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HEADMASTER’S REPORT 2015


NEXT GENERATION TEACHING AND LEARNING Strategic Plan Focus Areas

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LEADERS SCHOOL BOARD

PREFECTS

Following the AGM April 2015 Chairman Deputy Chair Treasurer Secretary

Ken Jolly AM Alan Williams Tim Cullen Christian Hobbs

Board Members Ashley Fill Margaret Haseltine Stephen Brahams Rosemary Johnston John Dyer

Executive

Walter Hopkins BUSINESS MANAGER

Acacia Katie Bowden, Amber Can, Rhys Greenwood, Victoria Guthrie, Jesse McGrath, Thomas Northall-Little, Brooke Piper, Daniel Tuddenham, Connor Wilkinson, Lachlan Wilkinson Grevillea Hagan Ashley, Liam Brewin Higgins, Eliza Cross, Jasmine Dick, Claudia Dobrohotoff, Nicholas Geddes, Emma Hunter, Laura Innes Barwick, Annabelle Lee, Liam Loader, Joseph McGrath, Emily Moore, Lauren Nicholson, Stephanie O’Callaghan Ironbark Jessica Balthazaar, Kain Barnett, Sophie Cox, Jessica Handley, Scarlett Harbin-Owens, James Herron, Elliott Holohan-Hill, Alannah Hook, Beycan Irmako, Vaughan Kernan, Alexa Khoury, Jeremy King, Lily McLachlan, Peter Schmidt, Samantha Schwarz

Linda Webb HEAD OF JUNIOR SCHOOL

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Eliza Cross and Liam Loader GREVILLEA HOUSE CAPTAINS

Acacia Captains: Olivia Stewart, Noah Needham, Gabrielle Taylor, Noah Stewart Vice Captains: Dominique Woodford, Max Rattray, Anni Lynch, Joshua Dickford Grevillea Captains: Anna Battersby, Angus Schoffl, Grace McGimpsey, Harrison Williams Vice Captains: Leah Doyle, Jack Jenkins, Jenna Watkins, Jack Quinlan

Steven Bennett HEAD OF MIDDLE SCHOOL

Katie Bowden and Thomas Northall-Little ACACIA HOUSE CAPTAINS

Nicholii Jannah Anderson, Paiden Bromfield, Evangeline Buckmaster, Lily Cameron, Olivia Gillam, Samuel Henry, Callie Kavanagh, Angus McQueen, Daniel Mezrani, Hunter Murray, Anna Norman, Caitilin Pettigrew, Mollie Reed, Nathalia Scott, Alexis Wildman

JUNIOR HOUSE LEADERS

Denise McDonough HEAD OF SENIOR COLLEGE

Lily Cameron and Daniel Mezrani HEAD PREFECTS

Alexa Khoury and Beycan Irmako IRONBARK HOUSE CAPTAINS

Ironbark Captains: Olivia Johns, Alex Cochrane-Smith, Lucinda Incoll, Hudson Bush Vice Captains: Georgia Bowers, Seb Plummer, Poppy Band, Juah Mare Nicholii Captains: Lilli Mitchell, Tim Wilkins, Mika Kulak, Hugh Wassall Vice Captains: Saba Horne, Eli Knox, Matilda Allen, Toby Kitchen

Mollie Reed and Hunter Murray NICHOLII HOUSE CAPTAINS


Since its launch in June 2015, we’ve been busy exploring the depth and breadth of the plan and seeking new ways to enhance and further develop our teaching and learning activities across all facets of the school.

Each year when I write my introduction for the Headmaster’s Report, I remark on what an outstanding year it’s been in the life of the school. Typically, every new year brings its own challenges and opportunities but with each passing year we seem to be able to compound and build on our successes from the previous year. 2015 was no different. Not only did we celebrate our 30th anniversary year, experience unprecedented enrolment demand and achieve outstanding academic results, we also launched the Next Generation Teaching and Learning strategic plan – a comprehensive map of where we are headed over the next 5 years.

I’m very proud of an extremely bus develop and defi strategic plan, I s community and f I have been extremely pleased with the energy of teachers, students, staff and parents as they embrace the plan. It’s very satisfying to see how confidently teachers are integrating key aspects and new learning into their everyday teaching programs and practices.

You won’t need t I’ll be publishing achievements an progress. They’ll photo galleries a our Next Generat be summarising t Report together success.

During the secon absorbed in the unpacking the go actions for the co Headmaster’s Re have achieved d and beyond.

This Hea insight i Gramma addresse and Lear

FROM THE HEADMASTE

This This Headmaster’s Headmaster’s Report Report provides provides a summary a summary insight insight into into thethe operations operations of of Central Central Coast Coast Grammar Grammar School School during during thethe 2015 2015 school school year. year. It It addresses addresses thethe goals goals of of our our Next Next Generation Generation Teaching Teaching and and Learning Learning strategic plan launched mid-year. strategic plan launched mid-year.

William William Low Low

Each Each year year when when I write I write mymy introduction introduction forfor the the Headmaster’s Report, I remark what outstanding Headmaster’s Report, I remark onon what anan outstanding year been the the school. Typically, every new year it’sit’s been in in the lifelife ofof the school. Typically, every new year brings own challenges and opportunities but with year brings itsits own challenges and opportunities but with each passing year seem able compound and each passing year wewe seem toto bebe able toto compound and build our successes from the previous year. 2015 was build onon our successes from the previous year. 2015 was different. Not only celebrate our 30th nono different. Not only diddid wewe celebrate our 30th anniversary year, experience unprecedented enrolment anniversary year, experience unprecedented enrolment demand and achieve outstanding academic results, demand and achieve outstanding academic results, wewe also launched the Next Generation Teaching and Learning also launched the Next Generation Teaching and Learning strategic plan a comprehensive map where are strategic plan – a– comprehensive map ofof where wewe are headed over the next 5 years. headed over the next 5 years.

William Low

ttle

FROM FROM THE THE HEADMASTER HEADMASTER

During the second semester were thoroughly During the second semester wewe were thoroughly absorbed the discovery and investigation phase, absorbed in in the discovery and investigation phase, unpacking the goals and planning key deliverables and unpacking the goals and planning key deliverables and actions the coming months and years. This actions forfor the coming months and years. This Headmaster’s Report provides a snapshot what Headmaster’s Report provides a snapshot ofof what wewe have achieved during 2015 and our next steps 2016 have achieved during 2015 and our next steps forfor 2016 and beyond. and beyond.

Since launch June 2015, we’ve been busy exploring Since itsits launch in in June 2015, we’ve been busy exploring the depth and breadth the plan and seeking new ways the depth and breadth ofof the plan and seeking new ways enhance and further develop our teaching and learning toto enhance and further develop our teaching and learning activities across facets the school. activities across allall facets ofof the school.

You won’t need wait another year next update. You won’t need toto wait another year forfor mymy next update. publishing termly editorial reports sharing our I’llI’ll bebe publishing termly editorial reports sharing our achievements and the innovations that are driving our achievements and the innovations that are driving our progress. They’ll published our website using video, progress. They’ll bebe published onon our website using video, photo galleries and infographics you can experience photo galleries and infographics soso you can experience our Next Generation advances a contemporary way. our Next Generation advances in in a contemporary way. I’llI’ll summarising these editorials 2016 Headmaster’s bebe summarising these editorials in in mymy 2016 Headmaster’s Report together with evaluation and measurement our Report together with evaluation and measurement ofof our success. success.

I have been extremely pleased with the energy I have been extremely pleased with the energy ofof teachers, students, staff and parents they embrace the teachers, students, staff and parents asas they embrace the plan. very satisfying see how confidently teachers plan. It’sIt’s very satisfying toto see how confidently teachers are integrating key aspects and new learning into their are integrating key aspects and new learning into their everyday teaching programs and practices. everyday teaching programs and practices.

very proud our collective achievements what was I’mI’m very proud ofof our collective achievements in in what was extremely busy and stimulating year. further anan extremely busy and stimulating year. AsAs wewe further develop and define our key objectives under the new develop and define our key objectives under the new strategic plan, I sense the strength our dynamic school strategic plan, I sense the strength ofof our dynamic school community and feel great excitement our future. community and feel great excitement forfor our future.

The establishment Strategic Planning Groups The establishment ofof Strategic Planning Groups comprising teachers and staff has been a great way comprising teachers and staff has been a great way toto involve everyone the planning process. delighted involve everyone in in the planning process. I’mI’m delighted byby the collaboration and communication within and amongst the collaboration and communication within and amongst groups which creating tremendous momentum groups which is is creating tremendous momentum forfor improvement levels school-wide. improvement atat allall levels school-wide.

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NEXT GENERATION LEARNERS

Goal: Create a contemporary learning community inclusive of students, parents and teachers and a K-12 next generation learning framework, encompassing the complimentary mix of learning characteristics necessary to participate, contribute and prosper in society. Consultation and research has taken place to identify next generation learning characteristics and needs.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 •

Investigation and development of the key learning characteristics that will define next generation learning at CCGS is underway and this will be used to promote and communicate an appropriate learning culture within the school for students, teachers and parents.

A survey asked staff what next generation learning ‘looks like, sounds like and feels like’. Parents and students will also be surveyed.

Schools and educational institutions that have successfully implemented similar learning frameworks are being identified.

Conceptual areas for a new next generation learning framework are being identified.

NEXT STEPS •

Research schools and educational institutions that have successfully implemented similar learning frameworks. Arrange school visits during 2016 to collect data and insights into best practice.

Develop consensus on CCGS next generation learning attributes and create a visual representation of these characteristics.

Create an interactive continuum and scope and sequence of learning which aligns with the digital literacy scope and sequence. Use this framework to embed next generation learning characteristics alongside digital literacy skills in the classroom.

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BACK TO SCHOOL To cater for the next generation of learners, it’s important that teachers understand what their learning needs are. Teachers and schools have a key role in assisting young people to negotiate the maze of learning opportunities provided by technology. Schools also have a responsibility to reinvent themselves in order to meet these needs. In response to this, Head of English Kate Tracy and Director of Teaching and Learning Damon Cooper went back to school for a day in the life of a CCGS student. They wore the school uniform, ate lunch with the students and attended classes as CCGS students. This valuable activity gave them key insights into the learning opportunities and barriers for students as next generation learners. Their insights will help to inform our learning spaces and approach to next generation learning.


NEXT NEXT NEXT GENERATION GENERATION GENERATION LEARNERS LEARNERS LEARNERS

NEXT NEXT NEXT GENERATION GENERATION GENERATION LEARNING LEARNING LEARNING ININACTION IN ACTION ACTION

Year Year 8Year students 8 students 8 students completed completed completed a new a new afully new fully digitally fully digitally digitally integrated integrated integrated Inquiry Inquiry Inquiry Based Learning (IBL) program. The new course creates flexible waysways Based Based Learning Learning (IBL) program. (IBL) program. The new The course new course creates creates flexible flexible ways learning and allows students move through the course their ofof learning of learning and allows and allows students students toto move to move through through the course the course atat their at their own pace. own pace. own pace.

These These These students students students are areworking are working working ononanan on English English an English project. project. project. Some Some Some are areusing using the thewhiteboard whiteboard totobrainstorm, brainstorm, while while others others use useuse are using the whiteboard to brainstorm, while others laptops laptops totoresearch research ideas ideas ororengage engage ononthe the large screen screen toto to laptops to research ideas or engage onlarge the large screen co-author co-author a adigitally digitally collaborative collaborative document. document. co-author a digitally collaborative document.

‘Write a Book in a in Day’ offered a new creative opportunity CCGS ‘Write ‘Write a Book a in Book a Day’ aoffered Day’ offered a new acreative new creative opportunity opportunity forfor CCGS for CCGS students across the school work together write, design and and students students across across the school the school toto work to together work together toto write, to write, design design and illustrate entire book in only one day. This was a live laboratory illustrate illustrate anan entire an entire book in book only inone only day. one This day. was This a was live laboratory a live laboratory next generation learning skills with students collaborating, forfor next forgeneration next generation learning learning skills with skills students with students collaborating, collaborating, planning, communicating, problem solving and sharing their ideasideas planning, planning, communicating, communicating, problem problem solving solving and sharing and sharing their ideas their whilst working digitally. whilst whilst working working digitally. digitally.

the English department’s flipped classroom, students moving In In the In English the English department’s department’s flipped flipped classroom, classroom, students students areare moving are moving from static consumers information dynamic participants their from static from consumers static consumers ofof information of information toto dynamic to dynamic participants participants in in their in their learning. Content presented online which students can access learning. learning. Content Content is is presented is presented online online which which students students can access can access anywhere and anytime. anywhere anywhere and anytime. and anytime.

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This Thispersonalised personalised way wayof oflearning learning allows allows students students totowork work This personalised way of learning allows students to work ininways ways which which benefit benefit their their individual individual learning learning styles styles whilst whilst in ways which benefit their individual learning styles whilst engaging engaging inina acollaborative activity activity with withtheir their peers peers and andand engaging incollaborative a collaborative activity with their peers teachers. teachers. teachers.


ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Goal: Every student achieves his or her academic potential.

Work has commenced on a new Gifted and Talented Policy and the creation of a framework for teaching, learning and assessment. Evidence based and data driven improvement plans are being implemented school-wide.

NEXT STEPS •

Research gifted and talented best practice in K-12 schools and accelerated university access options. Review current research models on identification and provision. Conduct a situational analysis of gifted and talented students at CCGS.

Write a new Gifted and Talented Policy in the latter part of 2016.

Assess and trial potential frameworks for teaching, learning and assessment. Visit schools and institutions that have a sound framework in place. Shortlist and evaluate potential frameworks and develop a specific implementation plan in the latter part of 2016.

Analyse student data to identify focus areas for improvement plans. Implement specific strategies and links to key learning areas. Monitor and evaluate improvement plans to ensure they meet the needs of students.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 •

A Gifted and Talented Policy Working Group has been developing an effective process for creating a new Policy from our existing guidelines. The positive elements of the existing guidelines have been reviewed, sub teams have been formed and these teams are working on specific areas. The importance of seeking and understanding students’ views of Gifted and Talented provision and policy has been identified as a crucial part of the research process and resulting Policy.

Research is underway to inform the decision to adopt, adapt or develop our own framework for teaching, learning and assessment. A decision matrix has identified the key priorities for the school.

Evidence based, data driven improvement plans are being implemented at school, sub-school and department levels to ensure the continual improvement of academic achievement through identification of weaknesses and strengths.

Finding academic opportunities for students to challenge and extend themselves is important. Two students achieved outstanding results in the Newcastle Permanent Mathematics Competition. Brandon (Year 5) was awarded 2nd Place Hunter Region and Joshua (Year 6) was awarded 1st Place Central Coast District

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Jessica Kitchen (Year 8) won the inaugural UNSW Bragg Student Science Prize for Science writing. Priya Soni (Year 8) placed runnerup. This prize celebrated non-fiction Science essay writing and is designed to encourage the next generation of Science writers, researchers and leaders.


ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

HSC HSC HSC TheThe 2015 2015 HSCHSC results results were were veryvery pleasing pleasing withwith Central Central The 2015 HSC results were very pleasing with Central Coast Grammar School ranking in the NSW Coast Grammar School ranking in the TopTop 100100 NSW Coast Grammar School ranking in the Top 100 NSW schools a second consecutive (Sydney Morning schools for for a second consecutive yearyear (Sydney Morning schools for a second consecutive year (Sydney Morning HSC Herald, 17 December 2015). Alexa Khoury named Herald, 17 December 2015). Alexa Khoury waswas named as as Herald, 17 December 2015). Alexa Khoury was named as DUX of 2015. Highlights can be viewed on page thethe DUX of 2015. HSCHSC Highlights can be viewed on page The of 2015 HSCHSC results were verycan pleasing with Central the DUX 2015. Highlights be viewed on page 18this of this report. 18 of report. Grammar School ranking in the Top 100 NSW 18 ofCoast this report.

Elliott Elliott Holohan-Hill Holohan-Hill (2015) (2015) wonwon an award an award fromfrom the Society the Society and and Elliott Holohan-Hill (2015) won an award from the Society and Culture Association for HSC her HSC Personal Interest Project. Culture Association for her Personal Interest Project. She She was was Culture Association for her HSC Personal Interest Project. She was of only 8 students to win prestigious award of 4600) one one of only 8 students to win this this prestigious award (out(out of 4600) for for one of only 8 students to win this prestigious award (out of 4600) for her thesis investigation the portrayal of patriarchal her thesis “An “An investigation into into howhow the portrayal of patriarchal her thesis “An investigation into how the portrayal of patriarchal attitudes in western advertising media is used to inform attitudes in western printprint advertising media is used to inform the the attitudes in western print advertising usedfrom to inform the and Elliott (2015) media won anisaward the Society construction ofHolohan-Hill feminine identity.” construction of feminine identity.” construction ofCulture feminine identity.” Association for her HSC Personal Interest Project. She was one of only 8 students to win this prestigious award (out of 4600) for her thesis “An investigation into how the portrayal of patriarchal attitudes in western print advertising media is used to inform the construction of feminine identity.”

schools for a second consecutive year (Sydney Morning Herald, 17 December 2015). Alexa Khoury was named as NAPLAN NAPLAN NAPLAN the DUX of 2015. HSC Highlights can be viewed on page 18 of this report.

CCGS CCGS again again achieved achieved excellent excellent results results in the in the 2015 2015 CCGS again achieved excellent results in the 2015 NAPLAN tests across Junior Middle Schools. NAPLAN tests across thethe Junior andand Middle Schools. NAPLAN tests across the Junior and Middle Schools. NAPLAN Compared to the 2014 NAPLAN results, 2015 many Compared to the 2014 NAPLAN results, 2015 sawsaw many Compared to the 2014 NAPLAN results, 2015 saw many areas of improvement. In June Weekend Australian areas of improvement. In June thethe Weekend Australian areasCCGS of improvement. June the Weekend again achievedInexcellent results in the Australian 2015 ranked CCGS as the Primary School, ranked CCGS as the 25th25th Primary School, 26th26th NAPLAN across Junior School, and Middle Schools. ranked CCGS tests as the 25ththe Primary 26th Coeducational School and 17th Comprehensive Private Coeducational School and 17th Comprehensive Private Compared to the 2014 NAPLAN results, 2015 many Coeducational School and 17th Comprehensivesaw Private Primary in Australia 21 June 2015). Primary School in Australia (Saturday, 21 June 2015). areas of School improvement. June(Saturday, the Weekend Primary School in AustraliaIn(Saturday, 21 June Australian 2015). NAPLAN results can be viewed on page 19this of this report. NAPLAN results can be25th viewed on page 1926th of report. ranked CCGS as the Primary School, NAPLAN results can be viewed on page 19 of this report. Coeducational School and 17th Comprehensive Private Primary School in Australia (Saturday, 21 June 2015). NAPLAN results can be viewed on page 19 of this report.

CCGS CCGS finished finished withwith fantastic fantastic results results in the in da theVinci da Vinci Decathlon, Decathlon, an an CCGS finished with fantastic results thechallenge da Vinci Decathlon, an minds academic competition designed to stimulate the minds academic competition designed toin challenge and and stimulate the academic competition designed to5challenge and stimulate the minds of school students. Our team finished 1stMathematics of school students. Our YearYear 5 team finished 1st in in Mathematics and and st of3rd school students. Our Year 5 team finished 1 inteam inthe Mathematics rd stDecathlon, stand CCGS finished with fantastic results da Vinci an 3 in Science. in Science. In Cartography, In Cartography, the Year the Year 10 team 10 finished finished 1 and 1 and the the 3rd in Year Science. In Cartography, 10 team finishedand 1ststimulate and the the minds academic competition designed to challenge nd .2nd .the Year 8 team finished Year 8 team finished 2 Year 8 team finished 2nd . of school students. Our Year 5 team finished 1st in Mathematics and 3rd in Science. In Cartography, the Year 10 team finished 1st and the Year 8 team finished 2nd .

rd place CCGS 3rd place CCGS tooktook out rd 3out at the at RoboCup the RoboCup Junior Junior Australian Australian Open Open took out 3rd RoboCup place at theJunior RoboCup Junior Australian CCGS took outCCGS 3 place at the Australian Open Open Championships in only our second of competing. Championships in only our second yearyear of competing. The The teamteam has has Championships in only year our second year of competing. Championships in only our second of competing. The teamThe hasteam has invited to the international competition in 2016. beenbeen invited to the international competition in 2016. to the international competition been invited tobeen theinvited international competition in 2016. in 2016.

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BALANCED EDUCATION Goal: Every student experiences a balanced education.

Wellbeing programs were identified as our initial focus because enhancing the safe and nurturing environment we provide for each individual will enable every student to achieve their personal and academic potential. The wellbeing curricula is incorporated throughout the fibre of the everyday workings of the school. It stems directly from the values that underpin the school and is both implicit in the way we operate and interact as well as explicit in our structures, scheduled programs and expectations.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 •

A Wellbeing Committee has been formed from teaching staff K-12. Many, though not all, have special responsibility in the wellbeing area.

Three specific focus areas were identified: interpersonal skills, resilience and leadership.

The group identified all the programs, structures and activities that promote student wellbeing using group contributions, brainstorming and whole school staff workshops.

This audit of our current wellbeing provision has been mapped to particular year groups K-12 in order to determine current scope and sequence.

NEXT STEPS •

Evaluate current scope and sequence to identify gaps and overlaps and fine tune for relevance and age appropriate approach.

Consider how best to use House Family time for delivering wellbeing programs.

Develop a cohesive, well-articulated wellbeing program that is sustainable and supports the fundamental values of the school.

Ensure that a common language is used from K-12 with age appropriate meaning underpinning it.

2015 saw student commitment to community service strengthen and grow. Year 9 students participated in a new Sunday Lunches program run by Gosford Uniting Church which aims to feed up to 50 needy people each Sunday.

During a series of Year 10 seminars, School Psychologists explored the notion of positive psychology and character strengths. The Year 10 students consolidated their learning by leading similar activities in their House families.

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BALANCED BALANCED EDUCATION EDUCATION

EMOTIONAL EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE An innovative An innovative newnew anti-anxiety anti-anxiety program program waswas trialled trialled in in Kindergarten to Year 3. A3.series of story books including Kindergarten to Year A series of story books including Please Don’t Feed TheThe Worry BugBug allowed teachers to to Please Don’t Feed Worry allowed teachers facilitate open discussion about complex emotional issues, facilitate open discussion about complex emotional issues, giving children andand families thethe language to process giving children families language to process difficult emotions. difficult emotions. Potential cancan be unlocked when children are are ableable to to Potential be unlocked when children understand andand cope withwith their feelings through learning understand cope their feelings through learning important concepts likelike empathy, self-confidence andand important concepts empathy, self-confidence self-awareness. Different emotions were presented as as self-awareness. Different emotions were presented quirky characters called Worry Woos whowho embark on on quirky characters called Worry Woos embark journeys of self-awareness in the story books. Having journeys of self-awareness in the story books. Having cuddly toystoys to personify thethe emotions really brought them cuddly to personify emotions really brought them to life. to life.

41 Junior 41 Junior School School sportsmen sportsmen and and sportswomen sportswomen headed headed off to off to Tamworth to attend the National Primary School Games (NPSG). Tamworth to attend the National Primary School Games (NPSG). ThisThis newnew sports tourtour was was so successful thatthat it will continue in 2016. sports so successful it will continue in 2016.

TheThe Junior School Wellbeing Coordinator, thethe Learning Junior School Wellbeing Coordinator, Learning Support Team andand thethe School Counsellors teamed up with Support Team School Counsellors teamed up with class teachers to support thisthis program. class teachers to support program. CCGS was was named the inaugural winner of the Champion CCGS named the inaugural winner of HICES the HICES Champion Debating School award, due due to excellent Debating results across Debating School award, to excellent Debating results across the board. the board.

A rich A rich and and comprehensive comprehensive cocurricular cocurricular program program is a key is a aspect key aspect of a of a balanced education. BoysBoys dance was was an was an extremely positive balanced education. dance an was an extremely positive (and(and energetic) addition to our Performing ArtsArts energetic) addition to cocurricular our cocurricular Performing offering. Under the instruction of CCGS Dance teacher, Larissa offering. Under the instruction of CCGS Dance teacher, Larissa Caruana, the new YearYear 4 - 64Boys CrewCrew debuted theirtheir talents at the Caruana, the new - 6 Boys debuted talents at the K-2 Presentation Assembly and and left the wanting more! K-2 Presentation Assembly left audience the audience wanting more! Cocurriculart dance will continue to grow and and expand in 2016. Cocurriculart dance will continue to grow expand in 2016.

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TEACHER QUALITY

Goal: Continually develop expert Next Generation teachers and the professional relationships between students,

teachers and parents, which are fundamental to excellent practice and outstanding student outcomes.

Teacher quality has been enhanced by shaping professional learning opportunities for teachers, promoting teacher collaboration and enhancing the teacher appraisal process.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 •

1:1 and small group collaborative professional learning sessions have been offered to teachers to improve digital literacy skills, discuss key challenges and learn from each other across the K-12 continuum. The sessions have been very popular and staff have reported positive engagement and enhanced understanding of learning across the school. Key research into an appropriate professional learning program has been undertaken. All teachers have engaged in the development of a professional learning decision matrix based on the priorities of the school. Eight focus areas have been identified.

Staff have undergone a process of self-assessment to identify their professional learning needs.

To ensure that all teachers are working towards the teaching and learning goals and objectives detailed in the strategic plan, the teacher appraisal process has been reviewed and has been realigned to focus on the key areas of the plan. Appraisals have now been completed for the majority of teachers.

The school continued to receive a very strong response to recruitment campaigns. We welcomed six new temporary and permanent teachers in 2015, following a very competitive selection process.

NEXT STEPS •

Expand the use of professional learning clusters of teachers to ensure a collaborative approach to teacher reflection and facilitate more teachers working more effectively together.

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Prioritise the eight focus areas in the professional learning decision matrix to guide future professional development.

Develop a scope and sequence for professional learning to enhance the ability of staff to teach next generation learning characteristics.

Enhance the appraisal process by training middle managers to increase opportunities for feedback and improve the quality of feedback.

Research ways to embed increased collegial feedback and student feedback into the appraisal process.

Make recommendations for a mechanism to use appraisal feedback to inform our professional learning plan.

TEACHER ACCREDITATION Central Coast Grammar School has had another successful year in regards to teacher accreditation with all Experienced Teacher and Proficient Teacher applicants meeting accreditation successfully. To further demonstrate the depth and quality of our teaching staff, one of our Junior School teachers, Annette McPherson, was requested by the Board of Studies to be an exemplar of an Experienced Teacher for the next round of applicants.


TEACHER TEACHER QUALITY QUALITY

FROM FROM THE THE CLASSROOM CLASSROOM

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DIGITAL LITERACY

Goal: Develop a high level of digital literacy, with staff and students as active learners and users, to enable them to function effectively now and into the future.

Staff and students have enthusiastically embraced new digital literacy tools, learning experiences and cyber safety awareness, working in collaborative and connected groups.

A database of recommended digital literacy skill sets has been created by researching frameworks in use in other schools and reviewing documentation from the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) and the Board of Studies.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 •

New tools were introduced to support digital literacy including: • Office 365 cloud platform to facilitate collaborative work and learning for students and staff • Webzone control module so teachers can manage access to specific websites at class level • Video conferencing to connect with global and local learning opportunities • BYOD (bring your own device) for Years 10-12 • Edublogs, an easy, safe and private platform for students to share their learning

VIDEO CONFERENCING CREATES GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Students have created digital works in a range innovative learning projects. Sociology students planned, filmed and edited a video assignment. The Write a Book in a Day event made creative use of Google collaborative resources. English students designed an app for iPad to teach literacy to younger students. Digital Citizenship courses have been provided for students and parents. Cyber safety expert Leonie Smith, known as ‘The Cyber Safety Lady’, worked with students and parents on How to Keep Kids Safe Online. Years 7-9 completed an in house, 3 hour Cyber Awareness course. Digital literacy professional learning workshops have been introduced for teachers. Groups from across the school worked with the Director of Innovative Learning/Digital Literacy to create innovative learning programs. They learned new skills and received support to integrate digital learning technology in their lessons. Feedback from participants indicated increased confidence and valuable sharing of ideas and experience within and beyond the groups.

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New video conference technology has connected students to learning opportunities in local and global communities. Year 6 shared their Antarctic vehicle designs with scientists stationed in the Antarctic. Year 9 Sociology students discussed the ethical issues of genetic engineering with scientific researchers at the Garvan Institute. Year 3 and Year 4 were immersed in convict life with the Sydney Living Museum. Year 12 students can also make important connections with other HSC students across NSW in preparation and revision for their HSC exams.


DIGITAL DIGITAL LITERACY LITERACY NEXT NEXT STEPS STEPS •

•Leverage Leverage thethe functionality functionality in the in the newnew Learning Learning Management System to connect learners andand teachers Management System to connect learners teachers andand facilitate collaboration inside andand outside thethe facilitate collaboration inside outside classroom in ainvirtual learning environment. classroom a virtual learning environment. Opportunities include hosting digital resources andand Opportunities include hosting digital resources showcasing digital learning; optimising learning showcasing digital learning; optimising learning management using learning analytics to offer a more management using learning analytics to offer a more holistic view of students andand engaging parents in in holistic view of students engaging parents student learning. student learning.

ageage appropriate cyber awareness courses •Expand Expand appropriate cyber awareness courses across thethe Junior andand Senior Schools. across Junior Senior Schools.

external eSmart accreditation through •Achieve Achieve external eSmart accreditation through planning, implementing andand sustaining policies, planning, implementing sustaining policies, practices andand whole-school change processes. eSmart practices whole-school change processes. eSmart willwill ensure students, teachers andand thethe wider school ensure students, teachers wider school community are are equipped to embrace smart, safesafe andand community equipped to embrace smart, responsible useuse of information andand communication responsible of information communication technology. technology.

through all staff completing a digital literacy •Work Work through all staff completing a digital literacy professional learning workshop andand develop a more professional learning workshop develop a more formal structure for for showcasing andand sharing outcomes. formal structure showcasing sharing outcomes.

thethe ICT ICT Curriculum Support Team a bookable •Make Make Curriculum Support Team a bookable resource offering 1:1 1:1 support to develop newnew programs resource offering support to develop programs andand resources. resources.

schools thatthat have introduced a digital literacy •Research Research schools have introduced a digital literacy skills framework andand develop a K-12 digital literacy skills framework develop a K-12 digital literacy scope andand sequence. scope sequence.

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Madeleine Madeleine Calverly-Haack Calverly-Haack and and Matthew Matthew Douglass Douglass (Year(Year 8) applied 8) applied and and werewere accepted for the Voices V2.0V2.0 iPhone accepted for Student the Student Voices iPhone Mentoring/Training opportunity withwith Jason Van Van Genderen (Student Mentoring/Training opportunity Jason Genderen (Student Voices Filmmaker). TheyThey werewere trained in shooting and and editing video Voices Filmmaker). trained in shooting editing video on aon mobile phone and and identifying opportunities to create student a mobile phone identifying opportunities to create student centred video for the community. centred video for school the school community.

Junior Junior School School Students Students usedused newnew digital digital toolstools available available on iPads on iPads to to undertake whole classclass research and and collaborative learning. undertake whole research collaborative learning.


COMMUNITY

Goal: Enriched engagement with the school’s community, present and past, immediate and international.

The celebration of the school’s 30th anniversary brought diverse strands of our community together online and at fresh new events.

NEXT STEPS •

Continue to support the P&F to expand and refresh the range of community events that develop the social capital of the school. Identify further P&F projects that support the strategic goals of the school.

Build on our relationship with Symphony Central Coast to maximise the benefits of having an ‘orchestra in residence.’

Create student mentoring opportunities through events like Australian Business Week, seeking dynamic mentors from our wider community.

Expand our contribution to community events, creating more opportunities for students to exercise community leadership.

Create new opportunities for cultural and educational experiences through travelling to other countries and hosting visits to CCGS.

Leverage the communication tools in the new School Management System to create a community portal that increases community participation and connects parents and teachers to work together.

Launch a new school promotional website that communicates the school’s ethos and identity in a fresh and contemporary way.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 •

New P&F leadership generated new community events including a Masquerade Ball, Business Cocktails and Christmas Carols, creating networking and socialising opportunities for parents, families and businesses. The P&F were proud to direct funds they raised during the year towards the construction of bus shelters for school bus pick up and drop off. Our relationship with Symphony Central Coast community orchestra commenced with weekly rehearsals and four public concerts in our Performing Arts Centre, attracting patrons from the wider arts community. Year 12 students were connected with community leaders, including former Governor of NSW Professor the Hon Dame Marie Bashir AD CVO, who addressed students during a new Colloquium Series of dinners. Past students and parents reconnected with the school sharing their CCGS memories in response to the #ccgsThrowbackThursday Facebook campaign.

Our community’s creative spirit and depth of talent was showcased at the 30th Anniversary Gala Concert, which brought together international guests and performances by past and present students, teachers and parents.

A new chapter in the school community’s history was created when the whole school assembled on the field to celebrate our 30th anniversary. The resulting video, CCGS Sky High, was viewed many thousands of times.

The school thanked its wider community in a local 30th anniversary advertising campaign.

16/ HEADMASTER’S REPORT 2015

The Masquerade Ball was a highlight of the year and brought new and existing families together.


GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT Goal : Ensure the sustainability of our institution through effective and efficient governance and management.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2015 The Next Generation Teaching and Learning strategic plan was launched in June 2015 and is proving a powerful force for school cohesion and development. Staff have been engaged with the plan through a whole school workshop and working groups have been formed around the key focus areas. •

New Learning Management System (LMS) and School Management System (SMS) platforms have been evaluated through extensive consultation and feedback from key stakeholder groups. The school’s governance policies have been reviewed by the Board in line with BOSTES compliance requirements. The school’s main risks and mitigation strategies have been reviewed by the Board’s Risk Management Committee. A new private Board portal has been established to assist Board members to carry out their duties. The quality of our learning facilities has been enhanced and nationally recognised. Kindergarten classrooms were refurbished and a fourth classroom added. The Performing Arts Centre won three national Master Builders Awards including the best public building in Australia $5 million to $ 10 million.

17/ HEADMASTER’S REPORT 2015

Contemporary digital marketing methodology and technology has been implemented to create more personal, relevant, efficient and measurable marketing and communication.

Day 1 2015 enrolments were 1172, a 3.6% increase on day 1 2014 (1131).

Operating results have been subject to monthly review. The financial position of the school is detailed on page 18 of this report.

A 2014 Annual Report was published in compliance with Board of Studies regulatory requirements.

NEXT STEPS •

Select LMS and SMS vendor and deploy software and training during 2016 with a view to completion early 2017.

Develop a mobile responsive promotional website during 2016.

Establish a new Masterplan Committee in 2016 to define and develop a new school Masterplan.


FINANCIAL INFORMATION INCOME

PERFORMANCE 2015 ($'000)

Fees and private income

19,011

Commonwealth recurrent grants

7,098

State recurrent grants

1,954

PAC Fundraising TOTAL

EXPENDITURE

136 28,199

2015 ($'000)

Salaries, allowances & related costs

18,890

Teaching resources & administration costs

4,210

Depreciation

1,504

Property expenses

1,201

Interest

798

Operating leases

528

TOTAL

NET TRADING SURPLUS

27,131

2015 ($'000)

Income

28,199

Expenditure

27,131

NET SURPLUS

18/ HEADMASTER’S REPORT 2015

1,068


PERFORMANCE EXTERNAL COMPETITIONS ICAS English Y2-6 3 High Distinction | 37 Distinction ICAS Spelling Y3-6 3 High Distinction | 21 Distinction

NAPLAN The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy tracks the progress of students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. The tables show the percentage of CCGS students compared to state school students (Percentages for the components may not add up to 100 due to rounding).

YEAR 3

ICAS Writing Y3-6 7 High Distinction | 28 Distinction

In Y3 there are 6 achievement bands. The bands start at Band 1. Band 6 is the top band

SUBJECT

CCGS% BAND 5-6

STATE % BAND 5-6

ICAS English Y7-10 3 High Distinction | 18 Distinction

Reading

78.2

50

Writing

93.6

54.4

Spelling

62.9

47.2

ICAS Mathematics Y2-6 5 High Distinction | 32 Distinction

Grammar & Punctuation

83.3

52.5

Numeracy

61.6

38.1

ICAS Mathematics Y7-11 3 High Distinction | 23 Distinction

YEAR 5

ICAS Science Y5-6 2 High Distinction | 12 Distinction ICAS Science Y7-10 5 High Distinction | 31 Distinction ICAS Computer Skills Y5-6 2 High Distinction | 17 Distinction

In Y5 there are 6 achievement bands. The bands start at Band 1. Band 6 is the top band

SUBJECT

STATE % BAND 5-6

Reading

64.9

38

Writing

58.3

21.4

Spelling

63.8

39.9

Grammar & Punctuation

75.8

38.7

Numeracy

55

30.7

Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians Y4-6 7 Distinction

YEAR 7

Newcastle Permanent Mathematics Competition Y5-6 1 Year 5 student awarded 2nd Place Hunter Region 1 Year 6 student awarded 1st Place Central Coast District 10 High Distinction | 30 Distinction

SUBJECT

HICES Mathematics Tournament Y7-8 A team of 4 students was awarded 2nd Place

CCGS% BAND 5-6

In Y7 there are 6 achievement bands. The bands start at Band 4. Band 9 is the top band

CCGS% BAND 8-9

STATE % BAND 8-9

Reading

53.7

31.8

Writing

33.6

18.9

Spelling

54.7

39.9

Grammar & Punctuation

51.9

34.3

Numeracy

55.6

29.1

Mathematical Association of NSW Y11 Colin Doyle Memorial Prize, Hunter & Central Coast 1 equal 3rd Place and 1 Honourable Mention

YEAR 9

SUBJECT

University of Newcastle Science and Engineering Challenge Y10 A team of 25 students was awarded 2nd Place Central Coast region

CCGS% BAND 8-9

STATE % BAND 8-9

Reading

45.8

25.2

Inaugural UNSW BRAGG Student Prize for Science Writing 2 Year 8 students were awarded 1st and 2nd Places National Geographic Channel Australian Geography Competition Y7-10 8 High Distinction | 10 Distinction 19/ HEADMASTER’S REPORT 2015

In Y9 there are 6 achievement bands. The bands start at Band 4. Band 9 is the top band

Writing

37

14.6

Spelling

48.2

27.7

Grammar & Punctuation

47.2

19.2

Numeracy

55.5

28.6


Central Coast Grammar School Arundel Road, Erina Heights, NSW 2260 T: +61 2 4367 6766 E: info@ccgs.nsw.edu.au ccgs.nsw.edu.au

Headmaster's Report 2015  
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