Issuu on Google+

RE: cento rifermenti x cento libri x cento mondi possibili Pierluigi Anselmi <minimum@fastwebnet.it> A:sm fs centoxcentoxcento@ymail.com Web Immagini Maps News Gmail Altro

Google|Fitzcarraldo|cerca| cerca: nel Web|pagine in Italiano|pagine provenienti da: Italia

Fitzcarraldo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Fitzcarraldo is a 1982 film written and directed by Werner Herzog and starring Klaus Kinski as the title character. It portrays would-be rubber baron Brian ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzcarraldo - Cached - Similar Fitzcarraldo (1995 album) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 16 May 2009 ... Fitzcarraldo is the second studio album by The Frames, released under the moniker The Frames DC to avoid confusion with the American band of ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzcarraldo_(1995_album) - Cached - Similar More results from en.wikipedia.org Âť Fitzcarraldo (1982) Directed by Werner Herzog. With Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, JosĂŠ Lewgoy. The story of Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, an extremely determined man who intends ... www.imdb.com/title/tt0083946/ - Cached - Similar


il riferimento è FITZCARRALDO un film di Werner Herzog (1982) Fitzcarraldo ha promesso di spostare una montagna e in qualche modo c’è riuscito. (128° minuto della pellicola)

RE: cento rifermenti x cento libri x cento mondi possibili Pierluigi Anselmi <minimum@fastwebnet.it> A:sm fs centoxcentoxcento@ymail.com


Web Immagini Maps News Gmail Altro

Google|Fitzcarraldo|cerca| cerca: nel Web|pagine in Italiano|pagine provenienti da: Italia

Fitzcarraldo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Fitzcarraldo is a 1982 film written and directed by Werner Herzog and starring Klaus Kinski as the title character. It portrays would-be rubber baron Brian ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzcarraldo - Cached - Similar Fitzcarraldo (1995 album) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 16 May 2009 ... Fitzcarraldo is the second studio album by The Frames, released under the moniker The Frames DC to avoid confusion with the American band of ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzcarraldo_(1995_album) - Cached - Similar More results from en.wikipedia.org Âť Fitzcarraldo (1982) Directed by Werner Herzog. With Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, JosĂŠ Lewgoy. The story of Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, an extremely determined man who intends ... www.imdb.com/title/tt0083946/ - Cached - Similar Video results for fitzcarraldo


Trailer â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fitzcarraldoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3 min 8 sec www.youtube.com Fitzcarraldo S1-2 11 min vids.myspace.com Kinski - Fitzcarraldo fight 3 min 27 sec www.youtube.com Fitzcarraldo S6-7 9 min vids.myspace.com Werner Herzog on Fitzcarraldo Shooting Fitzcarraldo, Werner Herzog undertook the most insane project of his entire career as a filmmaker. Has the eccentric director already been infamous ... www.hatii.arts.gla.ac.uk/.../00-01/.../herzogfitzcarraldo.htm - Cached - Similar Images - Fitzcarraldo video review: Fitzcarraldo. Directed by Werner Herzog. Starring Klaus Kinski and Claudia Cardinale. Music by Popul Vuh. www.imagesjournal.com/issue08/reviews/ fitzcarraldo/ - Cached - Similar Fitzcarraldo Movie Reviews, Pictures - Rotten Tomatoes Fitzcarraldo movie reviews, trailers - Check out Rotten Tomatoes Fitzcarraldo clips, pictures, critic and user reviews, forums and the Tomatometer!


www.rottentomatoes.com/m/fitzcarraldo/ Cached - Similar Fitzcarraldo The Myth of Fitzcarraldo. History of Iquito Rubber Baron Carlos Fermin Fitzcarrald. www.iquitosnews.com/page14a.html - Cached - Similar Amazon.com: Fitzcarraldo: Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, Josテゥ ... Amazon.com: Fitzcarraldo: Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, Josテゥ Lewgoy, Miguel テ]gel Fuentes, Paul Hittscher, Huerequeque Enrique Bohorquez, Grande Otelo, ... www.amazon.com/Fitzcarraldo-Klaus.../dp/ B00001ODHV - Cached - Similar Projections: Fitzcarraldo Fitzcarraldo (1982) portrays a European man impassioned to the verge of madness with the goal of building an opera house deep in the Amazon Basin. ... screened.blogspot.com/2009/04/fitzcarraldo.html - Cached - Similar Fitzcarraldo DVD Rental, Rent Fitzcarraldo Today at Netflix Fitzcarraldo DVD Rental. Rent Fitzcarraldo from only $4.99/month. Free, fast shipping both ways. Rent Fitzcarraldo at Netflix today. www.netflix.com/Movie/Fitzcarraldo/21475916 - Cached - Similar


Make a donation to Wikipedia and give the gift of knowledge!

article|discussion|edit this page|history

Fitzcarraldo From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fitzcarraldo is a 1982 film written and directed by Werner Herzog and starring Klaus Kinski as the title character. It portrays would-be rubber baron Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, an Irishman called Fitzcarraldo in Peru, who has to pull a steamship over a steep hill in order to access a rich rubber territory. The film is derived from the real-life story of Peruvian rubber baron Carlos Fitzcarrald. Story Brian â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fitzcarraldoâ&#x20AC;? Fitzgerald, a European living in a small city in Peru in the early part of the 20th century, has a great love of opera and an indomitable spirit. He is a great fan of the famous tenor Enrico Caruso and he dreams of building an opera house in his city of Iquitos. This will require a lot of money, and the most profitable industry in Peru at the time is rubber. The areas known to contain rubber trees have been parceled up by the Peruvian government and can be leased for exploitation. Fitzcarraldo investigates getting into the rubber business. He is shown a map by a helpful rubber baron, who points out the only remaining un-


claimed parcel in the area. He explains why no one has yet claimed the parcel: while it straddles the Ucayali River, the parcel is cut off from the Amazon by a treacherous set of rapids. However, Fitzcarraldo notices that the Pachitea River, another Amazon tributary, comes within several hundred meters to the Ucayali upstream of the parcel. To make his dream a reality, he leases the inaccessible parcel from the government. With the selfless underwriting of his paramour and brothel owner, Molly (Claudia Cardinale), he buys a steamer (which he christens the Molly Aida) from the same rubber baron, raises a crew and sets off up the Pachitea, the parallel river. This river is known to be more dangerous the further one gets from the Amazon because of the unfriendly tribes that inhabit the area. Fitzcarraldo’s plan is to reach the point where the two rivers nearly meet and then, with the manpower of enlisted natives, physically pull his three-story, 320-ton steamer over the muddy 40° hillside across an isthmus, from one river to the next. Using the steamer, he will then collect rubber on the upper Ucayali and bring it down the Pachitea to market. Production The story was inspired by the real life Peruvian rubber baron Carlos Fermín Fitzcarrald; in the 1890s, Fitzcarrald did bring a steamship across an isthmus from one river into another, but it weighed only 30 tons and he had it dismantled


before doing so. In his autobiographical film Portrait Werner Herzog, Herzog has stated that the film’s spectacular production was partly inspired by the engineering feats of ancient standing stones. The film production was an incredible ordeal, and famously involved moving a 320-ton steamship over a hill without the use of special effects. Herzog believed that no one had ever performed a similar feat in history, and likely never will again, calling himself “Conquistador of the Useless”.[4] Scenes were also shot onboard the ship while it crashed through rapids, injuring three of the six people involved in the filming. The casting of the film was also quite difficult. Jason Robards was originally cast in the title role, but he became ill and was forced to leave. Herzog then considered casting Jack Nicholson, and even playing Fitzcarraldo himself, before Klaus Kinski accepted the role. By that point, forty percent of shooting was complete and Herzog insisted on a total reshoot with Kinski. Mick Jagger was originally cast as Fitzcarraldo’s assistant Wilbur, but his shooting schedule expired and he departed to tour with the Rolling Stones. Herzog dropped Jagger’s character from the script and reshot the film from the beginning. Klaus Kinski himself was a major source of tension, as he fought with Herzog and other members of the crew and greatly upset the native extras. In


his documentary My Best Fiend, Herzog says that one of the native chiefs offered to murder Kinski for him, but that he declined because he needed Kinski to complete filming. Brazilian actor Grande Otelo and singer Milton Nascimento play minor parts. Les Blank’s documentary Burden of Dreams, about the production of the film, documents these many hardships. Blank’s footage, which also appears in Herzog’s Portrait Werner Herzog and My Best Fiend contains some of the only surviving footage of Robards and Jagger in Fitzcarraldo and many scenes documenting the ship’s journey over the mountain, along with several episodes of Kinski’s raving. Locations used for the film include: Manaus, Brazil; Iquitos, Peru; Pongo de Mainique, Peru; Puerto Maldonado, Peru. Awards Herzog won the award for Best Director at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival.


http://www.horschamp.qc.ca/new_offscreen/ werner_herzog.html The Trail of Werner Herzog: An Interview Offscreen: When you look back on your work, do you think it functions more as a series of strong illuminating moments than as an ongoing exploration of themes, narratives…? WH: No, I am a storyteller. These moments would not exist without everything that leads to it. If you show the last sequence of Land of Silence and Darkness to anyone, it does not make any impact at all. It’s a very average image. A man stands up from a bench and walks towards a tree. You notice that he must be blind because he bumps into some branches and starts to touch the stem, the trunk... That’s all there is, nothing more. Only in context, after spending nearly 90 minutes in the world of blind and deaf people, with the knowledge preparing your heart, your mind and your spirituality for something extraordinary, which is in the image, only then will you be able to see it. Offscreen: So would the image of the baby in Stroszek be an exception in that matter? Something that really stands on it’s own, that is selfsufficient in its power and beauty regardless of the story? WH: No it is not. It is also only because of the tremendous suffering of Stroszek, the torment of


his soul…Only having seen that and following that, only then and in context, does the shot become extraordinary. These moments do not exist per se. Offscreen: What are you searching for when you shoot a documentary like The Land of Silence and Darkness? WH: ‘Land of…’ without ‘The’, but here the French they do it wrong, they say, “Le pays…” it’s wrong it should be “Pays…”, Land of Silence and Darkness without the article. The article takes the beauty away from the title. Offscreen: Yes, indeed. So in such a film, which culminates in a way with the last scene, where the film finds its full meaning, do you look for that? Do you find it and know that you have something while you’re shooting it? Or is it for instance while editing that you see the structure take shape? WH: Yes it culminates with that man, whom we talked about, who lived in the stable with the cattle, to find some sort of warmth. When you make films, you sense it very quickly in which order you have to narrate a story like that. And there was not very much footage. Much of it was shot 1 to 1. And the whole film is made with about half of the footage that was shot. Offscreen: We often return to the documentary film Land of Silence and Darkness because it


seems, whether you were aware of it or not, that in making it, you found many things that would later occupy your work. WH: Yes. It’s one of the essential things I’ve done. I know that. Offscreen: You have often been associated with New German Cinema… WH: Which is a fiction anyway. Please continue. Offscreen: Let’s say all the filmmakers of your generation, whether you feel affiliated with them or not, all dealt in some way or another with Germany, with the present or the past. Did you feel very early that you needed to go away in terms of the subject, locations and context? ‘Germany’s past’ as a subject hasn’t really interested you until Invincible? WH: Yes. Offscreen: Is there a reason for that? WH: I don’t know. Sure, when you look at the others they did different subjects. But when we look at my films, I think it is obvious that I never left my culture. And I think that’s more decisive. Offscreen: What about your look at the present world, given the fact that in many of your feature films, the story is set in the past?


WH: A few films are in the past, like Kasper Hauser, Aguirre, Fitzcarraldo…. But it doesn’t mean to leave the present either. When you look at Shakespeare, I really do not want to compare myself, but when Shakespeare wrote Hamlet, which was a story about a Danish prince, hundreds of years before his time, he didn’t leave his time anyway. Or in writing Richard the III, he didn’t leave his time, even though this story is dating back hundred’s of years. Offscreen: So are the films set in the past allegorical in their relation to the present? WH: No. Allegorical? No I don’t understand that. I don’t have any sensory organs for that. I can only point to Shakespeare; do you think that he somehow was rooted in the past? And could only look backwards because he wrote Hamlet? Offscreen: Concerning walking again, you often talk about the virtue of walking. Yesterday at the press conference, you said that walking is the best way to discover a landscape. But you also said that when you shoot a film you don’t have time to walk, being too caught up in the production. Still, one could say that when we watch your films, we have the sensation of being taken for a walk, it’s in the films’ pace and feeling… WH: Sure, but it’s not necessarily tied to what happens in the production. It’s always some-


thing different when you just watch a film on the screen. Concerning the process behind the making, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help to know anything about it. The making of the film requires a lot of discipline and a lot of performance ad hoc, where you have to deliver no matter what. The procedure is sometimes very banal, very stupid, very technical and is filled with discipline. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a struggle with banalities in order to save something that stays in your heart and in your soul for a long time. It helps not to know the process. But since you know about filmmaking and since you are asking these questions, you must know that cinema works that way, the making of cinema works that way. Offscreen: You have to fight against banalities? WH: You cannot avoid them because they are persuasive. And bureaucracy is one of the all-persuasive enemies. You have to be endowed with enough perseverance and enough philosophy and enough street smartness to handle it anyway. Offscreen: There is something about temporality in your films, at times scenes are repetitive, like the plane landing over and over again in Fata Morgana. And sometimes there is also a kind of dilated time, perhaps again something akin to the state of perception we can reach when walking for a long time? WH: Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stick to filmmaking even though the background of your question is interesting.


Yes, sure there is a certain rhythm that comes, through one’s existence and by travelling on foot once and a while. It’s a question of rhythm and that is not established during editing. We establish rhythm while we are shooting. It’s a myth when filmmakers tell you: “I put the rhythm in the editing”. It doesn’t work like that. It is about some sense of timing and musicality. As an example, in terms of musicality, sometimes a shot has to be very long, out of proportion. Very early in the beginning of Aguirre there is a shot of the ferocious river, boiling. You see it for a long time. Seeing it for three seconds would be enough to know it is an angry boiling river. But I believe you see it for thirty seconds or so. It is completely out of proportion. But having seen that so early in the film, you accept more easily as an audience all of the disproportion to come, the disproportion of a character, the disproportionate fever, the disproportion of losing orientation, the disproportion of grandiose designs of conquering the continent with 30 starving men. It prepares the field. You plough the fields very carefully to sow and then you harvest. Offscreen: At the press conference you said that you wanted the viewers “to be able to trust their eyes again”. In the film Invincible, for the actress to be credible when she wakes up from hypnosis, you said that you actually taught Tim Roth how to hypnotize. In another instance, Jouko Ahola who plays the Jewish strong man, was truly lifting 800 pounds, which he could only perform once. We


could also think of Fitzcarraldo, where you did in reality, take the boat up the mountain and later threw it down into the rapids. Are there other moments when that wish of yours for the viewers “to trust their eyes” defined how you were going to do something with no tricks? WH: Sure, in many of my films. But we can extend the meaning of that. In The Great Ecstasy of Woodcarver Steiner, a man is flying, let’s face it. And there is no one who defies gravity like him with maybe the exception of Fitzcarraldo! Offscreen: The Great Ecstasy… is your documentary about a ski-jumping champion. On that subject, I find very intriguing the other image of a ski-jumper, that one being in Land of Silence and Darkness. Fini Straubinger, now blind and deaf, says that something that she remembers from her childhood was watching men fly in the air at a ski-jumping competition. You inserted an image of a man flying with his skis against the sky. But that was two years before you made The Great Ecstasy…? WH: That was made up. It was all made up. I gave her that sentence to speak for me. And she understood. Offscreen: So it was actually you being inhabited by that image? WH: It is how I would somehow reach a very very


deep truth about her. That is exactly what I call â&#x20AC;&#x153;ecstatic truthâ&#x20AC;?, which is at the centre of my work. Very early on, I had the feeling that only through invention and stylization would I reach a very deep truth about a character, even in a documentary. So in this case it is made up. But as much as it is made up, it also points to her deepest truth


Fitzcarraldo The Myth of Fitzcarraldo. History of Iquito Rubber Baron Carlos Fermin Fitzcarrald. www.iquitosnews.com/page14a.html - Cached - Similar Amazon.com: Fitzcarraldo: Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, Josテゥ ... Amazon.com: Fitzcarraldo: Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, Josテゥ Lewgoy, Miguel テ]gel Fuentes, Paul Hittscher, Huerequeque Enrique Bohorquez, Grande Otelo, ... www.amazon.com/Fitzcarraldo-Klaus.../dp/ B00001ODHV - Cached - Similar Projections: Fitzcarraldo Fitzcarraldo (1982) portrays a European man impassioned to the verge of madness with the goal of building an opera house deep in the Amazon Basin. ... screened.blogspot.com/2009/04/fitzcarraldo.html - Cached - Similar Fitzcarraldo DVD Rental, Rent Fitzcarraldo Today at Netflix Fitzcarraldo DVD Rental. Rent Fitzcarraldo from only $4.99/month. Free, fast shipping both ways. Rent Fitzcarraldo at Netflix today. www.netflix.com/Movie/Fitzcarraldo/21475916 - Cached - Similar


Fitzcarraldo