World War II, he paid off. The farm sold tur- first pick-your-own farm in found that his father was keys to other businesses, still in debt and was con- but now it sells them di- New Jersey. sidering selling the farm. rectly to consumers. Now, visitors can pick Applying his experience in The Lee family expandfruits and vegetables from raising turkeys, Dick con- ed the farm’s operation to vinced his father to raise sell produce, in addition to A to Z - apples to zucchithem by the thousands - turkeys, in the 1960s. ni, along with sweet corn, not the 100 turkeys he had After Dick Lee read lettuce, spinach, peaches, raised as a youth. about a Michigan farmer It was the transition to who operated a pick- pears, watermelon and raising and selling turkeys your-own cherries farm, cabbage. During the fall, on a large scale that was he decided to try out the the key to solving the debt pick-your-own concept at the corn maze is a popular problem. Within a couple his farm with apples and attraction. 00256889.0217.03x10.18.BeckerNose&Sinus.indd


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Windsor-Hights Herald/Cranbury Press

THE STATE WE’RE IN

www.windsorhightsherald.com & www.cranburypress.com

Friday, October 5, 2018F

By Michele S. Byers

Renewable energy: Save money, our land, water, air and health Gov. Murphy has signed a new law that requires New Jersey to get half of its power from renewable energy by 2030, and he’s setting the bar even higher with a goal of achieving 100 percent clean energy by 2050, which should be defined to mean 100 percent renewable energy. Right now, renewable energy makes up about 15 percent of our power. So how can we get from 15 percent to 50 percent to 100 percent? New Jersey’s Energy Master Plan, currently undergoing an update, will provide a roadmap to achieving these ambitious goals. The state Board of Public Utilities is now holding public hearings and asking for written comments. The encouraging news is that a 100 percent renewable energy future is not only possible, but can be more affordable than our current reliance on fossil fuels. Barb Blumenthal, an energy expert and researcher with New Jersey Conservation Foundation, testified at a Board of Public Utilities hearing that this state we’re in has the potential to reach a renewable energy future that both reduces air pollution emissions and reduces costs for consumers. “New Jersey’s renewable energy future can be lower-cost than a future that relies on natural gas,” stated Blumenthal. “A smart portfolio of renewable energy resources could now offer the lowest-cost pathway to provide reliable electricity by 2050.” The reason for the low cost is simple: Underlying economics increasingly favor renewable energy over gas. In fact, Blumenthal believes new natural gas projects “face the very real risk of becoming financial disasters for their investors and owners after 2030, if not sooner.” So how can New Jersey achieve both renewable en-

ergy and low costs? One way is to look at how other states are moving away from fossil fuels. Blumenthal said other states – most notably Hawaii, California and Minnesota – are using sophisticated computer models. These state-of-the-art models consider all types of power, including nuclear, gas, coal, hydro, solar and wind. They also look at all possible combinations of generation, flexible load, transmission and storage. The models come up with long-term plans for replacing fossil fuels with renewables. Blumenthal said New Jersey should use similar models. “This work is essential to preserve a healthy planet, to support a vibrant economy and to provide low-cost energy,” she testified. Blumenthal also emphasized that natural gas is not clean energy: It’s actually the primary source of New Jersey’s current emissions from electricity generation. New Jersey voters are getting the message. A new survey of the state’s registered voters, conducted by The Fairleigh Dickinson University Poll for ReThink Energy NJ, found that 66 percent do not consider natural gas as clean energy. This is a 23-point increase since 2016! The same poll revealed that three of every four respondents want New Jersey to achieve a goal of 100 percent of energy from renewable sources by 2050. Seventy-five percent of those surveyed said the state should invest more in renewable energy sources than in fossil fuels and pipelines. Two out of three (66 percent) said they are willing to pay $10 or $15 more per month for solar or wind energy in order to reduce emissions. Solar, more than natural gas (44 percent to 26 percent), is seen as most important to the state’s energy future, and 74 percent support the development of offshore wind energy.

Approximately eight out of 10 voters said they are concerned about proposed new gas pipelines, including impacts on natural areas and wildlife habitats (81 percent), the seizure of private property by energy companies (81 percent), risks to air and water quality (79 percent), and the targeting of protected natural areas like the Pine Barrens (78 percent). Two-thirds (67 percent) said the jobs created by pipelines are not worth the environmental and health risks, and the state should instead create jobs through clean, renewable energy projects. The last of the Board of Public Utilities’ public meetings on the Energy Master Plan are scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 4, in Newark; and Wednesday, Oct. 20, in Camden – go tohttps://www.nj.gov/emp/docs/pdf/Publid-Notice-EMP-Additional.pdf for more details. Written comments will be accepted through Friday, Oct. 12, at the email address EMP.comments@bpu.nj.gov. Please tell the Board of Public Utilities that New Jersey’s Energy Master Plan should facilitate a rapid transition to 100 percent renewable energy, like appropriately sited solar and wind projects, while preventing ratepayer dollars from being wasted on unneeded natural gas infrastructure that should not be considered clean energy. For more information and key talking points, go to  https://rethinkenergynj.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Key-messages-for-NJBPU-EMP-Meetings_Sept-2018.pdf. And to learn more about preserving New Jersey’s land and natural resources, visit the New Jersey Conservation Foundation website at www.njconservation.org or contact me atinfo@njconservation.org. Michele S. Byers is executive director of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation in Morristown.

South Main Street. He was transported to police headquarters, booked, processed, issued traffic summonses, and released on a summons complaint with a pending court appearance. On Sept. 18, a 25-year-old man from Egg Harbor Township was arrested for possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on West Ward Street. He was transported to police headquarters, booked, processed, issued traffic summonses, and released on a summons complaint with a pending court appearance. On Sept. 27, a 21-year-old man from Hightstown and a 21-year-old woman from Wast Windsor were both arrested for possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, and tampering with evidence, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on Grant Avenue. During the stop, he was found to have active warrants out of East Windsor and Belmar Municipal Courts. They were transported to police headquarters, booked, and processed. The man was charged, via summons complaint with a pending court appearance and turned over to the East Windsor Police Department, in lieu of bail. The woman was later released on a summons complaint with a pending court appearance. On Sept. 30, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on Mercer Street, two 20-year-old women and one 21-year-old woman, all from Philadelphia,  were arrested for possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. All subjects were transported to police headquarters, booked, processed, and released on summons complaints with pending court appearances. Other Arrests On Sept. 23, a 22-year-old man from Roselle was arrested for obstructing the administration of law, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on North Main Street. He was transported to police headquarters, booked, processed, and released on a summons complaint with a pending court appearance. On Sept. 28, a 28-year-old East Windsor man  was arrested for an active warrant out of Southampton Municipal Court, during the course of a motor vehicle stop in the parking lot of Meadow Lakes. He was transported to police headquarters, booked, processed, and released after posting bail. On Sept. 30, a 23-year-old man from Hightstown was arrested for criminal trespass, after patrol officers respond-

ed to a Hightstown Housing apartment for a report of an intruder inside an apartment. Upon the officer’s arrival, they located the man sleeping in the victim’s bed. He was subsequently arrested and transported to police headquarters. While at headquarters, he was booked, processed, and released on a summons complaint with a pending court appearance. The East Windsor Police Department initiated the following police reports through Wednesday, September 26. At 7:45 p.m. on Sept. 20, an officer conducted a motor vehicle stop after observing a vehicle being operated with an inoperable headlight, inoperable brake light and committing several moving violations. During the investigation, it was discovered that the driver, a  29-year-old East Windsor man, had provided false information as to his identity obstructing his arrest for unrelated outstanding warrants. He was charged with hindering apprehension, obstructing justice, driving while suspended, unlicensed driver, uninsured motor vehicle, fictitious license plates, tailgaiting another vehicle, maintenance of lamps, failure to signal turn and unregistered motor vehicle. The driver was arrested and released pending court action. --Just before 11 a.m. on Sept. 21, an  officer was dispatched to the Wawa Store at 104 Hickory Corner Road on a report of employee theft. During the investigation, it was discovered that the suspect, a 24-year-old East Windsor man,  had removed money from the cash register while working and removed items offered for sale from the store without authorization or payment for them. The suspect was arrested and later released pending court action. He was charged with theft. --At approximately 7 p.m. on Sept. 21, an  officer conducted a motor vehicle stop after observing a vehicle being operated while obstructing the flow of normal traffic. During the investigation, the driver, a 34-year-old man from Hightstown provided false information as to his identity obstructing his arrest for unrelated outstanding warrants. The driver was arrested and released pending court action. He was charged with hindering apprehension, obstructing justice, driving while suspended, unlicensed driver and impeding the flow of traffic. ---

POLICE BLOTTER The Hightstown Police Department initiated the following police reports from Sept. 17 to Sept. 30. CDS / DWI Arrests On Sept. 17, a 25-year-old woman from Hightstown was arrested for possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on Mercer Street. She was transported to police headquarters, booked, processed, issued traffic summonses and released on a summons complaint with a pending court appearance. On Sept. 17, a 24-year-old man from Lakewood was arrested for unlawful possession of a firearm, possession of less than 50 grams of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on

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Allentown Harvest Festival celebrates arrival of fall with weekend of activities By Mark Rosman Staff Writer

One of the premiere events in the scenic borough of Allentown, the Harvest Festival, will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 13-14. Residents of all communities are invited to visit the town that is nestled at the border of Monmouth and Mercer counties. Organizers of the Harvest Festival are expecting a turnout of 130 vendors, 80 of whom will be selling handcrafted items. There will be a petting zoo, a bounce house, a classic car show, food trucks and more. Community groups that will participate include the library, the Allentown High School band, and the soccer, lacrosse and ice hockey teams. The Allentown Lions Club will host a craft beer garden both days from 1-9 p.m. Members of the Hope Fire Company will accept donations for a fundraiser to secure thermal imaging ncameras for the fire com,pany. Demonstrations of sa thermal imaging camera

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Living history demonstrations and displays will be presented on both days. Included are wool spinning, cooking and washing stations, butter churning, uniforms and equipment, telegraphy, signaling, field hospital, U.S. Colored Troops and other living history presentations. Organizers said the Harvest Festival started about 35 years ago. During its first few years, the event was a sidewalk sale hosted by businesses owners. As the event grew, the business association sought and received permission to close Main Street. The goal was to bring people into Allentown to show what the businesses had to offer. The Harvest Festival is also a way for the Allentown Business Community Association to give back to the community that supports its businesses, according to the organizers. Parking is limited in the downtown area. Visitors may park at Allentown High School, 27 High St., where a shuttle bus will bring them to Main Street.

CAMPUS CORNER

Belmont University - in Nashville, Tennessee kicked off classes for its fall - 2018 semester earlier this d year with a record-breakd ing enrollment number as - the University welcomed d 8,318 students to campus, o nearly triple the enrollment g in 2000 and marking a 65

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will take place. The Lions said they are matching up to $3,500 toward the purchase of the first camera and organizers of the fundraiser are hoping enough money can be raised to secure a second camera. The Harvest Festival will feature a Civil War living history weekend at Heritage Park. Visitors are invited to tour the camps at any time. The tentative living history schedule for Oct. 13 includes the following: 10:30 a.m., march to the Allentown Presbyterian Church cemetery for a gun salute at the grave of Civil War soldier Pvt. Francis Getsinger; 11:30 a.m., cavalry demonstration; 2 p.m., skirmish (battle); 3 p.m., camp tours and hospital demonstration following the battle. The tentative living history schedule for Oct. 14 includes the following: 10:30 a.m., Confederate and Federal infantry units will perform drill; 11 a.m., cavalry demonstration; 11:30 a.m., Confederate and Federal artillery demonstrations; 2 p.m., skirmish (battle).

percent increase in the last decade alone. This marks Belmont’s 18th consecutive year of record enrollment. Newly enrolled students include Claire Ernst of Hightstown and Megan Porras of East Windsor. ---

Lucia T. Middleton of Hightstown enrolled at Colby College in Waterville, Maine, this fall. Before classes began Sept. 5, Middleton took part in aweeklong orientation that included an introduction to academic and intellectual See CAMPUS, Page 9A

Looking for a way to bring new customers to your store? Want to show your customers you appreciate them? Let NMG Events help! If you are looking to bring more people to your business, look to NMG events. We will develop a custom event for your business and bring it to life.

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• 7 Mercer County Freeholders approve expenditures of $330 million annually. • 80% ($267 Million) of this money comes from Mercer County property taxes. • Your combined Windsors property taxes contribute $57 Million of this total number. • The Freeholders approve 99.9% of all requests made to spend the $330 Million with little debate and practically no transparency. • These same Freeholders give themselves a salary increase every year and employ friends and family among the 1300+ Mercer County staff.

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answers! Enroll online or at the library. 11:30 a.m. Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main St., Cranbury. Mystery Book Club. The group will be discussing “The Surgeon” by Tess Gerritson. New members are always welcome and no registration is necessary.  7 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Sing-Along with Kim Yarson.  For ages birth-5 and a caregiver. Dance to Kim’s high-energy guitar music as she plays classics and original songs. Registration suggested online at www.mcl.org, under “Programs.”  10:30-11 a.m. Hightstown Memorial Library,  114 Franklin St., Hightstown. Lunch Time Guided Meditation.  Join us for guided mediation during your lunch hour. Help yourself regain the peace lost through busy mornings and smoothly get through the rest of the day.  Facilitated  by library staff member Leena, a 11 year practitioner of Rajyoga meditation. 12:30-1 p.m. Hightstown Memorial Library,  114 Franklin St., Hightstown. Adult English Learner  Writing Class.  Improve your writing skills for school and work with this drop in service. 2-3 p.m. Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St., Hightstown.

Wed., Oct. 17

Understanding Medicare. Learn the intricacies of the Medicare Program and how to navigate the government webpage. Presented by Golden Years Design of Freehold. 6:30 p.m. Enroll online or at the library. Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main St., Cranbury. Paper Crafts with Lonie. Join us for a paper crafting workshop to create a fun craft. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. 2 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Please register online at www.mcl.org or call the  Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. Embroidery Circle. Whether you are looking to create your first stitch or expand your skills, learn new methods and

techniques, or share embroidery art and craft ideas, the Embroidery Circle is open to all skill levels – including absolute beginners. Bring embroidery projects you are working on to share with others or work in the good company of fellow embroiders. No registration is necessary.  7 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Thurs., Oct. 18

Drawing From Your Imagination. This art class is a three part series of lessons. Learn to draw your own picture using felt-tip pens with the guidance of local artist Marge Rosen. Materials provided by the Friends of  the Hickory Corner Library. 9:30 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 4480957 for assistance. Conversational English as a Second Language.  Join ESL instructor Arthur Spero to learn how to improve your English language speaking skills, pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar and fluency. Must have some basic  knowledge of English. 7 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County  Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. College Financial Aid Workshop.  Kevin Simme of College Funding Alternatives will walk you  through how the admissions and financial aid processes work and how to maximize your financial aid package. 7 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County  Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Please register online at www. mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance.

Fri., Oct. 19

Ten Best Informational Websites. Have you ever needed a reliable review of a product or information about a medication you’ve been prescribed? Learn about some trusted websites you can use to find the information you need.

10 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. Drum Circle.  Join musician and teacher Jaclyn DiLouie of Mercer ARC to create simple rhythms using hand held drums and various percussion instruments. No experience required! Drums and  instruments provided or feel free to bring your own. No registration is necessary.  10:30 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Sun., Oct. 21

“A Walk Through Time” house tour. The Hightstown-East Windsor Historical Society is sponsoring a historical house tour of five private homes from 1-5 p.m. and titled “A Walk Through Time.” The walking tour includes special floral arrangements by The Rocky Brook Garden Club and antique cars from The Central Jersey Antique Car Club.  Tickets for event will be sold the afternoon of the tour at Ely House, society headquarters,  164 N. Main St., Hightstown - $25 adults; $5 children.  Presale tickets will be available after Labor Day for $20 at Perennial Home, 119 W. Ward St., Hightstown.  For more infomation, visit hewhs. com or call 609-448-8388. Movie: “Something Wicked This Way  Comes.”  Join us for a screening of the classic movie. Rated PG, 95 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. No registration is necessary.  2 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County  Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Mon., Oct. 22

Nonfiction Book Group. The group will be discussing “Killers of the Flower Moon” by David Grann.  No registration is necessary and new members are always welcome.  2 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System,  138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Tues., Oct. 23

East Windsor Offers Free Flu Clinics. 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Township Senior Center, 40 Lanning Boulevard. Residents 60 years and older. The vaccinations are  by appointment only, by  calling the Township Health Department at (609) 443-4000, ext. 222.

Wed., Oct. 24

Adult Craft Circle. Join us to create an autumn home decoration. All supplies provided; ages 14 to adult. Sponsored by Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. 2 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory  Corner Road, East Windsor. Please register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. College Admissions. Learn about the college admissions process. Presented by C2  Education of Princeton. 7 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library  System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Please register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance. Conversation Café Wednesday. Let’s have a conversation about what makes a book a classic.  We’ll also discuss the winning title of the Great American Read. Is it a classic by our definition? Please enroll online or at the library.  6:30 p.m.  Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main, Cranbury.

Thurs., Oct. 25

Conversational English as a Second Language. 7 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County  Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join ESL instructor Arthur Spero to learn how to improve your English language speaking skills, pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar and fluency. Must have some basic  knowledge of English. Please register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance.

Fri., Oct. 26

Movie: “Strangers on a Train.” Join

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us for a screening of the classic movie. Rated PG, 101 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. No registration is necessary. 2 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138  Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Sat., Oct. 27

Knights of Columbus Red Cross Blood  Drive.  KofC Council 6284’s 30th Red Cross Blood Drive will be held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hightstown First Aid Squad, 168 Bank St., Hightstown. You can now signup online at  https://www.redcrossblood.org/. Enter sponsor code: kofc6284  and select your time and donation type. There will Power Red machines at this drive.

Mon., Oct. 29

Library Apps. Learn how to use library apps for downloading ebooks, audiobooks, comics,  music and magazines to your tablet, laptop or smartphone. 10:30 a.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Please register online at www.mcl.org or call the Reference desk at (609) 448-0957 for assistance.

Wed., Oct. 31

Hickory Corner Book Discussion. The group will be discussing “Manhattan Beach” by Jennifer Egan. No registration is required and new members are always welcome! 7:30 p.m. Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor.

Thurs., Nov. 8

Thank You Cards.   Create a thank you card - just in time for Thanksgiving. Thank someone special with a hand-crafted card. Alicia  Vincelette will share her

expertise. Enroll online or at the library. 1 p.m. Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main, Cranbury.

Mon., Nov. 19

Bytes and Bites: Tech Q&A. Come meet Jay Oliver, our new Technology Specialist, and have a “tasty bite” with coffee or tea. Ask Jay your tech questions and he’ll find the answers! Enroll online or at the library. 11:30 a.m. Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main St., Cranbury.

Wed., Nov. 28

Conversation Café. Let’s have a conversation about culturally taboo reads and banned books. Please enroll online or at the library. 6:30 p.m. Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main, Cranbury.

Through January 2019

40 for 40 Exhibit. Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie Mansion – Cadwalader Park, Trenton. For more information, call (609) 989-3632 or visit ellarslie.org.

Continuing events

Artsy Toddler Story Time! A new story time for busy toddlers! There will be books, movement and an age-appropriate craft for toddlers ages 18 months to 2 ½ years, with caregiver. Limit 8. Enroll online or at the library. Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m. beginning Sept. 26. Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main St., Cranbury. HEWYBL fall flag football registration open. The league is open to players 4-18 years old. The registration deadline is August 15, and the season will run from early September until early November. Flag football is a great non-contact sport for both boys and girls. Games are played at Hancock Field in East Windsor. HEWYBL flag football typically draws players from Allentown, Cranbury, East Windsor, Hamilton, Hightstown, Millstone, Robbinsville, West Windsor and other surrounding towns. Please register on line at  www.

HEWYBL.com. Select REGISTER at the upper right-hand corner of the screen and follow the instructions. There is an early bird discount offered if registered and paid by June 19. A late fee of $20 starts on July 23. Costs for divisions are as follows: freshman (4-5 years old as of August 1, 2018) - $85; sophomore (6-8 years old as of August 1, 2018) - $145; JV (9-11 years old as of August 1, 2018) - $160; varsity (12-14 years old as of August 1, 2018) - $160; Sr. Varsity (15-18 years old as of August 1, 2018) - $125. If you have any questions about HEWYBL Flag Football or the upcoming season, please contact Eric Updegraff at hewyblflag@optimum.net. Spinning Yarns Craft Circle: This club meets the first and third Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. in the Cranbury Public Library at 23 N. Main St. in Cranbury. Visit the Gambino Room for an hour of knitting, crocheting, crafts and conversation. All levels welcome. Read It and Eat It. Cook Book Club: This club takes place the third Tuesday of the month at 1 p.m. in the Cranbury Public Library at 23 N. Main St. in Cranbury. Call the library to reserve a copy of this month’s book or visit www.goodreads. com/topic/group_folder/264622. Toddler Stay and Play: This event is held Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. in the at 23 N. Main St. in Cranbury. Early literacy story time helps prepare children with future reading skills. After singing, reading, and talking, children ages 12-24 months with a caregiver stay and play. Movie Club: This club meets on the third Thursday of the month at 1 p.m. in the Cranbury Public Library at 23 N. Main St. in Cranbury Join the lively discussions about movies. Central Jersey Chapter 148 of Korean War Veterans Association: Any veterans who served during the war from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953 or who have served in Korea from July 27, 1953 to the current date can join the group that meets at 10 a.m. the second Wednesday of every

month (except January, February, March and April) at the Monroe Township Municipal Building. Requirements for membership include paying dues of $25 to the Korean War Veterans Association and a $10 chapter fee per year. The chapter is involved in various functions throughout the year including parades with color guard, flag raisings, Korean War memorial ceremonies, funerals and more. For more information, contact Charles Koppelman at 609-655-3111 or email him at KWVANJ@yahoo.com. Community dinner: Rise and the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen offer free hot meals at the First Presbyterian Church, 320 N. Main St., Hightstown, on Mondays from 4 to 5:30 p.m. and the First United Methodist Church, 187 Stockton St., Hightstown, on Thursdays from 4:30 to 6 p.m. All meals are provided free on an unconditional, no-questions-asked basis. Volunteers are welcome. Food Pantry: The Rise Food Pantry is open 52 weeks a year from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and from 5 to 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month. Baby care items, personal products and all nonperishable and perishable food items are needed for local families. The pantry welcomes locally grown fruits and vegetables. Food can be donated directly to the pantry at 225 Franklin St., Hightstown, during operating hours or to the Greater Goods Thrift Store, 114 Rogers Ave., Hightstown. Contact info@rise-community-services. org for more information.

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MERCER COUNTY NOTES County sets National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day program

Mercer County Sheriff Jack Kemler announced the opportunity to dispose of unneeded and expired prescription drugs during the National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Sat., Oct. 27. The goal is to help local residents to rid their medicine cabinets of unused and easily abused opioid painkillers, in addition to any other unneeded prescription medications. Mercer County residents can easily dispose of unused and expired prescription pills by bringing them to the parking lot across from the Mercer County Administration Building at 640 South Broad St. in Trenton, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Hypodermic needles or liquid solutions not accepted. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible method for disposing of unneeded and expired prescription pills. The program held each spring and fall is conducted by the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office with the assistance of the Legal Notices PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that bid proposals will be received from Bidders classified under N.J.S.A. 27:7-35.2 via the Internet until 10:00:59 A.M. on 10/11/18, downloaded, and publicly opened and read, in the CONFERENCE ROOM-A, 1st Floor F & A Building, New Jersey Department of Transportation, 1035 Parkway Avenue, Trenton, NJ 08625; for:

Re-Advertisement Maintenance Long-Life Pavement Markings Contract, Central - 2018, Various Locations, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Somerset and Warren (South of Route 57) Counties 100% State DP No: 18474

Bidders are required to comply with the requirements of N.J.S.A. 10:5-31 (P.L 1975, c. 127); N.J.A.C. 17:27. Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 19:44A-20.19, contractors must provide a Certification and Disclosure of Political Contribution Form prior to contract award. Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 52:32-44, contractor must submit the Department of Treasury, Division of Revenue Business Registration of the contractor and any named subcontractors prior to contract award or authorization. Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 34:11-56.51, contractors must be registered with the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Division of Wage and Hour Compliance at the time of bid. Plans, specifications, and bidding information for the proposed work are available at Bid Express website www.bidx.com. You must subscribe to use this service. To subscribe, follow the instructions on the web site. Fees apply to downloading documents and plans and bidding access. The fee schedule is available on the web site. All fees are directly payable to Bid Express. Plans, specifications, and bidding information may be inspected (BUT NOT OBTAINED) by contracting organizations at our Design Field Offices at the following locations: 200 Stierli Court Mt. Arlington, NJ 07856 Phone: 973-601-6690

One Executive Campus Rt. 70 West Cherry Hill, NJ 08002 Phone: 856-486-6623

New Jersey Department of Transportation Division of Procurement Bureau of Construction Services 1035 Parkway Avenue PO Box 600 Trenton, NJ 08625 CP/WHH, 9/21/18, 9/28/18, 10/5/18, Fee: $133.92 Borough of Hightstown NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received by the Borough of Hightstown, County of Mercer, State of New Jersey on Friday, November 2, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. prevailing time at Borough Hall, 156 Bank Street, Hightstown, New Jersey, 08520, at which time and place bids will be opened and read in public for the following: Sludge Cake Removal, Transportation and Delivery Grit and Screenings Removal, Transportation and Delivery Chemical Purchases Liquid Chlorine Polymer Chemicals Fluorosilicic Acid Aluminum sulfate Calcium Hydroxide (Hydrated Lime) Magnesium Hydroxide Mixed Oxidant Odor Control Chemicals Sodium Bicarbonate Calcium Hypochlorite Granular Algaecide/Fungicide

Proposals must be submitted to the Borough Clerk, or her representative, not later Friday, November 2, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. Specifications and other bid information, prepared by Carmela Roberts, P.E. of Roberts Engineering Group, LLC, have been filed in the office of the Engineer at 1670 Whitehorse-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, New Jersey (609-5861141) and may be obtained during regular business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the cost of $10.00. Checks must be made payable to Roberts Engineering Group, LLC. Bids shall be submitted on the form(s) provided and shall be in accordance with the specifications contained in the Instructions to Bidders and other bidding documents. In order to assure that all potential bidders receive the complete bid documentation, as well as any amendments, modifications or supplements thereto, bid documentation must be obtained only from the Borough Engineer Carmela Roberts, PE of Roberts Engineering Group, LLC, 1670 Whitehorse Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, NJ 08690 by registering with the Borough Engineer and paying the required documentation fee. Failure to follow this procedure for registration and receipt of documentation in submitting a bid will result in the bid being deemed incomplete, and therefore will be rejected. Bidders are required to comply with the requirements of the Local Public Contracts Law, the Prevailing Wage Act, the requirements of P. L. 1975, c.127, and N.J.S.A. 10:5-31et seq. and N.JA.C. 17:27-1.1 et seq., Affirmative Action, and all requirements as set forth in the Instructions to Bidders. At the time a bid is submitted, the bidder shall submit a copy of its Business Registration Certificate. Bids must be made on standard proposal forms, in the manner designated and must be received in sealed opaque envelopes, bearing the name and address of the bidder and the name of the project on the outside, addressed to the Borough Clerk, Borough of Hightstown and must be accompanied by a Non-Collusion Affidavit and a bid bond or certified check for not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid, providing that said check or bid bond need not be more than $20,000.00 nor shall not be less than $500.00, and be delivered at the place and on or before the hour named above. N.J.A.C. 17:44-2.2 requires Contractors to maintain all documents related to the contract for five years from date of final payment and to make them available to the Comptroller’s office upon request. Any awarded Contractor shall maintain all documentation related to products, transactions or services under this contract for a period of five years from the date of final payment. Such records shall be made available to the New Jersey Office of the State Comptroller upon request. Pursuant to P.L. 2010 c. 108, a bidder may request that its bid be withdrawn due to a “mistake” on the part of the bidder, as defined in the Law. Otherwise, no bids may be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the date and time set for the opening of the bids. The Borough reserves the right to reject any or all bids, or accept a bid which, in its judgment, best serves the interest of the Borough. Debra Sopronyi, Borough Clerk WHH/CP, 1x, 10/5/18 Fee: $64.17 Affidavit: $15.00 Borough of Hightstown NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Borough of Hightstown will receive bids and hold a public bid opening on Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. in the Hightstown Borough Hall Building, 156 Bank Street, Hightstown, New Jersey 08520 for the First Avenue and Forman Street Water Main Extension Project. Work includes installation of 635 LF of 8-inch HDPE water main, 325 LF of 6-inch HDPE water main, 42 LF of 4-inch HDPE, 2 insertion valves, 1 10-inch gate valve, 3 8-inch gate valves, 2 6-inch gate valves, 3 wet taps, 1 fire hydrant assembly, 290 LF of 1” Type ‘K’ water services with electrofusion HDPE saddles and threaded brass outlets, restoration and incidentals. The HDPE water main is to be constructed using heat/butt fusion joining by qualified technicians.

The bidders will have 25 days for preparing bids, starting from the time of Bid Advertisement. Proposals must be submitted to the Borough Clerk, or her representative, not later Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. in Specifications and other bid information, prepared by Carmela Roberts, P.E. of Roberts Engineering Group, LLC, have been filed in the office of the Engineer at 1670 Whitehorse-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, New Jersey (609-586-1141) and may be obtained during regular business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the cost of $60.00. Checks must be made payable to Roberts Engineering Group, LLC. Bids shall be submitted on the form(s) provided and shall be in accordance with the specifications contained in the Instructions to Bidders and other bidding documents. In order to assure that all potential bidders receive the complete bid documentation, as well as any amendments, modifications or supplements thereto, bid documentation must be obtained only from the Borough Engineer Carmela Roberts, PE of Roberts Engineering Group, LLC, 1670 Whitehorse Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, New Jersey 08690 by registering with the Borough Engineer and paying the required documentation fee. Failure to follow this procedure for registration and receipt of documentation in submitting a bid will result in the bid being deemed incomplete, and therefore will be rejected. Bidders are required to comply with the requirements of the Local Public Contracts Law, the Prevailing Wage Act, the requirements of P. L. 1975, c.127, and N.J.S.A. 10:5-31et seq. and N.JA.C. 17:27-1.1 et seq., Affirmative Action, and all requirements as set forth in the Instructions to Bidders. At the time a bid is submitted, the bidder shall submit a copy of its Business Registration Certificate. Bids must be made on standard proposal forms, in the manner designated and must be received in sealed opaque envelopes, bearing the name and address of the bidder and the name of the project on the outside, addressed to the Borough Clerk, Borough of Hightstown and must be accompanied by a Non-Collusion Affidavit and a bid bond or certified check for not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid, providing that said check or bid bond need not be more than $20,000.00 nor shall not be less than $500.00, and be delivered at the place and on or before the hour named above. All applicable surety bonds required in connection with the advertisement and award of building contracts or sub agreements must be written by a surety company listed on the Federal Treasury List (Department Circular 570 – Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds).

Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. For more information, contact the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office at 609-989-6111.

Mercer County seeks nominations for Woman of Achievement Award

The Mercer County Commission on the Status of Women is seeking nominations for its 2019 Woman of Achievement and Young Woman of Achievement awards program. The Commission, which was established in 1976 to support the development of policies and programs for Mercer County women, is accepting nominations for these awards until Fri., Nov. 9. The Woman of Achievement Award was established to honor a Mercer County resident who volunteers her time to make the county a better place to live, work and raise a family. The Young Woman of Achievement Award honors a high school student for her  outstanding volunteer work within the county. Nominees must be Mercer County residents and have performed their volunteer work  within the county for the same organization for at least one year. Nomination forms and further information can be found on the Mercer County website or by calling 609-989-6719 or e-mailing womenscommission@mercercounty.org. Awards will be presented at a reception on Tues., March 26, 2019.

Spotted Lanternfly sighting confirmed in Mercer County

New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher announced the New Jersey Department of Agriculture and United States Department of Agriculture personnel confirmed the sighting of the Spotted Lanternfly in northern Mercer County in New Jersey. There were two confirmed sightings in southern Warren County earlier this summer. The specific areas where the Spotted Lanternfly has been identified have been treated. The sightings have led the State Department of Agriculture to quarantine the two affected counties as well as Hunterdon County, which is between Warren and Mercer counties, to prevent the spread of the Spotted Lanternfly. Businesses and the general public in the quarantine area are required to obtain and fill out a New Jersey residence checklist before moving any of the articles listed here. The checklist also serves to inform the public about the Spotted Lanternfly including how to identify all life stages of the insect and minimize or eliminate its movement. Business entities that routinely travel in and out of the quarantine area are required to take, and pass, training regarding the Spotted Lanternfly that is supplied for free by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture at  http://bit. ly/2K92DdZ. New Jersey will accept and recognize the Pennsylvania permit. Those businesses that interact exclusively in New Jersey’s quarantine zone must comply with the details outlined in the quarantine order. The quarantine also allows access to property for Department, USDA, or USDA contracted agents where the Spotted Lanternfly is suspected or confirmed to evaluate and treat the property if necessary. The Spotted Lanternfly prefers Tree of Heaven as its host, but can feed on 70 other different plant species, including fruit trees, ornamental trees, woody trees, vegetables, and herbs and vines, including agricultural crops like grapes. The Department is asking for everyone’s help in identifying areas where low numbers of this insect may be. Residents can email pictures of suspect insects to  SLFplantindustry@ag.nj.gov  or call the New Jersey Spotted Lanternfly Hotline at 1-833-223-2840 (BAD-BUG-0) and leave a message detailing your sighting and contact information.  For more information about this insect go to  https://www.state.nj.us/agricu lture/divisions/pi/prog/ spotte dlanternfly.html

Mercer County announces digital project for amateur photographers

Mercer County invites you to submit your digital images to help the County create a collection of recent photographs that illustrate living, working and playing within its 12 municipalities. The county is looking for images that illustrate area heritage, economic vibrancy and cultural diversity and that include public buildings, historic sites, parks and events with or without people using those places. This is not a contest but an opportunity for amateur

photographers who seek a broader audience for their work. The images could be used in editorial and commercial digital and print media promoting the County. The photographer’s credit line would appear in the media in which they appear, whenever possible. The county would have exclusive rights of the images and will not sell them. Participants must complete an agreement before submitting images. Instructions and requirements can be found online at ciephoto.com/PhotogDirex.pdf.

Commission hosts deer management program at Mercer Meadows

The Mercer County Park Commission will conduct a deer management program at Mercer Meadows through Feb. 16, 2019. Mercer Meadows Deer Management Program is open only to participants who have applied and been accepted to the program. Mercer Meadows will be open to hunting on a limited number of days during the fall bow, permit bow  and winter bow seasons. Hunting will take place Monday through Saturday, from 30 minutes prior to sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset, with no hunting taking place on Dec. 25. Each entrance to the park will be posted with bright yellow signs to notify park users of the hunting program. During the Mercer Meadows hunt, the Park Commission is asking park users to kindly keep their recreating to the finished  gravel paths, the Lawrence Hopewell Trail and Maidenhead Trail. The Pole Farm section and the wooded area of Rosedale Park are included in this year’s hunt. There will be no hunting near the Dog Park, picnic area or Rosedale Lake. Maps of the hunting boundaries are available on the Park Commission website. For the second year, the Park Commission will make a conscious effort to donate harvested deer to the Hunters Helping the Hungry program. Last season, a total of 14 deer were donated, producing approximately 1,960 servings of protein. The deer management program complies with all of the hunting regulations set by the State; in addition, the Park Commission has adopted County rules for the program. All hunting must be done from an  elevated tree stand; hunters are not permitted to hunt from the ground. There is no shooting across park trails. Interested parties should visit http://mercercountyparks.org/activities/deer-management or call (609)  3030706 for program rules and regulations, and zone maps.

Commission hosts deer management program at Baldpate Mountain

The Mercer County Park Commission will conduct a deer management program at Baldpate Mountain on select days through Feb. 16, 2019. This program is a method for reducing the overabundant deer herd in the greater Hopewell Valley area. The Baldpate Mountain Deer Management Program is open only to participants who have applied and been accepted to the program. The deer management program is open for fall, permit and winter bow, six-day firearm, permit shotgun and permit muzzleloader hunting. Hunting will take place 30 minutes prior to sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset, Wednesday through Saturday from Sept. 8 through Feb. 16. There will be no hunting on Sunday. Through Dec. 4, the park will remain open for public use during hunting days, when only bow hunting is permitted. The park will be closed to the public Wednesday through Saturday from  Dec. 5 to Feb. 9, when firearm hunting is permitted. No hunting will take place on Dec. 25. Each entrance and trailhead to Baldpate Mountain will be posted with a large bright orange “closed” sign as a reminder to the public that the program is taking place. The deer management program complies with all of the hunting regulations set by the State; in addition, the Park Commission has adopted County rules for the program. All hunting must be done from an  elevated tree stand; hunters are not permitted to hunt from the ground. There is no shooting across park trails. For the second year, the Park Commission will make a conscious effort to donate harvested deer to the Hunters Helping the Hungry program. Last season, a total of 14 deer were donated, producing approximately 1,960 servings of protein. Interested parties should visit http://mercercountyparks.org/activities/deer-management or call (609)  3030706 for program rules and regulations, and zone maps.

GET IT SOLD! Put Your Real Estate Ad Here!

This project is expected to be funded with funds from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust. Neither the State of New Jersey, the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust nor any of their departments, agencies or employees is, or will be, a party to this contract or subcontract or any lower tier contract or subcontract. This contract or subcontract is subject to the provisions of N.J.A.C. 7:22-3, 4, 5, 9 and 10. The successful bidder must comply with all the provisions of N.J.A.C. 7:22-9.1et seq., for the participation of small business enterprises owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals (SED’s) and must comply with the Project Plan developed by the project sponsor fulfilling SED utilization. The contractor will be required to comply with all requirements of the grant. In the event revisions or addenda to the documents are required, the owner shall transmit a Notice of Revision or addenda to advertisements or bid documents no less than 7 working days prior to bid opening as found in N.J.S.A. 40A:11-23. Pursuant to P.L. 2010 c. 108, a bidder may request that its bid be withdrawn due to a “mistake” on the part of the bidder, as defined in the Law. Otherwise, no bids may be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the date and time set for the opening of the bids. The Borough reserves the right to reject any or all bids, or accept a bid which, in its judgment, best serves the interest of the Borough.

The contract will be awarded to the lowest responsible, responsive bidder found in N.J.S.A. 40A:11-6.1. Debra Sopronyi, RMC, CMR, QPA Borough Administrator/Clerk CP/WH, 10/5/18 Fee: $72.54 Affidavit: $15.00

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8Friday, October 5, 2018

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New walking tours uncover historical sites of Princeton University By Samantha Brandbergh Correspondent

While taking in the sights during a recent walk through the Princeton University campus, a small group of tourists busily snap photos, their cameras pointed up to the gothic architecture. Below their feet, however, 49 colorful stickers and scannable codes hold a key to the university’s unknown history. The circles placed strategically along the university’s major walkways are part of four recently launched walking tours detailing various aspects of Princeton’s past and present. The tours — African American Life at Princeton, Firsts at Princeton, Traditions at Princeton and Women at Princeton —   are part of the new (In)Visible Princeton series, which aims to bring the lesser-known sites of Princeton University to the attention of students, local residents and tourists. According to Acting

Blotter

Continued from Page 4A At 1:51 a.m. on Sept. 26, an officer was dispatched to check a residence for a wanted person from the Hamilton Police Department. The officer observed the suspect, a  35-year-old man from East Windsor,  on foot outside the residence who then fled the area not complying with

University Spokesperson Michael Hotchkiss, an average of 860,000 people visit the Princeton campus annually since it became open to the public. With that traffic, those at the university hope the tour codes will be utilized, and visitors can learn something new. Hotchkiss said that, although the (In)Visible Princeton series is designed as a tour, visitors explore to stops independently or with friends and family, allowing the codes to be scanned at any time without having to download an external app. “Tens of thousands of people come [to campus] as tourists every year, and those kinds of tours don’t give any context for this stuff,” Project Specialist Abby Klionsky said. Those on the walking tours will find the stickers with a scannable QR code on each. Tour followers will scan the code using the camera on their mobile device to access text, video and audio about each his-

commands. The suspect was later located, arrested and released to Hamilton Police pending court action. He was charged with hindering apprehension. --Just before 11:30 p.m. on Sept. 26, an officer approached a vehicle parked in the closed Speedway gas station on Route 33 West. During the investigation,

torical site. The tours can also be accessed off-campus through the GuidiGO website for those who wish to take a virtual tour at home. “What stood out for me was how good the experience was on my phone and computer, you can really get a rich experience either way,” he said. “People don’t want to download an app to take a tour.” The Princeton University website says the tours “aim to narrate, demonstrate and reflect on the nuanced history of Princeton, and are part of broader efforts overseen by the Campus Iconography Committee to update and diversify campus art and iconography.” Walking the campus, Klionsky shares some of Princeton’s hidden history from the 1800s to present day. The first stop on the Traditions at Princeton tour is located at the entrance of campus, which leads to Nassau Hall. This tradition relates to a supersti-

marijuana was observed in plain view inside the vehicle. The driver, a 31-yearold man from Abington, Maryland  was arrested and later released pending court action. He was charged with possession of under 50 grams of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of controlled dangerous substance in a motor vehicle.

tion claiming that students who walk out of the center walkway of FitzRandolph Gate, which was closed until 1970, won’t graduate. While students still practice this tradition today, many others evolve over time. “Some students don’t know how they’ve changed,” Klionsky said. “We wanted to focus on ones relating to current students, graduate and undergraduate.” By looking through archives, yearbooks, conducting surveys and talking to alumni and representatives of different groups on campus — such as the Princeton and Slavery Project, the LGBT Center and the Women’s Center — the content for the tours was selected. “We wanted to make sure they were accurately represented on the tours and that we had our facts right,” Klionsky said. She added that the African American Life

and Women at Princeton tour stops were organized chronologically, while Traditions and Firsts were placed in specific geographical locations on campus that relate to the content. For example, the Center for Jewish Life is home to one of the Firsts at Princeton tour stops, which details the earliest record of a Jewish student at Princeton — Mordecai Myers, class of 1812. “Myers arrived at Princeton in 1809 and graduated in three years,” the text reads. “According to census records, it is likely that Myers owned enslaved people in Georgia, where he moved after becoming a lawyer.” Tour stops like these also indicate how the “firsts” have changed over time, Klionsky said, like how Princeton offers kosher dining options and hosted a L’Chaim conference in 2016, which celebrated the over 100 years

of Jewish life at Princeton. Further into campus, behind the Cannon Green, lies a tour stop relating to recruiting African American students in the 1960s. Audio for this tour stop features alumna Vera Marcus, Princeton’s first African American female student in 1969. “There was a division, there was a cover that was pleasant, but underneath that cover was the sense that you were different and you that were not included,” she says in a recording about her experiences at Princeton. Other stops on the tour explain why buildings that females donated money for are named after men, the forming of the Association of Black Collegians and the Step Sings and P-rade traditions on campus — things current and prospective students can relate to. “We really wanted people to become engaged with the history,” Klionsky said.

Continued from Page 5A

Patrick took classes at Muhlenberg in molecularlevel biology, genetics and developmental biology which led him to want to design his own research. Working with Amy Hark, associate professor of biology and co-director of biochemistry, Patrick studied how genes are controlled so that they are active in certain types of cells and developmental stages. Patrick sought to understand how the chromatin modifier, which is a protein that expresses gene expression, and GCN5 fits into

the trichome (plant hair) development pathway. Specifically, with what known molecular players in this pathway does GCN5 interact to influence cellular differentiation? More than 60 students are collaborating with faculty on a variety of research projects this summer as part of Muhlenberg’s vibrant research community. Topics can be student- or faculty-driven, and span the natural and social sciences, humanities and arts.

Campus

life at Colby, participation in an outdoor education trip (COOT), and an address by the Crawford Family Professor of Religion NikkyGuninder Singh  at Colby’s 201st Convocation. A graduate of Peddie School, she is the daughter of Claudio and Olivia Middleton of Hightstown. --Patrick Sockler, a biology major and French & francophone studies minor from Cranbury, conducted research over the summer at Muhlenberg College.

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Friday, October 5, 2018

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