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LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR

Keeping Pace with Evolving Threats In February 2011, the Director of National Intelligence

outside of the U.S. Once considered purely public health

stated that “The threat and destabilizing effect of nuclear

problems, disease outbreaks are now recognized as

proliferation, as well as the threat from the proliferation

potential threats to national and international security.

of materials and technologies that could contribute to

In a similar vein, advancements in the life sciences are now

existing and prospective chemical and biological weapons

seen as important not only to human health and agriculture,

programs, are among our top concerns.” In May 2011,

but also to national security. And preparations for nuclear

after announcing the death of Osama bin Laden, President

catastrophes and natural disasters are increasingly informed

Obama reminded the nation that “there’s no doubt that al

by work done in the realms of biosecurity and biodefense.

Qaeda will continue to pursue attacks against us.” Without question, biological and nuclear threats persist and, along with the threats of natural disasters and pandemics, may even increase over time.

approaches, and a combination of skill sets. That type of approach has long characterized the Center’s work and fueled our substantial contributions to scholarship, policy,

for Biosecurity, we pride ourselves on being a responsible

and practice.

response, and resilience in the face of such extraordinary challenges. Our independent research, analysis, and nonpartisan policy recommendations are important resources for the many leaders and policymakers responsible for national security and managing U.S. response to catastrophic events.

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of professional domains, fresh and unconventional

So, too, will the need for effective response. At the Center and steadfast voice for strengthening the nation’s planning,

Center for Biosecurity of UPMC

This intersecting of disciplines requires a merging

In this past year, our contributions included the conference Preserving National Security: The Growing Role of the Life Sciences, which we convened in recognition of the government’s interest in understanding life science trends and developments that could pose new threats or foster innovations in national security. Our meeting was designed to bridge gaps among science, security, and

As we’ve worked to address biological and nuclear threats

public policy. We also applied our understanding of the

over time, we have seen the traditional lines between

relationships among global security, U.S. national security,

many disciplines blur and even disappear. This is true, for

and international disease surveillance to frame a strategic

instance, with regard to perceptions of disease outbreaks

approach to U.S. investments in diagnostics.

Center for Biosecurity Annual Report 2011  

The Center for Biosecurity is an independent nonprofit organization of UPMC. Our mission is to strengthen U.S. national security and resili...

Center for Biosecurity Annual Report 2011  

The Center for Biosecurity is an independent nonprofit organization of UPMC. Our mission is to strengthen U.S. national security and resili...

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