Page 1

VOL. 49, NO. 28

Friday, September 28, 2018

thelawrenceledger.com

$1

Rider U. security officer charged with endangering welfare of child By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

A Bordentown City man who is a campus security officer at Rider University, Lawrenceville, has been charged with four counts of endangering the welfare of a child, Burlington County Prosecutor Scott Coffina said. Alan J. Berman, 58, allegedly posed online as a teenage girl in order to convince a teenage boy to send nude photographs and videos of himself through an on-

line video streaming application, the prosecutor’s office said. Berman, who is a volunteer firefighter, also allegedly engaged in sexually explicit conversations with the boy and also had child pornography in his possession, the prosecutor’s office said. Berman was arrested at his home on Lucas Drive on Sept. 21 after police executed a search warrant. A cell phone, a tablet and other digital devices were confiscated and will be examined by

the High-Tech Crimes Unit in the prosecutor’s office. The investigation was triggered by a report from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children after an Arkansas woman said her son had been contacted online by a man who was trying to engage him in inappropriate conversations. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children contacted the Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office about Ber-

man’s alleged online activities earlier this year. The High-Tech Crimes Unit launched an investigation which led to Berman’s arrest. The investigation was conducted by the prosecutor’s office with help from the New Jersey State Police Digital Technology Investigations Unit, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations and the Bordentown City Police Department.

The Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office’s High-Tech Crimes Unit is a member of the New Jersey State Police Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force and the New Jersey State Police Cyber Terrorism Task Force. Anyone who suspects Berman of inappropriate behavior is asked to call the prosecutor’s office at 609-265-5035 and should ask to speak to a detective in the HighTech Crimes Unit.

Terhune Orchards honored by agriculture department for educational efforts By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

Pam and Gary Mount, the owners of Terhune Orchards in Lawrence Township, have worked to make the connection between farms and schools for years, and this week their efforts were acknowledged when they were presented with the New Jersey Department of Agriculture’s inaugural Jersey Fresh Farm to School Farmer Recognition Award. New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas Fisher presented the award to the Mounts and their daughters, Tannwen Mount and Reuwai Hanewald, in celebration of Jersey Fresh Farm to School Week, which was held Sept. 2428. “Terhune Orchards is an amazing place. You can always point to Terhune Orchards and how a farm should work, how it relates to children and the community. I can’t think of a farm or a family that is more deserving of the award,” Fisher said of Terhune Orchards. Students benefit from consuming healthy local produce, but they can also learn from farmers about how their food is grown, Fisher said. The Farmers Recognition Award highlights how farms can work with schools to teach farm-to-school activities and to encourage more farmers to connect with schools, he said.

The 200-acre Terhune Orchards, which is open year-round, hosts classes from schools and hands-on activities for children. Through its tours, Terhune Orchards shows children how crops grow, beginning with seeds. Children learn what life is like on the farm by visiting the apple orchard, the pumpkin patch and the children’s garden. There are farm animals, too. For 13 years, Tannwen Mount has organized “read and pick” programs for preschool pupils. Terhune Orchards staffers read stories about farm produce and activities, and then the children and their parents can pick fruits and vegetables at the farm. There is also a summer camp. Reuwai Hanewald, who is a former science teacher, joins local chefs in the schools and provides fresh fruits and vegetables from Terhune Orchards, introducing the children to the growing, cooking and tastes of fresh farm produce. The hands-on educational activities offered by Terhune Orchards is the reason the first award was presented to the Mount family, said Beth Feehan, the New Jersey Department of Agriculture’s Farm to School program coordinator. State Sen. Shirley Turner (DHunterdon and Mercer) presented a resolution to the Mount family.

Photos by Scott Jacobs

Hitting the field

Lawrence High School’s football team faced Hightstown High School in an away game on Sept. 21. Above, the team rushes onto the field before the game starts. Below, Cory Frost rushed past the line of scrimmage for a big gain. Hightstown High School ultimately defeated Lawrence in a final score of 14-0.

See TERHUNE, Page 3A

Melker takes seat as county freeholder board By Philip Sean Curran Staff Writer

New Mercer County Freeholder Nina D. Melker took the oath of office on Sept. 24 during a ceremonial swearing-in, less three weeks after the Democrat won a vacant seat on the seven-member board. Melker stood with her family at her side as fellow freeholder and Hamilton resident John A. Cimino administered the oath inside Ravello by Toscano, a restaurant on Route 130 in Robbinsville. In remarks afterward, Melker thanked her supporters and said she was grateful to those who had helped her along the way. “I truly appreciate all the support everyone in this room has given me, whether you are my family, my friends or many of my colleagues,” she said. “I truly do look forward to serving Mercer County and I am truly excited for this opportunity.” The ceremony, taking place in the early evening, drew Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes, state Assemblyman Daniel R. Benson (D-Mercer and Middlesex), state Assemblywoman Verlina Reynolds-Jackson

(D-Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Somerset) and other politicos from the county. “I think Nina is going to make a fantastic freeholder,” Hughes told the crowd. “She has a sense of the people.” Cimino said this was the first time he had ever administered the oath of office to anyone and that he was “thrilled” to be doing it for Melker. “The Melker family is like a second family to the Cimino family,” he said. “The relationships See MELKER, Page 3A

Call us

Index Calendar........................2A Classified...................C/D/E Lifestyle.......................15B

Movie Times....................14B The State We’re In..............4A Mercer County Notes...........7A

News: (609) 924-3244 Classified: (609) 924-3250 Advertising: (609) 924-3244 To subscribe: (732) 254-7004 Ext. 8451


2A The Lawrence Ledger

www.thelawrenceledger.com

Friday, September 28, 2018

WHAT’S GOING ON Fri., Sept. 28

Meditation Circle. Slow down and join Reference Librarian Ann Kerr and reduce stress using meditation. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Mercer County Library System,  Lawrence Headquarters Branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-9896920 or email Ann Kerr at lawprogs@mcl.org. Posture & Dance Exercises. Reference Librarian Ann Kerr will share some simple exercises to improve your posture and increase your flexibility. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Mercer County Library System,  Lawrence Headquarters Branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-9896920 or email Ann Kerr at lawprogs@mcl.org. Bucket Book Club: “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” by James Joyce.  The world literary tradition is thousands of years old, extraordinary diverse, and energized by creative genius. Novels, short stories, essays, and poetry written prior to the twenty-first century provide a rich soil worth exploring. For the first year, the books discussed will be limited to books published since 1900 – originally published in English and translations from elsewhere in the world. The intent is to focus on works recognized to have a lasting impact on generations of readers and writers. Next bucket book club title is: “Blindness” by Jose Saramago. 4:30 p.m.  Mercer County Library System,  Lawrence Headquarters Branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Law-

renceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-9896920 or email lawprogs@ mcl.org. Friends of the Lawrence Library Book Sale. Preview Night. Thousands of used, gently-read books will be available at the Friends of the Lawrence Library Book Sale. A special preview night will be held Friday, September 28. The library will be closed for normal operations during the preview event but you will have the first chance to get some amazing deals. Admission to the Preview Night is free for members of the Friends of the Lawrence Library, $5 for the general public, and $20 for booksellers. This event is the only time booksellers will be permitted to use scanning devices. 6-8:30 p.m. Mercer County Library System,  Lawrence Headquarters Branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Call 609-9896920 for more information.

Sat., Sept. 29 Sun., Oct. 7

Friends of the Lawrence Library Book Sale. Thousands of used, gently-read books will be available at the Friends of the Lawrence Library Book Sale. A special preview night will be held  Friday, September 28. The library will be closed for normal operations during the preview event but you will have the first chance to get some amazing deals. Admission to the Preview Night is free for members of the Friends of the Lawrence Library, $5 for the general public, and $20 for booksellers. This event is the only time booksell-

ers will be permitted to use scanning devices. 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mercer County Library System, Lawrence Headquarters Branch, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Call 609-9896920 for more information.

Sat., Sept. 29

Reggae Night with The Verdict and The Mango Men. The concert will be held at 6 p.m. at the  Mercer County Park Festival Grounds, 1638 Old Trenton  Road, West Windsor.  Parking is $5 per car. For more information, visit mercercountyparks.org. “Nugget & Fang.” Showtimes are 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $12 and $10.  Kelsey Theatre,  1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (609) 570-3333 or visit kelseyatmccc.org.

Through Sun., Sept. 30

“Fun Home.” Tickets are $20, $18 and $16.  Kelsey Theatre,  1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (609) 570-3333 or visit kelseyatmccc.org. “Human Error.” Pegasus Theatre, 952 Alexander Road, West Windsor. For more information and to purchase tickets, call (609) 759-0045 or visit pegasustheatrenj.org.

Mon., Oct. 1

Friends of the Lawrence Library Meeting. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike,  Lawrenceville. For more information, call (609) 989-6922.

Yoga. Sunita Yadav teaches this series of yoga classes. All levels of experience are welcome. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a towel or yoga mat. Class is limited to 30 participants. 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike,  Lawrenceville. Registration is required and begins Mon., Sept. 17, at 9:30 a.m.  Participants must register online  for each individual class date. Go to  mcl.org, click on the  PROGRAM  tab at the top of the page to access  EventKeeper.

Tues, Oct. 2

Current Events Discussion Club. Join librarian Matthew Latta for a monthly open and informal discussion of events in the news. We will consider social, political and cultural issues from around the nation and around the world. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org.

Wed., Oct. 3

Active Aging Fitness: Fall Series. The health benefits of regular exercise for older adults are both physical and mental. Get moving with certified Senior Fitness Specialist Bob Kirby, and add some life to your years. 3 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or e-

mail lawprogs@mcl.org. Knitting Circle. Knitters who already know the basics are invited to drop in to socialize with other knitters and work on a project of their choice. Experienced knitter Helene Plank will be available to assist individuals. Registration is suggested. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike,  Lawrenceville. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org.

Thurs., Oct. 4

Crochet Corner. Needle crafters who already know the basic crochet stitches are invited to drop in to socialize and work on a project of their choice. Experienced needle crafter Margaret Woo will be available to assist individuals. 3 p.m. Registration is suggested. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Call 609882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org. Foreign and Independent Films at Your Library: “In Syria” (Belgium, France and Lebanon, 2017). Trapped inside her house in a city under siege, Oum Yazan, mother of three, turned her flat into a safe harbor for her family and neighbors, trying to protect them from the war outside. When bombs threaten to destroy the building, when snipers turn the courtyards into deadly zones, and burglars break in to claim their dreadful bounties, maintaining the thin balance of routine inside the walls becomes a matter of life and death. Not rated. Contains some

graphic violence. 86 min. Arabic with English subtitles. 6:30 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org.

Fri., Oct. 5 Sun., Oct. 14

“American Idiot.” A story of youthful disillusion will be told in the rousing renegade musical “American Idiot,” featuring the music of Green Day, coming to Mercer County Community College’s (MCCC’s) Kelsey Theatre.  Adapted from Green Day’s 2004 concept album, the Pennington Players get ready to turn up the volume Fridays, Oct. 5 and 12 at 8 p.m.; Saturdays, Oct. 6 and 13 at 8 p.m.; and Sundays, Oct. 7 and 14 at 2 p.m.  Kelsey Theatre is located on the college’s West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. A  reception with the cast and crew follows the opening night performance on Oct. 5. (Parental advisory: This show  is rated R.) Tickets are $20 for all and may be purchased online at www. kelseytheatre.net or by calling the  Kelsey Box Office at 609-570-3333.  Kelsey Theatre is wheelchair accessible, with free parking next to the theater.

Fridays, Oct. 5-26

Meditation Circle. Slow down and join Reference Librarian Ann Kerr and reduce stress using meditation. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer

See CALENDAR, Page 5A


Friday, September 28, 2018

www.thelawrenceledger.com

The Lawrence Ledger 3A

Bicyclists complete cross county ride at Bristol-Myers Squibb fundraiser By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

The atrium at the Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. office on Princeton Pike in Lawrence Township was jumping - the DJ turned the music up loud and dozens of employees were moving to the beat, shaking blue and white pom-poms on the morning of Sept. 26. But the DJ and his music were soon drowned out by cheers and the rattle from plastic New Year’s Eve noisemakers as a group of bicyclists rode up the sidewalk to the entrance to the atrium - wet and bedraggled from the morning rain. All smiles, the bicyclists dismounted and walked into the atrium. The employees, many of whom

Melker

Continued from Page 1A we share are truly special.” Melker technically became a freeholder earlier in the month after she defeated six other Democrats in an intra-party contest on Sept. 5 to replace Anthony S. Verrelli, who resigned his freeholder seat to become a state Assemblyman

were wearing T-shirts that said, “We are riding for our patients,” gave the riders “high fives” and fist pumps and even a few hugs. The riders, all of whom work for Bristol-Myers Squibb, were on the last leg of a company-sponsored coast-to-coast bicycle ride to raise money for cancer research. The annual event, dubbed Coast 2 Coast 4 Cancer, is a relay-style event that involved seven teams and totaled 109 riders. Members of the first relay team dipped their toes in the Pacific Ocean at the starting point in Cannon Beach, Ore., on Sept. 5, and now the last relay team was going to dip their toes in the Atlantic Ocean at Long Branch later in the day.

The seven teams raised $625,000 in pledges for the fundraising ride. BristolMyers Squibb was going to donate up to $500,000, but company officials decided to match the money, dollar for dollar. Fundraising is open until Oct. 15. Johanna Mercier, who was on the last relay team that arrived at the Lawrence Township office, told the employees that “rain or shine, we ride.” “As we started out this morning, the rain was pouring. But that’s nothing compared to what people go through when they get a diagnosis of cancer. I think we can all do a little ride in the rain,” Mercier said. She is the head of U.S. and Large Markets, Worldwide Commercial at Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Mercier said she was proud of the team and proud to ride along. It is one thing to see it and talk about it, but “it’s a whole other thing to live it. We had six months of training. It was four or five hours on the weekend. The coaches would tell us what to do during the week.” The ride took the bicyclists up hills and through 100-degree heat, with almost as much humidity, she said. The 109 employees who took part in the relay had to ride in the sun and in the rain. The only thing the coaches could not organize was the weather, she said. “It has really been incredible. I am riding for my mother. She is my biggest fan. She is a 10-year breast cancer survivor. Never give

representing Hunterdon and Mercer counties. Melker, a banker by profession, has been active in the community by serving on the boards of nonprofit organizations and getting involved in Hamilton Democratic politics. This is the first time she has held public office.

“Certainly, her community-based activities demonstrate the tremendous caring she has for young people, for those people in need,” Mercer County Democratic Chairwoman and East Windsor Mayor Janice S. Mironov said at the event. “She has really worked hard to come to this

moment.” Melker will run unopposed in November to serve the remaining year of Verrelli’s term. She will be able to run in 2019 for a full three-year-term. This year, four of the seven freeholder seats are on the ballot. The freeholder board is controlled by all Democrats.

State. You are the jewel in our crown,” Turner told the Mount family. Lawrence Township Councilman Michael Powers agreed and told the Mounts that Terhune Orchards is “really the jewel of Lawrence Township.” It has been that way for decades, he said, and it will continue to be a jewel be-

cause the land has been permanently preserved as farmland. Gary Mount, who was obviously pleased, said that when he and his wife bought the farm in 1975, they agreed to share the farm with the community. Since that time, thousands of people have visited Terhune Orchards, he said.

Terhune Continued from Page 1A She said she was “just delighted” to attend the recognition program. It is a privilege to be able to salute Terhune Orchards and the Mounts, she said. “They know the importance of getting children involved in agriculture, if we want to continue to keep the ‘garden’ in the Garden

GET CONNECTED!

up. That’s what the ride is all about,” Mercier said as the employees cheered. “As I think about the ride, it is a privilege to do this. The company offers us a chance to ride for cancer. I don’t know of any other company that gives you this chance. We not only work for the patients, we ride for the patients,” Mercier said. Susan Braun, the chief executive officer of the V Foundation for Cancer Research, which is the recipient of this year’s fundraising drive, praised the riders and their Bristol-Myers Squibb co-workers. The V Foundation for Cancer Research was founded in 1993 by ESPN and coach Jim Valvano, whose North Carolina State University basketball team won the national col-

lege basketball championship in 1983. “‘Don’t ever give up,’” Braun said, quoting Valvano, who died in 1993 from adenocarcinoma. “All of you who were riders embody it. You are there for the patients like no one I have ever seen.” Braun said every dime raised by the cross-country bicycle trek will go into cancer research, because the foundation has no overhead costs. “We can do so much with that money,” she added. “We want to celebrate more survivors. You are at the forefront. Your giving of yourselves will make a difference in the lives of others. Thank you, thank you.”

THE FLAP OVER WISDOM TEETH

When the third molars (“wisdom teeth”) do not have sufficient room to erupt through the gums, a partial eruption can lead to inflammation and infection of the soft tissue around the tooth. This inflammatory condition, known as “pericoronitis,” commonly occurs among young adults in their 20s, with about 81 percent of those affected being between 20 and 29 years old. The infection often occurs as a result of the development of a gum flap over the partially erupted tooth, which traps food and allows a buildup of bacteria that cause infection. Chronic symptoms include dull pain, a bad taste in the mouth, and swollen gums, while acute symptoms range from severe pain and pus discharge to swollen lymph nodes. Whether dealing with wisdom teeth, restorations,

or cosmetic dentistry, a good experience with dentistry is based on two things— choosing the right dentist whom you trust and who is up to date on the latest in dentistry, and taking the necessary steps to keep dental problems at bay through self-care at home between professional visits. We work with you to maximize your oral health here at Montgomery Knoll, 192 Tamarack Circle, Skillman (609-924-8300). “Our commitment is to relationships of partnership, respect, and appreciation.” “We offer cosmetic and family dentistry as well as Zoom!® and Invisalign®.” Please e-mail your questions or comments to: drjamescally@yahoo.com

P.S. Pericoronitis can be averted with regular dental checkups.

00256889.0217.03x10.18.BeckerNose&Sinus.indd

Classifieds Great Content Local News Job Listings


4A The Lawrence Ledger

THE STATE WE’RE IN

www.thelawrenceledger.com

Friday, September 28, 2018

By Michele S. Byers

We should all speak up for the endangered species “Nothing is more priceless and more worthy of preservation than the rich array of animal life with which our country has been blessed. It is a many-faceted treasure, of value to scholars, scientists, and nature lovers alike, and it forms a vital part of the heritage we all share as Americans.” These were the words of President Richard Nixon when he signed the landmark Endangered Species Act 45 years ago. In 1973, the outlook was grim for many animals and plants. Bald eagles were in danger of extinction. So were the gray wolves, peregrine falcons, humpback whales, Key deer, manatees and dozens of other species. The intent of the Endangered Species Act was to prevent the extinction of both plant and animal life by eliminating or reducing threats. In the early ‘‘‘‘70s conservation was nonpartisan, and the legislation sailed through Congress with overwhelming support. Today the Endangered Species Act is a global model that is popular among Americans of all ages and backgrounds. A recent poll by The Center for Biological Diversity found that 90 percent of respondents support the protection of endangered species. But today the Endangered Species Act is under unprecedented attack from the Trump administration and Congress, who have advanced a series of proposals – both bills and rule changes - that would gut current protections. • Proposed new rules would require costs to be consid-

ered when listing a species as endangered or threatened. This would inject economics – and politics – into what currently are science-based decisions. Commercial interests – including drilling for oil and gas and building roads, pipelines, mines and other industrial projects – would have greater influence on decisions about what species are protected. • The rule changes could eliminate the consideration of climate change threats when making decisions about protecting species and their habitats. Countless species are already facing damaging changes to their habitats, and many – especially trees and other plants – cannot adapt to rapidly changing conditions. • The rule changes would remove protections for new species listed as “threatened,” which currently are given the same protections as species listed as “endangered.” Threatened species would be protected on a case-by-case basis rather than uniformly and automatically, further opening the door to political and commercial interests. • Dozens of amendments before Congress would undermine the Endangered Species Act itself. Opponents of the Endangered Species Act claim that it’s a failure because only 3 percent of the more than 2,000 species listed as endangered have recovered to the point that where they can safely be taken off the list. But the fact is that recovery often takes decades for most species, and many are rebounding but still need protection. Hundreds of species on the endangered list would

be gone today without the law’s protections. In the last 45 years, only 10 listed species have gone extinct - some of them may have been gone by the time they made the list. As the Defenders of Wildlife organization notes, “Our nation and our planet face an extinction crisis of epic proportion, with species’ extinction happening at a rate at least 100 times greater than what would be considered normal. Scientists warn we could lose half of all Earth’s species in as little as 33 years.” Today, New Jerseyans regularly enjoy magnificent sights unimaginable in 1973, including bald eagles, humpback whales, and peregrine falcons. All of our endangered species deserve the same chance to recover. Our nation needs the strong, science-based Endangered Species Act. The Endangered Species Act must remain in full force to ensure the protection of our natural heritage for current and future generations. To learn more about the Endangered Species Act, go to the Center for Biological Diversity’s website at https:// www. biologicaldiversity.org/ And for information about preserving New Jersey’s land and natural resources – including endangered and threatened species – visit the New Jersey Conservation Foundation website at www.njconservation.org or contact me at info@njconservation.org. Michele S. Byers is executive director of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation in Morristown.

Legal weed should be available to 18-year-olds and up

young adults will still be facing criminal convictions for possessing something that will become even more commonly socially accepted than ever. It sounds like society is going to entrap adults ages 18-20 into letting their guard down and admitting cannabis possession to New Jersey cops, under the mindset that it is now no big deal, while walking into a minefield of federal program and employment ineligibility, along with extorting cash for corrupt municipal court coffers. If marijuana is legal, it needs to be legal for all adults, which means 18 and over under the law. The idea of following a flawed age policy based off a prohibitionist drinking age model is absurd and will only continue to get the age group most commonly busted for pot possession into legal trouble, for something that is supposedly becoming legalized. This is a glaring oversight that must be corrected, otherwise our overzealous police departments will continue arresting legal adults ages 18-20 (particularly racial minorities) for marijuana possession. Murphy is a great guy who needs everyone’s support, but he probably didn’t think of this, so let’s point it out to him to get the law right the first time.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR League of Women Voters compiling annual voters’ guide

To the editor:

To the editor: It’s election time, and the League of Women Voters is compiling the responses of candidates – from Senate to local municipality and school board – for its online Voters’ Guide, www.VOTE411.org. Princeton, Lawrence, Montgomery, West Windsor, Plainsboro, South Brunswick and Hillsborough voters will be able to see their entire ballot on VOTE411 starting the week of October 8. The deadline to register is October 16. More information and forms for registering or requesting mail-in ballots can be found at lwvprinceton.org. The League hopes that all New Jersey voters will visit VOTE411 and, most importantly, vote on November 6. Chrystal Schivell League of Women Voters of the Princeton Area Princeton

Lawrence Ledger

THE

centraljersey.com

www.thelawrenceledger.com Founded in 1968 Bernard Kilgore, Group Publisher 1955-1967 Mary Louise Kilgore Beilman, Board Chairman 1967-2005 James B. Kilgore, Publisher, 1980-2016

Joseph Eisele Publisher 2016 - Present

Michele Nesbihal General Manager

mnesbihal@centraljersey.com

Andrew Martins Managing Editor

Packet Media LLC

100 Overlook Center, 2nd Floor Princeton, NJ 08540 Corporate Offices

© Packet Media, LLC. 2018.

All Rights Reserved.

198 Route 9 North, Suite 100 Manalapan, N.J. 07726

(609) 924-3244 FAX (732) 780-4678

For many years, I worked at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft and proudly served as a National Education Association/New Jersey Education Association union officer. As a retired higher education administrator and Democratic socialist, I believe we must expand and encourage access to higher education. Gov. Phil Murphy has been a leader on introducing free community college to New Jersey and I am a supporter of his agenda. Looking at statistics, a lot of the wonderful students and brilliant educators I worked with probably consumed cannabis (a high level employee and a co-worker of mine once came back from lunch reeking of reefer), and some of them ended up facing criminal charges for doing so, most often requiring appearances in local municipal courts. Even the campus police made arrests at times for non-violent, adult marijuana offenses. It was always concerning to hear about a student facing drug charges of any kind, because of the impact on federal student aid. While a Brookdale student convicted of a murder charge or college president convicted of stealing money from the school faces no eligibility bar to receiving federal aid, the same cannot be said for a good person convicted of marijuana possession. I’m not sure what kind of misguided message this policy sends except that if you decide to kill someone or steal from a public college, just don’t smoke a joint afterwards, if you want to stay in school. New Jersey is currently about to legalize personal possession of small amounts of cannabis, and set up a limited licensing system for growing and selling of the herb. But, it must be taken into account that New Jersey criminal law considers any person 18 or over to be an adult, which means that if pot is legal for persons only 21 and over,

Carol “Kitty” Hafner Former Congressional candidate Box Elder, South Dakota

Editor’s note: All Letters to the Editor submissions should be sent to letters@centraljersey.com. Please include “The Register News” in the subject line. Submissions must be 500 words or less. Letters will be edited for clarity. Letters with hate speech, profanity and other inappropriate language will not be printed. Please also note that the final deadline for endorsement letters for candidates will be Tuesday, Oct. 23. No letters about the campaign will run after the Friday, Oct. 27 issue.

Lawrenceville School presents a $65,000 check to the local education foundation By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

A new storage unit for the Lawrence Intermediate School’s instrumental music department, and projectbased curriculum that teaches students how to start and run their own simulated business. A program for elementary school students encouraging them to celebrate women in science and engineering, and an artist-in-residence program with Mel Leipzig for Lawrence High School students. Those are among the special projects funded by the Lawrence Township Education Foundation, none of which

would have been possible without the support of donors such as the Lawrenceville School, according to the nonprofit group. Representatives of the Lawrenceville School presented a check for $65,000 to the foundation earlier this month, bringing the school’s total donations to the foundation to more than $1.5 million since 1995. Head Master Steve Murray presented the check, which is the Lawrenceville School’s annual contribution, to Amy Davis, the president of the foundation’s Board of Trustees, Vice President Rick Smith and Karen Fairman, the

See FOUNDATION, Page 7A

Looking for a way to bring new customers to your store? Want to show your customers you appreciate them? Let NMG Events help! If you are looking to bring more people to your business, look to NMG events. We will develop a custom event for your business and bring it to life.

Want to hear more?

Contact Angela at asmith@newspapermediagroup.com or 867.779.3800 x3106.


Friday, September 28, 2018

www.thelawrenceledger.com

The Lawrence Ledger 5A

Calendar Continued from Page 2A County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609882-9246 or email Ann Kerr at lawprogs@mcl.org. Posture & Dance Exercises.  Reference Librarian Ann Kerr will share some simple exercises to improve your posture and increase your flexibility. 3:30 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email Ann Kerr at lawprogs@mcl.org.

Fri., Oct. 5

Drum Circle: Fall Series. Join us for this drum circle. Bring your own drum or use one of ours. 4:30 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org. Monthly meeting. The Piano Teachers Forum (PTF) will hold its next monthly meeting at 9:15AM (coffee at 8:45AM) at Jacobs Music, 2540 Brunswick Pike in Lawrenceville, NJ.  Members of the PTF will perform all selections from our 2019 Spring Festival Syllabus, “Music of Our Time.”  We welcome visitors to attend our programs for a $20 guest fee at the door. The Piano Teachers Forum is an active professional association that has proudly served Central New Jersey area piano teachers since 1981. Our workshops and programs

are held the first Friday of each month. For this year’s full program calendar, and other information about the Piano Teachers Forum, visit website at  www.pianoteachersforum.org or email  ptfannouncements@ gmail.com.

Through Mon., Oct. 8

Auditions. Dr. Elayne Robinson Grossman, music director of Sharim v’Sharot, will hold auditions for all voice parts, SATB. Rehearsals are held Tuesday evenings in September (except for holidays) through May in Mercer County.  Performances take place in Mercer, Bucks and neighboring counties, including a February concert at The Kimmel Center.  The repertoire includes Jewish music of many eras, styles, and languages. Visit www.SharimvSharot. com for audition requirements and scheduling. For more information, contact  sharimvsharot@gmail. com.

Wed., Oct. 10

What Did We Learn and When Did We Learn It? The History of Public Education in Lawrence Township.  Two hundred years ago the world of Lawrence Township schoolchildren was nothing like it is today. But many of the education questions their parents faced sound familiar: where should schooling happen, who should be educated, and who should pay for it? At this free public lecture, you will learn how different generations of Lawrence citizens answered these questions and how our public schools

coped with rapid suburbanization and a changing society. Plus, you’ll take a visual tour of all of the schools, past and present. Presented by former Lawrence Township Historian Dennis P. Waters. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Cosponsored by the Lawrence Historical Society. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org. Master Gardeners talk. Dr. Jason Grabosky, renowned tree expert and Professor in Urban Forestry at Rutgers University’s School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Department of Ecology Evolution and Natural Resources, will share his vast knowledge of trees in the home landscape. The program, sponsored by the Rutgers Master Gardeners of Mercer County, will be held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Hamilton Public Library, 1 Justice Alito Way, Hamilton Township.  The talk is free to the public. Seating is limited and preregistration is strongly recommended. Register by email at  mgofmcprograms@gmail.com  or call the Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Mercer County office at 609-989-6830.

Thurs., Oct. 11

CookTalks: Moroccan Cuisine and the Tagine with Anita Costantine. Join Chef Anita Constantine as she shares her appreciation for Moroccan cuisine. Learn the benefits of cooking in the tagine and the foods one might find in Marrakesh’s

medina amid souks selling ceramics, jewelry and metal lanterns. 11 a.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org. Poetry Circle: Leonard Cohen (1934-2016). Leonard Norman Cohen (1934 – 2016) was a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. His work explored religion, politics, isolation, sexuality and personal relationships. Cohen pursued a career as a poet and novelist during the 1950s and early 1960s; he did not launch a music career until 1967, at the age of 33. For six decades, Leonard Cohen revealed his soul to the world through poetry and song— his deep and timeless humanity touching our very core. Simply brilliant. His music and words will resonate forever. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org.

Mon., Oct. 15

Morning Book Club: “The Warmth of Other Suns” by Isabel Wilkerson. In this epic masterwork, Pulitzer Prize– winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. 10 a.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Li-

brary System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-882-9246 or email  lawprogs@mcl.org. Movie Matinee: “Hostiles” (2017).  An Army captain helps transport a Native American chief and his family from Arizona to Montana. Along the way, the group of soldiers and Native Americans must learn to work together in order to make their way through dangerous territory. 133 min. R-rated. 2 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike,  Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609882-9246 or email  lawprogs@mcl.org. Yoga.  Sunita Yadav teaches this series of yoga classes. All levels of experience are welcome. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring a towel or yoga mat. Class is limited to 30 participants. 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike,  Lawrenceville. Registration is required and begins Mon., Sept. 17, at 9:30 a.m.  Participants must register online  for each individual class date. Go to  mcl.org, click on the  PROGRAM  tab at the top of the page to access  EventKeeper. Off the Page. Try out your acting chops (or indulge your secret passion) playing one of the great characters from dramatic literature or contemporary comedy—without the threat of performing in front of a live audience! We will “cast” and

read a play aloud, around a table,  as actors and production teams typically do at the first rehearsal of a play. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Registration suggested. Call 609882-9246 or email  lawprogs@mcl.org.

Tues., Oct. 16

Science Fiction Book Club: “Stories of Your Life and Others” by Ted Chiang.  This short story collection delivers dual delights of the very strange and the heartbreakingly familiar, often presenting characters who must confront sudden change—the inevitable rise of automatons or the appearance of aliens—with some sense of normalcy. Next sci-fi book title is: “Dreamsnake” by Vonda N. McIntyre. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike,  Lawrenceville. Registration is suggested. Call 609-8829246 or email  lawprogs@ mcl.org.

Wed., Oct. 17

Knitting Circle. Knitters who already know the basics are invited to drop in to socialize with other knitters and work on a project of their choice. Experienced knitter Helene Plank will be available to assist individuals. Registration is suggested. 7 p.m. Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville. Call 609-882-9246 or email lawprogs@mcl.org.


6A The Lawrence Ledger

www.thelawrenceledger.com

Friday, September 28, 2018

PRINCETON

A: Area resident competes on ‘Jeopardy!’ Q: Who is Kian Barry By Vashti Harris Staff Writer

trivia my whole life. When I was a kid I’d memorize lists for fun and accidentally wound up memorizing other things. It’s a consequence of being indiscriminately curious, for the most part,” Barry said. “I took the online test without thinking much of it the first time just to have fun and quiz myself for a few minutes, and started really thinking about it when I had my first in-person audition. I had always figured the people on ‘Jeopardy!’ were too smart for me before. “The process is rigorous. About 100,000200,000 people take the

With a passion for trivia, flash cards and hours of studying, area resident Kian Barry will be competing on ABC’s “Jeopardy!” quiz show on Oct. 4. Born and raised in the East Brunswick, Barry graduated from East Brunswick High School in 2004 and lived in East Brunswick for 27 years. He currently lives in Hopewell Township, while he is a teacher of Advanced Placement World History and European History at Princeton High School. “I’ve been interested in

online test each year, of which the best 2,500 scores are invited to an in-person audition. At the audition, I took another written test, played a simulated game against other potential contestants, and participated in an interview portion. “Four hundred people are chosen every year to compete on the show. I had passed the test once before but was not selected. This time I found out a year later that I was headed to Los Angeles.” Barry said he received two calls - which he ignored because of the odd area code, thinking it was spam - and then an email

letting him know that his taping would be in a month. He said he is glad casting agents didn’t give up on reaching him. Mostly studying subjects that are common on “Jeopardy!” Barry said he focused categories that he was not strong in, such as opera, classical music and literature. Categories such as geography, history and pop culture, in which he is much more learned, he said he mostly ignored. “I was given one month of notice for the show. I simulated playing the games in my living room from DVRed ‘Jeopardy!’ games and studied the

topics mentioned through flashcards and the J-archive, a site that lists nearly every clue every given on the show since before I was born,” Barry said. Barry said while filming his episode he had an incredible time. “It was surreal to walk into a studio I’ve seen thousands of times on TV and be part of an American institution. I feel deeply honored that I will forever have been part of such an incredible program,” Barry said. “Studying was rewarding for someone who loves it, too. I think it’s strictly better to know things than to not know things and I’m

glad for all I’ve learned in the process.” Barry said it was honestly strange meeting the legendary host, Alex Trebek. “You don’t get to speak to Trebek until the on-air interview, except for giving the questions during the game, and it was by far the most nervous I was on the show,” Barry said. “Alex was very kind and spoke to us for a few moments after the show but the whole process flew by.” The episode will air at 7 p.m. on Oct. 4 on ABC.

Princeton school district and charter school settle legal battle By Philip Sean Curran Staff Writer

trict keep $30,000 in each of the next two school years, for a total of $60,000, that it would have had to provide the charter school. As a public school, the charter school receives the bulk of its funds through local tax dollars the school district provides out of its annual budget. “I think one of the things that we, as a board, had decided was that there was, I think, a need, giving all the other things that are happening in this world, that we should find a way to come together and settle this case if we can get a couple of things that are important to us,” Board of Education President Patrick Sullivan said at the Sept. 25 board meeting.

The Princeton Public Schools Board of Education and the Princeton Charter School Board of Trustees have settled their legal battle over the enrollment expansion the public charter school obtained in 2017 to add 76 students. The school district agreed to abandon its appeal of the approval the state Commissioner of Education granted for the charter school’s enrollment growth and to drop a separate lawsuit it filed alleging the charter school board violated the state Open Public Meetings Act. The charter school agreed to let the school dis-

The Princeton board voted 10-0 for the settlement. The charter school’s board president, Maryellen McQuade, initially declined to comment on Sept. 25, but subsequently said a news release would be issued. “At our last board meeting we voted to delegate final authorization to myself,” she said in a text message on Sept. 26. Both sides had been reluctant to discuss the settlement talks. Asked on Sept. 14 if the charter board had approved at its meeting that week a settlement with the school district, McQuade said in a text message that “a detailed settlement agreement was not voted upon.”

centraljersey.com GET CONNECTED! Great Content

Classifieds

Local News

A resolution from that Sept. 12 meeting that McQuade and other charter trustees voted for said the board “approves the settlement agreement in the currently pending appeals adverse to Princeton Public Schools in accordance with the terms therein, subject to further attorney negotiations and final authorization by the Princeton Charter School Board President.” As for other terms of their deal, the settlement also said the two sides would meet, at least twice a year, in the current and next two academic years, “to discuss any issues affecting the parties’ relationship and potential collaboration opportunities and cost savings measures.”

• Unique group dining experience • Choose up to three broths, your meat & sides • Create your own sauce

FREE

10 OFF

$

sauce, fruit & dessert buffet

with purchases of a dinner • not valid for lunch hot pot special Have you eaten here before? Y / N • Zip Code ____________________ LIU YI SHOU HOT POT With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10-25-18 Go to LocalFlavor.com for more coupons.

5 OFF

$

20% OFF

any food purchase

any food purchase

any group of 4 or greater

of $50 or more • not valid for lunch hot pot special

of $30 or more • not valid for lunch hot pot special

not valid for lunch hot pot special

Have you eaten here before? Y / N • Zip Code ___________________ LIU YI SHOU HOT POT With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10-25-18 Go to LocalFlavor.com for more coupons.

Have you eaten here before? Y / N • Zip Code ___________________ LIU YI SHOU HOT POT With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10-25-18 Go to LocalFlavor.com for more coupons.

Have you eaten here before? Y / N • Zip Code ___________________ LIU YI SHOU HOT POT With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Expires 10-25-18 Go to LocalFlavor.com for more coupons.

3349 Brunswick Pike, Lawrence TWP, NJ 08648 609-250-7167 • www.liuyishouna.com

school district would have to provide. The legal battle pitted two sides with a history of acrimony, in a community that gave birth to the group Save Our Schools NJ, a group critical of charter schools. “First of all, I’m thrilled we were able to reach a point where we can put the past dissension behind us and really move forward in the spirit of collaboration,” Superintendent of Schools Stephen C. Cochrane said at the board meeting. “I look forward to the kinds of conversations and collaborations that will benefit the students in both places.”

Princeton University official will retire after 47 years of service By Philip Sean Curran Staff Writer

Ultimate Dining Experience

In particular, the two sides agreed they would explore “the possibility of advocating for potential legislative changes to the charter school funding formula that would be mutually beneficial to both parties.” For the current 201819 school year, the school district will provide the charter school with $6.3 million, money that comes out of the school district’s budget and gets counted toward spending limits, namely the 2 percent cap, the district must abide by. When the charter school’s enrollment expansion was proposed, school district officials said adding 76 students translated into an additional $1.1 million the

Robert K. Durkee, a Princeton University graduate who returned to his alma mater to advise university presidents, is retiring from his job as vice president and secretary in 2019, university officials announced on Sept. 24. Durkee will leave at the end of the academic year, winding down a 47-year career that started in 1972, university officials said. His retirement will occur the same year as his 50th college reunion, which the 1969 Princeton graduate is due to celebrate. “For my four years as an undergraduate and my 47 years in Nassau Hall, Princeton has given me almost daily opportunities to learn, to grow and to work with students, faculty, staff, alumni, presidents, trust-

ees, neighbors and others to help shape and strengthen this university, in support of the values for which it stands,” Durkee said in a statement. “For this I am deeply grateful.” Durkee will be succeeded by Hilary Parker, the chief of staff to Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgrubrer, who said in a statement that Durkee had “rendered incomparable service to this university.” Durkee outlasted most of the five presidents he advised, starting with the now late Robert F. Goheen. A 1973 article from the Princeton Alumni Weekly, the alumni magazine, recalled how Durkee, then in his 20s, had come to Princeton after working as a public school teacher in Trenton. The story indicated Durkee had expected to stay at Princeton for three years and then go on to some-

thing else — an estimate that was off by 44 years. “Bob Durkee will be a very hard act to follow,” former Princeton mayor and fellow Princeton alumnus Richard Woodbridge said on Sept. 24. “He has served as the voice of Nassau Hall for so long that many think of him as Mr. University. Bob communicated clearly in a calm, deep voice and had the rare ability to keep his cool under fire. It’s a gift. Even more important than making speeches was Bob’s willingness to listen carefully and make constructive suggestions. A very talented gentleman has left an indelible positive mark on Princeton, the town, and Princeton, the university.” “Bob has been like a fixture of the university in its relationship with the

See RETIREE, Page 7A


Friday, September 28, 2018

www.thelawrenceledger.com

The Lawrence Ledger 7A

MERCER COUNTY NOTES Prepare now for next emergency

Are you and your family ready if an emergency strikes? September is National Preparedness Month and now is the time to take simple steps for preparing your home, business and school to be ready for the next emergency that may affect our community. This year’s theme is “Disasters Happen. Prepare Now. Learn How.” Join Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes in celebrating this awareness event throughout the month. To guide you, each week will focus on different topics regarding preparedness efforts for you, your family and your community. The 2018 Weekly Themes are as follows: Week 4: Sept. 23-29 “Save for an Emergency” The first step in getting prepared is to make a plan. Make sure your family and everyone  involved knows the plan, including children and your emergency contacts. You should also create a kit. Your emergency preparedness kit should include a stockpile supply of items. You can also include important documents and

supplies for eating, bathing, safety and entertainment. Don’t forget to stay informed. A reminder from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is to check all types of media. During an emergency, your local Emergency  Management or Emergency Services office will provide you with information about such things as open shelters and evacuation orders. Also register for the Mercer County emergency  notification system by visiting www.mercercounty.org and clicking on “Alert Mercer” at the top of the home page. For resources on making a plan, creating an emergency kit and staying informed, visit www.ready. gov.

Birding 201 Series offered

Fledgling birdwatchers get a second chance to build their skills this fall at the Tulpehaking Nature Center by observing migratory bird patterns throughout the Abbott Marshlands. The Birding 201 Series will take place Sat., Sept. 29 from 8 to 10 a.m. Led by local expert Bill

Pitman, this series is created for beginning birdwatchers. Armed with the nature center’s supply of binoculars, participants will practice identifying birds by shape, size, behavior and habitat. The focus this fall will be the many migrating birds that stop to refuel at the Abbott Marshlands as they make their way south to their winter grounds. Class members will be on the lookout for enduring birds like the blackpoll  warbler, which migrates thousands of miles from Alaska and Northern Canada to South America, including a threeday nonstop flight over the over the Atlantic Ocean. Rest stops like the Abbott Marshlands become critical  feeding sites for birds like these. This workshop is $5 per person. Participants can bring their own  binoculars or borrow a pair from the nature center. This series is appropriate for teens and adults. Pre-registration  is required; please call (609) 888-3218, email natureprograms@mercercounty.org or register online at  https:// docs.google.com/forms/. The Tulpehaking Nature Center is located at

157 Westcott Ave. in Hamilton. It is open Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.

students will accomplish in this school year,” he said. Davis said the foundation is gratified the Lawrenceville School, a private, co-educational boarding school, recognizes the value of the foundation in the public schools. “It is because of its long-standing commitment to be a partner and good neighbor in our community

that we are able to make a difference in the education of every student in every one of the schools,” Davis said. The Lawrence Township Education Foundation raises money from individuals, businesses, corporations and foundations to support the grant requests from teachers and school administrators.

residents who would like to recycle common residential chemical wastes or used electronics. The event will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gallery presents at the John T. Dempster Fire School at 350 Lawphoto exhibit Mercer County Com- rence Station Road in Lawmunity College’s James rence, rain or shine. Please Kerney Campus Gal- note Bakers Basin Road is lery  (JKCG) presents  closed to through traffic “The  Sky’s Gone Out,”  a due to a bridge replacement personal meditation on project. Those traveling to a post-9/11 New York Dempster who normally City  by the Brooklyn- would take Bakers Basin based photographer Kai Road from Route 1 can McBride. The show runs take Route 1 north to Grovers Mill Road to Quakerthrough Thurs., Oct. 4. JKCG is located in bridge Road to Lawrence MCCC’s Trenton Hall, 137 Station Road. N. Broad St., across the While no registration is street from the necessary, the event is open Kerney Building. Hours to Mercer County residents for this exhibit are Tues- only, and attendees will days from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; need to show proof of resiWednesdays from 10 a.m. dency, such as a driver’s to  1 p.m.; and Thursdays license. No commercial or from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More industrial waste will be acinformation is available on cepted. For additional inthe JKCG website at www. formation, click here. mccc.edu/JKCgallery. The Electronic Waste Management Act, which Waste disposal took effect in 2011, bans disposal of televisions and day Sept. 29 The Mercer County Im- all personal or portable provement Authority will computers – including host a Household Hazard- desktop, notebook and lapous Waste and Electronic top computers, as well as Waste Disposal Day on computer monitors – in the Sat., Sept. 29, for county regular waste stream. These

Retiree

Foundation Continued from Page 4A nonprofit group’s executive director. In addition to the $65,000 annual donation, the Lawrenceville School provides event sponsorship and in-kind services, including office space on Phillips Avenue in the village of Lawrenceville. Murray said he was im-

pressed with the “inventive and inspired programs” the foundation supports for public school students that are made possible by the creativity of dedicated educators and the foundation’s volunteers. “I am pleased the Lawrenceville School is able to support these meaningful efforts. I am eager to see what the teachers and

Continued from Page 6A town,” Mayor Liz Lempert said on Sept. 24. “He’s also a resident of Princeton too, which I think is a really important perspective to have at Nassau Hall.” Durkee came to Princeton from Staten Island, N.Y., where he went to high school. In college, he worked at the student paper, the Daily Princetonian,

items must be recycled, and county residents can do so Sept. 29 at the Dempster facility. Acceptable household items include: aerosol cans, used motor oil, propane gas tanks, pesticides and herbicides, car batteries, paint thinner, oil-based paint, stains and varnishes, gasoline, anti-freeze, driveway sealer, insect repellents, mercury and fluorescent/ CFL bulbs. Acceptable used electronic items include:  computers, printers, copiers, fax machines, stereos, televisions and microwaves. For more information, individuals should call (609) 278-8086 or visit www.mcianj.org.

Drug Take-Back Day program set

Mercer County Sheriff Jack Kemler announced the opportunity to dispose of unneeded and expired prescription drugs during the National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday, Oct. 27. The goal is to help local residents to rid their medicine cabinets of unused and easily abused opioid painkillers, in addition to any

See NOTES, Page 9A

and made a big splash with a story in 1967 in which he reported Goheen saying it was “inevitable” that the then all-male school would be going co-educational. Princeton’s decision to move in that direction touched Durkee’s life directly as the father of three daughters who eventually would follow him to Princeton.


8A The Lawrence Ledger

9/29

9/30

10/1

10/2

www.thelawrenceledger.com

10/3

10/4

10/5

Friday, September 28, 2018


Friday, September 28, 2018

www.thelawrenceledger.com

The Lawrence Ledger 9A

Notes Continued from Page 7A other unneeded prescription medications. Mercer County residents can easily dispose of unused and expired prescription pills by bringing them to the parking lot across from the Mercer County Administration Building at 640 South Broad St. in Trenton, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Hypodermic needles or liquid solutions not accepted. National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible method for disposing of unneeded and expired prescription pills. The program held each spring and fall is conducted by the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office with the assistance of the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. For more information, contact the Mercer County Sheriff’s Office at 609-9896111.

County announces photo project

Mercer County invites you to submit your digital images to help the County create a collection of recent photographs that illustrate living, working and playing within its 12 municipalities. The county is looking for images that illustrate area heritage, economic vibrancy and cultural diversity and that include public buildings, historic sites, parks and events with or without people using those places. This is not a contest but an opportunity for amateur photographers who seek a broader audience for their work. The images could be used in editorial and commercial digital and print media promoting the County. The photographer’s credit line would appear in the media in which they appear, whenever possible. The county would have exclusive rights of the images and will not sell them. Participants must complete an agreement before submitting images. Instructions and requirements can be found online at ciephoto. com/PhotogDirex.pdf.

County confirms insect sighting

New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher announced the New Jersey Department of Agriculture and United States Department of Agriculture personnel confirmed the sighting of the Spotted Lanternfly in northern Mer-

Photo by Mary Anne Borg

Hundreds of migrating birds stop at the Abbott Marshlands as they wing their way to their wintering grounds. The final Birding 201 Series will be held Sat., Sept. 29. cer County in New Jersey. There were two confirmed sightings in southern Warren County. The specific areas where the Spotted Lanternfly has been identified have been treated. The sightings have led the State Department of Agriculture to quarantine the two affected counties as well as Hunterdon County, which is between Warren and Mercer counties, to prevent the spread of the Spotted Lanternfly. Businesses and the general public in the quarantine area are required to obtain and fill out a New Jersey residence checklist before moving any of the articles listed  here.  The checklist also serves to inform the public about the Spotted Lanternfly including how to identify all life stages of the insect and minimize or eliminate its movement. Business entities that routinely travel in and out of the quarantine area are required to take, and pass, training regarding the Spotted Lanternfly that is supplied for free by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture at  http://bit. ly/2K92DdZ. New Jersey will accept and recognize the Pennsylvania permit. Those businesses that interact exclusively in New Jersey’s quarantine zone must comply with the details outlined in the quarantine order. The quarantine also allows access to property for Department, USDA, or USDA contracted agents where the Spotted Lanternfly is suspected or confirmed to evaluate and treat the property if necessary.

The Spotted Lanternfly prefers Tree of Heaven as its host, but can feed on 70 other different plant species, including fruit trees, ornamental trees, woody trees, vegetables, and herbs and vines, including agricultural crops like grapes. The Department is asking for everyone’s help in identifying areas where low numbers of this insect may be. Residents can email pictures of suspect insects to SLF-plantindustry@ ag.nj.gov  or call the New Jersey Spotted Lanternfly Hotline at 1-833-223-2840 (BAD-BUG-0) and leave a message detailing your sighting and contact information.  For more information about this insect go to  https://www.state.nj.us/ agricu lture/divisions/pi/ prog/spotte dlanternfly.html

County park commission to conduct deer management program

The Mercer County Park Commission will conduct a deer management program at Baldpate Mountain on select days through Feb. 16, 2019. This program is a method for reducing the overabundant deer herd in the greater Hopewell Valley area. The Baldpate Mountain Deer Management Program is open only to participants who have applied and been accepted to the program. The deer management program is open for fall, permit and winter bow, six-day firearm, permit shotgun and permit muz-

zleloader hunting. Hunting will take place 30 minutes prior to sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset, Wednesday through Saturday from Sept. 8 through Feb. 16. There will be no hunting on Sunday. Through Dec. 4, the park will remain open for public use during hunting days, when only  bow hunting is permitted. The park will be closed to the public Wednesday through Saturday from  Dec. 5 to Feb. 9, when firearm hunting is permitted. No hunting will take place on Dec. 25. Each entrance and trailhead to Baldpate Mountain will be posted with a large bright orange “closed” sign as a reminder to the public

that the program is taking place. The deer management program complies with all of the hunting regulations set by the State; in addition, the Park Commission has adopted County rules for the program. All hunting must be done from an  elevated tree stand; hunters are not permitted to hunt from the ground. There is no shooting across park trails. For the second year, the Park Commission will make a conscious effort to donate harvested deer to the  Hunters Helping the Hungry program. Last season, a total of 14 deer were donated, producing approximately  1,960 servings of protein. Interested parties should visit http://mercercount y p a r k s . o rg / a c t i v i t i e s / deer-management or call (609)  303-0706 for program rules and regulations, and zone maps.

Deer management program to take place at Mercer Meadows

The Mercer County Park Commission will conduct a deer management program at Mercer Meadows through Feb. 16, 2019. Mercer  Meadows Deer Management Program is open only to participants who have applied and been  accepted to the program. Mercer Meadows will be open to hunting on a limited number of days during the fall bow, permit bow  and winter bow seasons. Hunting will take place Monday through

Saturday, from 30 minutes prior to sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset, with no hunting taking place on Dec. 25. Each entrance to the park  will be posted with bright yellow signs to notify park users of the hunting program. During the Mercer Meadows hunt, the Park Commission is asking park users to kindly keep their recreating to the finished  gravel paths, the Lawrence Hopewell Trail and Maidenhead Trail. The Pole Farm section and the wooded area of Rosedale Park are included in this year’s hunt. There will  be no hunting near the Dog Park, picnic area or Rosedale Lake. Maps of the hunting boundaries are  available on the Park Commission website. For the second year, the Park Commission will make a conscious effort to donate harvested deer to the Hunters Helping the Hungry program. Last season, a total of 14 deer were donated, producing approximately  1,960 servings of protein. The deer management program complies with all of the hunting regulations set by the State; in addition,  the Park Commission has adopted County rules for the program. All hunting must be done from an  elevated tree stand; hunters are not permitted to hunt from the ground. There is no shooting across park trails. Interested parties should visit http://mercercount y p a r k s . o rg / a c t i v i t i e s / deer-management or call (609)  303-0706 for program rules and regulations, and zone maps.


10A The Lawrence Ledger

www.thelawrenceledger.com

Friday, September 28, 2018

2018-09-28 The Lawrence Ledger  
2018-09-28 The Lawrence Ledger  
Advertisement