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Enrollment Services Office 600 Centralia College Blvd Centralia WA 98531

360.736.9391, ext. 221 From Olympia 753.3433 www.centralia.edu

SPRING QUARTER 2014

She dances to the beat ... See page 8 for details

Members of the Centralia College All-Washington Team have been selected. Turn to page 34 to read about the two stars.

Classes start Monday, March 31, 2014! Diesel Technology presents tremendous opportunity for students interested in a challenging field. Read how Zak got started. His story is on page 24.


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MISSION STATEMENT Improving people’s lives through lifelong learning.

GENERAL INFO

CENTRALIA COLLEGE GOALS

Programs of Study Academic Transfer Anthropology Biology Botany Business Administration Chemistry Construction Management Dramatic Arts Early Childhood Education Earth Sciences Education English Environmental Science Fine Arts Foreign Language General Engineering Graphic Design History Humanities Journalism

Mathematics Media Studies Natural Resource Management Physical Education, Health and Recreation Physics Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Dental Hygiene Pre-Medicine Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Veterinary Medicine Psychology Sociology Technology Workforce Education Accounting Accounting Clerk

Administrative Assistant Business Office Technology Computer Science Technology Corrections Officer Criminal Justice Diesel Equipment Technology Early Childhood Education Electronics, Robotics, Automation Energy Technology Crime Scene Investigations Medical Administrative Assistant Medical Assistant Nursing (RN) Power Plant Operations Welding

Note: this list is subject to change and may not include all programs available. Please check with the counseling center or an advisor for complete information.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

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• Access Centralia College shall provide quality education at an affordable price to the widest range of students. • Diversity Centralia College shall provide an inviting and supportive learning environment to those populations that have been traditionally underserved by higher education. • Educational Programs Centralia College shall provide to our greater community an ever-increasing number of educated people having the knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, and behaviors to become lifelong learners and productive and responsible citizens capable of realizing their highest human potential. • Personal and Community Enrichment Centralia College shall provide diverse multicultural, musical, theatrical, artistic, athletic, instructional, and social experiences for lifelong learning and community enrichment. • Stewardship Centralia College shall serve as a model of effective stewardship to the citizens of Washington. Vol. 28 No. 3 Centralia College (USPS 016318) is published quarterly by Centralia College, Office of College Relations, 600 Centralia College Blvd, Centralia, WA 98531. Periodicals postage paid at Centralia, WA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Centralia College, 600 Centralia College Blvd, Centralia, WA 98531-4099.

Making phone contact? Call the main number at 360.736.9391

or you can use the online directory at http://directory.centraliacollege.net/

SPRING Quarter 2014 Calendar Open registration begins........................................................................ March 5 Tuition and fees due............................................................................... March 5 First day of classes................................................................................ March 31 Online classes begin.........................................................................See page 37 Last day to add classes without faculty signature.....................................April 1 Last day to add classes with faculty signature.........................................April 11 *Advising Day (no day or night classes).................................................. May 15 Memorial Day Holiday (campus closed).................................................. May 26 *Assessment Day (no classes).................................................................June 10 Last class day..........................................................................................June 13 Final Examinations............................................................................ June 11-13 Commencement......................................................................................June 13 Quarter Break.................................................................................... June 14-30 *Note that BASM classes meet on Advising and Assessment days. Scan this with your smartphone and a QR barcode reader app and you will go to the Centralia College home page.


Get started at Centralia College! WHO CAN ENROLL? You may enroll if you are a high school graduate or at least 18 years of age. High school students may take classes with written approval from their high school principal and the Director of Enrollment Services. RUNNING START The Running Start program allows eligible high school juniors and seniors to enroll in college classes and earn high school and college credits. To learn more about Running Start, go to http://www.centralia.edu/academics/ runningstart/– or contact the Counseling Center at 360.736.9391, ext. 265. VETERAN BENEFITS AND SERVICES Centralia College is committed to assisting eligible students in applying for veterans’ benefits and works closely with Veteran’s Services personnel. All veterans, reservists, or dependents of veterans seeking veterans’ assistance to attend the college should contact Enrollment Services at 360.736.9391, ext. 684.

GENERAL INFO

1. Apply for admission online at: http://www.centralia.edu/admissions/. Be sure to enter your correct email address otherwise you may experience complications and delays. 2. Apply for financial aid online at http://www.centralia.edu/admissions/ finaid/ – do not delay! For assistance, contact Financial Aid at 360.736.9391, ext. 234. 3. Take your class placement test. You have three options: (1) Take your test on campus. For test times, fees, and instructions, contact the Testing Center at 360.736.9391, ext. 216. (2) If you have completed testing someplace else, submit your test scores to Enrollment Services. Test scores may be no older than three years. (3) If you would like to request equivalent placement into pre-college and college-level courses based on your placement at another Washington Community or Technical College, submit a copy of the document that provides specific placement recommendation information from the sending institution, along with your completed Placement Reciprocity Request Form. Documentation must be no older than one year. Contact the Enrollment Services office for details or to obtain a request form. (4) If you have taken and passed (2.0) GPA college-level writing and math, submit transcripts to Enrollment Services. The sooner you test, the earlier you can register. 4. Get advised and register. After testing, new and transfer students will be sent an invitation for the next Advising & Registration Fair. Returning students will be sent registration information via email. For more information, read “How to Register” or contact Enrollment Services at 360.736.9391, ext. 221 or admissions@centralia.edu. 5. Pay tuition and fees by the deadline at the Cashier’s Office or at www. centralia.edu/students/payment.html. A payment plan is available to help you spread your payments over a period of time. For more information, contact the Cashier’s Office at 360.736.9391, ext. 219. 6. Buy books/supplies online at http://www.centraliabookstore.com/ or in person at the Centralia College Bookstore. 7. Attend your first class and/or lab session otherwise you may lose your place.

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DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS If you need disability accommodations or have questions about available services, contact Disability Services at 360.736.9391, ext. 320 or TTY/TDD 360.807.6227.

How to Register Returning Students After you complete and submit your Returning Student Form, you will be sent an email that includes your registration time. Before registering, see the advisor you were assigned when you last attended Centralia College. After meeting with your advisor, you must come to Enrollment Services to register for classes during your registration time. If you forget or need a different advisor, contact the Counseling/ Career Center at 360.736.9391, ext. 265, or advising@centralia.edu. If you do not meet with your advisor, you must come to Enrollment Services to register for classes during open registration. Be aware, you will not receive priority registration for future quarters. Veteran Students Please contact Enrollment Services at 360.736.9391, ext. 684. You may qualify for early registration. Drop-in Students If you want to take a class or two for personal enrichment, you do not need to apply for admission. Simply download and complete the registration form at www.centralia.edu/admissions/forms.html. Send your completed form, along with a check, money order, or credit card number to the address listed on the bottom of the form (no cash please). Mail-in registrations will be processed on a first-come, firstserved basis. If the class is filled, payment will be returned to you. Auditing a Class You may attend a class but not receive credit. To do this, register as an “auditor.” Auditors pay regular credit hours and lab fees. An auditor does not take examinations or receive credit for the course. Your transcript will show an “N” for an audited class. If you have questions or need help, please contact Enrollment Services at 360.736.9391, ext. 221, or admissions@centralia.edu.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Current Students You must meet with your advisor on Advising Day or during advising week to plan your classes and receive your registration PIN. You are expected to contact your advisor BEFORE Advising Day to set up an appointment. After meeting with your advisor, visit www.centralia. edu/students/kiosk.html to access your registration time, login, and register for classes. IMPORTANT: If you do not meet with your advisor each quarter, you will lose your priority registration status. New and Transfer Students After you take your placement test, you will be sent an invitation for the next Advising & Registration Fair to meet with an advisor to plan and register for classes. You must contact Enrollment Services right away to make your appointment for the fair. Your attendance is very important! It is your step to priority registration for future quarters. If you do not attend an Advising & Registration Fair, you must come to Enrollment Services to register for classes during open registration. Be aware, you will not receive priority registration for future quarters. How to qualify to attend Advising & Registration Fair In order to qualify to attend an Advising & Registration Fair, you must complete all of the following criteria no later than 5pm three business days prior to the fair: 1. Apply for admission. 2. Take your class placement test (or submit to Enrollment Services official documentation demonstrating qualifying grades, placement, or test scores no more than 3 years old.) 3. Contact Enrollment Services in person or by phone to request an appointment. Students who show up at the fair without an appointment will not be allowed to register. For more information, visit www.centralia.edu/ admissions/register.html.


GENERAL INFO

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Adding/Dropping/Withdrawing from Classes:

You can add and drop classes for a limited time at the beginning of each quarter. To add or withdraw officially from a class, you must complete and submit a Change of Schedule form to the Enrollment Services Office.

5. 6. 7. 8.

IMPORTANT:

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• Adding and dropping classes are serious steps. Consult with your advisor before doing so. If you are receiving financial aid and/or scholarships, consult with the Financial Aid Office to avoid jeopardizing your aid. • If you stop attending class, you will NOT be dropped or withdrawn automatically. You must withdraw officially. To do so, you must complete and submit a Change of Schedule form to the Enrollment Services Office. If you do not, you may receive a failing grade in your class. • You are required to pay for any classes for which you register. Refunds are available for a limited time at the beginning of each quarter.

Instructor Initiated Withdrawal

In order to make space for other students waiting for a seat, an instructor may withdraw any student who does not attend the first two class hours or the first lab session. If you are unable to attend your first two class hours or lab session, you must communicate with your instructor beforehand to develop a plan to make-up any missed work. If you do not show up or stop attending, do not assume that you will be dropped or withdrawn automatically. You must withdraw officially. To do so, you must complete and submit a Schedule Change Form to the Enrollment Services Office. If you do not, you may receive a failing grade in your class. You are required to pay for any classes for which you register. Refunds are available for a limited time at the beginning of each quarter.

WHO WILL HELP ME?

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

The following services are available to you: 1. For general college information, call 736.9391 or 753.3433 toll free from Olympia or 496.5022 in Morton. 2. Advising - Faculty advisors are available to assist you in planning your degree or certificate program. 3. BAS – Contact the Instruction Office, ext. 245. 4. Bookstore Hours – 7:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday. For details on the bookstore hours of operation, please call ext. 310 or visit www.centraliabookstore.com.

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11. 12. 13. 14.

15. 16. 17.

Career Information – Contact the Counseling Center, ext. 265. Cashier – Contact the cashier at ext. 219. Child Care – Contact the Child Development Center, ext. 462. Counseling – The Counseling Center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. For advising, counseling, and career information, call ext. 265. Financial Aid –Contact the Financial Aid Office, ext. 234, for application forms and information. Center for Disability Services - Disability Services and equipment are available to make reasonable accommodation to any student with a documentable disabling condition. If you need accommodations to help you in a class or you have questions or concerns about degree requirements, call ext. 320 (TTY/ TDD 807.6227) for information and appointments. Available evenings by appointment only. Instruction Office – The Instruction Office is open 8am to 5pm, Monday through Friday. Job Placement – For on-campus or off-campus jobs, contact the Cooperative Education and Student Employment Office, ext. 208. Library – The Library hours are 7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday and Tuesday, 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Friday. Hours will vary when classes are not in session. Phoenix Center and Testing Center – Provides students with a wide variety of educational programs and services. Courses in adult basic education; English as a Second Language; Intensive English Program; GED test preparation; High School Completion; pre-college level English, reading and mathematics; tutoring and learning support; college placement testing; and GED testing. For current Testing Center hours check http://www.centralia.edu/students/testing.html. Senior Citizen Waivers – If you are 60 years of age or older and a Washington state resident, you may qualify for tuition and fee reductions. Tutors are available in the Phoenix Center, ext. 216, and through Student Support Services, ext. 360. Veterans’ Benefits – Contact Enrollment Services for information, ext. 221.

NOTICE TO STUDENTS

Although we make every effort to ensure accuracy in this schedule of classes, the information in this publication is subject to change without notice.

Romantic love unfolds under the (northern) lights in Almost This delightful play unfolds in a town that almost isn’t. It reveals love that, also, almost isn’t. But then isn’t that something that makes love special? Almost. Almost, Maine, by John Cariani, is a romantic comedy set in a fictitious small town in northern Maine in the dead of winter. “As the northern lights hover over the star-filled sky above, Almost’s residents find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and often hilarious ways. Knees are bruised. Hearts are broken. But the bruises heal and the hearts mend – almost – in this delightful midwinter night’s dream.” This entertaining play offers an icy blast of hot love with some very surprising twists and turns to keep the whole family engaged. The play opens in the Wickstrom Studio Theatre, Feb. 13-16, and 20-22. Call 360.736.9391, ext. 525, for times, and ticket reservations. Tickets: $10 for adults, $8 for students and senior citizens. This is produced in association with Dramatists Play Service. (Note: this play is suitable as an acceptable date night event.)


STATE SUPPORTS TUITION

Fees

In addition to tuition, a $5 fee voted by the Associated Students of Centralia College will be charged each quarter to support funding of student programs and activities, and a fee of 5% per credit up to 18 credits will be charged to support the construction of our new Student Center. A fee of $4 per credit, up to 10 credits, or a maximum $40 per quarter, is also charged. Additional fees may be required for correspondence, online and lab courses. All tuition and fees must be paid in full at time of registration.

STUDENT INSURANCE AVAILABLE

Student injury and sickness insurance is available. The plan is available to all registered students taking six or more

REFUND POLICY

If you register or begin a class and find that you must withdraw, you must complete and process a Change of Schedule form available in the Enrollment Services Office. Refunds cannot be arranged by telephone. Refunds are given according to the following schedule: 100% if you withdraw through..................................... April 4 50%............................................................................April 7-11 40%......................................................................... April 14-18 No refund after..............................................................April 18 For classes beginning after the first week of the quarter, refunds will be calculated consistent with the above rules. Refunds will be issued only after other student debts are paid. Refunds for students receiving financial aid and/or assistance will be made directly to the sponsoring agency (not the student). Centralia College distributes refunds in the mail, by check; please allow 12 working days for processing. Refunds for payments made with a credit card will be credited to the same credit card account. Refunds of less than $5 will not be issued. Remember that it is your responsibility to ofďťżficially withdraw through the Office of Enrollment Services to receive a refund.

NSF CHECK POLICY

Centralia College charges a $25 NSF check charge for each NSF check received from the bank. A hold will be placed on registration, grades, transcripts, etc. until the NSF check and NSF charges are settled. All NSF checks are sent to collections in 15 days. The collection agency charges the student an additional $40 collection fee and 12 percent interest. When the NSF check is for tuition (including lab and other fees) Centralia College may elect to cancel the student’s registration.

The Bachelor of Applied Science in Management (BASM) will enroll a new class in September 2014. Fifty-seven students are currently in the BASM program. If a bachelor's degree is in your plans, please contact Larry McGee, program executive director, for details. BASM caters to working adults who are intent in furthering their careers by attaining a four-year college degree. BASM offers instruction in a hybrid format: students meet face-to-face each week and continued instruction and student interaction takes place online. Two-or three-year tracks are available. Face-toface instruction takes place in the evenings on Tuesdays and Thursdays (two-year track) and Tuesdays only (three-year track). Qualifying students who apply before the early March deadline (for consideration for priority status) could have priority for admission, financial aid packages, and scholarships.

Call 360.736.9391, ext. 432, for information on the bachelor's degree programs.

BACHELORS.CENTRALIA.EDU

2

213.68

239.68

3

320.52

359.52

836.52

4

427.36

479.36

1115.36

5

534.20

599.20

1394.20

6

641.04

719.04

1673.04

7

747.88

838.88

1951.88

8

854.72

958.72

2230.72

9

961.56

1078.56

2509.56

10

1068.40

1198.40

2788.40

11

1121.39

1252.08

2846.40

12

1174.38

1305.76

2904.40

13

1227.37

1359.44

2962.40

14

1280.36

1413.12

3020.40

15

1333.35

1466.80

3078.40

16

1386.34

1520.48

3136.40

17

1439.33

1574.16

3194.40

18

1492.32

1627.84

3252.40

19

1588.58

1724.10

3520.66

20

1684.84

1820.36

3788.92

21

1781.10

1916.62

4057.18

22

1877.36

2012.88

4325.44

23

1973.62

2109.14

4593.70

24

2069.88

2205.40

4861.96

25

2166.14

2301.66

5130.22

5

557.68

US Citizen Non-US Citizen Credit Resident Non-Resident Non-Resident 1 $245.45 $258.45 $ 598.42

2

490.90

516.90

1196.84

3

736.35

775.35

1795.26

4

981.80

1033.80

2393.68

5

1227.25

1292.25

2992.10

6

1472.70

1550.70

3590.52

7

1718.15

1809.15

4188.94

8

1963.60

2067.60

4787.36

9

2209.05

2326.05

5385.78

10

2454.50

2584.50

5984.20

11

2464.38

2595.07

5994.77

12

2474.26

2605.64

6005.34

13

2484.14

2616.21

6015.91

14

2494.02

2626.78

6026.48

15

2503.90

2637.35

6037.05

16

2513.78

2647.92

6047.62

17

2523.66

2658.49

6058.19

18

2533.54

2669.06

6068.76

19

2768.41

2903.93

6656.60

20

3003.28

3138.79

7244.44

21

3238.15

3373.66

7832.28

22

3473.02

3608.54

8420.12

23

3707.89

3843.41

9007.96

24

3942.76

4078.28

9595.80

25

4177.63

4313.15

10183.64

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Bachelor of Applied Science in Management shows solid growth

US Citizen Non-US Citizen Credit Resident Non-Resident Non-Resident 1 $ 106.84 $ 119.84 $ 278.84

GENERAL INFO

The average cost of educating a resident full-time student not enrolled in a bachelor program for the 2012-2013 academic year was $6,282. Centralia College students paid an average of $3,217 in tuition. The remaining $3,065 was paid for by the state of Washington via state tax funds and other major moneys. International students must pay non-resident tuition and fees regardless of length of stay in the United States. Bachelor program students should refer to the BASM tuition chart.

credit hours per quarter. For complete information on the plan, contact the Student Life and Involvement Center.

2013-2014 Tuition Schedule

Tuition is set by the Legislature and is subject to change by legislative action. Community education courses, which are entirely self-supporting and not tax funded, have varying fees based on the cost of providing each course. Laboratory fees and special fees vary for all courses and are noted on the course listing. In addition to the cost of tuition, you should plan for the purchase of textbooks and supplies. Tuition must be paid separately from books and supplies.

2013-2014 BASM Tuition

HOW MUCH WILL IT COST?


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Two students named to All-Washington team

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

GENERAL INFO

Raegan Nelson

Kristina Lawley

Kristina Lawley, a resident of Lacey, and Raegan Nelson, a Running Start student from Chehalis, were named to the 2014 Coca-Cola All-Washington College Academic Team. Students were selected based on their academic achievement, community involvement, and service to the college. They are invited to take part in the AllWashington team awards ceremony March 27 at South Puget Sound Community College. Governor Jay Inslee has been asked to speak at the event. Stories on page 34

Returning vet finds success, new outlook Fresh out of Rochester High School in 1989, Patrick Zandecki knew a career in the military was the route he would follow. He did enroll at Centralia College, took a few classes, got scared and left. “I had zero confidence,” Zandecki said. “I was convinced that I was not going to be able to go to college.” That attitude confirmed his next move, a career in the army. Zandecki spent 13 years in a mix of active duty and National Guard service that found him as a frontline soldier in Operation Desert Storm and later in Iraqi Freedom. He also served as a member of the National Guard pulling security duty in Salt Lake City during the 2002 Winter Olympics and later in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Along the way he married, witness the birth of two of his children and the adoption of a third. Then a different reality moved in. In 1999, his wife was diagnosed with cancer. She died in 2007 leaving him to raise the kids. To further complicate things the army wanted to station him overseas, which could create problems with his parenting responsibilities. He shopped around for a military occupation that would fit him but nothing appealed. In 2008 he was granted a hardship discharge. He turned to alcohol to deal with the pain in his life. He was, however, sober enough to realize that education could make a difference. He returned to Centralia College, shaken and still lacking confidence. But he needed to start his education campaign to restart his life. “This is where the people at Centralia College made the difference,” Zandecki said. “I came here with problems and wasn’t sure where I would be going. The teachers and staff kept me on task. They wouldn’t let me quit. They pulled me up time and time again. I can never say enough about how everyone at this college helped me.” More than course content, Zandecki said, “Instructors like Randy Johnson (associate professor of English), taught me to overcome the roadblocks I put up. I didn’t think I could do English and he encouraged me, worked with me, and showed me that I could. Pat Pringle (associate professor

Patrick Zandecki of earth sciences) stood by me in ways I can’t describe. That was important.” Zandecki also credits other instructors with providing counseling, tutoring, and caring attitudes that “are getting me through,” he said. “They looked past my problems and my feelings in a way that I couldn’t. Each one is an amazing person.” With support from the college faculty and staff, he has marched from a life as a hard drinking soldier and a person who could barely make two words come together in a written sentence, to an individual who has not tasted alcohol in over two years and can stand in front of hundreds of people to deliver a presentation. Then Larry McGee, executive director of the bachelor degree program, grabbed him and wouldn’t let go. “He told me I couldn’t quit, that I needed to keep going. He showed me what I needed to do to get into the bachelor’s program,” said Zandecki. “He taught me to believe in myself.” And Zandecki paid attention.

For the complete story on Patrick Zandecki, please visit the college website http://news.centraliacollege.net.


701 Airport Way PO Box 147 Morton, WA 98356 496-5022 or 736-9391, ext. 380 www.centralia.edu/CCE Centralia College East (CCEast), located in Morton, represents Centralia College’s dedication to meeting educational needs of the residents of eastern Lewis County.

PROGRAMS AVAILABLE

SERVICES OFFERED

• Associate in Arts Degree • Business Technology Certificates • Pre-nursing Coursework • Running Start Advising & Classes • GED Classes & Testing • T.E.E.N. Program • Continuing Education Classes • Community Business Classes

• Educational Advising • COMPASS & GED Testing • Career Testing & Counseling • Financial Aid Assistance • Tutoring • Proctoring Tests

2014 SPRING QUARTER CLASSES The following classes are being offered at CCEast. For meeting times and course descriptions, refer to the class listing. Academic Transfer: English Composition I (C)....................................................(ENGL& 101) English Composition II (C) .................................................(ENGL& 102) Intro to Creative Writing (H)...................................................(ENGL 208) Drawing (H).....................................................................(ART 102, 103) Survey of Biology (S)............................................................(BIOL& 100) Intro to Statistics (M)......................................................... (MATH& 146) Lifespan Psychology (SS).....................................................(PSYC& 200) Foreign Film Festival..............................................................(HUM 297) Physical Fitness (HF).......................................................... (PE 110, 210)

Transitional Education: Spelling .................................................................................(ENGL 094) Vocabulary Development II....................................................(ENGL 096) Grammar Review...................................................................(ENGL 098) Fundamentals of English.......................................................(ENGL 099) Reading Improvement ......................................................... (READ 099) Basic Math............................................................................(MATH 095) Pre-Algebra..........................................................................(MATH 096) Algebra I & II.................................................................(MATH 098, 099) Community Business: Community Business (SMGT) classes are not transcripted and are offered at a reduced rate. Skills gained from these classes may be applied to the business setting or for professional development. Computer Keyboarding.........................................................(SMGT 157) Microsoft Excel – Brief..........................................................(SMGT 120) Microsoft Word.....................................................................(SMGT 197) Intro to Bookkeeping II.........................................................(SMGT 156) Quickbooks...........................................................................(SMGT 161) Adult Basic Education: Adult Basic Education courses prepare students for the GED and for college preparation courses. Day and Evening classes are available. GED Prep/ABE Math, Writing and Reading Community Education: Adult special interest classes are designed for learning new skills and information in a non-credit, non-graded, relaxed setting. Tuition is offered at a reduced rate. Fitness for Health Better Bones & Balance Foreign Film Festival Computers for the Fearful I, II Introduction to Digital Cameras Art Exploration: Drawing Learning & Playing (Child & Family Studies)

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Workforce Education: Intro to Business...................................................................(BUS& 101) Computer Graphics..................................................................(ART 130) Business English.................................................................... (BTEC 110) Intro to Healthcare.................................................................(HLSV 121) Keyboarding.................................................................. (BTEC 100, 101) Keyboard Skillbuilding I & II........................................... (BTEC 102, 203) Work Experience Seminar...................................................... (BTEC 191) Word I, II........................................................................ (BTEC 210, 219) Excel I, II......................................................................... (BTEC 214, 225) Access II................................................................................. (BTEC 216) PowerPoint Module............................................................... (BTEC 222) Medical Transcription............................................................. (BTEC 263) Practical Accounting I............................................................ (ACCT 120) Basic Computer Accounting................................................... (ACCT 130) Principles of Accounting II....................................................(ACCT& 202) Technical Math......................................................................(MATH 100) Cooperative Work Experience................................................ (COOP 190) GIS Introduction........................................................................(GIS 101) GIS and GPS Integration............................................................(GIS 104)

CC EAST

REGISTER NOW FOR CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST CLASSES. Most classes begin the week of March 31, 2014.

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CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

GENERAL INFO

8

Kat finds opportunity to learn while dancing to the beat of a different drum A seven-year-old girl dreaming of owning her own dance studio: That was Katherine (Kat) Kruger’s first memory of her passion and drive for dance. Now she’s 20 and enrolled full time at Centralia College, working toward that goal. Kruger looks forward to opening a traveling dance studio to serve rural communities. Her plan is to have a studio based in Randle, Wash., with satellite studios in neighboring communities. “I would offer classes at a small studio as a base for a dance headquarters, and then set up other community centers to offer lessons,” she says. At age seven, she performed in The Sound of Music a production of the Fire Mountain Arts Council in Morton, where she acted, sang, and danced. After that, she performed in the traveling Missoula Children’s Theatre, and took part in MCT’s summer camp. After dancing her way through lessons from age 16 at the Eatonville Dance Center, Kruger continued her dance studies while a student at Portland’s Lewis & Clark College, where she attended after graduating from White Pass High School. “I knew I loved dance and performing, but it wasn’t until I was at Lewis & Clark that I decided what to do with my life.” Kruger says she chose Centralia College because “It’s convenient, I can live at home in Randle and commute.” Also, she was inspired by her mother, who went back to school when Kruger was in fourth grade and graduated from Centralia College. As a first year Centralia College student (having transferred credits from Lewis & Clark), Kruger will graduate this June, then transfer to a four-year institution to complete her bachelor’s degree. As a work-study student in the Office of College Relations, Kruger helps prepare for campus events and assists with social media. She selects and interviews students for the BlazerBite Student of the Week, posted on the college’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ CentraliaCollege). The BlazerBite Student of the Week receives a coupon for a free coffee.

Katherine Kruger What’s the best thing about Centralia College? Kruger says, “I really like the class size. I have friends at other universities having trouble finding time to meet with professors. We have more opportunity to meet with the professor and be engaged in the subject.” Kruger’s believes that Centralia College “Is a really great school. I’m really pleased with my experiences here. The staff and faculty are helpful at getting the classes you need. It’s the same as classes at bigger colleges but a whole lot cheaper. It’s a really great thing!” After completing her bachelor’s degree, her plan is to “be involved in different dance studios. I’ll see what opportunities arise,” she says. “I’m really passionate about learning, so it makes going to school easy. I’m just thankful for the opportunities to expand myself and have it [education] be so attainable, because I realize that’s not true for everyone. I enjoy my time here. It’s good stuff!” Kruger is on her way to making dreams come true for other young dancers.

Baseball announcing comes alive in media studies class Do you think baseball is going out of favor? Not likely. As the sport evolves, trained announcers can get a leg up on opportunities announcing baseball (and other sports) games. Centralia College can help you learn and apply the skills and knowledge required of today’s baseball announcers. Whether it’s high school, college or the professional level, this course will emphasizes practical tips, ideas and theories that will help you on your way to becoming a quality baseball announcer. The spring quarter class, Media Studies 128, puts you in

the broadcast booth announcing baseball games. "This is great for those who have always wanted to know what it is like to announce baseball games and be a part of a broadcast team," Wade Fisher, media studies professor, said. “There is a lot more to know than just how the game is played. When you are part of a broadcast team you need to know your specific role." Fisher said there is room in the class for those who are considering a career in sports broadcasting. Check out the course on page 27 of this schedule.


HOW TO READ THIS SCHEDULE Course Title

Survey of Western Civilization (SS)

3513 4323

HIST 105A3 (5) 9-9:30 am HIST 104N (5) 6-9:30 pm

Daily M

LIN 197 LIN 107

Time

H – Humanities SS – Social Sciences

Staff Peterson

Days

S – Science HF – Health and Fitness

Indicates evening courses offered after 4:30 pm. (See sections coded N) Classes offered at Centralia College East in Morton are designated with a o box preceding the course listing. Regular classes, most of which are offered during the day on the main campus of Centralia College, are all other classes. Certain courses at Centralia College are approved as satisfying distribution requirements for degree programs and transferability to 4-year institutions. 8 Indicates online requirements. • • •

The following codes indicate applicability to the distribution course requirements for degree programs: C – Communications Skills M – Quantitative Skills

(sample only)

D – Diversity

Room/building abbreviations CAF.................................................................................Cafeteria CDC.....................................................Child Development Center COE............................................................... Center of Excellence

(formerly HSA-Health and Science Annex)

* Section codes have meaning! If your class has a number in the section, see below for details!

1 = Class is fully online 2 = Class is eCorrespondence 3 = Class is hybrid (some class time replaced with online activities) 4 = Class is web enhanced (some class resources, files or activities are online)

Courses have online requirements. Enrollment in an online, eCorrespondence, hybrid or web-enhanced class will result in a once per quarter, once per student $4 fee. Additionally, a $2 per credit fee will be applied for online and eCorrespondence courses. When registering for classes with online components students are required to submit an email address (See page 6).

U&ME COMMUNICATING IN MOMENTS THAT MATTER

Dr. John Stewart (Centralia College graduate and Distinguished Alumni Award recipient)

Nothing is more critical to the quality of our lives than our relationships, and nothing is more critical to our relationships than how we communicate. U&ME: Communicating in Moments that Matter is a book that shows how to improve the quality of your life by improving your everyday communicating. Dr. Stewart is a former professor at the University of Washington, assistant to the president at the University of Dubuque, and consultant to a wide range of public and private organizations. For more information, visit www.johnstewart.org.

February 12 • 1-1:50 p.m. Washington Hall, Room 103 (on the Centralia College campus)

This presentation is

FREE!

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

CTC............................................................. Chehalis Tribal Center DSL....................................Diesel Section of Technology Building FTE......................................... Flying Tiger Arts Center - Centralia HFL...............................................Home and Family Life Building HWC....................................Health and Wellness Center Building HVF.........................................................Fitness Center - Morton KMP............................................................................ Kemp Hall LIB............................................................... Kirk Library Building MOR............................................ Centralia College East - Morton MOS.........................................................Mossyrock High School NRA........................................No Room Assigned (as of printing) NSC.......................................................... Natural Science Center ONL............................................................Onalaska High School PAC...............................................................................Packwood RAN...............................Randle Site at the Randle Nazarene Church ROC.............................................................................. Rochester ROX...........................................................Roxy Theater - Morton SCC.................................................................Sharon Care Center TEC...............................................................Technology Building TEE.....................................................Teen House (formerly LAX) THO.................................................... Thorbecke’s FitLife Centers UMC.......................... United Methodist Church Annex in Morton WAH...................................................................Washington Hall WLD.............................. Welding Section of Technology Building

8 =

GENERAL INFO

Code# Course# Section Credits code*

Bldg./Room Instructor

9


INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

SCHEDULE

10

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

8 ONLINE

The following list of classes offered is correct on the date of publication. For the most current class information and list of classes offered, see Updated Class Schedules.

Centralia College Values Diversity

ACCOUNTING

Courses designated with a “(D)” focus on experiences of people traditionally under-represented in American history. At least one D-course is required for an Associate Degree. Some are only offered once a year. See course descriptions for details. Diversity courses offered Spring 2014:

87143

ANTH& 8 ANTH ANTH 8 ART 8 ENGL 8 HLTH MUSC 8 POLS& 8 SOC

Basic Computer Accounting

206A (5) 225AP1 (5) 235A (5) 202A4 (5) 160AP1 (5) 120A4 (3) 139A (5) 204AP1 (5) 225AP1 (5)

Cultural Anthropology (SS)(D) 9-9:50am Cultural & Ethnic Pluralism (SS)(D) Online Myth, Ritual, and Magic (SS)(D) 1-3:20pm Art History: 18th-20th C (D) (H) 11-11:50am Women’s Literature (H)(D) Online Women’s Health Issues (HF)(D) 8-8:50am Music of the World (H)(D) 9-9:50am Comparative Governments (SS)(D) Online Cultural & Ethnic Pluralism (SS)(D) Online

Practical Accounting II

Daily MW Daily TWTh Daily

ACCT 120S3

(3) 5-8:20pm

W

MOR 101

Langrell

Accounting theory as applied to bookkeeping systems of small businesses and professional organizations. Focuses on accounting for payroll, merchandise sales and purchases, cash receipts and payments, preparation of the worksheet and annual financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 110. 87144 87146

ACCT 130A3 (3) 11-11:50am MTWTh WAH 209 ACCT 130S3 (3) 5-8:20pm M MOR 112 6:30-7:50pm T MOR 112

Carlson E Langrell Langrell

Accounting experience on a personal computer using QuickBooks Pro software. Reinforces procedures learned in ACCT 110 and 120 or ACCT& 201. Students use QuickBooks Pro software to record transactions, prepare financial statements, and payroll. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 or ACCT 110 and 120. Lab fee $15.12.

Principles of Accounting II 87149

ACCT& 202S3 (5) 5-6:20pm 5-8:20pm

T W

MOR 101 MOR 101

Langrell Langrell

This course emphasizes accounting for partnerships and corporations. Topics include, but are not limited to, accounting for fixed and intangible asset, payroll, stock, bonds, the statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201.


 7150  8140  8141

ACCT& 203A3 (5) 11-11:50am Daily NRA ACCT& 203B3 (5) 12-1:20pm MWF WAH 115 ACCT& 203C5 (5) Flexible

Bruce Rabe Rabe

This course emphasizes accounting for departments and branches, cost accounting in a manufacturing environment cost-volumeprofit analysis, budget preparation and analysis, standard costs, segment reporting, differential costs and revenues, and capital budgeting decisions. Prerequisites: ACCT& 201 and 202.  8142  8143

ACCT 210A3 (5) 1-3:20pm TTh WAH 109 ACCT 210B5 (5) Flexible

Rabe Rabe

An introduction to the audit environment as it applies to the professional spectrum of financial accounting and reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT& 203.

Bookkeeper Cert. Course  8144  8145

ACCT 285A3 (5) 1:30-3pm MWF WAH 115 ACCT 285B5 (5) Flexible

Rabe Rabe

This is the capstone course for accounting students participating in the Associate of Technical Arts (ATA) program and culminating in the student candidacy of either the Certified Bookkeeper (CB), Registered Tax Return Preparer (RTRP), or both. Prerequisite: ACCT& 203, ACCT 240.

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION Adult Basic Education Orientation New ABE/ESL students need to attend an orientation session. Orientation appointments can be made at the front desk of the Phoenix Center in the Kirk Library Building, or by calling 360.736.9391 ext. 216.

ABE orientation and registration appointments can also be made at Centralia College East in Morton 360.736.9391, ext. 380 or 360.496.5022

English as a Second Language I-V, Lab Students will develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated manner that fosters cognitive English language acquisition and participation in native English communication in English-speaking environments. The ESL program helps students become more active participants in the community and work place. It offers them the opportunity to transition into the ABE program where they can pursue an academic track to either earn a GED or continue to improve their academic English in order to follow a career pathway.

Adult Basic Education Math Level II-IV Courses focus on developing basic arithmetic skills in the content areas of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, rations, proportions, and percents. Students will build understanding of mathematical relationships by focusing on problem-solving skills, developing estimation and mental math strategies.

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

Integrate problem-solving and reasoning strategies with math skills using problems encountered in everyday life. Students will build understanding of mathematical relationships by focusing on problem-solving skills, developing estimation and mental math strategies, and integrating algebra, geometry, and data analysis with arithmetic.

Adult Basic Education Writing Level II-IV Introduces parts of speech, building skills in mechanics, usage, sentence structure, organization, and spelling. Students are introduced to the writing process and develop basic writing skills in the essay forms of narrative, descriptive, expository, persuasive, and explanatory. Develop personal and workplace writing skills in correspondence, resumes, forms, invoices, messages and email.

Adult Basic Education Writing Level IV-VI Courses focus on developing English grammar skills in the areas of mechanics, usage, sentence structure, organization, and spelling. Students learn the writing process and develop rudimentary writing skills in the eight essay forms of narrative, descriptive, compare and contrast, cause and effect, persuasive, process, classification, and definition/example.

Adult Basic Education Reading Level II-IV Courses focus on developing critical thinking building reading skills in comprehension, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Content will focus on short readings in fiction, information, business, health/safety, and consumer materials. Students will develop personal vocabulary through dictionary use.

Adult Basic Education Reading Level IV-VI Courses focus on the development of reading comprehension and vocabulary skills while learning how to read and study college level textbooks, write summaries of what is read, learn when and how to highlight textbooks, how to take textbook notes, and find major ideas and supporting details.

ALLIED HEALTH CARE Records Confidentiality - HIPAA  7151

AHC 160AP1 (1) Online

Copeland

Overview of general confidentiality considerations and specific rules of the 1966 HIPAA law for healthcare/mental health professions. Explains and illustrates the law, with extensive review of security/privacy of patient information and records. Lab fee $31.84.

ANTHROPOLOGY Cultural Anthropology (SS)(D) 7154

ANTH& 206A

(5) 9-9:50am

Daily

NSC 208 van Alstyne

Explore the whole of the human social and cultural world by means of investigating other people’s beliefs and behaviors. Through a cross-cultural perspective we attempt to understand others in order to better learn about ourselves.

Cultural & Ethnic Pluralism in Contemporary Society (SS)(D)  7152

ANTH 225AP1 (5) Online

Medlin

Examine ethnicity, ethnic identity, and cultural characteristics of ethnic and social groups in North America and around the world. Understand relationship between social organization and forms of social, economic, and political domination and subordination.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Returning ABE/ESL students need to make a registration appointment with the ABE/ESL coordinator. Registration appointments can be made at the front desk of the Phoenix Center in the Kirk Library Building, or by calling 360.736.9391 ext. 216.

Adult Basic Education Math Level IV-VI

SCHEDULE

Introduction to Audit

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Principles of Accounting III

11


Myth, Ritual, and Magic (SS)(D) 7153

ANTH 235A

(5) 1-3:20pm

MW

NSC 121 van Alstyne

Experience the supernatural and religious beliefs of peoples and cultures. Examine different modes of constructing “reality” and “belief” as well as methods of ritual application in societies.

ART

SCHEDULE

Art Appreciation (H)  7165

ART& 100A4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily

WAH 109/116

Frey

Introduction to the visual arts. Painting, drawing, sculpture and architecture will be examined as art forms and for their role in human history. Students will be introduced to a variety of art media and techniques.

Drawing (H)  7155  7156  7157  7158  7159

ART ART ART ART ART

102A4 102R 103A4 103R 104A4

(5) (5) (5) (5) (5)

1-3:50pm 1-3:50pm 1-3:50pm 1-3:50pm 1-3:50pm

MW MW MW MW MW

WAH 108/116 Martindale MOR 101 Cantin WAH 108/116 Martindale MOR 101 Cantin WAH 108/116 Martindale

Emphasis on the fundamentals of drawing: composition, technique and manipulation of materials, exploration of a variety of subject matter. Lectures and presentations on artists and art, both historical and contemporary. Lab fee $8.96.

Sculpture

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

8 ONLINE

 7160

WAH 108/116 Martindale

An introduction to the fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Assignments include a variety of subject matter and materials. All are welcome.

Computer Graphics  8117  7161

ART 130A3 (5) 10-10:50am MWF ART 130R (5) 2:30-4:30pm TTh

WAH 214 Martindale MOR 112 Cantin

An overview of computer programs used to create images for print and screen, still and moving. Gain basic skills in design and programs by creating digital art work in a series of assignments. Lab fee $50.

Introduction to Fibers (H)  7162

ART 160A4 (5) 1-3:50pm

TTh

WAH 116

Frey

An introduction to fiber art history and techniques with an emphasis on traditional, hand-manipulated processes such as basketry, felting, dyeing and simple loom work. Lab fee $48.29.

Digital Photography (H)  7163

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

ART 111A3 (4) 12-12:50pm MW

ART 174A3 (5) 12-2:50pm

F

WAH 214

Duda

An introduction to digital photography as an expressive art form. Students will explore the creative and technical requirements of digital imaging, as well as examine the contributions of contemporary fine artists working in this medium. Prerequisite: basic computer experience required. Lab fee $50.

Art History: 18th-20th C (D) (H)  7164

ART 202A4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily

WAH 109

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

12

ASTRONOMY The Solar System & the Universe (S)  7174

ASTR 127AP1 (5) Online

Garcia

Brief overview of the history and scope of astronomy, followed by a systematic study of the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the universe. Prerequisite: one year HS algebra or MATH 098.

BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCEMANAGEMENT Accounting Principles for Managers  7176

BAS 310N3 (5) 5-6:50pm

T

NSC 109

Rabe

Foundation course in accounting principles from a management perspective. Analyze the interrelationships of financial statements and cost behavior to measure and control the performance of a business entity and make decisions based on this information.

Legal Issues  7177

BAS 325N3 (5) 6-7:50pm

Th

NSC 109

Rayan

A core course concerning the impact of laws, regulations and legal responsibilities on management behavior with a focus on the application of this learning to real life situations for organizations both large and small.

Practicum in Management  7178

BAS 370N3 (5) 7-8:50pm

T

NSC 109 LaFontaine

This course will explore and build student comprehension of the application of management functions covered in Bachelor of Applied Science in Management courses via direct interaction between students and local managers and entrepreneurs from private, public and non-profit sectors.

Operations Management  8108

BAS 435N3 (5) 7-8:50pm

T

NSC 213

Mattson

A capstone course in which students investigate the unique aspects of managing and growing small- to medium-sized businesses including strategic and operational planning and inevitable tradeoffs that must be considered. Evaluation of the operational decision-making management techniques used to improve the processes and productivity in organizations. Topics include quality and outcomes, efficiency, forecasting, work flow processes, working capital management, inventory control, design of good and services and supply chain issues. The final project will require students to apply techniques of operations management to develop realistic alternatives for a local organization.

Environmental Issues  8109

BAS 440N3 (5) 5-6:50pm

T

NSC 213

Carlson L

An exploration of environmental issues and their effect on business, communities and consumers. Case studies are used to examine basic concepts of ecology and environmental science as they relate to permitting and other business decisions.

Frey

A survey of the history of art in 15th-20th century Asia and 18th20th century Europe. Historical developments in architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms will be examined.

This list of classes offered is correct on the date of publication. For the most current class information and list of classes offered, see Updated Class Schedules at www.centralia.edu.


NSC 213 Cummings

Microbiology (S)  7191

BIOL& 260A4 (5) 9-9:50am BIOL& 260LA (0) 2-3:50pm BIOL& 260LB (0) 4-5:50pm

TWTh TTh TTh

NSC 121 NSC 301 NSC 301

A capstone course which is a culminating activity which will require the application of the BASM Program learning outcomes. An individualized or small team internship will conducted with students working (paid or unpaid) for local business, entrepreneurs, non-profits, or governmental units in a supervised environment where specific program-related outcomes have been designed and agreed to by the student, the organization providing the internship, the faculty member teaching BAS 470 and the BASM Program director. The internship will use the students’ acquired skills to provide meaningful and practical input to the organization involved. Students will work individually or in small teams as appropriate. The cohort will meet so students can share the nature of the issue, the progress as well as the barriers they are experiencing so students can learn from one another. Students will be graded on the basis of the quality of the deliverable that is provided to the host organization.

7192 8116

BIOLOGY

Dendrology-Trees in Our Environment (S)

Survey of Biology (S)

7197

Norton Norton Norton

Understand morphology, physiology, metabolism, genetics, and microbe evolution. Explore interactions of pathogenic microbes and human health. Review processes that inhibit microbial disease. Develop skills of culturing, identifying, and manipulating microbes. Prerequisite: one college chemistry course. Lab fee $31.52.

Plant Identification & Classification (S)  7194

7195

BOTA 113A4 (5) 9-9:50am BOTA 113LA (0) 1-3:20pm

MTWTh NSC 111 Th NSC 307

Carlson L Carlson L

The identification and classification of flowering plants of the Northwest with emphasis on plant families of western Washington. One full day field trip included. Lab fee $17.72.

BOTA 150A4 (5) 10-10:50am MTWTh NSC 111 BOTA 150LA (0) 1-3:20pm T NSC 307

SCHEDULE

BOTANY

 7196

 7183

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

Th

ROOM

BAS 470N3 (5) 6-7:50pm

DAYS

 8110

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Management Internship

13

Carlson L Carlson L

BIOL& 100R (5) 10am-12:50pm MW MOR 101 Mullenix Introduction to biology through trees, from cells and evolution Surveys the structures and functions of cells and organisms. through tree ecology and urban trees. Identification of trees will Explores basic genetic and evolutionary processes, and outlines be featured, including both Pacific Northwest natives and common street trees. Lab fee $18.44. the characteristics of life, its history, and biodiversity.

Human Biology (S)  7184

BIOL& 170A4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily

NSC 107

Priday

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Plant and animal comparative anatomy and physiology. Final Entrepreneurship (formerly BA 132) course in a three-quarter series (BIOL& 221, 222, and 223). 8149 BUS 132A (5) 8-8:50am Daily WAH 115 Coumbs Prerequisite: BIOL& 221 or 222 or instructor permission. Lab fee Experience the challenge and reward of planning a new business. $20.93. Topics include: development of a business plan, failure factors in small businesses, capital, accounting, financial statements, marAdv Topics Human A & P (S)  7179 BIOL 243A4 (5) 12-12:50pm MTWTh NSC 111 Norton keting, human resource management, legal/regulatory issues 7180 BIOL 243LA (0) ARR ARR NSC 314 Norton and management principles. Investigate the inheritance of human characteristics and the regu- Business Law lation of gene expression. Trace the development of major organ 7258 BUS& 201A (5) 8-8:50am Daily WAH 115 Pirzadeh systems in utero and fetal development. Trace the physiological  8150 BUS& 201BP1 (5) Online Pirzadeh and anatomical transformations in older individuals. Prerequisite: Introduction to state and federal constitution, laws and proceBIOL& 242 or instructor permission. Lab fee $18.46. dures including international trade, crimes, torts, contracts, sales, property, bankruptcy, securities, consumer protection, employIntroduction to Marine Biology (S)  7181 BIOL 250A4 (5) 10-10:50am MTWTh NSC 206 Staff ment, and debtor-creditor relationships. The relationship be 7182 BIOL 250LA (0) 2-3:50pm T NSC 314 Staff tween ethics and law will be discussed. Introduction to physical and chemical factors affecting marine Project Management organisms: the various marine habitats, the animals and plants  7255 BUS 250A3 (5) 12-12:50pm MWF NSC 210 Smejkal which inhabit them, and human exploitation of marine resources. Explore the concept of projects and the unique administrative Field trips to local marine habitats. Lab fee $26.49. approach needed to successfully complete a project on time and within budget. Identify the components of projects and the tools available to track project progression.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Presents the structure, organization, and life functions of the hu- Intro to Business man; cells, tissues, and organ systems; development from em-  7257 BUS& 101AT4 (5) 9-9:50am Daily WAH 216 Coumbs bryo to adult; aging and disease; human evolution and ecology. 8148 BUS& 101RT4 (5) 9-9:50am Daily MOR 110 Coumbs Introduction to the world of business. Emphasis will include Majors Organismal Phys (S)  7185 BIOL& 223A4 (5) 11-11:50am MTWTh NSC 111 Carlson L/Norton functions of business, management, types of business owner 7186 BIOL& 223LA (0) 2-3:50pm W NSC 303 Carlson L/Norton ship, human resources, production, marketing, ethics, and the 7187 BIOL& 223LB (0) 4-5:50pm W NSC 303 Carlson L/Norton role of accounting.


Principles of Management

SCHEDULE

 7256

BUS 275A3 (5) 11-11:50am MWF

8 ONLINE

Cooperative Work Experience 7217

BTEC 190A

(1-12) ARR

ARR

ARR

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

Smejkal

Copeland

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading.

BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

Topics include: job search techniques, resumes, interview preparation, professional image, business etiquette, sexual harassment and diversity in the workplace.

Keyboarding For Computing  7198  7199  7200  7201  7202

BTEC BTEC BTEC BTEC BTEC

100A4 100B3 100C3 100R 100RE

(2) (2) (2) (2) (2)

8-8:50am 9-9:50am 12-12:50pm 12-2pm ARR

Daily Daily Daily TTh TTh

WAH 207 Staff WAH 207 Vandegrift WAH 207 Copeland MOR 112 Cantin MOR 112 Cantin

Operation of standard alphabetic keyboard and 10-key pad. Upon completion, students should be able to keyboard at 20wpm and operate by touch a 10-key pad at 80dpm. Lab fee $7.36.

Keyboarding for Business

BTEC 101A4 (3) BTEC 101B3 (3) BTEC 101C4 (3) BTEC 101R (3)  7207 BTEC 101RE (3)

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

WAH 115

Management styles and effective management of personnel from the manager’s side of business. The course is built around the five traditional functions of management and exploring management problems and practices. Real-life case problems used.

 7203  7204  7205  7206

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

14

8-8:50am Daily 9-9:50am Daily 12-12:50pm Daily 12-2pm TTh + 2 lab hours/week ARR TTh

WAH 207 Staff WAH 207 Vandegrift WAH 207 Copeland MOR 112 Cantin MOR 112

Cantin

For beginning students. Learn to keyboard to 25wpm by touch. Develop speed, accuracy and apply basic word processing techniques to letters, reports and tables. Lab fee $14.77.

Keyboard Skillbuilding I  7208  7209  7210  7211

BTEC 102A4 (3) BTEC 102B3 (3) BTEC 102C3 (3) BTEC 102R (3)  7212 BTEC 102RE (3)

8-8:50am Daily 9-9:50am Daily 12-12:50pm Daily 12-2pm TTh +1 lab hour/week ARR TTh

Cantin

Meade Carlson E

WAH 207 Copeland

Introduction to machine transcription: operation of transcribing machines and integration of language and keyboarding skills in the preparation of mailable transcripts. Prerequisite: 2.0 or above in BTEC 110 and typing speed of 40wpm. Lab fee $7.36.

Applied Business Math  7216

BTEC 120A4 (3) 8-8:50am

MWF

 7220  7221  7222  7223

BTEC BTEC BTEC BTEC

203A4 203B3 203C3 203RE

(3) (3) (3) (3)

8-8:50am 9-9:50am 12-12:50pm ARR

Daily Daily Daily TTh

WAH 207 Staff WAH 207 Vandegrift WAH 207 Copeland MOR 112 Cantin

Using a computer for individualized, advanced skillbuilding for students who have already had BTEC 102 or equivalent and who need or want to increase keyboarding speed and improve accuracy. Prerequisite: BTEC 102 or equivalent. Typing speed of 50wpm. Lab fee $11.04.

Word I

 7226  7227  7225

BTEC 210R (5) 11am-2:30pm TTh MOR 112 BTEC 210RE (5) ARR TTh MOR 112 BTEC 210AP1 (5) Online

Cantin Cantin McClain

Class covers Word in depth: document preparation, formatting, graphics, WordArt, columns, sorts, charts, mail merge, and styles. Students will format business documents to business standards. Prerequisite: keyboard skill of 35wpm or instructor permission. Lab fee $18.46.

An introduction to Microsoft Excel. Students will learn basic Excel and integrate worksheets with Word. Prerequisite: word processing, Windows, keyboarding 35wpm or instructor permission. Lab fee $3.55.

BTEC 110R (5) 8:30-10:20am TTh MOR 101 BTEC 110AP1 (5) Online

BTEC 115A3 (4) 12-12:50pm Daily

Keyboard Skillbuilding II

Cantin Carlson E

MOR 112

Editing skills including grammar, punctuation, proofreading, and spelling for office correspondence. A basis for machine transcription, business communication, and office procedures.  7215

BTEC 191R (1) ARR M MOR 112 BTEC 191AP1 (1) Online

Excel I

Business English

Machine Transcription I

 7219  7218

WAH 207 Staff WAH 207 Vandegrift WAH 207 Copeland MOR 112 Cantin

Individualized skillbuilding program for increasing keyboarding speed and improving accuracy. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to type at a minimum of 35wpm with no more than one error per minute. Prerequisite: BTEC 101 and typing at 35wpm or instructor permission. Lab fee $11.04.  8165  7214

Work Experience Seminar

WAH 105

Mack

A review of arithmetic fundamentals including decimals, fractions, percents and their applications to a wide range of business problems. Prerequisite: Math 096 or equivalent test score.

 7229  7230  7228

BTEC 214R (5) 12:30-2:30pm TTh MOR 112 BTEC 214RE (5) ARR TTh MOR 112 BTEC 214AP1 (5) Online

Desktop Publishing  8162 BTEC

218A3 (2) 8-8:50am

MTWTh WAH 209

Cantin Cantin McClain

Carlson E

Students will use Microsoft Publisher to create letterhead, business cards, flyers, announcements, and brochures. Students will learn the basic elements in planning and designing a newsletter. Prerequisite: proficient in word processing. Lab fee $6.94.

Word II  7233  7234  7235

BTEC 219A4 (4) 9-9:50am MTWTh WAH 209 BTEC 219R (4) 11:30am-2pm TTh MOR 112 BTEC 219RE (4) ARR TTh MOR 112

Carlson E Cantin Cantin

Advanced word processing features using Microsoft Word; emphasis on Desktop Publishing terminology and concepts to create professional business and personal documents. Prerequisite: Word I or proficient in word processing. Lab fee $17.49.

Ten-Key Calculator 7236

BTEC 220A

(1) 10-10:50am MW

WAH 111 Vandegrift

Touch control of 10-key pad with emphasis on speed and accuracy. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division techniques used in solving business problems. Basic or Business Math recommended first. Lab fee $7.15.


7237

BTEC 221A

(5) 10-10:50am Daily

WAH 207 Copeland

Medical Law and Ethics 8154

BTEC 266A

(3) 11-11:50am MTW

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Business Communications

WAH 146

Murray

Overview of medical law/ethics for healthcare professionals in various settings: billing/coding, transcription, phlebotomy, etc. Designed to explain ethical/legal obligations to the patient, employer, and healthcare worker and clarify confidentiality requirements regarding patient records and history.

PowerPoint

8179 BTEC 270A (5) ARR

7239  7240  7241

BTEC 222A BTEC 222R BTEC 222RE

(1) 12-12:50pm MW (1) 10:30am-12:30pm M (1) ARR M

WAH 207 Vandegrift MOR 112 Cantin MOR 112 Cantin

An introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint. Upon completion of this course students should have beginning knowledge of a presentation program. Prerequisite: keyboard speed of 35wpm, CNT 117 or instructor permission. Lab fee $3.36.

General Office Procedures 7242

BTEC 224A

(5) 1-2:20pm

MWF

WAH 207 Vandegrift

Topics include: professional image and dress, employer expectations, human relations, receptionist techniques, telephone procedures, processing mail, business ethics, job safety, office supplies and equipment, travel and meeting arrangements, reprographics, financial activities, PC cleaning/care, internet and email. Prerequisite: A grade of 2.0 in BTEC 103 and 110 or instructor permission.

Filing

 7245

MWF

WAH 205 Copeland

Studeman

CHEMISTRY Introduction to Chemistry (S)  7309

7310 7311 8114

CHEM& 121A4 CHEM& 121LA CHEM& 121LB CHEM& 121LC

(5) (0) (0) (0)

8-8:50am 1-2:50pm 3-4:50pm 1-2:50pm

MTWTh W W Th

NSC 121 NSC 308 NSC 308 NSC 308

Nagelkerke Nagelkerke Nagelkerke Nagelkerke

Survey of chemistry with applications in everyday life: atoms, bonds, reactions, and calculations. Prerequisite: one year HS algebra or MATH 098. Lab fee $27.69.

Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry (S)  7312

BTEC 233A4 (3) 9-9:50am

Daily NRA

A mathematics course that focuses on solving applications using percent, proportion, and unit conversion as well as descriptive data interpretation. Satisfies the math requirement for the Medical Assistant ATA. Prerequisite: MATH 096 or equivalent.

7313

CHEM& 131A4 CHEM& 131LA

(5) 11-11:50am (0) 1-3:50pm

MTWTh NSC 121 W NSC 302

Goodwin Goodwin

Basic principles and procedures of records storage and management. Practice indexing, coding, and filing for alphabetic, numeric, subject, geographic filing systems, and introduction to forms design.

A survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM& 121. Lab fee $22.04.

Legal Terminology

7315

 7247

BTEC 240X2 (3) eCorrespondence Copeland Development of a legal vocabulary with emphasis on definitions and spelling. Upon completion of this course students should be able to recognize and use basic terminology used in the legal field.

The periodic table, chemical bonding, introduction to organic chemistry, intermolecular forces and liquids and solids, physical properties of solutions and kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM& 161, MATH 099 or equivalent. Lab fee $27.69.

Medical Terminology

General Chemistry w/lab III (S)

BTEC 260A3 (4) 10-10:50am MW WAH 209 McClain BTEC 260X2 (4) eCorrespondence Copeland Development of a medical vocabulary with emphasis on definition and spelling. Upon completion of this course students should be able to recognize spoken medical terms, analyze word parts for meaning, and understand basic medical terminology.

Medical Office Procedures 7251

BTEC 261A

(5) 1-2:05pm

MTWTh WAH 209 Copeland

Topics include professional image, medical ethics and law, safety, patient records, appointments, billing and collections, mail processing, meetings and travel arrangements, office finance, patient education, telephone procedures, cultural differences, and health insurance. Prerequisite: 2.0 or above in BTEC 101, 110, 260.

Medical Transcription  7253  7254

BTEC 263A3 (4) 12-12:50pm Daily BTEC 263RE (4) ARR T

General Chemistry w/lab II (S)  7314

 7316

7317 7318

CHEM& 162A4 CHEM& 162LA

CHEM& 163A4 CHEM& 163LA CHEM& 163LB

(6) 10-10:50am (0) 1-4:50pm

(6) 10-10:50am (0) 1-4:50pm (0) 1-4:50pm

MTWTh NSC 110 M NSC 302

Goodwin Goodwin

MTWTh NSC 121 Nagelkerke M NSC 308 Nagelkerke T NSC 308 Nagelkerke

Chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility equilibria, thermodynamics, redox reactions, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and polymers. Prerequisite: CHEM& 162. Lab fee $27.69.

Organic Chemistry W/Lab III  7319

7320

CHEM& 263A4 CHEM& 263LA

(6) 12-12:50pm (0) 1-4:50pm

MTWTh NSC 121 Th NSC 302

Goodwin Goodwin

Complex organic reactions: acids, amines; carbanions, heterocycles; polyfunctional compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM& 262 or equivalent. Lab fee $27.69.

WAH 207 Copeland MOR 112 Cantin

A review of medical terminology and the preparation of medical transcripts. Prerequisite: 2.0 or above in BTEC 102, 110, and 260 and typing speed of 40wpm. Lab fee $7.36. This list of classes offered is correct on the date of publication. For the most current class information and list of classes offered, see Updated Class Schedules at www.centralia.edu.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

 7249  7250

SCHEDULE

Applying principles of effective communication in written and oral business communication: letters, memos, reports, and presentations. Upon completion students should be able to produce effective positive, negative, and routine letters, memos, and reports and graphs. Prerequisite: BTEC 110 or ENGL& 101 or ENGL 105, or instructor permission.

Medical Math

15


INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

Positive Parenting VI

Learning and Playing

Level II students develop and practice parenting skills with children through classroom participation, lecture, and discussion.

CFS 110R

(1-2) 9-10:45am

Th

7293 MOR

Hanson

Parents learn about child development and how to apply that knowledge in their parenting role. Children attend classes with parents and participate in learning activities. Lab fee $11.

Learning with Infants and Toddlers

SCHEDULE

CRSE

CHILD & FAMILY STUDIES  7272

7273

CFS 122B

(2) 1-3pm

Th

HFL

Austin R

CFS 142CLS (1-4) ARR

Positive Parenting IX 7303

CFS 152CLS (1-4) ARR

CHINESE

Positive Parenting Children in ECEAP

7321

7275 7291 7301 7276 7292 7302 8177

CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS

132BEC 142BEC 152BEC 132CEC 142CEC 152CEC 132PEC

(1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR

7289 7299 7308

CFS 132TEE (1-4) ARR CFS 142TEE (1-4) ARR CFS 152TEE (1-4) ARR

8 ONLINE

CFS 132AP1 (1-4) CFS 142AP1 (1-4) CFS 152AP1 (1-4)

 7274  7290  7300

Positive Parenting Children in Headstart

Positive Parenting as Fathers 7281 7283 7296

CFS 132FTH (1-4) ARR CFS 132H CFS 142H

(1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR

ARR ARR ARR CDC CDC CDC ARR

Online Online Online ARR Daily Daily

7279 7294 7304 7280 7295 7305  7286  7297  7306 7288 7298 7307

CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS CFS

132FD 142FD 152FD 132FDL 142FDL 152FDL 132MOR 142MOR 152MOR 132ROC 142ROC 152ROC

(1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR (1-4) ARR

ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR Daily Daily Daily ARR ARR ARR

T.I.P.S. Positive Parenting 7284 7285

CFS 132K CFS 132M

(1-4) 9:30-11:30am TTh (1-4) 5:30-7:30pm TTh

Mohoric Mohoric Mohoric

ARR

Staff

CEN CEN

Morehouse Morehouse

Positive Parenting Children in Cooperative Preschool

Martin Mohoric Mohoric Chapman Mohoric Mohoric Martin

ARR TEE 103 Kirkpatrick MTWTh TEE 103 Kirkpatrick MTWTh TEE 103 Kirkpatrick

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

Positive Parenting Online

ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR

Eldredge Eldredge Eldredge Eldredge Eldredge Eldredge Hanson Hanson Hanson Chapman Davis Davis

HFL HFL

Davis Davis

Positive Parenting as Grandparents or Relative Caregivers 7282

CFS 132GAP (1-4) 6-8pm

Positive Parenting in Recovery 7287

CFS 132REC (1-4) ARR

M

ARR

HFL

CDC

Chinese II (H)

Rearden Mohoric

Level I students are introduced to parenting skills to use with children through classroom participation, lecture, and discussion.

ARR

CDC

CDC

Mohoric

Mohoric

CHIN& 122A

(5) 12-12:50pm Daily

NSC 208

Wynder

Continued study of the fundamental skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing the Mandarin Chinese language. Develop an understanding and appreciation of the Chinese people and culture. Prerequisite: CHIN& 121 or instructor permission.

Chinese III (H) 7322

CHIN& 123A

(5) 11-11:50am Daily

NSC 208

Wynder

Continued study of the fundamental skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing the Mandarin Chinese language. Develop an understanding and appreciation of the Chinese people and culture. Prerequisite: CHIN& 122 or instructor permission.

Chinese VI 7323

CHIN& 223A

(5) 1-1:50pm

Daily

NSC 208

Wynder

Continued study of the fundamental skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing the Mandarin Chinese language. Develop an understanding and appreciation of the Chinese people and culture. Prerequisite: CHIN& 222 or instructor permission.

CIVIL ENGINEERING Flagger Certification

CEN CEN CEN CEN CEN CEN MOR MOR MOR ROC ROC ROC

ARR

Level III students demonstrate parenting skills from previous levels through classroom participation, lecture and discussion.

Parents learn about child development and how to apply that knowledge in parenting. Children attend classes with parents and participate in learning activities, music, discussion and art.

Positive Parenting for Teen Parents

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

16

7259 7260

CET 101A CET 101B

(1) 8am-5pm (1) 8am-5pm

Sa Sa

WAH 115 WAH 115

Bunker Bunker

Course meets the Department of Labor and Industries State Certification and safety requirements for traffic control. Traffic control situations will be demonstrated. Three-year photo certification card issued upon successful completion. Lab fee $17.74. Section A meets 4/5; section B meets 5/3.

Computer-Aided Drafting III  7263

7264

CET 114A4 (5) 9-11:50am CET 114LA (0) 9-11:50am

M W

WAH 212 WAH 212

Alves Alves

Develop sound computer-aided drafting. Emphasis is placed on importing survey points, defining parcels, creating 3D terrain models, calculating cut and fill volumes, and creating contours with labels. Prerequisite: minimum 2.0 grade in CET 113 or instructor permission. Lab fee $53.47.

CAD for Industry 8178

CET 115A

(2) 1:30-3:30pm TTh

WAH 212

Alves

ntro to AutoCAD drafting, editing, and dimensioning in all phases of industry and construction. Basic computer skills needed.


TEC 155

Alves

CNT Internship I 8157

CNT 140A

(2) 1-1:50pm

M

WAH 211

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

(4) 10am-12:50pm TTh

ROOM

CET 122A

DAYS

7265

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Surveying III

Daniels

Further practice in traverse and levels under more challenging field conditions. Introduction to field techniques in location of highway curves, topographic mapping, and corner stake-out. Introduction to the Global Positioning System. Prerequisites: CET 120 and 121. Lab fee $27.68.

Students will get hands on experience in Helpdesk operations and multi-faceted student support. Prerequisite: CNT 124.

Survey Computations

Course concentration on materials commonly associated with Security+ certification. Coverage includes risk identification, intrusion detection, encrypted communication, firewalls and basic forensics. Prerequisite: CNT 201.

CET 132A

(3) 8-9:50am

TTh

TEC 159/155

Alves

Land surveying calculations using coordinate geometry, including forward and inverse computations, intersections, parcel areas, and short plats. Computations of structure quantities from construction plans, including surface areas and volumes. Manual and computer-based solutions. Prerequisites: CET 121 and MATH 110. Lab fee $17.64.

Cooperative Work Experience 7267

CET 190A (1-12) ARR

ARR

ARR

Alves

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading.

Highway Engineering  7268

CET 252A4 (5) 10am-12:50pm MW TEC 159/WAH 212 Lund

Intro to highway engineering principles. Study highway components, geometrics, and traffic. Design of bases, flexible and rigid pavements with overview of maintenance and rehab techniques. Prerequisite: minimum grade of 2.0 in CET 122, 132 and 251.

Elements of Design  7269

CET 270A4 (5) 1-3:50pm

MW TEC 159/WAH 212

Lund

Study of civil engineering design and construction practices involved in land development. Students will use current software and tools to complete technical drawings and designs complying with local design standards. Prerequisite: minimum 2.0 grades in CET 114, 200, 210, 261, and 262. Lab fee $38.04.  7270

CET 271A3 (2) 10-11:50am T

TEC 159

Lund

Study of the fundamentals of land use planning and urban design methods related to land development projects. Focus on project permitting processes at the city, county, and state levels in accordance with Washington State laws. Corequisite: CET 270.

COMMUNICATIONS Dragon NaturallySpeaking 7342

COMM 100A

(2) 8-8:50am

T

NSC 101

Hoel

Designed to assist students in the development of computer and English composition skills while using Dragon NaturallySpeaking (voice recognition) and text to speech software.

8155 8156

CNT 125A CNT 125LA

(4) 9-9:50am (0) 9-9:50am

MWF TTh

WAH 211 WAH 211

 7340

7341

Daniels Daniels

This a third course based on COMP TIA A+ and Linux+ certification materials. Material covered includes advanced troubleshooting, more advance system configuration and cmd/shell scripting. Prerequisite: CNT 124.

(5) 10-10:50am MTWTh WAH 211 (0) 10-11:50am F WAH 211

CNT 137A3 (3) 11-11:50am MW CNT 137LA (0) 11-11:50am TTh

Daniels Daniels

WAH 211 WAH 211

Daniels Daniels

A second course in Linux. Learn how to optimize system architecture, create custom kernals and configure networks. Prerequisite: CNT 136. Lab fee $33.86.

COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY Web Scripting 8160 8161

CST 119A CST 119LA

(4) 8-8:50am (0) 8-8:50am

MWF TTh

WAH 211 WAH 211

Staff Staff

This course is designed for new web designers who want to develop, modify and design standards compliant web pages and sites using HTML and CSS Languages. Students will be publishing their work on a web server.

Computer Science I C++ 7346 7348

CS& 131A CS& 131LA

(5) 12-12:50pm MWF (0) 12-1:50pm TTh

WAH 211 WAH 211

Daniels Daniels

Intended as an introduction to programming. Emphasis is on the features of the “C” programming language with an introduction to C++ object oriented programming and good programming style. Lab fee $31.88.

JAVA: Server Side Programming II  7350

7351

CST 230A3 (5) 12-12:50pm TW CST 230LA (0) 12-1:50pm Th

WAH 205 WAH 205

Carlson C Carlson C

A second course in how to build and program dynamic web applications. Topics include: creating custom tags, integrating email into web applications, specialized servlets, Hibernate, Java Server faces, Struts and deployment strategies. Prerequisite: CST 228. Lab fee $30.44.

COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE Cooperative Work Experience  7345

COMPUTER NETWORK TECHNOLOGY Desktop OS 3

Linux II

CNT 203A CNT 203LA

COOP 190RE (1-12) ARR

ARR

MOR

Bloomstrom

Cooperative Work Experience allows students to apply classroom learning to on-the-job settings. Credit is earned for new and continued learning taking place in the work environment. Reaching set learning objectives and development of positive work habits are emphasized. The Cooperative Education Faculty Coordinator, the student employee, and the worksite supervisor identify the learning objectives. 30-360 hours on-the-job per quarter. Instructor permission is required. Corequisite: Enrollment in a Work Experience Seminar is required of Co-op students. You may take the Work Experience Seminar before or in the same quarter as the Co-op course.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Land Planning & Permitting

8158 8159

SCHEDULE

7266

Network Technology 3

17


CRIMINAL JUSTICE CJ& 101AP1 (5) Online

Belden

Examines local, state and federal law enforcement agencies and the judicial and correctional systems. Career opportunities and qualifying requirements are studied.

SCHEDULE

Community Policing  7324  7325

CJ CJ

109A3 (5) 10-10:50am MTWTh TEC 154 109BP1 (5) Online

Gilbertson Belden

8 ONLINE

7352

(1) 8am-5pm

Sa

Internal Combustion Engine I Theory

Criminal Law

7355 DET 121A (5) 10am-2:30pm MW 10am-12pm F

 7334

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

DET 102A

CJ& 110A3 (5) 12-12:50am MTWTh TEC 154

Gilbertson

DSL 104

Fay J

A comprehensive classroom training along with practical, handson instruction on forklift operation and safety. Course covers state and federal regulations and proper operator training. Students are awarded a certification card upon successful completion. Prerequisite DET 100. Lab fee $40.

7354

DET 120A

(3) 9-9:50am

MWF

DSL 104

Fay J

The study of operating principles of the internal combustion engine. Corequisite: DET 121.

Internal Combustion Engine I Lab

DSL 106 DSL 106

Fay J Fay J

A broad survey of the common criminal laws and statutes of Washington and the other 49 United States. Pre/corequisite: CJ& 101 or instructor permission. Lab fee $14.37.

The disassembly and re-assembly of a variety of diesel engines using service manuals to inspect, analyze and perform tune-up procedures. Corequisite: DET 120. Lab fee $49.47.

Criminal Justice Ethics

Shop Skills for Welders

CJ

111A3 (5) 11-11:50am MTWTh TEC 154

Gilbertson

Presents an in-depth examination and analysis of the practical, theoretical, ethical and moral considerations found in the criminal justice system. Pre/corequisite: CJ& 101 or instructor permission. Lab fee $15.31.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

Forklift Certification

Focus on resolving community issues and concerns via Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving (COPPS) skills and strategies. Pre/corequisite: CJ& 101 or instructor permission. Lab fee $15.31.

 7327

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

CRSE

DIESEL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY

Intro to Criminal Justice  7332

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

18

Community Corrections  7330

CJ

116A3 (5) 1-4:10pm

W

TEC 154

Gilbertson

7356

DET 166A

(3) 10-11:50am TTh

DSL 104

Driscoll

Develop practical work skills and work habits in the student. Includes safety procedures and practices, proper use and maintenance of common shop equipment and common processes and materials of metal products fabrication and manufacturing. Lab fee $49.27.

Cooperative Work Experience

Community corrections, alternative sentencing, probation and diversion concepts studied. Explores technology innovations pertaining to community supervision. Pre/corequisite: CJ& 101 or instructor permission. Lab fee $15.31.

7357 DET 190A (1-12) ARR

Crime Scene Technology

Review common technical repair practices. Introduction to wage/ salary systems, productivity, customer relations, job ticket writing, phone etiquette, employer requirements and policies. Coverage of related state and federal requirements. Class meets 4/15-6/9.

 7331

CJ

225N4 (5) 5-9:50pm

Th

TEC 154

McLeod W

Students learn techniques to collect and preserve common evidentiary items at crime scenes for future laboratory analysis and judicial proceedings while ensuring proper chain of custody. Aspects of arson investigation are also studied. Lab fee $14.38.

Crime Scene Photography  8146

CJ

228A3 (5) 1-3:50pm

T

TEC 154

Belden

Practical application of basic crime scene photography methods and techniques for criminal investigations studied. Skills designed to capture the details of automobile accidents, misdemeanor, and felony crime scenes are discussed and practiced. Lab fee $14.88.

Intro Forensic Science  8147

CJ& 240AP1 (5) Online

Belden

Introductory course in forensic science examines physical evidence and laboratory analysis in criminal investigations. Skills and procedures required for collection, preservation, and identification of physical evidence are studied. Diagramming of crime scenes is practiced.

ARR

ARR

Conrad

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading.

Practical Applications Theory 7358

DET 230A

(3) 8-8:50am

Daily

Practical Applications Lab 7359

DET 231A

(5) 10am-2:50pm Daily

DSL 104

DSL 106

Conrad

Conrad

Service and repair of industrial trucks and equipment as per customer/instructor repair order. Work is done in an industrylike setting using current repair orders and standard repair time guides (SRT’s). Emphasis on quality, efficiency and productivity. Prerequisite: DET 230. Lab fee $84.60. Class meets 4/15-6/9.

Mobile HVAC Systems Theory 7360

DET 235A

(2) 8-8:50am

Daily

DSL 104

Conrad

Basic principles of heating and air conditioning as used in mobile applications. Corequisite: DET 236. Class meets 3/31-4/14.

Mobile HVAC Systems Lab 7361

DET 236A

(4) 10am-2:50pm MTWTh DSL 106

Conrad

Industry accepted practices and procedures of air conditioning system diagnosis and repairs. Corequisite: DET 235. Lab fee $67.69. Class meets 3/31-4/14.


Applied Drama 7362

DRMA 100A

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

DRAMA

EDUCATION (3) ARR

ARR

WAH 150

Petzold

Intro to Education  7380

EDUC& 201AW1 (3) Online

Price

Provides credit for participation in either the artistic or technical aspects of the college’s quarterly play productions. This course may be repeated for credit.

Explore role education in society and investigate teaching as a career. Historical perspective and current trends in education discussed.

Beginning Acting (H)

8122

WAH 150 WAH 150

Tyrrell Tyrrell

Introduction with emphasis on concentration, imagination, movement, and characterization via vocal, physical, emotional exercises, improvisation, and scene work. Students will be expected to attend two plays during the quarter at their own expense.

Intermediate Acting (H)

7364 DRMA 108A (5) 10-11:50am MW 11-11:50am F

WAH 150 WAH 150

Tyrrell Tyrrell

Cooperative Work Experience

EDUC 190A (1-12) ARR

ARR

KMP 113

White

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading.

Classroom Observation

7378 EDUC 202A (2) 10-10:50am T 7379 EDUC 202B (2) ARR ARR

KMP 104 ARR

White White

Students review teaching as a career. Students observe classrooms in action and attend seminars to discuss their findings. Students may make arrangement with the instructor to start observations before quarter begins. Lab fee $10.

Continuation of acting fundamentals with an emphasis on improvisational techniques and exercises, and advance monologue and scene work. Students will be expected to attend two plays during the quarter at their own expense.

EDUCATION-EARLY CHILDHOOD

Dramatic Performance (H)

Designed to meet licensing requirements for early learning providers, STARS 30 hour basic course recognized in MERIT system. Topics: child development, cultural competency, community resources, guidance, health/safety/nutrition and professional practice.

DRMA 115A

(5) ARR

ARR

WAH 150

Tyrrell

For students involved in the creative/performance aspects of a play production, from audition through research/preparation for their portrayal and evaluation of their performance. The student must successfully audition and be cast in a college production. Prerequisite: audition selection for quarterly play production.

Advanced Acting (H)

7367 DRMA 201A (5) 10-11:50am MW 11-11:50am F

WAH 150 WAH 150

Tyrrell Tyrrell

ECONOMICS Microeconomics (SS) 7369  8134

ECON& 201A (5) 10-10:50am Daily WAH 113 ECON& 201BP1 (5) Online

Suozzo Suozzo

Study of individual markets and how prices and quantities react within those markets to meet the unlimited wants of human beings.

Macroeconomics (SS) 7370  8103

ECON& 202A (5) 9-9:50am ECON& 202N3 (5) 5-6:50pm

Daily W

WAH 113 NSC 204

Suozzo Suozzo

Study how any system allocates limited resources to meet unlimited human wants. The major concerns of macro economic policy are: inflation, full employment, national income accounting, fiscal policy, the money supply and international trade.

 8126

ECED& 100AW1 (3) Online

Health/Safety/Nutrition  7368

ECED& 107AW1 (5) Online

Staff

Staff

Develop knowledge and skills to ensure good health, nutrition, and safety of children in group care and education programs. Recognize the signs of abuse and neglect, responsibilities for mandated reporting, and available community resources.

Guiding Behavior (formerly EDEC 165)  8127

EDUC& 130AW1 (3) Online

Staff

Examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Develop skills promoting effective interactions while providing positive individual guidance and enhancing group experiences.

Infants/Toddlers Care (formerly EDEC 173)  8130

ECED& 132AW1 (3) Online

Staff

Examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers, and culturally relevant care.

Family Child Care  8131

ECED& 134AW1 (3) Online

Staff

Learn the basics of home/family child care program management. Topics include licensing requirements; business management, relationship building, health, safety, and nutrition, guiding behavior and promoting growth and development.

Admin Early Lrng Prog (formerly EDEC 155)  8132

ECED& 139AW1 (3) Online

Staff

Establish administrative skills required to develop, open, operate, manage, and assess early childhood education and care programs. Explore techniques and resources available that meet Washington State licensing and NAEYC standards.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Continued study of acting; character analysis, scene interpretation and classical styles. Students will be expected to attend two plays at their own expense and will be responsible for the presentation of a children’s theatre production.

Child Care Basics (formerly EDEC 105)

SCHEDULE

7363 DRMA 107A (5) 10-11:50am TTh 10-10:50am F

7365

19


Curriculum Development (formerly EDEC 230)  8129

ECED& 160A4 (5) 1-3:30pm

MW

SCHEDULE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

INSTRUCTOR

TITLE CODE

ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

Language and Literacy (formerly EDEC 172)

Continuing coverage of power systems, boilers and prime movers. Prerequisite: PPO 102.

NSC 107

Bunker

Create teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skills at each developmental stage (birth-8) through the four interrelated areas of listening, speaking, writing, and reading.

ECE Practicum II (formerly EDEC 234)  8133

ECED 233A4 (5) 1-3pm

HFL

Price

Develop a professional understanding of teaching methods and practices with an opportunity to evaluate teaching skills and learning environment. Prerequisite: minimum 15 ECE credits.

ELECTRONICS, ROBOTICS & AUTOMATION DC Electronics  7381

7382

8 ONLINE

Price

Electric Utility Distribution System

ECED 181A4 (5) 1-3:50pm Th +4 hrs/wk TBA

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

NSC 107

Investigate learning theories and create curriculum that enhances the development of language, fine/gross motor, social-emotional, cognitive and creative skills in young children.  8128

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

20

ELT ELT

115A4 (5) 9-9:50am 115LA (0) 9-10:50am

MWF TTh

KMP 128 Peterson D KMP 121 Peterson D

 7656  7657

PPO 103AT3 (5) 1-3:20pm M PPO 103NT3 (5) 5:30-7:50pm M

Industrial Safety  7658  7659

PPO 130AT3 (5) 1-3:20pm W PPO 130NT3 (5) 5:30-7:50pm W

COE 115 COE 115

COE 115 COE 115

Crawford Crawford

Crawford Crawford

Industrial safety practices, procedures, and equipment as found in modern power plants. Also included will be basic first aid and CPR, and basic firefighting equipment and procedures. Basic Rigging will be taught stressing safety. Prerequisite: PPO 102.

Cooperative Work Experience 7660

PPO 190A (1-10) ARR

ARR

ARR

Crawford

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading. Plant Operations Refrigeration & HVAC  7661  7662

PPO 203AT3 (5) 2-4:50pm T PPO 203NT3 (5) 5:30-8:20pm T

COE 115 COE 115

Steidel Steidel

Provides a background in power plant operations and controls. Prerequisite: PPO 202.

Basic electronic theorems. DC circuit analysis. Series and parallel circuits. Lab fee $33.86.

Power System Operator 1

Solid State Electronics

Learn to operate a power grid by using Incremental Systems “Power Simulator” to learn communication protocols, reliable switching operations, managing MW flow and preventing voltage collapse. Passing PPO 201 with a grade of 2.8 on a 4 point scale or an 80% is required to take this course. Lectures will use the “EPRI Power System Dynamics Tutorial”. The class is required for NERC certification.

7383 7384

ELT ELT

133A 133LA

(5) 9-9:50am (0) 8-9:50am

MWF TTh

KMP 121 KMP 129

Taylor C Taylor C

Semiconductor theory. Diodes. Bipolar junction transistors. Field Effect Transistors. Biasing Circuits. Prerequisite: ELT 121. Lab fee $33.86.

Power Supplies 7385 7386

ELT ELT

137A 137LA

(5) 11-11:50am MWF (0) 11am-12:50pm TTh

KMP 121 KMP 121

Taylor C Taylor C

Half wave and full wave rectifiers, voltage multipliers and power supply filters. Linear power supplies. Monolithic IC regulators. Prerequisite: ELT 121; corequisite: ELT 133. Lab fee $33.86.

Communication Systems 7387 7388

ELT ELT

235A 235LA

(5) 1-1:50pm (0) 1-2:50pm

TWTh MF

KMP 128 KMP 129

Taylor C Taylor C

AM, FM and SSB Modulation, tuners, Class C amplifiers, radio frequency oscillators, Pulse and Digital Modulations, oscillators, Phase Locked Loops, RFID, antennas. Prerequisite: ELT 213. Lab fee $33.86.

Robotic III  7432

7433

ERA 270A4 (4) 11-11:50am MWF ERA 270LA (0) 11-11:50am TTh

KMP 128 Peterson D KMP 129 Peterson D

A third course in Robotics. Topics covered are: infrared range sensing, navigation principles of autonomous robots, behavior based control, and characteristics of workcell robotics. Prerequisite: ERA 230. Lab fee $22.95.

 8136

PPO 205A3 (5) 2-4:30pm

Th

COE 115

Steidel

ENGINEERING Electrical Circuits 7427

ENGR& 204A

(5) 12-12:50pm Daily

NSC 108 Threapleton

An introduction to basic electrical circuits and systems. Topics include: basic analysis techniques; nodal and mesh analysis; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; operational amplifiers; step, natural and steady state circuit response. Concurrent enrollment in MATH 212 is recommended. Prerequisite: MATH& 152 and PHYS& 222.

Statics 7428

ENGR& 214A

(5) 10-10:50am Daily

NSC 108 Threapleton

First of a three-course sequence. The basic principles of vector statics; friction, analytical and graphical methods of solving force systems including frames, trusses, and other simple mechanisms; centroids and moments of inertia; chains and cables. Corequisite: MATH& 151.

This list of classes offered is correct on the date of publication. For the most current class information and list of classes offered, see Updated Class Schedules at www.centralia.edu.


English Composition I (C)

Spelling

7391 ENGL 094N  7392 ENGL 094R 7393 ENGL 094S4

(1-5) 5-7:20pm (1-5) 8-10:20am (1-5) 4:30-7pm

TTh TTh TTh

NSC 111 Shriver MOR 108 Smith MOR 108 Johnson T

ENGL& 101A3 ENGL& 101B4 ENGL& 101C3 ENGL& 101D3 ENGL& 101E4 ENGL& 101G4 ENGL& 101R ENGL& 101FP1

(5) 9-9:50am Daily NSC 108 (5) 10-10:50am Daily HWC 106 (5) 11-11:50am Daily NSC 109 (5) 12-12:50pm Daily WAH 109 (5) 1-1:50pm Daily NSC 206 (5) 8-8:50am Daily NSC 111 (5) 10:30am-12:50pm TTh MOR 101 (5) Online

Waliezer Brown C Waliezer Burr Knott Bennett Nellis Reigle

Builds a base of words used in everyday communication, provides systematic study, increases proficiency in oral and written communication and reading comprehension. Students are given a placement test and assigned materials at an appropriate level.

Expository writing course which encourages students to think and write with clarity, conciseness, and enjoyment; to organize and develop their ideas; and to express themselves sharply, economically, and grammatically. Prerequisite: students must meet mandatory placement requirements to enroll. A minimum score of 83 on the COMPASS test, a minimum score of 46 on the ASSET test, or completion of five credits of ENGL 099 with a minimum grade of 2.0.

Vocabulary Development II

Composition II (C)

Vocabulary Development I 7394

7395  7396  7397

ENGL 095N

ENGL 096N ENGL 096R ENGL 096S4

(1-5) 5-7:20pm

(1-5) 5-7:20pm (1-5) 8-10:20am (1-5) 4:30-7pm

TTh

MW TTh TTh

NSC 111

Shriver

NSC 111 Shriver MOR 108 Smith MOR 108 Johnson T

Builds a base of words used in everyday communication, provides systematic study, increases proficiency in oral and written communication and reading comprehension. Students are given a placement test and assigned materials at an appropriate level.

Vocabulary Development III 7398

ENGL 097N

(1-5) 5-7:20pm

MW

NSC 111

Shriver

 7420  8135  7421  7422  7423  7424  7425  8100  8164  7426

ENGL& 102A3 ENGL& 102B4 ENGL& 102C4 ENGL& 102D3 ENGL& 102E4 ENGL& 102F3 ENGL& 102G4 ENGL& 102N3 ENGL& 102R ENGL& 102HP1

(5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5) (5)

8-8:50am Daily NSC 206 12-12:50pm Daily HWC 106 9-9:50am Daily NSC 206 10-10:50am Daily NSC 101 11-11:50am Daily HWC 106 12-12:50pm Daily NSC 206 1-1:50pm Daily NSC 109 5-6:50pm M KMP 104 1:30-3:50pm TTh MOR 101 Online

Weil Schnabl Schnabl Waliezer Erickson Weil Erickson Bennett Nellis Reigle

Course provides a systematic study of college level academic words and their roots, prefixes, and suffices to increase proficiency in oral and written communication.

A course in argumentative and persuasive writing, methods of research, development and preparation of an original research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101.

Writing & Grammar Review

English in the Workplace

ENGL 098A ENGL 098N ENGL 098R

(1-5) 10-10:50am Daily (1-5) 5-7:20pm TTh (1-5) 8-10:20am TTh

COE 103 Johnson R NSC 111 Shriver MOR 108 Smith

Study proper word usage, sentence structure, and punctuation. Writing includes personal essays and summaries. Emphasis is on improving grammar and writing skills for personal needs and preparation for technical coursework. Prerequisite: students must meet mandatory placement requirements to enroll.

Fundamentals of English 7402 7403 7404  7405

ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL

099A 099B 099N 099R

(1-5) 9-9:50am (1-5) 12-12:50pm (1-5) 5-7:20pm (1-5) 8-10:20am

Daily Daily TTh TTh

COE 103 Johnson R NSC 101 Shriver NSC 111 Shriver MOR 108 Smith

Prepares students for college composition. Students analyze texts, review sentence structure and punctuation, and write several short essays and other writing. Students must meet mandatory placement requirements to enroll.

Writing for College  7406

ENGL 100A4 (1) ARR

ARR

ARR

Erickson

Lab hours in the Writing Center will support skill development and confidence in specific aspects of college writing, to be defined in an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) with instructor.

 8101

ENGL 105A4 (5) 8-8:50am

Daily

HWC 106

Brown

Study a variety of workplace communications, along with proper use of grammar, sentence structure, mechanics and vocabulary within those communications. Prerequisite: ENGL 098 or equivalent score on Compass/Asset test.

Introduction to Creative Writing (H)  7409

ENGL 208R

(5) 11am-1:20pm TTh

MOR 108

Smith

Writers will move beyond the traditional “academic essay” into an exploration of literary genres to include poetry, creative nonfiction, short fiction, and drama in interactive workshop environment. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101.

American Literature I (H)  8119

ENGL& 244A3 (5) 11-11:50am Daily

NSC 206

Weil

Surveys how great American writers have addressed classic American values and conflicts, tracing the development of our national literature through the Puritan, Transcendental, Realist, Naturalist, and modern movements and covering poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Women’s Literature (H)(D)  8138

ENGL 160AP1 (5) Online

Foss

Examines literature written by women to understand how gender, class, and race shape their experience and their writing. Genres will include poetry, short stories, non-fiction, fiction and drama. College-level reading and writing skills expected.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

7399 7400  7401

SCHEDULE

Topics covered in this course include basic spelling patterns, commonly confused words, apostrophe use, capitalization, plural formation, and how pronunciation helps to improve spelling. Students utilize materials according to pretesting information.

 7412  7413  7414  7415  7416  7418  7419  7417

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

ENGLISH

21


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ENVS& 100A3 (5) 11-11:50am MTWTh NSC 110

Ramsdell

SCHEDULE

An introduction to the interactions between humans and the natural world. Topics include structure and function of ecosystems; populations growth; mineral, water, forest, food and energy resources, waste management, pollution. Local and global environmental issues will be discussed.

FRENCH French III (H) 7434

FRCH& 123A

(5) 9-9:50am

Daily

NSC 210 Mawamba

A multimedia course that combines video, audio, and print. Emphasis is on communicative proficiency, self-expression and cultural insight. Resources include CDs, videos and the World Wide Web. Prerequisite: FRCH& 122 or instructor permission.

GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS GIS Introduction

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

8 ONLINE

8174 8175 8176

GIS GIS GIS

101R3 (3) ARR 101LR3 (0) 3-4:50pm 101LA3 (0) 3-4:50pm

F F F

MOR MOR 112 WAH 209

8167 8168 8169

GIS GIS GIS

104R3 (3) ARR 104LA3 (0) 1-2:50pm 104LR3 (0) 1-2:50pm

F F F

MOR WAH 207 MOR 112

Lund G Lund G Lund G

Lund G Lund G Lund G

Collect, transfer, and use global Positioning System (GPS) data as primary and secondary data in GIS software for analysis and visualization. Students will complete Esri 'Virtual Campus' Certificates. Prerequisite: CNT 117 or equivalent; GIS 101 recommended. Lab fee $21.67.

GEOLOGY 7436

GEOL 100A4 (3) 1-1:50pm GEOL 100LA (0) 2-3:50pm

MW W

 7437

7438 7439

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

HLTH 120A4 (3) 8-8:50am

TWTh

NSC 107

Pringle Pringle

GEOL 108A4 (5) 11-11:50am MTWTh NSC 101 GEOL 108LA (0) 1-2:50pm T NSC 105 GEOL 108LB (0) 3-4:50pm T NSC 105

Pringle Pringle Pringle

An examination of earth materials and processes through the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, and meteorite impacts. Examination of causes and effects on human populations and the environment; preparedness, prediction and forecasting; mitigation of risks, and case studies. Lab fee $28.36.

Priday

An opportunity to examine current women’s health and wellbeing issues. Lab fee $3.10.

Health & Wellness (HF)  7461

HLTH 130AP1 (3) Online

Priday

An exploration of current personal health issues and a presentation of contemporary approaches to obtaining and maintaining a high level of wellness.

Healthy Weight Control (HF) 7462

HLTH 135A

(2) 9-9:50am

TTh

HWC 115 Johnson C

An introduction to healthy eating that focuses on a balance of foods, including a variety of lifestyle change strategies that will enhance the maintenance of a healthy weight. Lab fee $3.10.

Safety and Fitness (HF)

HLTH 145A4 (3) 8-8:50am MWF HWC 115 Johnson C HLTH 145B4 (3) 9-9:50am MWF HWC 115 Johnson C HLTH 145CP1 (3) Online Johnson C

Emphasizes the importance of safety, first aid, and exercise as they relate to an individual’s level of health and fitness. The course includes American Red Cross Community First Aid and Community CPR certification. Lab fee $47.49.

AHA Community First Aid/CPR 7466 7467 7468

HLTH 154A HLTH 154B HLTH 154C

(1) 8:30am-4pm Sa (1) 8:30am-4pm Sa (1) 8:30am-4pm Sa

HWC 106 HWC 106 HWC 106

Layton Layton Rubadue

Introductory American Red Cross first aid class with emphasis on the basic skills needed in case of an emergency. Adult, child and infant first aid CPR covered. Lab fee $44.23. Section A meets 3/22; section B meets 4/19; section C meets 5/17.

HISTORY Western Civilization III (SS) 7445

HIST& 118A

(5) 10-10:50am Daily

NSC 204

Peterson J

Analysis of the late 19th and 20th centuries with special attention paid to the development of political, social and economic trends and events.  7446

NSC 101 NSC 105

Explore minerals and rocks, geological processes, and geological investigation techniques that relate to geotechnical and environmental concerns. Lab fee $12.93.

Natural Hazards and Catastrophes (S)

 7460

US History II (SS)

Geology for Engineering & Environ. Studies (S)  7435

Women’s Health Issues (HF)(D)

 7463  7464  7465

Provides an overview and hands-on practice with Esri's ArcGIS Software (ArcMap/ArcCatalog). Encourages students to associate, relate, and apply GIS technology to major and career goal. Students will complete Esri 'Virtual Campus' Certificates. Prerequisite: CNT 117 or equivalent skills recommended. Lab fee $21.67.

GIS and GPS Integration

CRSE

HEALTH

Survey of Environmental Science (S)  7429

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

22

HIST& 147AP1 (5) Online

Austin K

Analysis of American history from Antebellum Era to the Progressive Era. Emphasis will be on the political, social, and economic changes.

US History III (SS) 7447

HIST& 148A

(5) 12-12:50pm Daily

NSC 204

Peterson J

Analysis of American history from World War One to the present. Emphasis will be on the political, social, and economic changes.


(5) (5) (5) (5)

8-8:50am Daily NSC 208 Smejkal 9-9:50am MWF WAH 105 Smejkal 5:30-8:30pm M NSC 110 Schimelpfenig Online McClain

Human Resource Mgmt  7444

H R

210AP1 (5) Online

King

Introduction to fundamental concepts of human relations management. This course will focus on recruiting, employee selection and training, employee performance and compensation, and employee laws and labor relations.

HUMANITIES Humanities III (H)  7502

HUM& 118A4 (5) 9-9:50am

Daily

WAH 109

Mitchler

A survey of the major movements in art, architecture, music, philosophy, and literature in a historical context, from 1800 C.E. to the present.

Lyceum VI 7500

HUM 286A

(1) 1-1:50pm

W

WAH 103 Peterson J

The Lyceum offers a variety of lectures on topics of current interest across a wide variety of disciplines. The theme may vary from quarter to quarter.

Foreign Film Festival  7501

HUM 297R

(2) 11am-2:30pm Roxy Theater

Cantin

(1-5) 2-2:50pm (1-5) 2-2:50pm (1-5) 2-2:50pm (1-5) 2-2:50pm

Daily Daily Daily Daily

KMP 104 KMP 104 KMP 104 KMP 104

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CR

#SEC

086A 090A 094A 098A

Shriver Shriver Shriver Shriver

Multi-level reading course for non-native English Speakers that emphasizes the acquisition of reading skills at a post-secondary level, including vocabulary, comprehension, reading rate, and study skills.

Intensive English: Writing and Grammar Level I-IV

7506 7510 7514 7518

IEP IEP IEP IEP

087A 091A 095A 099A

(1-5) 1-1:50pm (1-5) 1-1:50pm (1-5) 1-1:50pm (1-5) 1-1:50pm

Daily Daily Daily Daily

KMP 104 KMP 104 KMP 104 KMP 104

Johnson R Johnson R Johnson R Johnson R

This is a multi-level class to prepare non-native English students for writing in college level academic and technical courses. Difficulty and length of writing assignments increase with each level. Students write about themselves, their culture or other familiar topics, discuss and write about American and world culture, and academic topics. Writing fluency is stressed, and correction focuses on structural and grammatical errors appropriate to each level. Paragraph development and short essay organization are emphasized. Writing includes description, narration, comparison/ contrast, with some analysis and summarizing of short reading passages. Students keep a daily journal.

JOURNALISM Introduction to Mass Media (H) 7519  7520

JOUR 160A (5) 11-11:50am Daily WAH 113 Fisher JOUR 160BP1 (5) Online McQuarrie

A survey of the mass media in America: newspapers, magazines, books, recorded music, radio, television, motion pictures, the World Wide Web: with emphasis on structure, function, audience, content, effect and social responsibility.

LIBRARY

INTENSIVE ENGLISH PROGRAM

Research in the 21st Century

Intensive English Speaking I-IV

Students examine various strategies for locating, evaluating, and applying information resources in the research process. Attention is paid to information issues like intellectual property, censorship, and freedom of information. Prerequisite: eligibility for ENGL& 101.

 7503  7507  7511  7515

IEP IEP IEP IEP

084A4 088A4 092A4 096A4

(1-5) 10-10:50am (1-5) 10-10:50am (1-5) 10-10:50am (1-5) 10-10:50am

Daily Daily Daily Daily

NSC 109 NSC 109 NSC 109 NSC 109

 7521

Burr Burr Burr Burr

Multi-level language course with emphasis on communicative oral proficiency. Instruction includes use of multimedia to enhance the learning of the English language and American culture.

Intensive English Listening I-IV  7504  7508  7512  7516

IEP IEP IEP IEP

085A4 089A4 093A4 097A4

(1-5) 11-11:50am (1-5) 11-11:50am (1-5) 11-11:50am (1-5) 11-11:50am

Daily Daily Daily Daily

COE 103 COE 103 COE 103 COE 103

Burr Burr Burr Burr

This course provides students with reciprocal listening training. They will also be introduced to non-reciprocal listening tasks both in a formal and non-formal method of communication.

LIBR 180AW1 (5) Online

Staff

MATHEMATICS Basic Mathematics  7531  7532  7533

MATH 095A4 (1-5) 7-8:50am MATH 095B4 (1-5) 9-9:50am MATH 095C4 (1-5) 1-3:20pm +5 hrs/wk TBA  7534 MATH 095N4 (1-5) 4:30-6:50pm +5 hrs/wk TBA 7535 MATH 095R4 (1-5) 8:30-10:20am 8:30-9:20am 7536 MATH 095S4 (1-5) 4:30-7pm

Daily Daily MW

LIB 003 LIB 003 WAH 105

Spitzer Spitzer Spitzer

TTh

WAH 105

Breuer

MW F TTh

MOR 108 Bloomstrom MOR 108 Bloomstrom MOR 108 Johnson T

For students who need to review basic math concepts such as whole number, fraction and decimal operations. Appropriate placement test scores.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Discover and explore the art of film. Eight films from various parts of the word will be shown during the quarter with instructor-led discussions following each film.

IEP IEP IEP IEP

SCHEDULE

Study of behavior, personality, self development, and elementary business psychology. Focus on understanding of intrapersonal and interpersonal effectiveness emphasizing communications, motivation, leadership, and personal attitude. Lab fee $5.

7505 7509 7513 7517

ROOM

110A4 110B3 110N3 110CP1

DAYS

H R H R H R H R

CRSE

Intensive English Reading I-IV

Human Relations-Workplace  7440  7441  7443  7442

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

HUMAN RELATIONS

23


CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

GENERAL INFO

24

Second time around makes for a perfect fit in diesel program Raised by his grandparents, Zak Luker had what he likes to call a “different than normal” childhood. Although he excelled as an athlete at W.F. West High School, he didn’t apply himself and certainly didn’t see himself pursuing a college education. After some prodding from his grandparents, especially his grandmother Bonnie Luker, the first to graduate college in his family, Luker agreed to give college a try. He first attended classes in the Centralia College criminal justice program. After a year he realized that criminal justice wasn’t for him, and withdrew. Luker spent the next year working at different deadend jobs, and after more than a little prodding from his grandparents this time, Luker decided to give college one more try, entering the diesel technology program. This time it was a perfect fit. Luker, now in his second year, maintains a nearly 4.0 GPA and is president of the college diesel club. “Criminal justice didn’t fit, and I’ve always liked working on cars, so I thought I’d give the diesel tech program a try,” Luker said. “I couldn’t have made a better choice, the instructors are great, and the hands-on learning of how to work on large diesel engines is a lot of fun.” Though Luker is an excellent student, it’s through the diesel club and the support of its members that he really stands out. The diesel club works on a variety of activities and fundraisers on and off campus. Members are busy year-round raising money for scholarships through firewood raffles, helping with clothing drives for kids, food drives for local food banks, removing invasive species in the Kiser Natural Outdoor Learning Lab at the college, or helping with the foundation’s annual kickoff dinner. Then there’s the popular ‘touch a truck’ event

Zak Luker for school children and the diesel club entry of a semi-truck in the Christmas and tractor parades every year. “I like to keep busy and I get to meet a lot of people when I work in the community,” Luker said. “Growing up here, it’s like helping my family and friends.” Once Luker finishes school he plans to enter the proposed Bachelor of Applied Science in Diesel (BASD) program at Centralia College. If approved, it would be only the fourth program of this kind in the country and the first community college to offer it.

Centralia College offers quality education You may think that students who start at Centralia College, then transfer to a four-year college or university, such as the University of Washington, have problems with the academic rigor at the four-year school. For the most part, that’s not the case. Information provided to Centralia College by the state’s four-year institutions shows that overall grade point average of students who transfer is comparable to, if not better than, the grade point average of those students who start out at the fouryear school. “The data collected since 2005 illustrates that the grade point averages Centralia College graduates earn during their initial quarter at our state’s public baccalaureate institutions is comparable to that earned by direct-entry students. Likewise, our graduates, who go on to receive their baccalaureate degrees, earn grades at the four-year institutions that are

similar to the grade point averages earned by direct-entry graduates,” said T.R. Gratz, Centralia College’s dean of Instruction, Academic Transfer. “Clearly, our graduates are well-prepared for the rigors of academia once they leave here. We have a dedicated faculty who take pride in preparing our transfer students for the next step on their educational journey,” he said. The bottom line: The quality of the first two years of a college education students get at Centralia College is every bit as good as the education at any state four-year institution. And that’s a fact! Students who do start here just don’t spend as much money on tuition. Given that, a case could be made for the possibility that Centralia College transfer students are wiser.


25

GENERAL INFO

CENTRALIA CENTRALIACOLLEGE COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu www.centralia.edu


Pre-Algebra

SCHEDULE

 7538  7539  7540  7541

MATH 096A4 (1-5) 7-8:50am MATH 096B4 (5) 9-9:50am MATH 096C4 (5) 11-11:50am MATH 096D4 (1-5) 1-3:20pm +5 hrs/wk TBA  7542 MATH 096N4 (1-5) 4:30-6:50pm +5 hrs/wk TBA 7543 MATH 096R4 (1-5) 8:30-10:20am 8:30-9:20am 7545 MATH 096S4 (1-5) 4:30-7pm

Daily Daily Daily MW

LIB 003 NSC 215 NSC 211 WAH 105

Spitzer Brosz Ziegler Spitzer

TTh

WAH 105

Breuer

MW F TTh

MOR 108 Bloomstrom MOR 108 Bloomstrom MOR 108 Johnson T

Covers percents, proportions, unit conversions, geometry, simplifying algebraic expressions and solving simple first degree linear equations. Prerequisite: MATH 095 or appropriate test score placement.

Algebra for Statistics  7547

MATH 097A4 (5) 12-12:50pm Daily

NSC 215

Brosz

An algebra course for students intending to enroll in MATH& 146, Introduction to Stats. This course does not meet the algebra prerequisite or other quantitative skills courses or for transfer to the University of Washington. Prerequisite: MATH 096 or Compass score of 78+.

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

8 ONLINE

Algebra I  7548  7549  7550  7551

MATH 098A4 (1-5) 7-8:50am Daily LIB 003 Spitzer MATH 098B4 (5) 12-12:50pm Daily NSC 211 Ziegler MATH 098C4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily NSC 215 Brosz MATH 098D4 (1-5) 1-3:20pm TTh WAH 105 Spitzer +5 hrs/wk TBA  7552 MATH 098N4 (1-5) 4:30-6:50pm MW WAH 105 McLeod A +5 hrs/wk TBA 7553 MATH 098R4 (1-5) 10:30am-12:20pm MW MOR 108 Bloomstrom 10:30-11:20am F MOR 108 Bloomstrom 7554 MATH 098S4 (1-5) 4:30-7pm TTh MOR 108 Johnson T  7555 MATH 098EP1 (5) Online Ziegler For students with good arithmetic skills and familiarity with signed numbers and basic algebraic expressions. Problemsolving skills are emphasized. Topics include: linear equations and inequalities, graphing, polynomials, and rational expressions. Prerequisite: MATH 096.

Algebra II  7556  7557  7558  7559

MATH 099A4 (1-5) 7-8:50am Daily LIB 003 Spitzer MATH 099B4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily NSC 211 Ziegler MATH 099C4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily NSC 215 Brosz MATH 099D4 (1-5) 1-3:20pm TTh WAH 105 Spitzer +5 hrs/wk TBA  7560 MATH 099N4 (1-5) 4:30-6:50pm MW WAH 105 McLeod A +5 hrs/wk TBA 7561 MATH 099R4 (1-5) 10:30am-12:20pm MW MOR 108 Bloomstrom 10:30-11:20am F MOR 108 Bloomstrom 7563 MATH 099S4 (1-5) 4:30-7pm TTh MOR 108 Johnson T  7564 MATH 099EP1 (5) Online Ziegler Introduces the concept of functions, their graphs and properties. Particular attention will be paid to linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 098 or equivalent.

Technical Mathematics I 7565 7566

MATH 100R3 MATH 100S4

(5) 1-2:30pm (5) 4:30-7pm

F TTh

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

26

MOR 108 Bloomstrom MOR 108 Johnson T

Focus is on methods of problem solving for the technical fields. Course develops mathematical vocabulary and skill with algebraic expressions, formula manipulations, graphing techniques, right triangle trigonometry, geometry, exponents, logarithms, and equation/system of equation solving. Prerequisite: MATH 098 or equivalent

Math in Society (M)  7571  7572

MATH& 107A4 (5) 9-9:50am Daily NSC 110 MATH& 107BP1 (5) Online

Staff Falcon

Designed to enhance math proficiency of liberal arts students as they meet personal and professional demands. Includes mathematics in management, statistics, probability, art, and other practical applications in society. Not preparation for calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent.

Industrial Math  7567

MATH 116A4 (5) 8-8:50am

Daily

WAH 109

Falcon

Application of basic mathematical operations to specific workforce programs including common fractions, decimal fractions, percentages, ratio and proportion, practical algebra, and computations involving rectangles and triangles. Emphasizes the use of mathematics in diesel and welding.

Math for Elem Ed 1 (M)  7573

MATH& 131AP1 (5) Online

Tveten

Designed to provide the conceptual framework for teaching mathematics from kindergarten through eighth grade. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent ASSET/COMPASS score.

Pre-Calculus I (M)  7574

MATH& 141A

(5) 8-8:50am

Daily

NSC 204

Carlson C

Study of elementary functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic), systems of equations, matrix algebra, and series and sequences. Modeling and problem solving techniques are emphasized from a graphic, symbolic, and numeric perspective. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent placement.

Pre-Calculus II (M)  7575

7576

MATH& 142A4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily MATH& 142N (5) 4:30-6:50pm TTh

WAH 216 NSC 108

Taylor D Canfield

Graphical, numerical, and symbolic development of the trigonometric functions and their inverses as defined on the unit circle and right trae and right triangles; identities, equations, and applications; complex numbers, polar coordinates, parametric equations, vectors, and conic sections. Prerequisite: MATH& 141 or equivalent placement.

Introduction to Stats (M)  7577  7580 7581  7578

MATH& 146A4 MATH& 146NT3 MATH& 146ST3 MATH& 146BP1

(5) (5) (5) (5)

12-12:50pm Daily NSC 110 5-6:50pm T WAH 216 5-6:50pm T MOR 110 Online

Taylor D Kiekel Kiekel Kostick

Introduction to concepts of data collection, organization and summaries. Develop the fundamental concepts of mean, median and standard deviation, probability, probability distributions, and apply these ideas to hypothesis testing, linear regression and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent.


Taylor D Taylor D

7525 M ST 262A (5) 1-2:50pm 1-1:50pm

TTh MWF

WAH 113 WAH 113

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Television Production

ROOM

MATH& 151A4 (5) 8-8:50am Daily NSC 215 MATH& 151BP1 (5) Online

DAYS

 7582  8107

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Calculus I (M)

Fisher Fisher

Students will write, direct, produce and edit video packages and participate as crew members in producing classmate’s video projects. Lab fee $17.94.

Calculus II (M)

 7583

MATH& 152A4 (5) 9-9:50am

Daily

NSC 107

Carlson C

The second in a four-quarter sequence. Covers the calculus of transcendental functions (exponential, logarithm, inverse circular, hyperbolic), techniques of integration, sequences, series, and power series. Prerequisite: MATH& 151 or equivalent.

Elementary Differential Equations  7569

MATH 212A4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily

NSC 108

Carlson C

Linear ordinary differential equations with emphasis on supporting concepts of differential operators, Wronskians, characteristic polynomials, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous cases, variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients. Solution of IVP by Laplace transforms and power series method. Prerequisite: MATH& 163.

Discrete Mathematics (M) 8115

MATH 228A

(5) 10-10:50am Daily

WAH 103

Taylor D

This class introduces the basic concepts of mathematics that are used in computer science. Topics covered include logic, mathematical induction, combintorics, set theory, relations and functions and descriptive statistics. Prerequisites: MATH& 141 or equivalent.

Calculus IV 7570

MATH 264A

(3) 1-2:20pm

TTh

NSC 110

Taylor D

7526 7527 7528 7529

M ST M ST M ST M ST

271A 272A 273A 274A

(1) (2) (3) (4)

ARR ARR ARR ARR

ARR ARR ARR ARR

WAH 140 WAH 140 WAH 140 WAH 140

Fisher Fisher Fisher Fisher

Practice and perfect your announcing skills on the campus radio station KCED FM. Prerequisite: MST 230, 231 or instructor permission.

TV Broadcasting Internship 7530

M ST 281A

(1) 1-2:50pm

T

WAH 113

Fisher

Designed for students who wish to produce independent video projects outside of the classroom environment. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: MST 260, 261, 262.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT Electrocardiography 8153

AHC 108A

(2) ARR

ARR

WAH 146

Staff

Electrocardiography (ECG), including anatomy of the heart and cardiac cycle, ECG applications and methods for testing in ambulatory care, is the focus of this course. Prerequisite: HLSV 141. Lab fee $10.87.

Medical Assisting Intro 8163

HLSV 140A

(5) 1-5:15pm

MTW

WAH 146

Murray

MEDIA STUDIES

7459 HLSV 143A (6) 1-4:50pm 1-2:50pm

7522

M ST 128A

(1) 2-2:50pm

W

WAH 140

Fisher

Learn and apply the basic skills and knowledge required of today’s baseball announcers. This course will emphasize practical tips, ideas and theories that will help you on your way to becoming a quality baseball announcer.

Studio & Outdoor Lighting for Television & Film 7523 M ST 158A (2) 2-2:50pm ARR

W ARR

WAH 113 WAH 113

Petzold Petzold

Discover the basic principles and techniques of lighting television and film sets in both indoor and outdoor situations.

Introduction to Broadcast News and Production 7524

M ST 220A

(4) 12-12:50pm Daily

WAH 113/140 Fisher

Learn basic media news writing, produce and broadcast news and feature stories on both radio and television. Some media production techniques will be covered during the quarter.

MA Clinical Procedures II

MTWTh WAH 146 F WAH 146

Murray Murray

Surgical setup for clinical/office procedures explored in detail; review of the role of diagnostic imaging, rehabilitation, and nutrition in the interdisciplinary approach of patient care. Prerequisite: HLSV 140, 141, 142, 146. Lab fee $40. Class meets 3/31-5/2.

MA Externship Seminar 8151

HLSV 144A

(1) ARR

ARR

WAH 146

Murray

This class allows the medical assistant extern to explore objectives and challenges in bridging their classroom/lab experiences to the experiences they are encountering in their externships. Prerequisite: HLSV 140, 141, 142, 146.

MA Clinical Externship 8152

HLSV 145A

(6) ARR

ARR

WAH 146

Murray

One hundred eighty unpaid hours of externship in an ambulatory health care setting that allows the medical assistant student to bridge their classroom education and lab training to the real world medical setting. Prerequisite: HLSV 140, 141, 142, 146. Lab fee $15.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Fourth in a four-quarter sequence. Optimization of 2 and 3 variable functions, Lagrange Multipliers, applications and techniques of multiple integration, Green’s Theorem, Stokes Theorem, and line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: MATH& 163 or equivalent.

An introduction to the profession of medical assisting in the ambulatory health care setting. Designed to explore the medical assistant as a valuable member of the health care team. Prerequisite: BTEC 260 with a 2.5 gpa. Lab fee $33. Class meets 5/2-6/9.

Sports Announcing for Baseball

SCHEDULE

The first in a four-quarter sequence. Limits, derivatives of algebraic and some transcendental functions, applications of derivatives, the indefinite integral. Topics covered from numerical, analytical and graphical viewpoints. Prerequisite: MATH& 142 or equivalent.

Radio Broadcasting Internship

27


MUSIC MUSC 100A4 (2) 1:30-2:20pm MW

WAH 125 Woodcock

SCHEDULE

Designed for the student that has not previously had exposure to reading music. The skills acquired can be used to perform, create music, or enter the field. Practice rooms with pianos are available at the college.

Piano II 8120

MUSC 109A

8124

8 ONLINE CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

T

WAH 107

Huffman

MUSC 110A

(1) ARR

ARR

WAH 107

Huffman

Continued piano study for the non-keyboard music major. Includes secondary chords, modulation, sonata, variation form, performance of ensemble pieces, and early intermediate-level repertoire. Prerequisite: MUSC 109 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or instructor permission.

Applied Music I

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

(1) 8-8:50am

Continued piano study for the non-keyboard music major. Emphasizes arpeggios, inversions, seventh chords, modes, pedaling and performance of elementary-level repertoire. Prerequisite: MUSC 108 with a minimum grade of 2.5 or instructor permission.

Piano III

7585 7586 7587 7589 7590 7591

MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC

115A 116A 117A 215A 216A 217A

(1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1)

ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR

ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR

WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107

Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman

Study of specific instrument literature and techniques applied to performance. Required of all music majors. By audition and permission of instructor only.

Dictation III 8121

MUSC 120A

(1) 9-10:50am

T

WAH 107

Huffman

Continues practice of ear training skills required for sight reading and performance of musical literature as well as correct notation through music dictation. Prerequisite: MUSC 132; corequisite: MUSC 133.

Music Theory III 7611

MUSC& 133A

(3) 8-8:50am

MWTh WAH 107

Huffman

A technical study of music, designed for music majors and minors. Emphasis on part-writing, harmonization of melody and harmonic analysis. Required of all music majors. Prerequisite: MUSC& 132 or instructor permission; corequisite: MUSC& 123.

Music of the World (H)(D) 7588

MUSC 139A

(5) 9-9:50am

Daily

WAH 103 Woodcock

A music survey of diversity found in music around the world. Examines music as accompaniment to ceremony and ritual, aid to work and routine, and an expression of universal unchanging human emotions. Prior musical experience is not necessary. Prerequisite: Proficiency in reading, grammar skills.

Music Theory VI 7613

MUSC& 233A

(3) 9-9:50am

MWTh WAH 107

Huffman

A technical study of music of the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on analytical skill for music of this century both tonal and atonal. Music majors must also register simultaneously for the course, MUSC& 223. Prerequisite: MUSC& 232 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUSC& 223.

7592 7593 7594 7595 7596 7597

MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC

244A 245A 246A 247A 248A 249A

(1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1)

ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR

ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR ARR

WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

Performance Ensemble I

Music Reading  7584

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

28

Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman

An ensemble is for the advanced performer (Instrumentalists or Vocalists). Music reading is imperative. Will perform many styles of music. Concert performances will be both on and off campus and/or tour. By audition ONLY.

Vocal Ensemble I

7598 7599 7600 7601 7602 7603

MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC

254A 255A 256A 257A 258A 259A

(2) (2) (2) (2) (2) (2)

12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm

MW MW MW MW MW MW

WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107

Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman

A small vocal ensemble that prepares and performs chamber works, and contemporary vocal literature. Placement is by audition only. Auditions will take place during the first scheduled class.

Instrumental Improvisation I

7604 7605 7606 7607 7608 7609

MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC

281A 282A 283A 284A 285A 286A

(2) (2) (2) (2) (2) (2)

12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm 12-1:20pm

TTh TTh TTh TTh TTh TTh

WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107 WAH 107

Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman Huffman

An historical study of improvisation in instrumental styles: Dixieland, jazz, and contemporary popular music. Course will involve stylistic and chordal analysis as well as performance on the students major instrument. Lab fee $17.50.

NURSING Common Alterations II  7614  7615

NURS 103A4 (12) ARR NURS 103B4 (12) ARR

Daily Daily

NSC 202 NSC 202

Hinderlie Hill

Progressive competencies reflecting program themes are applied to surgical, neurologic, musculoskeletal, renal, and gastrointestinal nursing care. On-campus theory and skills labs and off-campus acute care clinical experiences are provided. Prerequisite: NURS 101, 102 or equivalent. Lab fee $48.47.

Complex Management  7617  7618

NURS 203A4 (8) ARR NURS 203B4 (8) ARR

Daily Daily

NSC 213 Fritz NSC 213 Ormrod/Sullivan

Progressive competencies reflecting program themes are applied to the care of clients with complex alterations in health. Community-based and acute care inpatient clinical opportunities are provided at regional facilities. Prerequisite: NURS 201 and 202 or equivalent. Lab fee $55.23.

Transition to Practice  7621  7622

NURS 222A4 (4) ARR NURS 222B4 (4) ARR

Daily Daily

NSC 213 Hill NSC 213 Ormrod/Hill

Preceptor-guided experiences in community health care organizations are provided. Community-based and personal professional development projects are assigned. Prerequisite: NURS 201 and 202 or equivalent; corequisite: NURS 203. Lab fee $46.95.


Intro to Healthcare  8166

HLSV 121R

(2) 1-2:20pm

MW

MOR 108

Jones

HLSV 131B (9) 8am-12pm MTWTh TEC 115 HLSV 131LB (0) 5:45am-12pm Daily SCC HLSV 131LC (0) 5:45am-12pm MTWTh SCC HLSV 131NA (9) 5-9pm Daily TEC 115 HLSV 131LN (0) 4-10pm Daily SCC HLSV 131LNB (0) 4-10pm MTWTh SCC

Holifield Holifield Holifield Speer Speer Speer

Awareness of the role of the nursing assistant in nursing care and skill development. Topics: maintain a safe environment, provide restorative care, communication, and practice basic concepts of care. Background check is required for clinical. Lab fee $194.58. Section B meets 3/31-5/20; section LB meets 5/21-3/30; section LC meets 6/2-6/11; section NA meets 3/31-5/20; section LN meets 5/21-5/30; section LNB meets 6/2-6/11.

Nurse Delegation 7454

HLSV 132A

(2) 12-5pm

MTWTh TEC 115

Speer

Class is for Washington State caregivers who work in or will work in specific community-based long-term care settings. Course covers: medication administration, diabetes care, roles and laws pertaining to delegation and hands-on skills practice. Prerequisite: NAC Certification or co-enrollment in NAC. Lab fee $36.52. Class meets 5/6-5/14.

Mental Health 7455

HLSV 133A

(1) 12-5pm

TW

TEC 115

Speer

Dementia 7457

HLSV 134A

(1) 12-5pm

ThF

TEC 115

Speer

Learn how a caregiver, in a generalized residential setting, can work effectively with a person who has memory impairments. Prerequisite: NAC certification or currently enrolled in NAC course. Lab fee $30. Class meets 4/17-18.

NUTRITION Nutrition (S)  7623  7624

NUTR& 101A4 (5) 12-12:50pm Daily NSC 107 NUTR& 101BP1 (5) Online

Priday Priday

An exploration of the six basic nutrients with diet planning principles, human metabolism, weight control and digestion also being studied. Some chemistry or biology background is helpful. Prerequisite: prior knowledge of chemistry or biology would be helpful.

 7625

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

OCEA& 101AP1 (5) Online

Corliss

Explore the physical, geological, chemical and biological characteristics of the ocean: waves and tides, ocean and atmosphere circulation, coastal features and beach processes, ocean basins, sediments, ocean chemistry, and physics, plate tectonics, and marine life.

PHILOSOPHY Intro to Philosophy (H)  7651

PHIL& 101AP1 (5) Online

Diamant

Investigate the assumptions philosophers have made about reality, knowledge, truth, God, morality, social construction, freedom, and paternalism.

Introduction to Ethics (H)  7650

PHIL 103A3 (5) 12-2:20pm

TTh

WAH 216

Diamant

Focus on choices made in concrete circumstances. Study traditional ethical theories and present-day moral dilemmas.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Fitness (HF) 7626 7627  7628

P E P E P E

110A 110N 110R

(1) 11-11:50am TTh (1) 5-5:50pm TTh (1) 4-4:50pm MW

HWC 125 HWC 125 MOR 108

Oien Sanchez Staff

Study all five areas of fitness: aerobic endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Students work at their own fitness levels. Lab fee $3.10.

Volleyball 7629

P E

115A

(1) 12-12:50pm TTh

HWC 103

Ewings

This course will cover the fundamental skills and techniques of beginning volleyball. Includes basic rules, scoring and strategy. Lab fee $3.10.

Lifestyle Management and Exercise (HF)  7630

P E

120A3 (2) 9-9:50am

MWF

HWC 125

Sanchez

Designed to assist individual in making life style changes associated with health and fitness. Lab fee $3.10.

Basic Weight Training/Conditioning (HF) 7631 8125

P E P E

123A 123B

(1) 10-10:50am TTh (1) 6-6:50pm TTh

HWC 125 HWC 125

Oien Sanchez

Designed to condition the musculature of the body using machine and free weights. Lab fee $3.10.

Free Weights (HF) 8137

P E

125A

(1) 9-9:50am

TTh

HWC 130

Sanchez

Designed to develop muscle fitness through lifting free weights, Olympic lifts, plyometrics and power lifting. Students need prior weight training experience. Lab fee $3.10.

Baseball Application I 7633

P E

131A

(3) ARR

ARR

HWC 103

Skinner

Learn the techniques and strategies in a practice or game situation with an emphasis on fundamentals, conditioning, team concept and sportsmanship. Lab fee $18.75.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Learn how a caregiver, in a generalized residential setting, can work effectively with a person who has a major mental disorder. Prerequisite: NAC certification or currently enrolled in NAC course. Lab fee $30. Class meets 4/15-16.

Intro to Oceanography (S)

SCHEDULE

Nursing Assistant Certification 7448 7450 7451 7449 7452 7453

CRSE

OCEANOGRAPHY

The complexity of health care, health care provider certifications and team concepts will be introduced. Professionalism, safe patient handling, physical/emotional changes with aging, and specific infection control issues for all care givers will be explored.

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

NURSING ASSISTANT

29


Boot Camp Basics (HF) 7634

P E

140A

(1) 10-10:50am MW

HWC 200 Johnson C

A high-impact exercise class designed to improve muscle strength, endurance, flexibility and aerobic capacity. Lab fee $3.10.

Cardio Combo (HF)

SCHEDULE

7635

P E

142A

(1) 10-10:50am TTh

HWC 103

Sanchez

A combination of cardio experiences to improve cardiovascular endurance, body composition, muscle fitness and flexibility. A variety of movements will be explored, including step aerobics, kickboxing, Drums Alive, Zumba, and circuits and weights. Lab fee $3.10.

Yoga (HF) 7636

P E

150A

(1) 10-10:50am TTh

HWC 200

Schnabl

An exercise class integrating components of flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and relaxation. Students will be encouraged to work at their own level of fitness. Lab fee $3.10.

Pilates/Core (HF) 7638

P E

152A

(1) 11-11:50am MW

HWC 200 Johnson C

An exercise class designed to teach breathing with movement, body mechanics, balance, coordination, spatial awareness, strength and flexibility. Lab fee $3.10.

Tai Chi Basics (HF)

153A

(1) 8-8:50am

MW

HWC 200

Barr

Develop balance, coordination, agility, spatial awareness, strength, and flexibility through the Korean art of Tae Kwon Do. Students will work at their own level of fitness. Lab fee $3.10.

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

8 ONLINE

P E

Develop balance, lower-body strength and relaxation in motion with Wu Style Tai Chi. Students will work at their own level of fitness. Lab fee $3.10.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

7639

Beginning Tae Kwon Do (HF) 7640

P E

158N

(2) 6-8pm

Intermediate Tae Kwon Do 7641

P E

159N

(2) 6-8pm

MW

MW

HWC 200

HWC 200

Grove

Grove

Further development of the techniques, forms, the sport, and selfdefense aspects required to advance to blue belt in the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do. Lab fee $3.10.

Advanced Tae Kwon Do 7642

P E

160N

(2) 6-8pm

MW

HWC 200

Grove

Further development of the techniques, forms, the sport, and selfdefense aspects required to advance to blue and orange belt in the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do. Lab fee $3.10.

Softball Applications I 7643

P E

165A

(3) ARR

ARR

HWC 103

Bajo

Advanced Physical Fitness (HF)  7645

P E

210R

(1) 4-4:50pm

MW

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

30

MOR 108

Staff

Designed to continue the individual’s personal health-related physical fitness - cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition and flexibility. Students will be encouraged to work at their own level of fitness. Prerequisite: PE 110 or instructor permission. Lab fee $3.10.

Advanced Volleyball 7646

P E

215A

(1) 12-12:50pm TTh

HWC 103

Ewings

Advanced techniques and skills included in competitive volleyball. Advanced offensive and defensive tactics and strategy will be covered. Prerequisite: PE 115 or instructor permission. Lab fee $3.10.

Physical Fitness Concepts (HF)  7647

P E

229A3 (3) 12-12:50pm MWF

HWC 115 Johnson C

A combination of theory and practice in the development of physical fitness. Two lecture hours and two activity hours per week. Lab fee $3.10.

Baseball Application II 7648

P E

231A

(3) ARR

ARR

HWC 103

Skinner

Learn advanced techniques and strategies in a practice or game situation with an advanced emphasis on fundamentals, conditioning, team concept and sportsmanship. Prerequisite: PE 131 or instructor permission. Lab fee $18.75

Softball Applications II 7649

P E

265A

(3) ARR

ARR

HWC 103

Bajo

Learn how to apply the advanced techniques of softball in gamelike situations. Prerequisite: PE 165 or instructor permission. Lab fee $3.10.

PHYSICS Engineering Physics III (S) 7652 7653

PHYS& 223A PHYS& 223LA

(5) 8-8:50am (0) 1-3:50pm

MTWTh NSC 108 Threapleton M NSC 106 Threapleton

Optics modern physics, electricity and magnetism. Includes geometrical and physical optics, Maxwell’s equations, AC/DC circuits and special relativity. Prerequisite: PHYS& 222 and MATH& 153. Lab fee $18.46.

POLITICAL SCIENCE American Government (SS) 7654

POLS& 202A

(5) 9-9:50am

Daily

NSC 204

Peterson J

Students will examine the American political structure and its ideological roots. We will explore how the structure is organized and how it operates.

Learn how to apply the fundamentals of softball in game like situations. Lab fee $3.10.

Comparative Governments (SS)(D)

Lifetime Fitness (HF)

Examine political theory and application within a comparative framework: ideology, nature of participation, as well as a variety of governmental structures, and functions. Contemporary situations will provide the cases for example and analysis.

 7644  8118

P E P E

168A (2) 10-10:50am MW 168B3 (2) 10-10:50am F

HWC 115 HWC 115

Sanchez Johnson

Cardiovascular endurance, muscle fitness, weight management and flexibility will be studied. One lecture hour and two hours of activity per week. Lab fee $3.10.

 7655

POLS& 204AP1 (5) Online

Austin K

This list of classes offered is correct on the date of publication. For the most current class information and list of classes offered, see Updated Class Schedules at www.centralia.edu.


8106

POLS 220A

(5) 1-3:20pm

TTh

NSC 204

Peterson

An introduction to terrorism in contemporary society, focusing on the underlying political, social, economic, cultural and religious causes, its use as a political tool and measures to be taken to counter and prevent its use.

PSYCHOLOGY

Technical Reading 7675 7676

READ 100A READ 100N

(3) 11-11:50am Daily (3) 5-7:20pm MW

Speed Reading

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior: history, research methods, biology of behavior, lifespan development, sensation and perception, learning, memory, intelligence, motivation, emotion, personality, psychological disorders and therapies, and social psychology.

SCIENCE

Lifespan Psychology (SS)  7667  7669  7668

PSYC& 200AT4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily WAH 216 Neal PSYC& 200RT4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily MOR 110 Neal PSYC& 200BP1 (5) Online MacNamara

Human development from conception to death. Basic concepts and principles of biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development are integrated for each age period. Typical developmental tasks as well as problems are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 or instructor permission.

Introduction to Personality  7663

PSYC 210A4 (5) 12-2:20pm

TTh

WAH 103 MacNamara

Introduction to study of personality, including major theories, with a focus on basic principles of psychology and their application to personality development, personal growth and psychological adjustment. Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 or instructor permission.

Independent Study 7670

READ 096N

Specific Reading Skill Development 7671

READ 097N

MW

NSC 111

Shriver

(1-3) 5-7:20pm

MW

NSC 111

Shriver

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to improve their reading specifically identified areas of need. Comprehension building, word attack skills, and content area reading are a few of the specific areas that can be targeted by this class.

Improvement of Reading 7672 7673  7674

READ 099A READ 099N READ 099S4

 7678

(1-5) 11-11:50am Daily (1-5) 5-7:20pm MW (1-5) 4:30-7pm TTh

WAH 103 Shriver NSC 111 Shriver MOR 108 Johnson T

Students strengthen thinking, reading comprehension, and vocabulary skills in learning to read and study textbooks, writing summaries, note taking, and test taking. Completion of course satisfies the basic skill deficiency in reading. Prerequisite: ASSET placement (reading) 33-41.

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

Shriver

SCIE 104AP1 (5) Online

Brown D

Study the basic concepts of physical science, learn to apply the scientific method to problem solving and popular science, and apply the scientific methods to a project.

Weather and Climate (S)  7679

7681 7682  7680

SCIE SCIE SCIE SCIE

115A4 115LA 115LB 115AP1

(5) (0) (0) (5)

9-9:50am MTWTh NSC 101 1-2:50pm Th NSC 105 3-4:50pm Th NSC 105 Online

Pringle Pringle Pringle Brown D

Study of Earth’s atmosphere, atmospheric processes, weather, climate, and climate history. Experience will be provided in weather map interpretation, use of instruments, forecasting, interpretation of past climate conditions, and hands-on dendrochronology. Prerequisite: MATH 098 or equivalent. Explore topics in meteorology through problem solving, and laboratory or home exercises. Lab fee $27.22.

SOCIOLOGY  7697

(1-5) 5-7:20pm

ARR

Intro to Physical Science (S)

Intro to Sociology (SS)

Individualized instruction for the student whose needs are not currently being met by the available course offerings. Specialized curriculum and instruction are developed to meet each student’s needs. Permission of instructor only.

ARR

Self-paced course for students wishing to increase reading rate and comprehension using proper eye movements, improved vocabulary, and correct reading methods based on reading material. Prerequisite: college level reading and vocabulary skills.

7698 7699  7700

SOC& SOC& SOC& SOC&

101A4 101B 101C 101DP1

(5) (5) (5) (5)

8-8:50am Daily NSC 211 9-9:50am Daily KMP 104 11-11:50am Daily KMP 104 Online

Coffman White White Medlin

Study of society and human interaction. Topics include social ranking, change, deviance, social control, the creation of thought and personality, groups, institutions, political and economic power, social movements, and how to gather valid sociological information.

Cooperative Work Experience 8123

SOC 190A (1-12) ARR

ARR

ARR

White

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading.

Social Problems (SS) 7701

SOC& 201A

(5) 10-10:50am Daily

NSC 208 van Alstyne

Investigate societal problems and how we view social conditions as social problems. Topics include technology, environment, population, economy, class, race/ethnic relations, sexism, ageism, education, cities, deviance, crime, mental and physical health.

Cultural & Ethnic Pluralism in Contemporary Society (SS)(D)  7696

SOC 225AP1 (5) Online

Medlin

Examine ethnicity, ethnic identity, and cultural characteristics of ethnic and social groups in North America and around the world. Understand the relationship between social organization and forms of social, economic, and political domination and subordination.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

READING

Shriver Shriver

SCHEDULE

7677 READ 110N (3) 5-7:20pm

PSYC& 100B4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily NSC 107 MacNamara PSYC& 100C4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily WAH 105 Neal PSYC& 100AP1 (5) Online MacNamara

WAH 103 NSC 111

Designed to teach discipline-specific reading strategies useful to students in both vocational and academic areas. It will also teach awareness of academic though processes and present skills to enhance that thinking process.

General Psychology (SS)  7665  7666  7664

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

International Terrorism

31


SCHEDULE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

Spanish II (H)

Students identify their interests, skills and abilities and evaluate their personality styles, values and work environments as they relate to careers. Activities include interest inventory test, computer programs, job market research and informational interviewing. The format is lecture, discussion, group activities and individual projects. Lab fee $17.94.

 7684

SPAN& 122A4

(5) 1-1:50pm

Daily

NSC 210

Gorecki

Spanish III (H)  7703  7704  7705

SPAN& 123A4 (5) 8-8:50am Daily SPAN& 123B4 (5) 10-10:50am Daily SPAN& 123NT4 (5) 6-8:20pm MW

NSC 210 NSC 210 NSC 210

Gorecki Gorecki Martinez

Learn the fundamental skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Develop an awareness of Spanish speaking countries and their cultures. CD’s are used outside of class to promote oral proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN& 122 or instructor permission.

Spanish VI  8105

SPAN& 223A4 (5) 11-11:50am Daily

NSC 204

Martinez

Discuss Hispanic cultures in Spanish, develop oral and written skills, review and expand essential points of grammar, and build vocabulary. Prerequisite: SPAN& 222 or instructor permission.

SPEECH

Fundamentals of Public Speaking (H) 7707

8 ONLINE

#SEC

Career Planning

Learn the fundamental skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Develop an awareness of Spanish speaking countries and their cultures. CD’s are used outside of class to promote oral proficiency. Prerequisite: SPAN& 121 or instructor permission.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE EAST |

CRSE

SPANISH  7702

DAY | NIGHT | V VIDEO |

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

32

SPEE 101A

(3) 10-10:50am MWF

WAH 115

Fisher

A course focusing on development, preparation, and delivery skills for beginning public speakers. Attention given to anxiety reduction techniques in addition to the preparation and use of visual aids in informative and persuasive speeches.

Principles of Speech Communication (H)  7708  7709  7710  7711

SPEE SPEE SPEE SPEE

110A4 110B4 110C4 110D4

(5) (5) (5) (5)

9-9:50am 8-8:50am 11-11:50am 12-12:50pm

Daily Daily Daily Daily

NSC 109 McQuarrie NSC 109 McQuarrie NSC 206 McQuarrie NSC 109 Tyrrell

Introduction to principles of human communication emphasizing interpersonal/intercultural relationships, group process, and problem-solving skills; designing, preparing, and delivering effective informative and persuasive speeches; reducing anxiety; and preparing and using visual aids.

Theory and Practice of Public Speaking (H)  7712

SPEE 220AP1 (5) Online

McQuarrie

Development, preparation, and delivery skills needed for a variety of public speaking events plus visual aids utilization. Ethics of public speaking are examined and applied. Study of classic speeches provides historical framework.

Study Skills 7683

SDEV 099N

(1-5) 5-7:20pm

MW

Mercer

WELDING Industrial Drafting 7713 7714

WELD 126A WELD 126B

(2) 9-10:50am (2) 1-2:50pm

MW TTh

TEC 155 TEC 155

Kristenson Cotton

Basic concepts in developing working drawings for use in industry. Emphasis is on the use of freehand sketching and drawing instruments to produce drawings of three-dimensional objects. Also included is basic dimensioning and pictorial drawing.

Welding Theory for Mechanics  7715

WELD 151A4 (2) 11-11:50am TTh

TEC 105

Fay J

Introduction to principles of gas and arc welding and cutting processes. Includes information in welding equipment and material, various welding techniques and proper safety procedures. Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in WELD 152 or instructor permission.

Welding Procedures for Mechanics 7716

WELD 152A

(3) 8-11am

TTh

TEC 103

Fay J

Practical application of welding and cutting techniques using oxyacetylene and electric arc welding equipment. Metal preparation, layout, and weldment testings included. Concurrent enrollment in WELD 151 required. Lab fee $73.78.

M.I.G. Welding Theory 7717 7718

WELD 164A WELD 164B

(4) 10-11:20am MWF (4) 8:30-10:20am TTh

TEC 105 TEC 105

Cotton Kristenson

Theory related to gas metal-arc welding (GMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW); process and shop safety; machine setup, operation and troubleshooting; welding procedures and techniques; filler electrode selection and AWS weld testing.

Gas Shielded Arc Welding Lab 7719 7720

WELD 165A WELD 165B

(6) 12-2:50pm MWF (6) 11am-2:50pm TTh

TEC 103 TEC 103

Cotton Kristenson

Welding lab consists of GMAW and FCAW gas shielded arc welding instruction, practices and procedures on butt, lap, tee, and corner joints in all positions on steel. Also includes GMAW with aluminum. Lab fee $143.09.

Oxyacetylene and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding 7721

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

SDEV 105AP1 (2) Online

WELD 180N

(5) 5-8:50pm

TTh

TEC 103

Cotton

Safety, setup, brazing, cutting, and welding in all positions using oxyacetylene and gas tungsten arc welding equipment. Lab fee $73.78.

NSC 111

Shriver

Students learn essential skills needed for effective study. Course includes learning style assessment, time management, study reading, memory techniques, test-taking strategies, and research techniques.

Shielded Metal Arc Welding 7722 WELD 181N

(5) 5-8:50pm

TTh

TEC 103

Cotton

Safety, setup, and welding in all positions using AC/DC arc welding equipment. Lab fee $73.78.

Gas Metal Arc Welding 7723

WELD 182N

(5) 5-8:50pm

TTh

TEC 103

Cotton

Safety, setup, and welding in all positions using gas metal arc welding equipment. Lab fee $73.78.


7724

WELD 190A (1-12) ARR

ARR

TEC 105

Driscoll

See description under Cooperative Work Experience heading.

Advanced Fabrication and Welding Theory 7725

WELD 269A

(4) 12-12:50pm MWF

TEC 105

Driscoll

7726

WELD 270A

(6) 9-11:50am

MWF

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

Advanced Fabrication and Welding Procedure Lab

TEC 103

Driscoll

Fabrication and fitting tools, setup, and procedures. Butt and tee joint will be required in the flat position using various welding processes. Students will have the opportunity to work on individual projects. Prerequisite: WELD 268 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: WELD 269. Lab fee $73.78.

Arc Welding Certification 7727

WELD 285N

(5) 5-8:50pm

TTh

TEC 103

Cotton

Practical exercises enable students to prepare for the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) certification tests in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). Prerequisite: prior welding experience required. Lab fee $73.78.

English faculty member named Teacher of Excellence Award honoree

Daytime child care available

Child care will be available during spring quarter, which begins Monday, March 31. Slots for children, including infants, will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

The college’s Child Development Center accepts children ranging in age from one month to five years. The center accepts all children (until all slots are filled), including those whose parents are not college students.

“I was surprised and honored to receive this award,” Foss said. “When a student excels it affirms that your work makes a difference.” Foss began teaching at Centralia College in 1993. She is currently expanding her role to include teaching Webbased workshops and educational resources to faculty. “I didn’t want to teach anywhere but at the community college level,” Foss said. “Like many, I began my education later in life, and whenever you are ready to show up, Linda Foss community colleges are ready for you.” During spring quarter the facility will be open Mondays through Fridays, from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., during quarter break, and will be closed on holidays and weekends. There is a special rate for the children of enrolled Centralia College students. There is no evening child care program. Please call the Child Development Center to reserve your child’s place in the program or to get additional information. The phone number is 360.736.9391, ext. 462. Slots will not be reserved until the front office has received a copy of the paid child care deposit receipt.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Linda Foss, Centralia College English professor, is the recipient of The Evergreen State College 2013 Teacher of Excellence Award. The honor is given each year to teachers who have made an impact on a student’s life. This is the second consecutive year that Foss has received this award. Edward Riley, a 2013 Centralia College graduate who is currently attending The Evergreen State College and working in the Centralia College Office of College Relations, nominated her for the award. He attributes the support and mentoring he received from Foss as one of the reasons for his success as a student and in life. “Linda Foss continues to have a profound influence in my life and academic career,” Riley said. “She supports and encourages me, and then challenges me as a student.” In addition to her role as an English professor, Foss is chair of the English Department and writing center coordinator at the college.

SCHEDULE

Fabrication and fitting tools, setup and procedures. Correct steps to follow when designing, cost estimating, and planning a large scale welding project. Blueprint interpretation and the completion of scale drawing will also be required. Prerequisite: WELD 267 or permission of instructor.

TITLE CODE

INSTRUCTOR

ROOM

DAYS

TIME

CR

#SEC

CRSE

TITLE CODE

Cooperative Work Experience

33


CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

GENERAL INFO

34

Centralia College duo named All-Washington team scholars Kristina Lawley, an All-Washington Team scholar, plans to become a Registered Nurse. Her first-born daughter, Abigail, passed away after only five days of life and that lifechanging event is driving her. “The nurses and respiratory therapists (during her daughter’s hospitalization) were amazing, never taking us out of the care loop for our daughter,” Lawley said. Now, I feel it’s time to give back to other Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) families and their babies.” Her goal is to obtain her RN degree then her master’s in nursing and be in position to provide “the best care that I can to families and their loved ones.” Lawley will finish her associate degree at South Puget Sound Community College. She will then transfer to Pacific Lutheran University to work toward her bachelor’s in nursing. As if nursing studies were not enough to occupy her time, Lawley, 34, stays Kristina Lawley active as a wife and mother of three- and four-year old daughters. She is a Certified Nursing Assistant and was a primary care provider for an elderly individual and now helps care for up to 10 residents at the Mother Joseph Care Center in Olympia. “There is a tremendous need in providing care here and I love working in this environment,” Lawley said. While a student at Centralia College, she joined Phi Theta Kappa, the two-year college honor society, and served as a tutor in the writing center. Lawley took a roundabout journey to college. She was born into a military family, lived in Germany, South Carolina, and Victory, Texas, where she graduated high school. While visiting her uncle, who lived in California, she fell in love with the West Coast. She told herself she wasn’t ready for college. She moved to the Olympia/Lacey area and worked as a veterinarian tech for several years before she joined the army in 2004 and became a signal support specialist and met the

soldier who would become her husband. Not too much later she was discharged from the army while her husband continued his military career. The couple relocated to Rochester where Lawley began to entertain notions of a college education and a career as a nurse. She felt she had a debt to repay. “A friend told me about Centralia College so I visited the campus and loved it. It’s an intimate campus, easy to find everything. Everyone was so friendly, that really drew me in,” Lawley said. Although new to the campus, she wasn’t treated as a stranger. She was also impressed with the help she received from her advisor, Dale Carroll. “She was always there for me, very helpful and always willing to listen and I mean really listen. That was very important to me,” Lawley said. “She took the time needed to explain what I needed to know and to answer my questions.” Centralia College proved to Raegan Nelson be an important place for Lawley as she moves toward her career goal in nursing. “This is really a good school with really helpful people,” Lawley said. “There’s a lot of diversity among the students and the teachers are willing to listen to all points of view. I appreciate that.” Raegan Nelson, the second All-Washington team member representing Centralia College, knows what it means to lead a busy life. She is a Running Start student carrying a 3.97 GPA, and is majoring in cellular/molecular biology. She is the starting point guard and a team captain on her high school varsity basketball team, runs varsity track in the spring, works on the college campus as a biology lab aide, she organized and leads a Centralia College chemistry study group, and has evolved her role into that of a mentor. She is

Raegan's story is continued on page 45


p i h s r a l o h S c e c i pi e n t s R

35

Ty Lorton

igh!

alia H r t n e C Lauren Wiley

Marisa Peterson

gh!

i Toledo H

Marisa is a talented musician who has a clear career goal: She wants to teach and direct choir and band at the high school level. Her plans include a quality education at Centralia College. She chose Centralia College because she really likes the campus and because she earned a scholarship to attend here. “I knew this was where I wanted to start my education.” Centralia College is helping her ease into college life, a first step before heading off to a four-year college to complete her degree. Her Centralia College Foundation scholarship is making a difference. “The scholarship is allowing me to put more time into my studies and gives me more time to practice my instruments,” she said. “I applied online and it was a very easy process.”

Jace Peterson

est!

W.F. W

2013 WF West grad Jace Peterson is focusing on his zoology studies but is undecided about a career choice. He does plan to move on to a four-year college after completing his studies at Centralia College. His impressions are “far better than the ones my friends are having at large universities! They complain about large class sizes and teachers that aren’t approachable. I love the small class sizes here at Centralia College. Teachers are real approachable. “Attending Centralia College is making it possible for me to take care of all my prereqs while saving me thousands of dollars.” He applied for the Centralia College Foundation scholarship to help cover the cost of his education. He said he is able to save even more money by living at home. These facts will make a tremendous difference when moving on after Centralia College. “I have been pleasantly surprised at the education here at Centralia College. I am learning what my buddy at the UW is learning and I’m doing it for much less,” said Jace.

It's not too late to apply for a Centralia College Foundation 2014-15 scholarship. The deadline is March 1, 2014. It's totally online, easy and could mean support for your education.

Visit: http://www.centralia.edu/admissions/finaid/ scholarships.html

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Lauren earned her RN degree in 2013 at Centralia College and is now attending Calvary Chapel Bible College in California. She will eventually couple her nursing education with her call to go into a medical ministry. Her college education began at Centralia College where she received a boost from a foundation scholarship. “My scholarship helped me focus more on school and took some of the stress off of my family. Nursing school is hard and time consuming so the scholarship really helped alleviate some of that stress,” she said. “The application process was easy. Some scholarships take so much time and this one was more doable.“ She loved her time at Centralia College. “This is a learner-friendly environment and I felt very supported by staff who work here. Their goal and focus was to help me get the best education possible.”

Ty has set his sights high. He plans to transfer to Central Washington University to study to become a commercial pilot. He will leave Centralia College with his Associate in Arts and an Associate in Biology, an indication of his ambition. He is bright enough to have been able to enroll at just about any college of his choice. He chose Centralia College and is convinced it was the right decision. “The campus is really nice. Dr. (Steve) Norton (professor of biology) is one of the smartest men I’ve ever met. The rest of the staff and instructors are so friendly. “I was valedictorian from Napavine in 2012 and Centralia College offers scholarships to local valedictorians. Having these two years of college paid for is more helpful than you can imagine.” The application process is all online and very straightforward. Ty recommends students apply. “You never know what will happen unless you apply. Centralia College is a great college. One of the best and they prove it.”

GENERAL INFO

alia rmer Centr a College fo r o t n e few curr Centrali stories of a ve benefited from a 200 students e th re a e s n a a h Th e they would dents who ear, more th College stun scholarship. This y f them didn’t realize d word that Foundatio scholarship. Many o applied and receive ip. received a an award until they ed them a scholarsh qualify for work in school earn their hard

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36

WHAT DO I DO AFTER REGISTRATION?

Go to cconline.centralia.edu to access instructions on how to login to ANGEL.

eLEARNING

If you are unable to attend regularly scheduled classes on campus, an eLearning course may be a way for you to earn college credits. For the latest information check centralia.edu/elearning

eCORRESPONDENCE COURSES

eCorrespondence courses allow you to complete coursework on a self-paced schedule. There are no due dates for assignments. You have until the end of the quarter following registration to complete an eCorrespondence course. If you’re receiving Financial Aid, be sure to ask about a 2nd quarter. You can register up until the 35th class day. All of your course material will be available online, and you’ll turn in your homework online as well.

eCORRESPONDENCE AND ONLINE FEE INFORMATION

A fee of $4 per student enrolled in at least one online or eCorrespondence class will be applicable. Additionally, a $2 per credit fee will also be applied.

ONLINE CLASSES

Online courses are dynamic and interactive classrooms where you can login any time, day or night. You will have the flexibility of working in your classroom when it’s convenient for you, but there are assignments, schedules and due dates. Plan on logging in regularly to interact with the instructor and other students.

SECTION CODES

Class sections that include numbers indicate online components are part of the class.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

1 = Class is fully online (An interactive virtual classroom is used to communicate with faculty and other students. There are assignments, schedules and due dates.) 2 = Class is eCorrespondence (Self-paced, no scheduled due dates for assignments. Students can enroll up until the 35th class day. All course material is online.) 3 = Class is hybrid (A portion of seat time is replaced with online interaction.) 4 = Class is web-enhanced (100% face-to-face, some files, resources or activities are online.)

8

For the latest information, check centralia.edu/elearning

Bookstore offers ISBN for college books, gifts and a whole lot more! • No lines • No hassles • No waiting And a wide range of Blazer apparel

The Centralia College Bookstore offers more than textbooks for all classes, Blazer apparel and gifts, class materials, and supplies. Now you can use the posted ISBN number to find your textbooks online to shop around for the best price. This service assures you that no matter where you buy your textbook, as long as you shop using the same ISBN, you will know the required book for each class. Visit the Bookstore at: www.centraliabookstore.com.


37

Classrooms open starting on ....................................March 24 Instruction begins .........................................................March 31 Instruction ends ................................................................ June 13 Credit 1 5 5 5 1 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 5 5 5

Classrooms open starting on ....................................March 20 Instruction begins .........................................................March 27 Instruction ends ...................................................................June 4 Code Crse 8 8126 ECED& 8 7368 ECED& 8 8130 ECED& 8 8131 ECED& 8 8132 ECED& 8 7521 LIBR

Sec 100 107 132 134 139 180

Title AW1 CHILD CARE BASICS AW1 HEALTH/NUTRITION/SAFETY AW1 INFANTS/TODDLERS CARE AW1 FAMILY CHILD CARE AW1 ADMIN EARLY LRNG PROG AW1 RESEARCH IN THE 21ST CEN

CENTRALIA COLLEGE eCORRESPONDENCE COURSES Code 7247 7250

Crse BTEC BTEC

Sec 240 260

Title X2 LEGAL TERMINOLOGY X2 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

Credit 3 5 3 3 3 5

Credit 3 4

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Code Course Section Title 8 160AP1 RECORDS CONFIDENT -HIPAA 7151 AHC 8 CULTURAL & ETHNIC PLURAL 7152 ANTH 225AP1 8 7174 ASTR 127AP1 THE SOLAR SYSTEM & THE U 8 110AP1 BUSINESS ENGLISH 7214 BTEC 8 7218 BTEC 191AP1 WORK EXPERIENCE SEMINAR 8 210AP1 WORD I 7225 BTEC 8 7228 BTEC 214AP1 EXCEL I 8 BUSINESS LAW 8150 BUS& 201BP1 8 7274 CFS 132AP1 POSITIVE PARENTING III 8 142AP1 POSITIVE PARENTING VI 7290 CFS 8 7300 CFS 152AP1 POSITIVE PARENTING IX 8 101AP1 INTRO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 7332 CJ& 8 7325 CJ 109BP1 COMMUNITY POLICING 8 8147 CJ& 240AP1 INTRO FORENSIC SCIENCE 8 MICRO ECONOMICS 8134 ECON& 201BP1 8 8127 EDUC& 130AW1 GUIDING BEHAVIOR 8 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 7417 ENGL& 101FP1 8 7426 ENGL& 102HP1 COMPOSITION II 8 WOMEN'S LITERATURE 8138 ENGL 160AP1 8 7442 H R 110CP1 HUMAN RELATIONS-WORKPLAC 8 210AP1 HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT 7444 H R 8 7446 HIST& 147AP1 US HISTORY II 8 HEALTH & WELLNESS 7461 HLTH 130AP1 8 7465 HLTH 145CP1 SAFETY & FITNESS 8 INTRO TO MASS MEDIA 7520 JOUR 160BP1 8 7555 MATH 098EP1 ALGEBRA I 8 7564 MATH 099EP1 ALGEBRA II 8 MATH IN SOCIETY 7572 MATH& 107BP1 8 7573 MATH& 131AP1 MATH FOR ELEM EDUC 1 8 INTRODUCTION TO STATS* 7578 MATH& 146BP1 8 8107 MATH& 151BP1 CALCULUS I 8 7624 NUTR& 101BP1 NUTRITION 8 INTRO TO OCEANOGRAPHY 7625 OCEA& 101AP1 8 INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY 7651 PHIL& 101AP1 8 7655 POLS& 204AP1 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 8 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 7664 PSYC& 100AP1 8 7668 PSYC& 200BP1 LIFESPAN PSYCHOLOGY 8 7678 SCIE 104AP1 INTRO TO PHYSICAL SCIENC 8 115AP1 WEATHER AND CLIMATE 7680 SCIE 8 7684 SDEV 105AP1 CAREER PLANNING 8 INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY 7700 SOC& 101DP1 8 7696 SOC 225AP1 CULTURAL & ETHNIC PLURAL 8 7712 SPEE 220AP1 THEORY & PRACTICE PUBLIC *Course requires proctored testing, for more information call (360) 736-9391, ext 672.

WAOL SHARED ONLINE CLASSES

eLEARNING

CENTRALIA COLLEGE ONLINE CLASSES


CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

GENERAL INFO

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Jake Kinsman, a 2012 Centralia College graduate, finds energy in his career choice As a kid, Jake Kinsman, 29 of Morton, lived by a hydroelectric plant. He was always curious about what was inside that big concrete structure. “I always wanted to get into the energy industry, but figured I would never get the opportunity,” Kinsman, a hydroelectric mechanic at Tacoma Power, said. “I was working as a millwright and didn’t plan on switching careers until the recession laid me off.” He qualified for the dislocated worker program and discovered that at that point, doors were beginning to open. “I was excited when I found out that I could go to Centralia College and enroll in the Energy Technology program,” Kinsman said. He enrolled in Centralia College’s Associate of Applied Science in Energy Technology program in spring of 2010. It gave Kinsman the foundation he needed to understand the industry. Kinsman then began working for Tacoma Power in June 2011. “The first day I had butterflies like no other, but once I got to know the crew, I realized I would fit right in. After my orientation was done, they threw me right into the mix of things,” Kinsman said.

Kinsman graduated a year later and has been advancing in his career ever since. “Jake placed number one on the Hydroelectric Mechanics test for the City of Tacoma last summer,” Milt Hollingsworth, a fellow Centralia College classmate and Tacoma Power hydroelectric plant electrician said. “His degree at Centralia College played a large part of his success.” “It is impossible for me to describe a typical day at work. Every day is different. That is what I love most about this job. I could be working in the power houses one day, on the dam the next, and taking care of wildlife lands the next.” Kinsman also enjoys giving plant tours for the college’s energy technology students. “I like knowing that what I do every day makes a huge difference in the community,” Kinsman added. “Working in power generation is an extremely rewarding job and I get to work outside in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. Tacoma Power is a great company to work for in all aspects.” Tacoma Power offers tuition reimbursement to its employees, has donated used equipment for educational purposes and lent staff to advise program curriculum. Pat McCarty, generation manager, also serves as the chairman for the center’s advisory board.

Trekkers plan summer Cambodia trip It could easily be the trip of a lifetime when Centralia College professors lead the summer study/travel program to mysterious Cambodia. This year, Dr. Steve Norton, professor of biology, joins veteran travel guide Dr. Greg van Alstyne in leading the tour. The study/travel team will leave June 24 for 25 days of exploration, visiting sites including the monumental 12th Century temple complex of Angkor Wat temple in Siem Reap. Travelers will visit the fortified 13th Century city of Angkor Thom containing the spectacular monuments including the Bayon, Baphuon, the Royal Enclosure, and the Terrace of Elephants; everything is on a grand scale here. The trip also offers a backpack trek in Virachey National Park, camping in the jungle and lodging at indigenous villages.

You will pass through tropical rain forests and grasslands and snorkel the colorful coral reefs and mangroves in the Gulf of Thailand. Norton will describe the diverse natural environments and wildlife that you encounter throughout the trip. Van Alystne will immerse you in traditional culture, provide insights into the social and historical development of the region and touch on the influence of the French and other cultures. The initial cost of the trip is $3,000, which includes most travel and meals during home stays or treks. For information, contact van Alystne at gvanalstyne@ centralia.edu, or by calling 360.736.9391, ext. 552. Norton can be reached by calling the college and dialing ext. 261, or sending an email to snorton@centralia.edu.


Energy Technology graduates can earn up to $35/hour graduates who enrolled in Centralia College’s Energy Technology program through the interactive television (ITV) system. The Pacific Northwest is home to the world’s largest hydroelectric system. There are 55 major hydroelectric projects located on the Columbia River Basin and its tributaries which produces most of the region’s electricity. Electric utility employment in the Pacific Northwest exceeds 40,000 highly skilled workers and generates nearly $2.8 billion in annual payrolls, according to Workforce Challenges of Electric Power Employers in the Pacific Northwest, a labor market study recently published by the Center of Excellence. On average, the region’s utility wages are 82 percent higher than the average jobs across all industries. The study also echoes national forecasts about future labor shortages in the energy workforce.

GENERAL INFO

Entry level positions within the energy industry are opening more frequently. Within nine months, 12 energy technology graduates landed high-skills, high-wage jobs within Washington state. “A 2013 graduate shared that he was recently hired at Seattle City Light’s Diablo Dam and is making $36 an hour as a hydro operator apprentice,” Barbara Hins-Turner, executive director of the Center of Excellence for Clean Energy said. “That means in 30 months, when he finishes his apprenticeship, he’ll be making at least $45 an hour.” Centralia College 2013 graduates were hired by Seattle City Light (at Boundary Dam on the Pend Oreille River and Diablo Dam, on the Skagit River), by Puget Sound Energy, Douglas County PUD Well’s Dam on the mid-Columbia River, Tacoma Power, Lewis County PUD, and TransAlta. The TransAlta hires included three Grays Harbor College

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Careers in energy start at Centralia College! Our Energy Technology program prepares students to compete for high-skilled, high-wage careers within the power (electricity) industry – an industry that’s losing half of its workforce due to retirements.

Day, evening & online classes Energy Tech Advisor: 360.600.6915

Career Opportunities in Electric Utility Companies: Entry level starting wages: $15 - $30 an hour • Power plant operator • Plant electrician • Maintenance technician • Substation operator • Energy efficiency advisor Graduates work in dams, power houses, corporate buildings, utility buildings, substations, hospitals and factories.

Photo courtesy of Bonneville Power Administration

Photo courtesy of Puget Sound Energy

Career information

cleanenergyexcellence.org

This program is supported by: Pacific Northwest Center of Excellence for Clean Energy/ A Centralia College Partnership

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Join successful graduates who have quality jobs, generous benefit packages, and career security!


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CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

How to register: • • • •

Watch for the complete Continuing & Community Education schedule coming soon to your mailbox. For more information, call (360) 736-9391, ext. 483 or visit www.centralia.edu/academics/cont-ed/

BEEKEEPING

Intermediate Computer

Beginning Beekeeping/Apprenticeship This class will focus on the hobby, residential and small farm beekeeper. With so many new beekeepers in this area, emphasis will be put on the seasonal care of new hives and colonies. Our style is copious amounts of networking, participation and interaction. Our focus is to tailor our discussions to your needs and questions. We have tons of examples and actual hands-on learning aids. You see, hold, analyze and feel what the books only talk about. This will give you the productive knowledge base to keep your bees happy, productive, healthy and safe. The class is sanctioned by the Washington State Beekeepers Association. Upon completion of the course each participant will receive an Apprenticeship Certificate. Instructor Tim Weible has 50 years of beekeeping experience. Class held at: 708 Harrison Ave., Centralia. (Centralia Deli/Honey Hut Beekeepers Supply)

Mar 31 - May 5 Code 8665 Apr. 1 - May 6 Code 8666

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Mail in registration to Centralia College Office of Admissions and Records. Phone in using a credit card by calling (360) 736-9391, ext. 427 or 483. Fax in registration and credit card information to 330-7504. Walk in registration at the Office of Admissions and Records

M Course CS 118A T Course CS 118B

7:00pm - 9:00pm $15 7:00pm - 9:00pm $15

Centralia Centralia

COMPUTERS

Facebook – Everything You Want To Know Are you getting the most out of Facebook? If not then this course is for you. Facebook students will start by understanding why it is so popular and the things that they can do with it. They will further learn to build and modify a personal profile and privacy strategy in line with best practices and personal preferences. Additionally, students will learn the multi-media skills required to select and post pictures, video, documents and other media to their Facebook profiles, groups or pages. Finally, students will learn accelerated multi-media learning strategies that will transfer to other areas of media. Students are welcome to bring personal laptops or use computers provided. Class taught by Mitchel Townsend.

April 12, 26 May 10, 24 Sa Code 8663 Course CS 151A Computer Basics for Beginners

9:00am-10:30am $10

TEC 109

For the new computer user who wants to learn about computers in an easy to understand hands-on course. You will learn to use the desktop, taskbar, scroll bars and other controls necessary to be proficient in Windows. Effectively use the basic programs to write letters and save them into organized folders you create. Learn to use flash drives so you can make information portable. This class uses Windows 7, Not Windows 8. Class taught by Amanda Warner.

Mar 31- Apr 21 M Code 8610 Course CS 152B Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8611 Course SNRC 043B

6:00pm-8:30pm $50 $30

TEC 109

This course is designed for students who have completed Computer Basics or have an understanding of creating and saving documents. We will continue to work with file management skills, practicing, creating, copying, moving, and deleting files and folders. You will expand your knowledge to include common tasks such as printing and moving information from one application or folder to another. Use “search” to find anything on your computer! We will also learn to maintain your computer and work with the Control Panel to make common personalization changes. Everyone should learn a little about navigating the Internet and how to effectively find and save information. This class uses Windows 7, Not Windows 8. Class taught by Amanda Warner. No Class 5/26

May 5- Jun 2 M Code 8614 Course CS 152D Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8615 Course SNRC 043D Microsoft Word

6:00pm-8:30pm $50

TEC 109

$30

Designed to help you become efficient at creating, editing and saving documents. Topics include formatting, copying, selecting, and editing. Class taught by Amanda Warner

Apr 2- Apr 23 W Code 8612 Course CS 152C Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8613 Course SNRC 043C Microsoft Excel

6:00pm-8:30pm $50

TEC 109

$30

Introductory class! Students will learn to create new worksheets and edit existing worksheets. Learn to input data, use auto fills to save time and improve accuracy. Students will also learn how to format data using color, fonts, size and how to sort and select data effectively. Class will also cover writing formulas and creating charts to present data. Class taught by Amanda Warner

May 7 - May 28 W Code 8616 Course CS 152E Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8617 Course SNRC 043E Power Point – Basic

6:00pm-8:30pm $50

TEC 109

$30

PowerPoint Basic covers basic functions and features of PowerPoint 2007/2010. Students create new presentations that include text, graphics, WordArt, tables, charts, and diagrams. They will also edit and format slide content, and apply transition effects. Instructor James Moliassa has been teaching computers for 20 years.

Apr 1- Apr 10 T Th Code 8670 Course CS 152F Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8671 Course SNRC 043F

6:00pm-8:30pm $50 $30

TEC 109


Access I - Basic Access Basic covers the basic functions and features of Access 2007/2010. Students will learn how to design and create databases; work with tables, fields, and records; sort and filter data; and create queries, forms, and reports. Instructor James Moliassa.

6:00pm-8:30pm $50

TEC 109

$30

In Windows 7 students will learn how to manipulate the desktop, gadgets, windows sizes, windows locations, multiple applications, folders, libraries, files, Windows Explorer, Internet Explorer, control panel, aero features, and so much more. Instructor James Moliassa.

May 13 - May 22 T Th Code 8674 Course CS 152H Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8675 Course SNRC 043H Access II - Intermediate

9:00am - 11:30am $50

TEC 109

$30

This class covers the functions and features of Access 2007/2010 at an intermediate user level. Students will learn more about table relationships, in depth design of tables, queries, forms and reports. Instructor James Moliassa

Jun 3 - Jun 12 T Th Code 8676 Course CS 152J Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8677 Course SNRC 043J

6:00pm-8:30pm $50

TEC 109

$30

Mosaics for the Garden

WAH 108

Add color and architectural interest to your entryway with a unique mosaic address plaque! Whatever the style of your home — rustic, whimsical, country, traditional, modern — you can create just the right look with colors, fonts, and other details. Address plaques make a great gift, too! Choose from a selection of suitable substrates and mosaic tiles, plus adhesives, grout, and tools, all provided by the instructor. All experience levels are welcome to come and work at their own pace; beginners are welcome! Instructor Susan Alexander A $20 materials fee is due to the instructor at the first class.

May 3-24 Code 8641

Sa Course CS 103B

9:00am-12:00pm $75

DANCE

9:30am-3:00pm $45

WAH 116

9:30pm - 3:00pm $45

WAH 116

9:30pm - 3:00pm $45

WAH 116

9:30pm - 3:00pm $45

WAH 116

DANCE

Belly Dance Fusion- Beginning

WAH 108

Mar 31 - Jun 9 M Code 8618 Course CS 157A Beginning Ballroom Dancing

6:00pm-7:15pm $48

Centralia

Learn to glide your partner around the dance floor with style and grace. You will learn the salsa, waltz, foxtrot, swing, rumba, cha cha, tango, and nightclub two-step. Leading and following techniques and timing are stressed. Instructor Ms. Marie Kiser holds associate standing with the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing. Classes will be held at Flying Tiger Exercise Arts Center at 219 S. Tower, Centralia. No class 5/26

Mar 31- Jun 9 M Code 8619 Course CS 157B Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8620 Course SNRC 093A Apr 4- Jun 6 F Code 8621 Course CS 157C Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8622 Course SNRC 093B Intermediate Ballroom Dancing

6:00pm-7:00pm $55 $25 7:00pm-8:00pm $55

FTEAC

FTEAC

$25

For those who know the basics and want to move on to more technical steps and dance positions. This class will improve your floor craft and personal styling. Includes all dances from the beginning class, plus introduction to West Coast Swing and Samba. Classes will be held at Flying Tiger Exercise Arts Center at 219 S. Tower, Centralia. Instructor Ms. Marie Kiser.

Apr 4 - Jun 6 F Code 8623 Course CS 157D Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8624 Course SNRC 093C

6:00pm-7:00pm $47 $25

FTEAC

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Bird houses, stepping stones, flower pots, light catchers, gazing balls ... from a shaded woodland yard to a tiny urban terrace to an expansive waterfront estate ~ every garden is a perfect setting for creative garden mosaics! They add interest, color, whimsy, and individuality ~ and they’re fun to make. Students in this class will learn the basic techniques of mosaic art, then choose from a great selection of garden items to mosaic, all provided by the instructor, along with adhesives, grout, and tools. Students may also bring their own treasures to transform. All experience levels are welcome to come and work at their own pace; beginners are welcome! Instructor Susan Alexander creates custom, one-of-a-kind mosaics for homes, gardens and businesses using salvaged materials, vintage furnishings, old architectural embellishments, and useful household items in her Olympia workshop and business. A $20 materials fee is due to the instructor at the first class.

9:00am-12:00pm $75

One finished basket per class. . Market Basket ($13.50) April 12 Sa Code 8701 Course CS 101J Bean Pot 8” ($13) April 26 Sa Code 8702 Course CS 101K 10” Wood Bottom bowl ($15) May 10 Sa Code 8703 Course CS 101L Quilt/Picnic Basket ($20) May 17 Sa Code 8704 Course CS 101M

Introduction to a fusion of dance styles. Middle Eastern steps and music blended with other cultures. Belly dance is a wonderful way to tone both body and spirit. It is recommended that students wear flexible layers and bring a water bottle. Geneva Lombardi has been teaching dance for 12 years. Classes will be held at Fitscape Health Annex, 1610 S. Gold St., Centralia No class 5/26

CRAFTS

April 5-26 Sa Code 8640 Course CS 103A Mosaics Address Plaques

Basket Weaving using mostly flat reed resulting in strong, working baskets. You’ll be learning the basics of weaving along with new weaving techniques with each new basket. One finished basket per class. Instructor Carolyn Snedigar. Materials fee due to instructor at each class.

CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

Apr 22- May 1 T Th Code 8672 Course CS 152G Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8673 Course SNRC 043G Windows 7

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Basket Weaving


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Advanced Ballroom Dancing

CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

For those who love dancing and are comfortable with 7-10 patterns in most of the dances. You will learn show lines, syncopations, and continuous movement in closed and open positions. Enhances your personal style and whets your appetite for more. Will include optional dances such as Viennese Waltz and Quickstep, and others. Classes will be held at Flying Tiger Exercise Arts Center at 219 S. Tower, Centralia. Instructor Ms. Marie Kiser. No class 5/26

Mar 31 - Jun 9 M Code 8625 Course CS 157E Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8626 Course SNRC 093D

7:00pm-8:00pm $47

FTEAC

$25

DRAWING & PAINTING Zen Doodling

Zen Doodling is a fascinating, meditative style of drawing that allows you to unwind from stress, focus your thoughts, and explore your creative side -- even if you have no artistic talent! In this class, you will learn a wide variety of striking drawing patterns, styles and techniques, based on Zentangle® an art form developed by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas, that uses simple, repetitive lines and shapes and deliberate pen strokes to create striking, one-ofa-kind abstract art. You’ll be left with a heightened sense of clarity, personal well-being, and artistic satisfaction. Come prepared to relax and experience something truly unique and restorative. Instructor Susan Alexander will provide all necessary materials and supplies. A $10 materials fee is due to the instructor at the first class. Apr 8 - Apr 29 T 1:00pm-3:00pm WAH 113 Code 8669 Course CS 102B $75

Pencil Drawing Simple Objects

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Have you always wanted to be able to draw a leaf or rock so that it looks life like? This course is crafted to help even the most inexperienced artist see like artists see and render objects realistically as a result. Basic proportion and perspective will be discussed along with the importance of value and basic composition. This is an introductory class and is intended to lead into more advanced drawing instruction. Instructor Jeanne Hamilton. Supply list and driving directions will be mailed.

May 8 - May 22 Th 6:30pm-7:30pm Code 8638 Course CS 101C $30 Five Abstract Painting Projects in Acrylic

Winlock

If you’ve always wanted to tr y your hand at abstract (nonrepresentational) art but didn’t know where to start, here’s your chance. Class one will be an introduction to color systems, compositional basics and paint application. After that, each of the other five class meetings will work on a different project. Paintings will probably need to be finished at home. Come prepared to think outside the box. Supply list will be mailed. Jeanne Hamilton holds a Masters in Teaching. She is a retired high school art teacher and one of the founding members of ARTrails of SWW.

Apr 22 - May 27 T Code 8637 Course CS 102A Getting Started With Soft Pastels

6:00pm-7:30pm $50

WAH 116

This course is designed for the beginner to intermediate pastel artist. A discussion of necessary supplies, their variety, quality and cost will be covered. At each session an instructive project teaching technique, plus a homework project will be given. Some drawing background is helpful but not mandatory. Teacher will supply samples of papers but pastels and other supplies must be provided by student. Instructor Jeanne Hamilton Supply list will be mailed and a $10.00 paper fee and additional supplies is due to the instructor on the first day.

Apr 3 - Apr 24 Code 8639

Th Course CS 101D

6:00pm - 7:30pm $40

WAH 116

FIRST AID/CPR

First Aid & CPR Certification Emergency care of injured or ill person to prevent death or further injury, relieve pain, and counteract shock until aid is obtained. Upon completion, students receive American Heart Association cards. Course includes certification for adult, child and infant First Aid, CPR and AED. No refunds will be given if you do not withdraw at least 24 hours before the start of class. Cost for each class is $60

Sa March 22 April 19 May 17 June 14

8:30am-4:00pm HWC 106 Code 8600 Code 8667 Code 8668 Code 2602

Course CE 207A Course CE 207B Course CE 207C Course CE 207A

FITNESS

Senior Adult Fitness - previously called Cardiac Capri Capri is a medically supervised exercise class for individuals who have had a heart attack or are at high risk of heart disease. Individuals with pulmonary disorders are also encouraged to participate. Class will be taught by Lisa Davis . No class 5/15 & 5/26 Classes:

Mar 31- Jun 20 MWF Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8692 Course SNRC 096A Mar 31- Jun 20 MWF Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8693 Course SNRC 096B Mar 31- Jun 20 MWF Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8694 Course SNRC 096C T’ai Chi Daytime

7:00am-7:50am

HWC 125

$42 8:00am-8:50am

HWC 125

$42 10:00am-10:50am

HWC 125

$42

T’ai Chi is a centuries old Chinese form of exercise characterized by slow, graceful movements of a gentle, non-impact nature. Taught by Russell Barr. No class 5/15 & 5/26

Mar 31 - Jun 9 MW Code 8627 Course CS 129A Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8628 Course SNRC 090A Beginning-Advanced Tae kwon-do

8:00am-8:50am $54

HWC 200

$35

Multi-level classes for men, women, and youth (ages 16 and up) providing exercise, body conditioning and mental discipline. Basic through advanced Karate techniques and forms required for advancement from white belt through black belt. Helps develop self-confidence, balance, and self-defense. Associated with NW Tae kwon-Do Association. Taught by Larry Grove. 5/15 & 5/26

Mar 31 - Jun 9 MW 6:00pm-8:00pm Beginning Code 8629 Course CS 129B Intermediate Code 8630 Course CS 129C Advanced Code 8631 Course CS 129D Senior-Friendly T’ai Chi, Wu Style

HWC 200 $69 $69 $69

Learn the slow and graceful movements of Wu style T’ai Chi in an approach designed for the abilities of mature adults. Ta’i Chi has been shown to improve balance, coordination, and lower-body strength and lead to deep relaxation. Instructor Margaret Rader has been studying Tai Chi for the past 8 years. No class 5/15 & 5/26

Mar 31 - Jun 9 MW Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8632 Course SNRC 090B

2:00pm-2:50pm $35

HWC 200


Senior-Friendly T’ai Chi, Wu Style Level 2 For students with at least two quarters of Senior-Friendly Tai Chi and who want to learn entire Wu-style long form. Emphasizes exercises to increase strength, flexibility and deepening intent and relaxation. Students who have not completed two quarters of Senior-Friendly Tai Chi but have studied Tai Chi with other teachers or another movement art may register with instructor's permission. Instructor Margaret Rader has been studying Tai Chi for past 8 years. Class combined with Level 1. No class 5/15 & 5/26.

2:00pm-2:50pm

HWC 200

$35

FLAGGER

Flagger Training & Certification Upon successful completion of this course, taught by Rich Bunker, Master Instructor, American Traffic Safety Services Association, You will be taught professional flagging techniques and proper work zone set-up in accordance with standards and guidelines of the Federal Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) , Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) , and the Department of Labor and Industries (L & I) Washington Administrative Code pertaining to flagging and temporary traffic control. Students passing the demonstration portion and 50 question exam will receive the Washington State Flagger Certification Card accepted in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, and the American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA) National Flagger Certification Card accepted in most other States. Course includes references to the ATSSA flagging work book, MUTCD, work shops, flagging demonstration, video, and powerpoint presentation. Successful completion of course certifies students for a period of three years. No refunds will be given if you do not withdraw at least 24 hours before the start of class. Taught by Rich Bunker. Cost for each class is $55.

Sa March 8 April 5 May 3 June 7

8:00am-5:00pm WAH 115 Code 8601 Code 8608 Code 8609 Code 2601

Course CE 200A Course CE 200B Course CE 200C Course CE 200A

Chehalis

Learn how you can get immediate pain relief without using drugs! You will learn how you can relieve pain all by yourself - anytime you need to, anywhere you are, while remaining fully conscious. This is an introductory course for information only, and you will not be hypnotized during this workshop. A medical referral from your physician will be required if you choose to continue beyond this initial class. No prior training is required. Taught by Howard Batie, who is certified to practice Hypnotherapy by the International Medical and Dental Hypnotherapy Association. Class will be held at Evergreen Healing Arts Center in Chehalis. See www.howardbatie. com for driving directions, or call 360-219-8512.

May 3 Sa Code 8645 Course CS 206B Reiki Level I for Caregivers

9:00am-11:00am $20

Chehalis

This all-day Reiki I class provides the instruction and attunements for Reiki Level I that will teach you how to transfer healing Usui Reiki energies directly to yourself or to another person for restoring health and balance on all levels. Both the traditional Western Reiki and the original Japanese Reiki methods of healing are taught. No prior training is required. Instruction and certification is provided by Reiki Master-Teacher Howard Batie. Class will be taught at Evergreen Healing Arts Center in Chehalis. See www. howardbatie.com for additional details and driving directions, or call 360-219-8512.

May 10 Code 8644

Sa Course CS 207A

9:00am-5:00pm $150

Chehalis

INTERVIEWING

Interviewing and Job Search Strategies

Forklift Certification This 8-hour course is designed to certify operators of sit-down counterbalance lift trucks, light, medium, and heavy duty. Students will have written and hands on testing. Cost for the class $140. If you are interested in Forklift Certification please call our office for more information 360-736-9391 ext. 427

HEALTH & WELLNESS Healing Body, Mind & Spirit

The Human Energy Field discussed and described in terms of acupuncture meridians, chakras (body energy centers), and the five energy bodies. Learn about Reiki and Healing Touch for accelerated physical healing; Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) and Regression Therapy for release of emotional issues; and Inner Light Consciousness (ILC) Meditation, Life Between Lives Therapy, Trans-Scalar Healing and Spiritual Journeys for spiritual development and exploration. No prior experience necessary for this 20-hour program taught over 3-Sat. by Howard Batie at Evergreen Healing Arts Center in Chehalis. See www.howardbatie. com for details and driving directions, or call 360-219-8512.

April 5-19 Code 8642

May 3 Sa 1:00pm-5:00pm Code 8643 Course CS 206A $30 Chronic Pain Relief using Self-Hypnosis

Sa Course CS 209A

9:00am-5:00pm $90

Chehalis

Learn advanced job search strategies and how to differentiate yourself as a candidate in a fiercely competitive job market. You will learn how to work with recruiters and use their knowledge of local hiring practices to land a better job. This highly interactive course will equip you with the knowledge needed to increase your chances of landing a job or landing a better job. This course will draw on the real-life examples of the instructors who collectively have placed over 350 candidates in full-time permanent jobs since 1999. Students need to bring 3 printed copies of their resume. Taught by Jenny and Brian Kearney. Together they have over 15 years of experience with job recruiting and placement.

April 12 Code 8697 April 26 Code 8698 May 10 Code 8699 May 17 Code 8700

Sa Course CS 238C Sa Course CS 238D Sa Course CS 238E Sa Course CS 238F

10:00am-3:00pm $60 10:00am-3:00pm $60 10:00am-3:00pm $60 10:00am-3:00pm $60

WAH 105 WAH 105 WAH 105 WAH 105

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

FORKLIFT

Learn how to deeply meditate effectively using a unique guided visualization technique called the Inner Light Consciousness Meditation. This technique rapidly develops your inner senses and intuitive abilities, and significantly accelerates the expansion and exploration of your spiritual consciousness. No prior experience is necessary, and a complimentary meditation CD is provided. Taught by Howard Batie at Evergreen Healing Arts Center in Chehalis. See www.howardbatie.com for additional details and driving directions, or call 360-219-8512.

CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

Mar 31 - Jun 9 MW Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8633 Course SNRC 090C

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Inner Light Meditation


44

MUSIC

STAINED GLASS

Community Band

CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

Lewis County Community Band offers performance experience for band instrumentalists, college students, and community adults. Provides opportunity to improve technical and musical skills, as well as community service when possible. If you would like to join but do not have an instrument, some are available through the college for a rental fee of $15 per quarter. Directed by Louie Blaser.

Apr 1 - Jun 3 T Code 8634 Course CS 163A Pacific Northwest Chamber Orchestra

7:00pm-9:00pm $25

WAH 150

The orchestra provides performance experience for any high school, college or adult community string musician. Players will be seated by the conductor through audition at the first rehearsal. Please prepare a short excerpt to demonstrate your skill. Sightreading will be required. In addition to the regularly scheduled Monday evening rehearsal, additional sectional rehearsals may be scheduled as needed. Musicians must supply their own instrument. Supported in its activities by the Pacific Northwest Orchestra Association. Conductor David Judd. No class 5/26

Mar 31- Jun 9 Code 8635

M Course CS 163B

7:00pm - 9:00pm $25

WAH 150

SCIENCE

CSI Bigfoot, Legend Meets Science

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

CSI Bigfoot, the first ever college course devoted to the scientific examination of the questions and controversies surrounding Bigfoot. Is a giant undiscovered creature roaming the wilds of the Pacific Northwest? Native American legends and decades of credible reports beckon the curious to look deeper. Students will be exposed to the latest evidence and analysis while developing their own theories through the use of a unique flow chart assessment instrument. Join us as we peel back the layers of time and misinformation to get to the bottom of this mystery once and for all. Instructor Mitchel Townsend Recommended text book (not required) “Sasquatch Legend Meets Science” available at Amazon.com.

Apr12, 26, May 10, 24 Jun 7 Sa Code 8664 Course CS 227A

11:00am - 2:00pm $5

WAH 103

SIGN LANGUAGE Conversational ASL

The emphasis of this course will be on developing fluency in conveying information in American Sign Language. Students lessons will be focused on utilizing signed vocabulary and grammar skills and applying them in signed assignments to be presented in class. This course will be conducted primarily without voice. Students will be required to have taken Beginning ASL I & II, or be able to demonstrate comparable signing skills for instructor’s approval. Students will need pens/pencils, notebook paper and a 1”to 3”-ring binder and the textbook: “Talking With Your Hands, Listening with Your Eyes” the book is widely available online. Instructor Julie Lobaugh

Apr 1 – Jun 3 Code 8636

T Course CS 238 B

6:00pm-8:00pm $50

WAH 113

Stained Glass – Lead & Foil

Learn all the techniques to make and complete your first stained glass panel. Class covers selecting design, leading basics, soldering, and finishing techniques. Equipment provided by the instructor. Students will purchase their supplies from the instructor at class. Glass supplies will cost approximately $100-$120, payable to the instructor. Taught by Karen Milton, a 30-year veteran of stained glass work. Class will be taught in Rochester at 18245 Irwin St SW at Karen’s shop. Call for directions 273-6562 Please bring a fine or medium black sharpie to class. If students have other supplies please bring them but please do not purchase any for the class. The instructor will have tools available for use during class time. Students may bring a sack lunch or snack to the day classes.

Day class: Apr 4- Apr 30 W Code 8678 Course CS 102C Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8679 Course SNRC 081H May 7 - Jun 4 W Code 8680 Course CS 102D Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8681 Course SNRC 081J Jun 11 - Jul 9 W Code 8682 Course CS 102E Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8683 Course SNRC 081K Evening class: Apr 17 - May 15 Th Code 8684 Course CS 102F Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8685 Course SNRC 081L May 22 - Jun 19 Th Code 8686 Course CS 102G Lifelong Learners 50+ Code 8687 Course SNRC 081M Stained Glass Workshops

11:00am-2:00pm $107

Rochester

$54 11:00am-2:00pm $107

Rochester

$54 11:00am-2:00pm $107

Rochester

$54 6:00pm-9:00pm $107 $54 6:00pm-9:00pm $107

Rochester

Rochester

$54

No experience needed! Beginners Welcome! Do you want to try your hand at stained glass? Do you like quick projects? One or two day workshops are a great way to “sample” stained glass and create a project to keep or give as a gift! Material cost listed below. Instructor Karen Milton. Class will be taught in Rochester at 18245 Irwin St SW at Karen’s shop.

Open Heart Box ($15) April 12 Sa Code 8688 Course CS 101E Windchimes ($15-$25) May 12 & 19 M Code 8689 Course CS 101F Garden Flowers ($10 each flower) May 21 W Code 8691 Course CS 101H Fused Dichroic Bracelet/Pendant ($8 each) June 6 & 9 F, M Code 8690 Course CS 101G

10:00am-2:00pm $35

Rochester

6:00pm - 9:00pm $35

Rochester

6:00pm - 9:00pm $35

Rochester

6:00pm - 9:00pm $35

Rochester

This list of classes offered is correct on the date of publication. For the most current class information and list of classes offered, see Updated Class Schedules at www.centralia.edu.


WRITING

Write A Great Novel Covers the creative process of writing novels and short stories.; research and fact-checking; novel structures and viewpoints; plots and subplots, plot charts, outlines, and other organizational methods; selecting titles and names; developing characters; writing dialogue; continuity; drafting, rewriting, editing, and proofing; and working with book and copy editors.. PowerPoint presentation and detailed outline. Plenty of time to get your questions answered. Instructor Joelle Steele Break for 1 hour lunch

WAH 105

Learn how the publishing industry works today and what it takes to be a writer. Class covers assessing writing markets; what editors, publishers, clients, and readers want; developing specialties; query letters and avoiding “sales slumps”; submitting manuscripts; creating ebooks; and getting paid; contracts and rights; research, interviewing, fact-checking; self-publishing; bar codes and ISBN numbers; book design and illustrations; reviews and promotion; and marketing. Instructor Joelle Steele has almost 40 years writing, editing, and publishing experience. PowerPoint presentation and detailed outline. Plenty of time to get your questions answered. Plenty of time to get your questions answered. Break for 1 hour lunch

May 3 Sa 9:00am-3:00pm Code 8647 Course CS 176B $70 Researching and Writing Your Family History or Memoirs

WAH 105

Covers obtaining genealogical and anecdotal data; interviewing people; and Internet and archive searches. Also variations in research data and getting to the truth behind family stories; handling delicate information, speculative data, and “holes” in stories. Fact-checking and ethics. Use of formats and viewpoints, and writing from outline through finished book. Collecting, identifying, dating, and managing photos and other images. Kinship terms, charts, and trees. Instructor has more than 30 years genealogical experience and has researched and written her own memoirs and two extensive family histories. PowerPoint presentation and detailed outline. Plenty of time to get your questions answered. Instructor Joelle Steele Break for 1 hour lunch

Sa Course CS 176A

9:00am-3:00pm $70

WAH 105

WINEMAKING Weekend Winemaking

Make your own delicious fruit wines at home! Just in time for the 2014 fruit season. If you can boil water, you can make wine! Learn an easy natural winemaking process, which uses no sulfites or other toxic chemicals. Class includes step by step process from fruit to the bottle; what happens during fermentation, selecting yeasts, equipment, cleaning and sterilization, Clearing, Bottling, Corking, Standard Recipes, Troubleshooting, and how to taste your wines for balance. Demonstrations and/or hands-on experience of techniques for each step in the winemaking process. Instructor Anine Grumbles has been making natural fruit wines without any sulfites or toxic chemicals for over 30 years. Optional book “Natural Winemaking At Home” $21.50 will be available to purchase at class. Bring a lunch or snacks.

May 3 Code 8695

Sa Course CS 147A

9:30am - 5:00pm $50

WAH 116

also active in the college’s Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and TRiO Club. In her spare time, if such a thing exists, she curls up with a good book or hangs out with friends. This past summer she served as a lab assistant for Dr. Steve Norton (Centralia College biology professor) during the annual Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Academy for high school students. “I was going to pay to attend. Instead, I had the privilege of working at the event, helping Dr. Norton run his chick respiration lab and his heart anatomy/electrical conduction lab. I was very humbled to have been asked by Dr. Norton to assist him.” Dr. Norton inspired her focus on biology. She said she was fascinated by his expertise and his passion for biology. “He motivated me to learn more about cellular biology. He’s a great professor who makes me want to dig deeper, to see what is going on,” Nelson said. No doubt she is motivated. “I’ve always had a passion for science,” she said. “My mother and father instilled a love of learning in me. I have always loved to read and am constantly asking questions to learn more about the way the world works,” Nelson said. She plans to transfer to Central Washington University after she receives her high school diploma and two-year college degree this June. Her goal is to earn a doctorate and to share her passion for learning. She isn’t certain what she will do once her education is complete but she is considering a college-level teaching career. “I am also thinking about cancer research. I want to investigate nanotechnology, which will be important in curing cancer,” Nelson said. She said she chose to attend Centralia College through the Running Start program. “It was an amazing opportunity. Not only would attending a community college … help me pay for my first two years,” Nelson said, “I would also be able to challenge myself in a way my high school classes were unable to do.” A resource she found helpful when first coming to Centralia Collge was the introductory class, CC101. “Coming to college was scary for me at first but CC101 helped me get comfortable. The class decreases the stress incoming students have. I learned where things were and where to go for help. Plus, everyone was so friendly. That was very important,” Nelson said. Last year’s CC101 experience was so influential that she became an event leader this year. “I’ve found that people really care and the professors truly care about their students’ education.”

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

May 31 Code 2600

Continued from page 34

CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

May 17 Sa 9:00am-3:00pm Code 8646 Course CS 176A $70 Make Your Living As A Writer & Self-Publishing.

All-Washington scholars named

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The following classes are offered by the Morton branch campus. Watch for the complete CC East Continuing & Community Education schedule coming soon to your mailbox. For more detailed descriptions or questions please call 360.736.9391, ext. 380.

Please use the following options to register for the below classes. • Mail in registration to Centralia College Office of Admissions and Records. • Phone in using a credit card by calling (in Morton) 360.496.5022 or 360.736.9391, ext. 380. • Walk in registration at the CC East Branch campus in Morton

SMALL BUSINESS MGMT

Computers II

Microsoft Excel-Brief

Become familiar with the Windows Help system, My Computer, Control Panel and other exciting features of the operating system. Prerequisite: Computers I - for the Fearful - Windows. Class fee $27. Class meets 4/15-4/25.

CONTINUING AND COMMUNIITY EDUCATION

 7686

SMGT 120R

(2) 12-2pm

TTh

 7169

MOR 112

Cantin

Courseware incorporates an accelerated, step-by-step, projectbased approach, students develop an introductory level competency in Excel learning to create, edit, format, calculate and add special features to spreadsheets. Prerequisite: some computer experience. Class fee $45.13.

Introduction to Bookkeeping II 7688

SMGT 156S3

(3) 5-8:20pm

W

MOR 101

Langrell

Accounting theory as applied to bookkeeping systems of small business including the completion of the accounting cycle. Prerequisite: SMGT 152. Class fee $66.13.

Computer Keyboarding  7689

SMGT 157R

(2) 11am-1pm

M

MOR 112

Cantin

+ 2 hrs/wk Beginning keyboarding. Upon completion of this class, students should be able to type at 20 wpm. Class fee $66.13.

Quickbooks 7691

SMGT 161S4 (4) 5-8:20pm M 6:30-7:50pm T

MOR 112 MOR 112

Langrell Langrell

Courseware incorporates a step-by-step, project-based approach to create a company, working with customer, vendor and banking transactions with inventory, payroll, and balance sheet accounts. Use quick learning tutorials for audio instruction. Class fee $77.13.

Microsoft Word

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

 7692

SMGT 197R

(3) 1-2:30pm

TTh

MOR 112

Cantin

Courseware incorporates a step-by-step, project-based approach, to develop competency in Microsoft Word learning to create, edit, format, and add graphics to documents. IEffectively plan, research, write and publish documents. Prerequisite: general understanding of personal computers and Windows. Class fee $66.13.

ADULT SPECIAL INTEREST Fitness for Health  7166

ASI

012R

(1) 4-4:50pm

MW

MOR 108

Staff

Designed to help improve the five areas of health-related physical fitness-cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition and flexibility. Participants will be encouraged to work at their own level of fitness. Class fee $25.

Better Bones and Balance  7167  8173

ASI ASI

015R 015S

(1) 9-10am (1) 4-5pm

WF WF

MOR 101 MOR 101

Cooper Cooper

Reap the benefits OSU Bone Research studies have shown: this exercise program can significantly slow loss of bone density in adults of all ages as well as improve balance, flexibility, coordination, muscle tone and overall body fitness. Class fee $25.

Computers I - For the Fearful  7168

ASI

020R

(1) 8:30-11am

TTh

MOR 112

Burres

If computers intimidate you, this is the class for you! Become familiar with the parts of a computer and terminology used to talk about them. Produce a few documents and learn about the programs that come with windows. Class fee $47. Class meets 4/1-4/10.

ASI

021R

(1) 8:30-11am

Introduction to Digital Cameras  7170

ASI

025R

(2) 8:30-11am

TTh

TTh

MOR 112

MOR 112

Burres

Burres

Learn how to: download, rename, and organize digital images; apply basic image retouching, resizing and color balance; insert images into a Power Point presentation for displaying on the computer and/or overhead display. Class fee $53.

Art Exploration  7171  7172

ASI ASI

050R (1-5) 11am-2:30pm F 050RR (1- 2) 1-2:50pm MW

ROX MOR 101

Cantin Cantin

Discover and explore works of art through slide lectures, seminars, and creative hands-on art activities. Designed for adults of all artistic abilities and experience. Class fee $11.

BASM fits the bill for business education At the age of 22 Tyler Kaut hasn’t wasted much time working toward his goals. As salutatorian of the 2011 Napavine High School graduating class, Kaut chose to attend Centralia College the following fall. As a student worker in the Instruction Office Kaut realized that he wanted to work in business, so after researching his options, he chose Centralia College and the Bachelor of Applied Science in Management (BASM) program. “The classes and programs at the college are challenging but good,” Kaut said. “I feel that the faculty and staff are very supportive of the students and do what they can to help them be as successful as possible.” Kaut is involved with International Network Club and Conversation Partner Program on campus and helps foreign exchange students practice conversational English. He has plans to visit Tyler Kaut New York with the Players Club, an on campus student club through the Drama Department. Kaut is a part-time employee with e-learning at the college.


Closure, emergencies notification information

The possibility of an emergency arising on the Centralia College campus does exist. Natural and/or man-caused situations could arise requiring that all students, faculty, staff, and members of the community at large who might be impacted to be notified. The college has added e2Campus, a system that sends messages when emergency and selected other events and situations arise that impact the normal day-to-day operation of the college. The college is asking students to sign up for e2Campus, the extra measure to enhance safety. It’s considered to be among the most efficient means of notification. In case of a campus emergency of any kind, you can be alerted fast and accurately. When you subscribe, you will receive emergency, crisis, severe weather, priority, or other important messages via text, email, voice mail, etc. The system is used for emergency and other high priority messages and for selected messages in categories you select. Subscribing to e2Campus will also put you on the Lewis County Code Red Emergency messaging system, which provides emergency messages from county emergency personnel. To sign up follow the instructions at: http://www.centralia. edu/admin/services/it/e2campusinst.html.

There are times when inclement weather (snow, ice, or flooding for example), power curtailments, weather conditions, or other natural or mancaused disasters (including outbreaks such as a flu pandemic) can interrupt the operation of the college. Any decision to close the college or to delay classes is delivered to the media and the college website as soon as possible. All personnel and students should monitor local radio stations or personal electronic devices for information or other instructions. The college subscribes to www. cancellations.com. All anyone needs to do to access this site is to know that the zip code for the college is 98531. Centralia College and Centralia College East will post closure or late start notices to this website.

GENERAL INFO

e2Campus brings instant access, info to students, staff

47

Centralia College Board of Trustees Stuart Halsan...............................................................................................Chair Dr. Joe Dolezal..................................................................................Vice-Chair Jim Lowery............................................................................................ Member

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords you certain rights with respect to your records. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605

Joanne Schwartz................................................................................. Member Dr. James M. Walton...............................................Secretary to the Board

College Administration Dr. James M. Walton.........................................................................President John Martens.................................................... Vice President, Instruction Steve Ward........................Vice President, Finance and Administration Lucretia Folks.........................................Interim Vice President, Students Julie Ledford...........Vice President, Human Resources & Legal Affairs

Notice of nondiscrimination Centralia College provides equal opportunity and access in education and employment and does not exclude, deny benefits to, or otherwise discriminate against any person on the basis of race, ethnicity, creed, color, sex, gender, citizenship status, national origin, age, marital status, religious preference, the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability, reliance on public assistance, sexual orientation, veteran status, political opinions or affiliations, or genetic information under any of its programs, activities and services. The College complies with all Washington State anti-discrimination laws (RCW 49.60) and the following federal laws relating to equal opportunity: Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding non-discrimination, equal opportunity, affirmative action or the ADA policies: Vice President of Human Resources and Legal Affairs, 600 Centralia College Blvd, Centralia, WA 98531, (360) 736-9391, ext. 285, (360) 807-6227/TTY. For Title IX/504 compliance, contact: Vice President Human Resources and Legal Affairs at the same number.

CENTRALIA COLLEGE | www.centralia.edu

Confidentiality of Centralia College student records

Doris Wood-Brumsickle.................................................................... Member


Periodicals Postage PAID Centralia, WA 98531

Centralia College 600 Centralia College Blvd Centralia, WA 98531

RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMER w w w.centralia.edu Are you a Veteran or a dislocated worker collecting Unemployment Insurance? Returning from the military? Lost your job? Facing Layoff? Am I eligible for Worker Retraining funding? • A Veteran receiving Unemployment Insurance? • Other Dislocated Worker receiving Unemployment Insurance? • Received benefits within the last 24 months? Getting started Begin by meeting staff members who will guide you through each step. Staff will assist students with Employment Security Department and Financial Aid applications. Information will be shared about demand programs, testing, Advising Fairs, where to fax/mail documents, degree progress, referrals to other grant programs along with answers to frequently asked questions. Centralia College may provide: • Eligibility Determination • Cost of GED tests • Career Planning • Assistance with Employment Security Department Applications • Coordination with WorkSource agencies • Assistance with Financial Aid Applications • Financial Assistance to eligible students • Resume & Cover letter support • Job Search Assistance Worker Retraining benefits The program may pay for your tuition, required books/supplies, and some other expenses to eligible students in combination with other funding sources. • Training is based on jobs that are In-Demand • Counseling is available to find your occupational goal • You can begin a program without a GED or High School Completion Classes are available on the Centralia campus, and at Centralia College East in Morton. You can earn a degree in two years or complete a one year certificate. All programs fall under the vocational area (professional/technical). Classes are delivered in various formats: lecture, online, or hybrid. You can get started on a new pathway with quality education along with caring faculty and staff.

Contact Worker Retraining Intake Center, Kemp Hall Room 120, on the main campus

• Worker Retraining • BFET (Basic Food) • WorkFirst

Call: 360. 736.9391, ext. 385, 793, or 770

Get the Retraining you need • Accounting • Business • Computer Science • Criminal Justice • Diesel • Electronics, Robotics & Automation

• Energy/Power • Medical Assistant, or Administrative Assistant • Welding • Nursing Assistant Certified • more programs, demand list may change

Centralia College Class Schedule, Spring 2014  

News, registration, admissions and program information, and classes offered at Centralia College for Spring 2014 quarter.

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