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December 2012/January 2013, Volume 13, Issue 4

cover story a QUest For tradition

Understanding Food allergies taipei’s Fabric Market all aboUt HanUkkaH exploring Food Moods witH graci kiM wHat tHis Magazine Means to Me

2013 spring & sUMMer actiVities catalog inside Dec_12_Cover.indd 2

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ContentS

December 2012 volume 13 issue 4

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lEttEr from thE EDitor

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riCharD rECommEnDs national ConCErt hall: DECEmbEr 2012/january 2013

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Cultural CornEr ChiCken Soup

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CEntEr GallEry thE CEntEr’s favoritE finDs

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off thE bEatEn traCk Water Curtain Cave

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CovEr story a QueSt for tradition

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Community taS eventS at the Center orphanage Club

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spECial supplEmEnt 2013 Spring & Summer aCtivitieS Catalog 19

hEalth underStanding food allergieS

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profilE graCi in the kitChen

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Expat pErspECtivEs belle of the ball

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CoffEE CornEr glaCio iCe Cream SpeCialtieS

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photoGraphy Snapping fireWorkS

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ask bin fabriC marketS and SurroundingS

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GEnEration y hanukkah

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tCm CornEr building a Strong ConStitution

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CsC What the magazine meanS to me

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ChinEsE kitChEn taiWaneSe SWeet SoupS

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CsC businEss ClassifiED

insiDE baCk CovEr poStCard perfeCt

CovEr imaGE CourtEsy of profEssor tsai yushan. An original male leg-covering of Puyuma tribe that Professor Tsai used for analysis (part of the collection at Fu Jen Catholic University). Read more on page 10.

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Centered on Taipei is a publication of the Community Services Center, 25, Lane 290, ZhongShan N. Rd., Sec. 6, Tianmu, Taipei, Taiwan Tel: 02-2836-8134, fax: 02-2835-2530, e-mail: coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw Correspondence may be sent to the editor at coteditor@communitycenter.org. tw. Freelance writers, photographers and illustrators are welcome to contact the editor to discuss editorial and graphic assignments. Your talent will find a home with us! Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. Material in this publication may not be reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner. www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2012/jan 2013

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DEC 2012/jan 2013 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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LEttEr From thE EDitor Publisher: Editor: Co-editor: advertising manager: tel: Fax: email:

Community Services Center, Taipei Kath Liu Richard Saunders Paula Lee 0926-956-844 02-2835-2530 paulalee@communitycenter.org.tw

Writing and Photography Contributors: Nancy Achorn Leat Ahrony Marina Burana Ivy Chen Michelle Cheung Aly Cooper Fang Shao Neng Craig Ferguson David Gill Katharine Susa Gill Monica Hess Bin Huang Brandon Huang

Serina Huang Ting Ting Huang Graci Kim Natalie Köhle Amy Liu John McQuade Shaun Ramsden Michael Russell Richard Saunders Rosemary Susa Maria Tan Sonya Walter Tina Yuan Tsai Yushan

Community Services Center Editorial Panel: Siew Kang, Fred Voigtmann

Printed by: Farn Mei Printing Co., Ltd. 1F, No. 102, Hou Kang Street, Shilin District, Taipei Tel: 02-2882-6748 Fax: 02-2882-6749 E-mail: farn.mei@msa.hinet.net

Community SErviCES CEntEr www.communitycenter.org.tw

Director: Adam McMillan office manager: Grace Ting Counselors: Suzan Babcock, I-Wen Chan, Fawn Chang, Katherine Chang, Jung Chin, Wendy Evans, Cerita Hsu, Perry Malcolm, Eva Salazar-Liu, Ming-I Sun, Cynthia Teeters newcomer orientation Consultant: Amy Liu accountant: Monica Cheng Communications: Kari Schiro Programs Coordinator: Rosemary Susa Events Coordinator: Bianca Russell Chinese teacher: Gloria Gwo volunteers: Nancy Achorn, Alison Bai, Wen Finamore, Shana Garcia, Lily Lau, John McQuade, Bunny Pacheco, Gloria Peng, Ruth Reynolds, Jenni Rosen, Julia Ruggiere, Kari Schiro, Desta Selassie, Emmy Shih, Michelle Smith, Anita Town, Lillian Yiin Premier Sponsors: 3M Taiwan Bai Win Antiques BP Taiwan Ltd. Breitling China American Petrochemical Concordia Consulting Costco Wholesale Taiwan Crown Worldwide Movers Ltd. Four Star Int’l Grand Hyatt Hotel, Taipei HSBC ICRT Metacity Development Corp ProQC San Fu Gas Co. Ltd. Smerwick Ltd Songfu Li Standard Chartered Bank the Community Services Center (CSC) is a non-profit foundation. CSC provides outreach and early intervention through counseling, cross-cultural education and life skills programs to meet the needs of the international community in taipei. CSC offers the opportunity to learn, volunteer, teach and meet others. Check out our website www. communitycenter.org.tw and drop by the Center to chat with us about our programs. you can also email us at csc@communitycenter.org.tw.

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Kath Liu Editor

Richard Saunders Co-editor

Paula Lee Advertising Manager

The weather has finally agreed to get cooler, the festive season is approaching and another year is drawing to a close. I hope that 2012 has been a peaceful, happy year for all of you and that 2013 brings good luck, good health and good times! Here at C entered on Taipei, we’re getting into the festive spirit! Leat Ahrony explains the stories and traditions behind Hanukkah, Ivy Chen gives us a taste of Taiwan’s many and varied sweet soups (a perfect winter dessert), Craig Ferguson teaches us the trick to capturing photographs of fireworks just in time for the New Year extravaganza and Aly Cooper clues us in on where to go for a real indulgent seasonal treat at Glacio. Keeping with foodie delights, Serina Huang profiles Graci Kim, a Korean Kiwi living here in Taipei who has her very own YouTube cooking show based around mood cooking. And what better mood food than chicken soup? Amy Liu shares the secret behind the Taiwanese people’s love of and belief in a steaming hot bowl of chicken soup. We also have a very special cover story this issue about Professor Tsai’s work on rediscovering Taiwanese aboriginal textiles. Marina Burana chats with Professor Tsai about what sparked her interest in this topic and what has kept her interest alive through years of hard work. An article that is close to home for many of us who love our magazine is Nancy Achorn’s article about what Centered on Taipei has meant to her in a recent move to Taipei from Greece. Anyone else with a story to share about how the magazine helped them settle in is more than welcome to submit - we always love to hear from you! No matter what it is you’re looking for, don’t forget that Centered on Taipei is your magazine, written by your community for your community. If you would like to contribute to the magazine, whether with your writing or photography, please write to me with your ideas at coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw. Right now we would really love to see more photography - so dust off your cameras and show us your Taipei or let us know if you are able to help out our writers by providing photography for their articles. Also, if you would like to write but you’re not really sure about which topics to cover, let me know. There are always stories waiting for someone to write them! As always we welcome your news and views. Stay safe and well during this festive Season and we will see you again in the new year!

Kath Centered on Taipei is printed on 50% post consumer waste content stock. We have also replaced the glossy laminated cover with a softer aqueous based resin coating which makes it easier to recycle. By committing to post consumer paper stock we support the market for recycled fibers and reduce environmental impact. Recycling paper uses 60% less energy than manufacturing paper from virgin fiber. "Every ton of recycled paper saves enough electricity to power a 3 bedroom house for an entire year." (http://www.greenseal.org/index.cfm)

www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2012/jan 2013

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national Concert hall

RICHARD ReCommenDs riChard SaunderS

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ecember’s monthly program from the National CKS Cultural Center once again boasts some stellar concerts, along with a healthy quota of unintentional laughs, courtesy of several hilarious event titles (first prize this month is a tie between “Love and Death VI – Love or Hell!” & “Arise from Horizon”). A couple of amusing concert adverts also raise a smile (will someone please tell local conductors that those deep “lost-in-the-music” poses aren’t dignified but merely pretentious). At least they provided me with a welcome giggle after a hard day’s work…. Right, quickly on to what actually matters – the music – and there’s no moaning there. The run-up to (and aftermath of) Christmas is celebrated in fine style this year. That long-running group of versatile vocal virtuosi known as the Swingle Singers is equally at home in both difficult contemporary music and light, fun arrangements of classical and popular favorites. Glee fans will know them through the jaunty ditty that accompanies the closing credits each week. No prizes for guessing which genre the ensemble (fifty years-old this year) will be featuring in their Taipei recital (on the 19th December), but it’ll certainly be light, fun and astonishingly assured. For those that prefer their classical music as the composer meant it to be heard, the concert on Christmas Eve couples a seasonal fave, the Nutcracker Suite, with Poulenc’s much loved Gloria, a magnificent setting of text from the Catholic mass. This is late, great Poulenc, seamlessly blending almost austere magnificence with a couple of the composer’s most achingly beautiful melodies. There are plenty of excellent non-seasonal programs during the next two months to please classical music aficionados who simply want to hear some great music. The wonderful French violinist Augustin Dumay plays a program of, er, French violin classics on December 5th, including Ravel’s stunning Tzigane and Chausson’s gorgeous Poeme. He does however throw in a Czech gem for variety: Dvorak’s four Romantic Pieces, while the orchestral strings get to shine by themselves in the Serenade by another very fine Bohemian composer, Josef Suk. Sticking with string instruments, one of the world’s great string quartets, the Juilliard, is in Taiwan for a rare performance on December 14th, with a weighty program of late Beethoven and Mozart quartets. No easy listening this, but those with the necessary stamina (and these works are too much for me so far) should grab their tickets before they sell out. More string quartet greatness is in town in January, with the Jerusalem Quartet. To my shame I’ve never come across them before, but quartet mavens regard the group as one of the finest working today. In their varied program an early Beethoven rubs shoulders with Borodin’s Second String Quartet (the one with the famed Nocturne slow movement). Rounding out the concert is a return to profound depth: Shostakovich’s fifteenth (and last) quartet. This is one of the (many) DSCH quartets that I don’t know, but, like the late symphonies (which date from the same time) it’s apparently a reflection on mortality. Hopefully it’s not quite as dark as the Fourteenth Symphony (perhaps the most disturbing and upsetting piece of classical music that I’ve ever heard), but surely food for thought for those that can take it.

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DECEmbEr 2012/ january 2013 NATIONAL CONCERT HALL Vitus: Teo Gheoghiu 2012 Concert Works for piano by Debussy, Scriabin and Brahms, and Rachmaninov’s Third Paino Concerto December 1

Family Concert by Ju Percussion Group II December 2

Augustin Dumay Works for violin and orchestra by Chausson, Suk, Dvorak and Ravel December 5 RR

Andrei Gavrilov Piano Recital Works by Chopin and Prokofiev December 7 RR

Song of Soul: Faure’s Requiem Plus Franck’s Symphony in D minor December 8

2012 Taiwan Connection Orchestral works by Beethoven and Brahms December 9

Zhang Hao-Chen Piano Recital Pieces by Schumann, Balakirev, Debussy, Beethoven and Liszt December 12

Alexander Kobin Piano Recital Works by Beethoven and Schumann December 13

Juilliard String Quartet Works by Mozart and Beethoven December 14 RR

Arise from Horizon Bruckner’s magnificent Sixth Symphony, plus Mozart’s Haffner Symphony December 16 RR

Oriental Fantasy: Lin Wei-qi Piano Recital Works by Debussy, Ravel, Balakirev, Chopin and Debussy December 17th RR: Richard Recommends

Klazz Brothers & Cuba Percussion December 18th

A Capella Christmas with Swingle The amazing Swingle Singers do their own inimitable take on seasonal classics December 19 RR

2012 NTCH Christmas Concert: Java Five More jazzy vocal gymnastics on a Christmas theme December 21-22

Ju Percussion Group Winter Concert December 23

Christmas Feast Concert Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite and Poulenc’s Gloria December 24 RR

ECO Christmas Concert Music by Bruckner and Bach December 25

Lu Chia-hui Piano Recital Works by Liszt, Bartok, Albeniz, Chopin and Bach December 29

NSO New Year Concert – Forever Love Verdi arias and orchestral excerpts December 31 and january 1 2013

Love and Death VI – Love or Hell! Orchestral music by Mozart and Prokofiev january 10 – 11 RR

NSO Masters and NSO – Emperor and Hero Beethoven’s Eroica symphony and Emperor piano concerto january 13

Jerusalem Quartet String Quartets by Borodin, Beethoven and Shostakovich january 14 RR

for full details, please log on to the Culture Express website at http://express.culture.gov.tw or take a copy of the monthly program from Cks Cultural Center, available from mrt stations, bookshops and ticketing offices.

TICKETING OFFICES: • NTCH: (02) 3393 9888 • ERA: (02) 2709 3788

DEC 2012/jan 2013 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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台灣

Amy's ultural Corner

Chicken Soup: Comforting and healthy

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he German family I spent a month with during Christmas in Frankfurt a few years ago could not understand why I always craved soup for dinner. Soup is a comfort food to many Taiwanese, and it was especially soothing during the freezing, snowy days of the Christmas holiday season when I was in Germany. Soup features on almost every Chinese menu; it is a staple, and often a meal in itself. It should come as no surprise that there are an amazing variety of Chinese soups. Furthermore, the Chinese are especially obsessed with chicken soup, as it has been used by the Chinese to treat illness for centuries. As in other parts of the world, chicken soup is believed by the Taiwanese to cure colds, sore throats or an achy body.

disease. Homemade chicken soup is both nutritious and good for the body and the soul. The curative powers of chicken soup are not simply an old wives’ tale. There is medical evidence it can help relieve cold or flu symptoms. Drinking it ups the intake of fluids and provides easily absorbed nutrients; the steam from hot soup can also reduce nasal or bronchial congestion and sooth a sore throat. Even if you don’t believe that certain chicken soups can have healing powers, a bowl of soup, lovingly prepared, can at least make us think we feel better — and it certainly has the ability to comfort. Editor’s Note: For more about Sweet Soups, see Chinese Kitchen on page 29.

healing QualitieS Many of you will have heard or learned about yin and yang (陰陽). A large part of Chinese medicine is based on the concept of these two forces, which rule the universe. Yin and yang can be described as opposite or complementary forces. Depending on the context, yin refers to the feminine, darker, cooling forces; while yang represents the masculine, lighter, hot forces. So, in Chinese terms, illness is a signal that the yin and yang forces are out of balance. This imbalance leads to disharmony and blockages of energy flow in the body, thus causing disease. For example, if you have a cold, according to the Chinese principles of yin and yang, it’s because there is too much yin in your body. A Chinese herbalist might prescribe a soup designed to restore the yang force. Similarly, a fever might be treated with a yin soup. The secret of a good Chinese soup lies in the stock (no, I can’t cook, but I’ve checked with my mom!). Chicken is the primary meat of choice for preparing good stock to help restore physical strength so chicken soup made with a number of Chinese herbal ingredients to balance yin and yang is thought to increase energy, to strengthen body functions and to have an effective healing effect. As a result, after drinking chicken soup, one’s body should be neither too ‘warm’, nor too ’cold’, but neutral. The beauty of Chinese herbal soup is that it is not only drunk to correct imbalances and restore energy during times of illness, it is also drunk frequently in Taiwanese homes for its delicious taste and to care for the body, preventing

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GALLERY

The Center's Favorite Finds

Dec 2012/Jan 2013

TEXT: MONICA HESS

Color Creativity + home décor

tien tung gallery This month the Gallery features the wonderful artwork of Huan Yuan Chen and other artists from Tien Tung Art Gallery. Priced between NT$700 and NT$1,800, these beautiful scroll paintings make great gifts or an excellent addition to your home decor. Tien Tung also accepts custom orders.

lemongrass house taiwan Lemongrass House Taiwan is proud to present to you a range of aromatherapy, bath and household products. Light up your life with Sniff Soy Candles from Australia, or indulge your body and mind with delicious handmade bath products from Planet Yum Australia.

Sahar Shaikh On the sideboard display this month is Sahar Shaikh's exclusive collection of fabulous short and long Indian kutis, tunics and scarfs.

The other day I took a different route home, and on the way noticed an interesting sight within walking distance from the Dunhua/Xinyi intersection: brightly colored canvases in a well-lit, inviting studio. I went in to inquire and learned that Escape Artist is “a painting studio with an attached cafe, offering a peaceful oasis from the enveloping urban environment.” The idea is to offer a “social painting experience” with no boundaries (beyond that of the pre-stretched canvas you purchase). I like that the atmosphere inside felt like a place where you could discover your inner Picasso (or Miro or Monet or fill-in-the-blank) and “escape” the hustle and bustle of city life – at least for a few hours. If you’ve never painted before, you can browse through a basket of inspiration cards (swatches of different images and patterns) to see just how easy it can be to create something amazing. Children are welcome to join in, as long as they can reach the paint containers. Prices for a blank canvas range from NT$1,200 – NT$4,800, depending on size. When your masterpiece is complete, it’s packaged in a sturdy cardboard box with a handle, for easy transportation. To schedule your own “escape”: Address: 1F, 68 Wenchang Street, Taipei Phone: (02) 2707-0767 Hours: Tues – Sat: 10 am – 11 pm / Sun: 10 am – 10 pm / Friday and Saturday evenings: If a group of ten or more arrive after 9 pm, then EA will remain open until 1 am. Email: ea@escapeartist.com.tw Website: http://www.escapeartist.com.tw/ Happy Painting!

A percentage of all proceeds of items sold at the Gallery go to The Center, so please remember that by displaying and shopping here you are helping us to provide much needed services to the international community.

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OFF THE BEATEN TRACK RICHARD SAUNDERS EXPLORES TAIWAN'S LESS-TRODDEN PATHS

Water Curtain Cave, nantou County

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s a kid growing up in England I never dreamed I’d end up living in the Far East. In fact in those days I doubt I even thought I’d ever visit the mysterious Orient. About the full extent of my exposure to Chinese culture (apart from a tablecloth mum once embroidered using the ‘willow pattern’ design she’d traced off a plate) was watching Monkey on TV. In those days I had no idea that the series was based on a Chinese classic (Journey to the West). In any event the mad antics of Monkey, Pigsy and Sandy made a bigger impression than the fabulous scenery of the locations. In the novel, the Water Curtain Cave is the home of the monkey king, Sun Wukong, and this wonderfully evocative name has been adopted for several of Taiwan’s most enchanting waterfalls, in Taoyuan, Chiayi, Yunlin, and Hualien counties. Perhaps the most beautiful (and certainly the most mysterious) lies in a remote spot in the central county of Nantou. This waterfall requires a miniexpedition to reach, and can only be approached by those with their own wheels. The last leg of the trip, following the valley of the Ping Lai Stream (坪瀨溪) on which Water Curtain Cave lies, is one of the scariest public roads I’ve

ever negotiated by car in all Taiwan, and nerves of steel are needed if you intend to drive the last three kilometers to the trailhead. There’s hardly enough room for a car to pass along the one-lane track in some places, and a sheer drop on the left waits for the careless; pray no one is coming the other way! En route, the road passes a fascinating natural curiosity, the Pinglai Peculiar Rock (坪 瀨奇景), a large boulder precariously lodged in the top of a narrow cleft. The trail – when you finally reach it – is quite gentle, wandering up the valley and crossing a vertigo-inducing suspension bridge across an awesome canyon cut through the mountains a few hundred meters downstream from the Water Curtain Cave. From here can be seen a breathtaking yet unnamed waterfall nearly a hundred meters high, plunging gracefully over the sheer cliffs of the canyon wall into the main stream below. Water Curtain Cave (水濂洞) itself is hidden until the last moment, when the full force of the main stream plunges sixty meters free of the cliff into the canyon: a place of spectacular beauty. While enjoying the magnificence of the scene, spare a thought for the path builders: until this route was constructed a few years ago, Water Curtain Cave was almost inaccessible, and the only way to its foot was via a dangerous, 3-hour wade up the canyon, with its deep pools and cascades!

more information on Water Curtain Cave can be found on richard’s blog, off the beaten track at http://taiwandiscovery.wordpress.com/

Richard Saunders is a trained classical musician and writer who has lived in Taipei since 1993. He has written several books (available at The Center and in bookshops around Taipei), including Yangmingshan: the Guide (a complete guide to the National Park on Taipei’s doorstep) and Taipei Escapes I and 2, which together detail sixty day trips and hikes within easy reach of Taipei city. A fourth book, a guide to Taiwan’s offshore islands, is due out in January 2013.

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cover story

A Quest for Tradition: Taiwan Aboriginal Textiles Text: Marina Burana Images: Fang Shao Neng and courtesy of Tsai Yushan

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he is petite. Her eyes are sincere and she smiles nearly all the time. We talk in a very strange mixture of French and Chinese and laugh at our absurd neologisms. In the eighties she studied at the École National Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, and now reminisces about that wonderful time when she had just arrived in that wild bohemian city to obtain a degree in Design. Those years are long gone now, but Professor Tsai YuShan still has the same fraîcheur (freshness) of those passionate people who dream intensely. Professor Tsai has worked as an Associate Professor at Fu Jen Catholic University since 1993 and is the author of four books about weaving technique theory and the creation of textiles. One of Professor Tsai’s academic specialisations is Taiwan aboriginal textiles: she does exquisite reproductions and has dedicated years of her life to studying, understanding and honing the necessary techniques needed to weave, embroider and analyze the astounding patterns of the yuanzhumin (Taiwanese aboriginal people). Her work is both colorful and sober, and it covers a wide variety of fabrics, weaving and embroidering processes. She explains that she hasn't found any book with a complete structural analysis of these types of Taiwanese aboriginal textiles, and so she has been working hard in her personal quest for a more profound and detailed understanding of that unique world. The color of Identity The Taiwanese aborigines descend from the Austronesian peoples that settled in Southeast Asia and Oceania, and they share the languages and culture of the Austronesian family, differentiating them from the Han Chinese communities which migrated to Taiwan from China. The various tribes are distributed throughout

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Taiwan and although they don't speak the exact same language, they have certain similarities in the way they live and in the way they dress – especially the latter. The many geometric patterns found in their textiles tend to vary only a little from tribe to tribe. The weaving patterns of the Atayal tribe consist of stripes and diamonds, which can also be found in designs of the Seediq tribe. But although some may only have a small variation in pattern, there is a strong difference in color. While Yami woven textiles are mostly blue and white, others like those of the Pingpu tend to be more colorful and playful. The Paiwan tribe's creativity in textiles is superb and their patterns go beyond the use of geometric shapes, plus they use delicate or powerful colors. The Tsou tribe, on the other hand, seems to have lost its tradition of weaving but its women still know how to adorn their black towel turban with straightline stitching or cross-stitching and pompoms. What all tribes have in common, though, is their geometric shapes: diamonds, zigzag twills, straight l i n e s; s o m e a l s o h a v e f l o w e r s, animals, or leaf patterns; they are all part of the tribes' expressions on different fabrics. Others have rich brocade patterns or use the same kind of materials, such as cotton, linen or bark: ramie (a flowering plant in the nettle family Urticaceae, native to eastern Asia) used to be the main material used for clothing. Each tribe interprets the world in

its own way. Sometimes they mirror nature on their textiles, other times that intimate and complicated scenario of rituals which permeates the day-to-day relationship with their past, their traditions and their families can be seen. Their cultures and their identities are all in the presence of colors and the presence of that powerful tool of geometry. Hard work Professor Tsai has used many resources in order to recapture the magic of the old aboriginal textiles, from research in museums, private collections, collection catalogs, and photographs, to meeting with

aborigines and asking about their special techniques when weaving and embroidering. T h e I n s t i t u t e o f Te x t i l e s a n d Clothing at Fu Jen Catholic University was sponsored by the Council of Indigenous Peoples of the Executive Yuan for a “Teacher Qualification Training Program for the Aboriginal Traditional Crafts of Dying and Weaving”, a program in which fifteen aboriginal students wer e trained to teach others how to give life to their traditional arts

and crafts. A course on shuttle weaving in this program used charts with symbols and numbers based on Professor Tsai’s analysis of the traditional old fabric structure. This helped students to reproduce Atayal traditional fabrics with a dobby loom. After this course, Tsai YuShan accepted a commission from the Taichung County Cultural Center, working on their museum's collections of other tribes' traditional fabrics. In these last few years she has been part of a research group on Taiwanese aboriginal clothing and culture, a project organized by Kobe Design University of Japan. Ta i w a n A b o r i g i n a l s h a v e f o r the most part lost their traditional brocade skills; however the tribes on the island of Lanyu (Orchid Island) and in Taidong have retained this ability. Tsai and some Japanese scholars met a Puyuma weaver from this region who was still weaving a traditional fabric, and although asking questions and taking pictures was all they could garner from this meeting, Professor Tsai could decipher, thanks to her knowledge and experience, the structures and materials used, which she then combined with her weaving skills to create a formidable result. Weaving was particularly difficult since the aboriginal's back strap loom is different from her dobby loom, but after a few years she finally mastered it. She spent many hours trying to decipher how the 'up and down' threads and the 'across' threads interact in order to later record her findings on what is called a 'weaving draft', a specialized standard code on a paper graph. With that complicated tool she can start her reproduction and also make her own variations. All her books have these graphs to

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help students, professionals and amateurs make their own personal combinations. This means a lot of hard work and concentration, qualities Professor Ts a i Yu S h a n c e r t a i n l y d o e s n't lack. From her years as a student at the Department of Fine Arts at the Chinese Culture University in Taiwan, she has developed a strong sense of commitment to what she likes and to what she wants. Those later years in France only served to strengthen her endeavors. She spoke little French and she started as a common student, but finished as one of the best, receiving congratulations from all her teachers for her

dedication and will. She now focuses on studying southeast Asian textiles on their pattern color and technique. When I told her how amazed I was that she chose to engage in such a complex job she just said 'It's what I like to do'. Enjoying the Tradition Professor Tsai YuShan has spent a great deal of time in museums and at home, sitting down in front of her dobby loom, recovering that elegant and important tradition that speaks of the peoples of Taiwan. This year she has put together an exhibition at the Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines, in which she presented a total of 103 pieces of thirteen different tribes. Her next exhibition will be at the Bai Win Gallery run by Faye Angevine later in 2013 as part

of a wider showing of Aboriginal artwork. Tsai YuShan's work is definitely one of the most important when it comes to recovering old woven treasures. She made her way through the colorful patterns and succeeded in making astonishing reproductions full of life, creativity and a sense of identity. When I said goodbye after our meeting, she lit up the room with a bright smile that reminded me of those patterns and colors she has so beautifully brought back to life. Marina Burana is an Argentinean writer born in 1986. She has published two books of shor t stories in Spanish and is now writing plays in English. She speaks French and reads Ancient Greek. She also plays violin, paints and studies Chinese in Taipei.

To read more about Professor Tsai’s work, see: Recovering lost woven treasures: Translation and Transformation By Tsai YuShan Published by Tsai Hsuanchu Published in 2012 ISBN 978-957-41-9248-9

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coMMUNIty

scholars in residence at taipei american school TEXT: MICHAEL RUSSELL, COMMUNICATIONS/ SPECIAL PROJECTS IMAGE: TAS

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aipei American School (TAS) has initiated an exciting new program over the past two years that provides our students with unique opportunities to engage with and learn from world-renowned experts for extended periods of time. The Joanna Nichols Visiting Scholar program brings a relevant, distinguished, and stimulating figure to TAS for one month each year to share singular insights and experiences with our students. The first two scholars in residence were journalist Mike Chinoy, in 2011, and “Mathemagician” Dr. Arthur Benjamin, in 2012. Both Mr. Chinoy and Dr. Benjamin kept very busy schedules at TAS and immersed themselves in the school community: teaching two or three classes a day; advising student clubs and activities, such as the math team and the student newspaper; presenting at assemblies for students at nearly every grade level at TAS; and giving presentations for parents, alumni, and other community members. Through this program, TAS hopes to broaden student horizons, inspire passions, provide unique opportunities for development of meaningful experiences, and enrich the overall learning environment. During his time at TAS, Mr. Chinoy, a former CNN correspondent who covered the Tiananmen Square demonstrations and many other events of major global impact, said: “The world is becoming an increasingly complex, inter-connected place, and the need to better understand what is happening across the globe, and how it can affect one's own life, has only become more important. I hope I will be able to encourage students to get more excited about — and engaged in — understanding history, current affairs, journalism, and the dramatic changes in communications technology that are shrinking borders and turning all of us into ‘global citizens.’” Mr. Chinoy’s visit gave students the chance to engage in unique learning experiences, such as a conference call discussion with a United Nations Assistant Secretary General about U.N. operations in conflict resolution and rebuilding, a viewing of unreleased home movies of President Nixon’s visit to China, and a simulation of North Korean peace talks, with the guidance of a reporter who has first-hand experience

with those talks and the figures involved. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) learning was the primary focus of “Mathemagician” Dr. Benjamin, a hugely popular TED talk speaker and math professor from Harvey Mudd College. Teaching classes in math and other subjects was just a fraction of his impact, as he gave astounding, funny, thought provoking performances at assemblies for upper, middle, and lower school students and parents. Reflecting on his visit, one student explained, “His presentations in both math and Theory of Knowledge classes were extremely eye-opening because they highlighted the ways in which math could actually be fun and interesting to the ordinary student. Dr. Benjamin was able to portray problem-solving as less of a task, and as more of an intellectual exploration.” He expressed a desire to not only amaze and entertain students, but to broaden horizons and impart an appreciation for the beauty of mathematical theory and structure, the fun and creative process of exploring STEM fields, and the vast array of possibilities that these fields present. With the extended length of the scholars’ stays at TAS, students are able to build relationships with figures who are unmatched resources for expansive information and high level thinking that the average student might not be exposed to at the university level, much less in high school. Our Model United Nations teams, debate and public speaking competitors, student journalists, robotics teams, and science fair participants among others have demonstrated the new knowledge and insight these experts provided. TAS is extremely fortunate to have such a rewarding program made possible by a gift to the Friends of TAS. Visiting experts for the next two years are already lined up: Dr. Benjamin Elman, Chair of the Department of East Asian Studies at Princeton University, and Dr. David Spergel, Chair of the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, in 2014-2015.

Events at The Center SpeCial topiC Coffee morning Thursday, December 6th, 10:30 am - 12 noon. This month we will be discussing volunteering around Taipei. Come in and meet a few of the organizations you can lend your time to and, as always, enjoy a cup of coffee with us! Mark your calendars for January’s Coffee Morning which will be held on 17th January.

book ClubS: The Help by kathryn Stockett The morning book club will meet Wednesday 12th December, 10:30 am onwards. For more information email coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw. The evening book club will meet on Thursday 20th December, 7:15 pm onwards. For more information, email melanie.k.leonard@gmail.com.

www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2012/jan 2013

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Orphanage Club TEXT: TINA YUAN AND BRANDON HUANG

pearl S. buCk ChriStmaS party preparation Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, December 20th to December 22nd To ensure that this is a spectacular luncheon and party, we will decorate the entire TAS cafeteria, purchase and wrap each child's gift, and prepare individual packages to be taken home at the end of the party. We welcome everyone to assist on Friday and Saturday from 9 am until 5 pm. It is truly a "Santa's workshop." pearl S. buCk ChriStmaS party Sunday December 23rd. Set up begins 9 am, party commences 12 noon. The Orphanage Club members with other volunteers will serve our guests a sumptuous feast. Entertainment will be provided by TAS students. People interested in helping set up the party beginning at 9 am are welcome. Although most guests leave after 3 pm, the cleanup usually lasts until after 5 pm. angel treeS Until January 11th Angel trees are still up in front of the middle school office and at the entrance of the new high school building (the D block). Please pick up angel-shaped cards hung on the trees and purchase gifts requested by the orphans. These gifts will be distributed for the Pearl S. Buck Foundation Party as well as for children at both Cathwel and Chung Yi Orphanages who will have Chinese New Year parties in January sponsored by the club.

CathWel and Chung yi outingS Saturday January 19th and Sunday January 27th As usual, the guests will be paired up with an Orphanage Club member for a day of fun. Each child will receive the gift he or she requested on the Angel Tree. The club purchases any gifts not donated from the tree. We are always looking for adults willing to help supervise meaningful, funfilled days. Please contact us at the email below if you are interested. firSt book Workday Saturday January 12th In order to prepare for our annual book sale in March, we’ll be holding our first book workday from 9 am to 5 pm. We’ll be sorting the donated books and organizing them into different genres alphabetically to price and box them for the sale. We welcome everyone to help us! paCk and mail Shopping Thursday January 31st and Friday February 1st We’ll be heading to Carrefour to buy canned foods and snacks that are to be sent before Chinese New Year to twenty-five poor families in Taiwan. The next day a delegation will go to Dihua Street to purchase a variety of traditional foods enjoyed by locals during the celebrations. Again we welcome others to join us. raffle tiCketS and prizeS Anyone wanting to purchase raffle tickets for our annual drawing or having prizes to donate can contact us also. We appreciate everyone's support. Please visit our website at www.orphanageclub.com; for enquiries, email our sponsor, Mr. Arnold, at arnoldr@tas.edu.tw 14

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Dec_p3-end.indd 15

2013 Spring & Summer Activities

www.communitycenter.org.tw novEmbEr 2012

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Welcome To The Center December 2012

Registration Information Advance registration and payment is required for all activities. We are pleased to announce that online pre-registration is now available via The Center’s website. Go to www.communitycenter.org.tw/whats-on/pre-register.

Dear Friends, Congratulations! If you are reading this letter and looking over this Activities Catalog it means that you have in some way become aware of the Community Services Center. You might be a volunteer or current activity participant who we see each week; you might be a newcomer who just walked into the Center for the first time; or, you might be reading this online and have never even set foot into our office. It really doesn’t matter because you are now connected to the Center and all that we have to offer you. Inside this catalog there are sixty ways for you to learn a new skill, visit a new place, and meet other people who share your interests. Also inside is information about our Counseling Program, which is why the Center exists in the first place. And, if that isn’t enough, the schedule for our monthly special topic coffee mornings is also included so that you can mark your calendar and be sure that you pay us a visit some time during the Spring/Summer 2013 semester. So, what are you waiting for? Register for a course or tour. Come to a coffee morning. Get and stay connected to the Center. We’re here for you. We can’t wait to see you!

Grace Ting Office Manager

Rosemary Susa Programs Coordinator

Please note that we cannot guarantee your place until full payment is made. If you are unable to visit The Center, please call us for alternative payment options.

The Center office hours are Monday – Friday, 9:00am – 5:00pm. Cancellations Please be sure to register early. By paying at least one week before an activity begins you can help to ensure that we have sufficient enrollment to conduct it. The Center reserves the right to cancel any activity or program that does not have sufficient enrollment. We make every effort to notify registered participants promptly. Please help us save time as well as show courtesy to our instructors by not waiting until the last minute to confirm your participation. Refund and Credit Policy Activities cancelled by The Center: • Full refund will be issued. Refunds may be collected until the last day of the semester. When a participant cancels a tour or activity registration, no refund will be issued. However, credit is available on the following terms: • A full credit will be issued if you cancel your registration at least one week prior to the first meeting. After that time, we are unable to give credit. • Credit may be applied to other Center activities within the current term or to the term which immediately follows.

Tel: 02-2836-8134

E-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

http://www.communitycenter.org.tw

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

Activity

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan Description

Arts, Culture and Tours in Taiwan 1

2

Jingmei Area and Fairy Footstep Rock Hike

Guandu Temple: Seeking Wealth and Fortune

3

Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum Tour and Show

4

Celebrating Chinese New Year: Di Hua Street Tour

5

Longshan Temple, Bopiliao and Wanhua Herb Street Tour

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 4

Wed

Mon

Thu

Tue

Wed

Jan 23

Jan 28

Jan 31

Feb 05

Feb 20

Lunch or meal included

1

1

9:00am 12noon

9:00am 12noon

1

10:00am 12noon

1

9:45am 12noon

1

9:30am 12noon

$ 500

$ 500

Jingmei MRT Sta. Exit 2

Guandu MRT Sta. Exit 2

Richard Saunders

Jennifer Tong

$ 700

Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum

Robin Ruizendaal

$ 500

Shuanglian MRT Sta. Exit 2

Ivy Chen and Rosemary Susa

$ 500

Longshan Temple MRT Sta. Exit 1

Jennifer Tong

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

From the Jingmei MRT station we will begin our adventure with a short, but steep climb up concrete steps to the Fairy Footstep Rock to see a lovely piece of countryside in the middle of the city. Legend has it that the foot prints imbedded in the rock face belong to one of the Eight Immortal Gods. We’ll end the tour with a visit to a tiny, but old temple in the Jingmei Night Market below. Wear sturdy shoes. Originally built in 1661, Guandu is Taiwan’s oldest temple and is dedicated to Mazu, Goddess of the Sea. It is one of the most interesting to visit as it is built against a cliff and features two caves, one of which extends quite far into the hillside and houses many deities representing the God of Wealth. Join Jennifer to learn about this fascinating temple, explore the caves, and be one among the many seeking their fortune for the upcoming Year of the Snake. Used for religious, entertainment and communication purposes, puppetry holds a significant place in Chinese and Taiwanese history. The Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum, a lovely little gem in the midst of the Dadaocheng area of Taipei, is dedicated to preserving and sharing this piece of local cultural heritage. Join the Center for a tour with the curator whose passion for puppetry brings the museum to life. After the tour, enjoy a delightful puppet show. Children welcome. Macy's at Christmas. Harrod's at Easter. Di Hua Street at Chinese New Year! Join Ivy for a tour of the famous Di Hua Street market area and enjoy the sights, sounds and tastes of the holiday. Included will be a quick walk around the fabric market making this your one-stop tour of the neighborhood. Lantern Festival marks the end of the Chinese New Year celebration. Visit the very old and atmospheric Longshan Temple where you will not only learn about the history of the temple, but also be able to view colorful lanterns made especially for this auspicious occasion. Included in this tour is a visit to the Bopiliao Historic Block and the nearby Wanhua Herb Street, a complete Taiwanese cultural experience. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [iv]

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

Activity

6

Ecologically Grown: Farm Tour and Vegetarian Lunch

7

8

The Shi Dong and Local Market Tour or What Is That Vegetable and How Do I Cook It?

Exploring Scenic Wulai: Hike and Tour

9

Tea Tasting and Walking Excursion of the Old Tea District

10

The Grand Hotel: History, Rumors and Secret Tunnels

11

Little Burma Tour

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 5

Day(s)

Fri

Tue

Tue

Wed

Mon

Thu

Dates

Feb 22

Feb 26

Mar 05

Mar 13

Mar 18

Mar 21

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

1

1

1

Time

$$$

Meet@

$ 1400

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 and Lane 290

9:00am 3:00pm

9:00am 12noon

8:30am 3:00pm

1

9:30am 12:30pm

1

9:30am 11:30am

1

10:00am 12noon

$ 500

$ 1200

$ 500

$ 600

$ 500

The Center

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 and Lane 290

ABC Tea Shop

Jiantan MRT Sta. Exit 2

Nanshijiao MRT Sta. Exit 4

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan Description

Ivy Chen

Join Ivy on a visit to an ecologically friendly farm, established by a local eye doctor in search of a source of pesticide-free food. Learn all about the special techniques they use to grow their rice, fruits and vegetables. Tour the farm, help pick some vegetables and enjoy a delicious vegetarian lunch.

Ivy Chen

Bright, colorful and noisy, the Shi Dong Market is the place for all your produce needs. Join Ivy and learn some helpful hints and tips on what to buy, where to buy it, and how to be sure it's fresh. Ivy will also show you how to select fresh fish, seafood and other items of interest. Starting from the Center, this informative tour includes stops at various smaller markets along the way. It’s one Center tour not to miss!

Richard Saunders

Jackson Huang

This tour begins at the impressive spectacle of the highest cascade in northern Taiwan, Wulai Waterfall, plunging 80 meters in a series of drops into a deep gorge. After a short hike to take in the beautiful landscape further up the gorge, we will visit a nearby aboriginal village, with shops selling souvenirs and snacks. We'll take the little train back down the gorge to Wulai village and return through beautiful mountain scenery to Taipei. Wear comfortable shoes, bring a packed lunch and rain gear--just in case. Come to the ABC Tea Shop to learn about the different types of tea and participate in a hands-on brewing and tasting demonstration. With many years in the tea industry, Jackson Huang will share his wealth of knowledge of the history of tea in Taiwan. Afterwards, he will take the group on a walking tour of the Old Tea District, including a stop at the City Tea Association.

Jennifer Tong

Join the Center for a fascinating tour of the Grand Hotel and learn about its history, folklore and colorful past. This is also your chance to visit one of its secret passageways, which for many years was the object of much speculation. Where it leads, no one really knows. If they do, they aren't telling!

Ivy Chen

On the other side of town, far away from Tianmu, is a small neighborhood known as “Little Burma.” Join Ivy as she walks you through this tiny enclave of spice shops and small eateries. If you're not too full after snacking on some of the tasty treats available, you can stay and join Ivy for lunch.

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2013 Spring & Summer Activities [v]

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

12

13

14

15

16

Activity

Xindian Area Hike: Countryside in the City

Meeting a Local Artist: Studio Tour

Sky Lanterns and Waterfalls in Pingxi Township

Discover Maokong

Eating Taiwanese

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 6

Day(s)

Wed

Thu

Tue

Sat

Thu

Dates

Apr 17

Apr 25

Apr 30

May 04

May 09

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

1

1

1

1

1

Time

9:30am 12noon

9:00am 2:00pm

8:30am 3:00pm

11:00am 4:00pm

11:45am 1:30pm

$$$

$ 500

Meet@

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan Description This short and fairly easy walk never strays far from the city, yet explores some remarkably secluded and attractive countryside. From the suspension bridge of Bitan we will take a short climb up to the fine viewpoint of Hemei Hill. Next we’ll be rowed across the river in the quaint old Xindian Ferry boat for a leisurely walk beside the river back to the city. Upon your return there are some nice little places to stop for coffee or lunch, if you have time. This walk has several short, but steep, climbs up steps.

Xindian MRT Sta.

Richard Saunders

$ 1400

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 and Lane 290

Visit the private studio and Art Museum of Yang TzeYun, a Taiwanese artist, well-known for his avant garde Yang Tze-Yun calligraphy and abstract painting. Meet the artist, learn about and his work, and enjoy the lovely environment he has created Rosemary Susa in the countryside of Sanzhi.You will also be treated to a demonstration of his distinctive calligraphy technique. Bring a packed lunch for the ride home.

$ 1500

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 and Lane 290

Jennifer Tong

Taipei Zoo MRT Sta. Exit 2

Join Katy for a tour of the Maokong area known for its tea cultivation, tea cuisine, beautiful day and night-time views of the city below, and the gondola ride which transports you Katy Ho Boyden there. This tour includes a visit to the Taipei Tieguanyin and Paochung Tea Promotion Center, a chance to sample some varieties of Formosan tea and a tasty tea meal at the "Big Tea Pot" restaurant. Bring your Easy Card for the gondola.

Golden Formosa Restaurant Tianmu

Join Sally, our resident foodie and trained chef, for a mouthwatering lunch at the Golden Formosa Restaurant in Tianmu. Enjoy a selection of local delicacies such as Crispy Fried Spareribs, Wild Mountain Chicken Slices, Fried Tofu with Garlic Sauce, and Stir Fried Rice Noodles with Pumpkin. The "Hungry Girl" gives this restaurant the big thumbs up!

$ 1200

$ 900

Sally Duh Chu

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

We start this tour at the beautiful Shifen Waterfall, the widest in Taiwan. From there we will continue to Shifen Village where you will have the chance to decorate and send off your own paper sky lantern. After a bit of wandering and time to shop we will take a short train ride to the quaint town of Pingxi where we will rejoin our bus for the ride back to Taipei. Wear comfortable shoes and bring a packed lunch. Cost of one sky lantern and entrance fees included.

2013 Spring & Summer Activities [vi]

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

17

Activity

Flat Hike: “I HATE Steps, but Love to Hike”

Day(s)

Tue

Dates

May 14

# of Sessions

1

Time

9:00am 1:30pm

$$$

$ 1000

Meet@

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 and Lane 290

Instructor

Richard Saunders

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan/ Family, Fitness & Health

Description Enjoy the sights and sounds of the great outdoors, but aren’t so crazy about steps? Here's your chance to join Richard on a moderate Yangmingshan National Park hike which follows the level "Butterfly Path" along the wooded shoulder of Mt. Datun and ends at a landscaped pond in a pleasant, park like area where we will have time to rest, eat our lunch and then return back to the bus. Wear sturdy shoes, bring water, a packed lunch, and rain gear--just in case.

Family, Fitness & Health 18

19

Gentle Yoga I

Kindermusik I-A 0-18 mos.

Wed

Thu

Jan 16 to Mar 13

Jan 24 to Mar 21

8

7

9:30am 11:00am

9:15am 10:00am

$ 3200

$ 4500

The Farès Academy Dojo

The Center

Maria Moberg

Jennifer Chau

20

Kindermusik II 18 mos.-3yrs.

Thu

Jan 24 to May 23

14

10:15am 11:00am

$ 8000

The Center

Jennifer Chau

21

Kindermusik I-B 0-18 mos.

Thu

Jan 24 to Mar 21

7

11:15am 12noon

$ 4500

The Center

Jennifer Chau

22

Eat Right for Your Blood Type

Fri

Jan 25

1

12:30pm 2:00pm

$ 500

The Center

Dr. Dustin Wu

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 7

Lunch or meal included

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

Yoga doesn't need to be hard or difficult to do. The focus of this course is to teach easy yoga postures, breathing exercises and meditation to help you open up the body, mind and spirit. Enjoy the gentle stretches and traditional yoga poses in a non-competitive environment where everyone is encouraged to practice within their own abilities. It is suitable for beginners and anyone requiring a gentler exercise program. Bring water, a yoga mat and towel. Kindermusik is a developmentally appropriate music and movement class that enhances the bond between parent and baby. Your baby will thrive on musical and rhythmic activities designed to lay the foundation for a lifetime love of music. High-quality "take home" materials are included. Enrollment is limited; please register early. Kindermusik is a developmentally appropriate music and movement class that enhances the bond between parent and child. Your toddler will thrive on musical and rhythmic activities designed to lay the foundation for a lifetime love of music. High-quality "take home" materials are included. Enrollment is limited; please register early. Please refer to Activity #19 for a full course description. Are you A positive or B negative? Do you know what foods suit your blood type best? Let Dr. Wu unravel the mysteries of what types of foods best suit your blood type to gain the maximum health benefits. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [vii]

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

23

24

25

26

Activity

Your Next Career Step

Fostering Your Young Child's Future Success

Self-Defense for Boys: Boys Empowered

Taipei Hospital Tour

Day(s)

Tue

Tue

Mon

Wed

Dates

Jan 29

Feb 26

Mar 04 to Apr 22

Mar 06

27

Self-Defense for Women and Girls

Fri

Mar 08 to Apr 26

28

Kindermusik I-C 0-18 mos.

Thu

Apr 11 to May 23

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 8

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

1

1

6

1

6

7

Time

4:00pm 5:30pm

4:00pm 5:30pm

4:00pm 5:00pm

9:30am 1:00pm

4:00pm 5:00pm

9:15am 10:00am

$$$

$ 500

$ 500

$ 2400

$ 600

$ 2400

$ 4500

Meet@

The Center

The Center

The Farès Academy Dojo

The Center

Instructor

Ralph Whalen

Ralph Whalen

Antoine Farès

Juchi Tang-Liu

The Farès Academy Dojo

Antoine Farès

The Center

Jennifer Chau

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

Family, Fitness & Health Description Career satisfaction involves matching a paid or unpaid job with your unique talents, interests and values. Whether you are seeking your first position, considering changing careers, or looking for volunteer opportunities this class will help you clarify your next career step. This workshop will be conducted by Ralph Whalen, a Taipei American School counselor. When do people start learning skills necessary for building successful careers? The answer: childhood. The foundation for later success in the world of work is built in the early years. This course, geared towards the parents of elementary-age children, will help you to learn how you can assist your child to cultivate good work habits, develop proper attitudes, make wise decisions and learn key skills. We live in an ever-changing world and today's young boys are faced with many challenges and obstacles. Studying martial arts is a well known way to prepare young people, both mentally and physically, and give them the confidence to stand up to any challenge they meet. In this class students will learn the Rules of Engagement and how to handle physical and verbal aggression. For boys ages 8-14. Don't wait until you are faced with an illness or medical emergency to find out about the medical services in Taiwan. Join Juchi, a nurse practitioner with experience both in the United States and Taiwan, for a tour of Taipei Veteran's General Hospital and the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) to learn how to access both private clinic and National Health Insurance covered care. Tour ends at NTUH. “Self-defense” is not just a set of techniques; it’s a state of mind, and it begins with the belief that you are worth defending. Any woman has the power within to defeat an attacker and this program will bring it out. In this class, you will learn the most common strategies recommended to cope with both stranger and non-stranger assailants. This is a great class for friends or moms and daughters to take together. For ages twelve and up. This is a new session of our Kindermusik Infant program and early registration is recommended. Please refer to Activity #19 for full description. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [viii]

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

Activity

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Family, Fitness & Health/ Hobbies & Skills Description

29

Kindermusik I-D 0-18 mos

Thu

Apr 11 to May 23

7

11:15am 12noon

$ 4500

The Center

Jennifer Chau

This is a new session of our Kindermusik Infant program and early registration is recommended. Please refer to Activity #19 for full description.

30

Gentle Yoga II

Wed

Apr 17 to May 29

7

9:30am 11:00am

$ 2800

The Farès Academy Dojo

Maria Moberg

Please refer to Activity #18 for a full course description.

Dr. Peter GuĂŠrin

Taught by the Regional Medical Director for the AIT, this classroom, video-based, instructor-led course will cover first aid basics and how to deal with medical, injury and environmental emergencies. Learn important skills such as how to treat bleeding, sprains, broken bones, snake bites, and shock. In addition, find out what to do, where to go, and how best to transport someone if you are ever faced with a serious injury or medical emergency in Taiwan.

31

32

Basic First Aid Plus Handling Medical Emergencies in Taiwan

What is Acupuncture and How Does it Work?

Mon

Thu

Apr 22 and Apr 29

May 02

2

1

12:30pm 2:00pm

12:30pm 2:00pm

$ 1000

$ 500

The Center

The Center

Dr. Dustin Wu

Acupuncture, a major component of Chinese traditional medicine and culture, is now practiced worldwide. If you've ever wondered if acupuncture might work for you, join Dr. Wu who will teach you about the history and scientific interpretation of acupuncture and how it is used to treat a variety of conditions and illnesses.

Hobbies & Skills 33

34

English Conversation: Speaking with Confidence

Chinese Lantern Painting

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 9

Tue

Thu

Jan 15 to Feb 26

Jan 24 to Feb 07

Lunch or meal included

6

3

12:30pm 2:00pm

12:15pm 2:15pm

$ 2100

$ 2400

The Center

The Center

Bunny Pacheco

Jennifer Tong

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

This course is for adult learners who already have some knowledge of English and who want to improve their conversational skills. It is for students who want to speak with confidence, fluency and accuracy. The course will focus on helping students to improve their spoken English through structured dialogues, pair practice, current events discussions and grammar exercises. In this class, Jennifer will teach you the basic skills of Chinese painting, or if you have already taken her previous painting class, will work with you to develop your technique. She will then guide you to paint a beautiful paper lantern ready to hang in your home. Cost of all materials included. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [ix]

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The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

35

36

37

38

Activity

Skin Care and Make-Up Workshop

Shadow Puppet Workshop

Spanish Conversation

Chinese Calligraphy

Day(s)

Fri

Sat

Tue

Fri

Dates

Mar 15 and Mar 22

Mar 16

Apr 16 to May 21

Apr 19 to May 03

# of Sessions

2

1

6

3

Time

12:15pm 2:15pm

10:00am 12noon

12:30pm 2:00pm

12:15pm 2:15pm

$$$

$ 1600

$ 700

$ 2100

$ 2000

Meet@

The Center

Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum

The Center

The Center

Instructor

Hobbies & Skills/ Learn Chinese Description

Claire Yeh

This two-session workshop will teach you the basics of skin care and proper make-up application. Using products you already own, Claire, a professional make-up artist, will teach you how to apply a perfect day make-up and then show you how to turn your daytime look into nighttime glamour. A small set of brushes to take home is included in the cost. Please bring your own cosmetic products to the class.

Robin Ruizendaal

Join The Center on a Saturday morning for a fun and educational Shadow Puppet Workshop suitable for adults and children ages five and over. We'll make the puppets and put on our very own shadow puppet show. After the workshop you can stay and visit the fascinating Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum at your leisure. Workshop and entrance ticket are included. Children under twelve must be accompanied by an adult.

Ana Palazuelos Berasategui

Jennifer Tong

This course is for adult learners who already have some knowledge of Spanish and who want to improve their conversational skills. It is for students who want to speak with confidence, fluency and accuracy. The course will focus on helping students to improve their spoken Spanish through structured dialogues, pair practice, current events discussions and grammar exercises. This class is an introduction to the traditional style of Chinese writing using brush and ink. Jennifer will instruct you on the correct way to hold the brush and maneuver it to produce beautiful results. If you’ve taken calligraphy or brush painting before, Jennifer will work with you to improve your technique and form. Cost of all materials included.

Learn Chinese With Gloria Gwo 39

Survival Chinese I

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 10

Mon & Wed

Jan 14 to Mar 06

Lunch or meal included

14

9:00am 10:20am

$ 5300

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

Would you like to be able to communicate with shopkeepers, taxi drivers and co-workers? Whether you've just arrived in Taiwan or have been here awhile, this is the class for you. Learn spoken Mandarin in a relaxed and informal environment right here at The Center. Course materials included. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [x]

2012/11/25 6:56:51 PM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

Activity

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Learn Chinese Description

Mon & Wed

Jan 14 to Mar 06

14

10:30am 11:50am

$ 5300

The Center

Gloria Gwo

This course builds upon the skills learned in Survival Chinese I and offers approximately 20 hours of language instruction for people who would like to upgrade their basic skills and go one step further with Mandarin. This class is also suitable for anyone who has taken some basic Chinese lessons and would like to carry on with his or her studies. Course materials included.

41 Chinese Study Group III

Mon & Wed

Jan 14 to May 01

26

12noon 1:20pm

$ 9700

The Center

Gloria Gwo

This is an advanced Chinese language course for students who have completed Study Groups I & II and wish to continue their studies. Books not included in course fee.

Chinese Study Group I

Tue & Fri

Jan 15 to May 10

25

9:00am 10:20am

Gloria Gwo

This is an intensive Chinese language course that focuses on learning how to read and write characters. You need to have attended Survival Chinese I and II or completed approximately 40 hours of language instruction. Books not included in course fee.

40

42

Survival Chinese II

$ 9400

The Center

This is the second part in our intensive Chinese language course that covers spoken Chinese plus learning to read and write characters. You need to have attended Survival Chinese I+II and Study Group I or completed approximately 80 hours of Chinese language instruction. Books not included in course fee.

43 Chinese Study Group II

Tue & Fri

Jan 15 to May 10

25

10:30am 11:50am

$ 9400

The Center

Gloria Gwo

44

Evening Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Jan 21 to Mar 06

12

6:30pm 8:30pm

$ 5700

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #39 for course description.

45

Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Mar 11 to May 08

14

9:00am 10:20am

$ 5300

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity # 39 for course description.

46

Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Mar 11 to May 08

14

10:30am 11:50am

$ 5300

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #40 for course description.

47

Evening Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Mar 11 to May 08

12

6:30pm 8:30pm

$ 5700

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #40 for course description.

48

Summer Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Jun 17 to Jul 31

14

9:00am 10:20am

$ 5300

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #39 for course description.

49

Summer Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Jun 17 to Jul 31

14

10:30am 11:50am

$ 5300

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #40 for course description.

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 11

Lunch or meal included

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2013 Spring & Summer Activities [xi]

2012/11/25 6:56:51 PM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

Activity

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

What's Cooking Description

What's Cooking 50

51

52

53

54

It's All in the Sauce

Indian Vegetarian: Cooking Curries

Delicious Dumplings

Decorative Fruit and Vegetable Carving

Taiwanese Please

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 12

Fri

Fri

Fri

Tue

Sat

Jan 18

Jan 25

Feb 01

Mar 05 to Mar 19

Mar 09

Lunch or meal included

1

1

1

3

1

10:00am 12noon

10:00am12noon

10:00am12noon

12:15pm 2:15pm

10:00am 1:00pm

$ 1000

$ 1000

$ 1000

$ 3000

$ 1200

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

Sally Duh Chu

Dee Sharma

Ivy Chen

Sally Duh Chu

Ivy Chen

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

The secret to many a tasty dish is in the sauce. Join Sally who will teach you how to make five different sauces: Sweet & Sour, Ginger Vinegar, Oyster, Red Chili and Spicy. She will also teach you how to prepare your own chili oil and pepper salt, two major staples in Chinese cooking. Then, enjoy a feast as she demonstrates how to use these delicious sauces on a selection of appetizers, salads, and main courses. What better way to serve veggies to your family than in a delicious and satisfying curry. Join Dee who will share three of her favorites: Mushroom and Fenugreek Curry, Chickpea Curry (Cholle), and Kashmiri-style Potato Curry with Nuts (Dum Aloo). She will also demonstrate a nice surprise side dish to go with them. Here's your chance to try your hand at dumpling making. In this hands-on class, learn how to make delicous Boiled Dumplings with Pork and Cabbage and Fried Dumplings with Assorted Vegetables. In addition, Ivy will also prepare her delicious Hot and Sour Soup and a seasonal vegetable to round out the meal. With surprisingly little time and effort, you can make meals more fun to prepare, serve and eat. Learn to dress up food, choose garnishes that complement the main ingredient of the dish, and create the mood you want to establish--dainty, elegant or casual. Cost of all produce and a small carving knife is included. Students will be given a short list of basic kitchen utensils to bring from home. Join Ivy on a Saturday morning and grab this chance to learn to prepare some of her favorite Taiwanese-style dishes. Enjoy a feast of Gong Bao Chicken, Stir-fried Beef with Coriander, Fried String Beans, Spicy Eggplant and a couple of surprises. In addition, Ivy will show you how to make a simple and tasty sauce in a jar as well as offer her expert advice about which ready-made sauces are best to buy to stock your kitchen cupboard. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [xii]

2012/11/28 7:27:54 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

#

Activity

Day(s)

Dates

Indian Vegetarian: 55 Snacks, Appetizers and Chutneys

Fri

Mar 15

56

Fri

Mar 22

57

58

59

60

Tantalizing Thai

All Wrapped Up

Incredible Italian

Cake and Cookie Decorating: Magical Marzipan

Fantastic Fish

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 13

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

Apr 19

Apr 26

May 03

May 10

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

1

10:00am 12noon

$ 1000

The Center

Shakha Gupta

1

10:00am 12noon

$ 1000

The Center

Saithip Tantiwongkorn

1

1

1

1

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

$ 1000

$ 1000

$ 1000

$ 1000

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

Sally Duh Chu

Heather Martin Lowder

Eva Lu

Ivy Chen

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

What's Cooking Description Learn how to make tasty Pakoras (vegetable fritters), Vegetable Cutlets (which can be eaten on their own or used as "burgers") and Veggie Puffs, all accompanied by homemade Mint/Cilantro and Tamarind Chutneys. Perfect for tea time, snacks or as appetizers, these delicious morsels will be a wonderful addition to your recipe collection. Fragrant and flavorful, Thai food is always a favorite at the Center. Saithip returns with another great menu selection which includes Green Curry Chicken, Thai Herb Omelette, Steamed Fish with Lemon and Pumpkin in Coconut Milk. Join Sally for a class in preparing the Chinese way of serving delicious morsels of food in a "wrap." Tasty and light, these dishes make for great spring and summer meals. Enjoy Minced Shrimp in Lettuce Leaves and Chinese Pancakes with Shredded Pork and homemade Duck Sauce. This class will also include a hands-on pancake-making demonstration. Come to the Center for a little taste of Italy and learn to prepare some of Heather's favorite family recipes. The menu for this delicious meal includes Tomato and Feta Bruschetta with Garlic Crostini, Mushroom and Asparagus Risotto, Basil Pesto Pasta with Chicken, and if you are not too full, a Traditional Tiramisu. Learn the art of modeling marzipan from Eva, a trained pastry chef and cake decorator. Modeling with marzipan is a unique style of cake decorating that produces stand alone, cute themed novelty items or exquisite cake and cookie toppers. Once you have learned the basic techniques, you'll open the door to a completely new dimension in cake decorating. This fun course is suitable for students of all levels. This class covers three ways to prepare fish--steaming, baking and frying--using three different types of locally available fresh fish. Learn how to properly prepare and fillet a fish and how to buy the right fish for your dish. An accompanying seasonal vegetable dish will also be demonstrated. 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [xiii]

2012/11/25 6:56:56 PM


Suzan Babcock

Counselors Since its inception in the mid-1980s, the Community Services Center has been blessed with an exceptional team of professional counselors. All counselors at the Center have at least a Master’s level degree in their field; most have more than five years of experience delivering face-to-face counseling, and some hold special qualifications. To s c h e d u l e a c o u n s e l i n g appointment, simply call the Center at (02) 2836-8134. We’re open Monday through Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm. For new clients, an intake counselor will ask you for some basic information about your preferences and needs. For example, will the counseling be for an adult or child, whether you require spoken English or Chinese, if you prefer a male or female counselor, when you are available for counseling and if you prefer a particular counselor. Then, as soon as possible, you will be contacted to set up an appointment. For urgent or after hours counseling and intake, call 0932-594-578. The following is a brief introduction to each counselor to help familiarize you with their backgrounds and areas of expertise. More detailed information is available on our website at www. communitycenter.org.tw/counseling.

M.C. Ed., MIIM

Sue has an M.C. Ed. in Counselor Education from St. Lawrence University and a Master's degree in International / Intercultural Management from the Graduate School for International Training (SIT). Her areas of professional interest include: individual and group interpersonal relationship counseling, loss and bereavement work, life and career coaching, and cross-cultural issues counseling. Before coming to Taiwan, Sue worked with a number of U.S. communities in crisis, including diverse populations, as a community organizer and crosscultural negotiator.

Fawn Chang

MA/LMFT

Fawn holds a Master's degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from the University of Southern California. For two years, she studied in the Ph.D program in Organizational Behavior at CSPP (the California School of Professional Psychology). Fawn has 10 years of clinical experience working with children, teenagers, adults, and families in both the U.S. and Taiwan. She is a contracted Counselor/Instructor with Taipei City Hall, NTNU (the National Taiwan Normal University), and the EAP (Employee Assistance Program). Fawn's practice consists of working with children and their families on issues, such as behavioral/relationship related difficulties, learning disabilities, academic achievement, cultural adjustment, parenting, and career planning. Fawn uses family and marriage therapy, solution focused therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and Adlerian therapy in her practice.

Katherine Chang

M.S.

Katherine has an M.S. in Counseling, specializing in School Counseling from San Diego State University. She also holds an American School Counselor (PPS) credential. Her areas of professional interest include school-aged children with emotional, social or academic difficulties, working with teachers on behavioral and classroom management strategies and providing support to parents in addressing their children’s social and emotional development. Katherine has been in Taiwan since 2009 and has experience working as a Lower and Middle School Counselor at the Dominican International School in Taipei.

Jung Chin

Psy. D.

Jung has a Doctor of Psychology from the University of Denver. Her areas of professional interest include psychotherapies (including comprehensive evaluations and professional treatments) for sexually abused children, adolescents and adults; survivors of domestic violence; children, adolescents and adults who are experiencing emotional and behavioral problems. She is also interested in assessment (intelligence, emotion and personality) for children, adolescents and adults. Jung has also studied in Melbourne, Australia where she earned a Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology from Deakin University and at Western Michigan University where she earned her M.A. in Counseling Psychology.

Wendy Evans

MSW, ACSW, RD

Wendy holds a Master’s degree in Clinical Social Work from Michigan State University and a Bachelor’s of Science degree from Indiana University in the field of nutrition and health. Wendy has more than 12 years of clinical experience and was accepted into the USA Academy of Certified Social Workers in 2000. In addition to being a certified counselor, Wendy is also a Registered Dietitian. Her primary counseling interests are helping adults, couples, and teens struggling with issues pertaining to marriage, parenting, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, substance abuse, and emotional eating. Through raising five children internationally, Wendy has a deepened understanding of the challenges of cross-cultural living.

Cerita Hsu

MA, MS

Cerita is a Licensed Counseling Psychologist in Taiwan. She received her two Master's degrees in Psychology and Marriage and Family Therapy from Boston University, Massachusetts and Cal Poly Pomona, California. Cerita has clinical experience working with children, adults and families in both the U.S. and Taiwan and has counseled adults in individual, 2013 Spring & Summer Activities [xiv]

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couple, and family therapy. Some areas that her work focuses on include anxiety, depression, emotional disturbance, trauma, substance abuse, cultural adjustment, loss, and family and relationship issues. In counseling with teenagers and children, she has experience working on issues, such as fear/anxiety, anger, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, school adjustment, peer relationship, and abuse issues. She uses solution focused therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, play therapy, and structural family therapy in her practice. Her experience in child, adult, marriage and family counseling covers diverse cultural groups in the expatriate setting.

Eva Salazar-Liu

Ph.D.

Eva has a Ph.D in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology from the University of Toledo, Ohio. Her areas of professional interest include marital relationships, divorce, women’s issues, grief, cross-cultural relationships and issues. Eva has been associated with The Center since 1987 and returned to the Center's Counseling staff this year after a four-year leave of absence. Eva is concurrently teaching Psychology, Educational Psychology and Graduate Research as an Associate Professor at Ming Chuan University.

Perry Malcolm

MSW, LCSW

Perry is a clinical/psychiatric social worker from the state of Georgia in the U.S. Growing up in Athens, a large, Southern university town which had an ever competing atmosphere of academics, sports and art, has given him a rich variety of experiences which inform his current clinical work with individuals (teens and adults), couples and families from all walks of life who may find themselves in transition or trouble. Issues may include depression, anxiety, substance abuse, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, crisis intervention needs,

post trauma issues, men's issues and cross-cultural marriage/ parenting. Perry has been affiliated with The Center since his arrival in Taiwan and has been working fulltime there for eight years.

Ming-I Sun

MSW, LCSW

Ming-I is based in the Hsinchu branch of the Community Services Center. Ming-I is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) both in the U.S. and Taiwan. She obtained two Master's degrees in Developmental Psychology and Social Work. She is also affiliated with the Infant Mental Health Team of the Taipei Psychotherapy Center. She is contracted as a clinical supervisor at the Taipei Early Intervention Team of Taipei City Government. Ming-I’s specialties include: parenting consultation, floor time therapy for autistic children, play therapy for school-age children, child adolescent developmental and learning issues, difficulties on emotional regulation (e.g. depression or anger management), expatriates’ adjustment issues, and any trauma or loss related issues. Ming-I can provide individual or group counseling services. The address of the Hsinchu office is No. 11, Lane 51, Daxue Rd., East Dist., Hsinchu City 30080. The contact number is 03-571-0023 ext. 3208.

Cynthia Teeters

MSW, LMSW

Cynthia has a Master’s degree in Social Work from Columbia University and is a licensed social worker in New York. She works primarily with adults and teens and provides counseling to individuals, couples, and families. Her areas of expertise are depression, anxiety, emotion regulation, borderline personality disorder, substance abuse, relationship issues, bereavement, sexuality and HIV/AIDS. She also conducts adoption home studies and counseling for adoption-related issues.

2013 Spring & Summer Activities [xv]

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— Kobe Bryant, LA Lakers

— Fred Couples, 2012 Senior Open Champion

Transportation included

CE_spring 2013.indd 16

Lunch or meal included

— A-Rod, NY Yankees Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2012/11/25 6:57:06 PM


health

One man’s food may be another man’s poison: understanding food allergy — A-Rod, NY Yankees

TEXT: MICHELLE CHEUNG CHI-KWUN (STATE REGISTERED DIETITIAN OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS COUNCIL (UK))

F

ood is essential to our life as it provides energy and nutrients. All of us eat to s u r v i v e, a n d m o s t o f u s enjoy eating. However, some people cannot tolerate some kinds of food and may develop an adverse reaction after ingesting.

differenCeS betWeen food allergy and food intoleranCe Are food allergy and food i n t o l e r a n c e i n t e r c h a n g e a b l e? Although both are reactions to food they are different. Food allergy can be serious and life-threatening; even eating a tiny bit of food that one is allergic to can cause immediate and severe reactions (symptoms may occur from within minutes to two hours after eating) such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, nasal congestion, stomach cramps, shortness of breath, angioedema (swelling) of the lips, face, tongue and throat, etc. This abnormal response to a food protein involves the immune system and there is no cure; a complete and strict avoidance of the food allergen is the only protection from the adverse reactions. The prevalence of food allergy in children has shown an increase of 18% between 1997 and 2007. Eight foods cause 90% of allergic reactions in the United States: Milk Eggs Wheat Soy Peanuts Tree nuts Fish Shellfish

On the other hand, food intolerance reactions are of slower onset (symptoms occur between hours and days after ingesting) and do not involve the immune system. Food intolerances, such as lactose intolerance, Coeliac disease and wheat intolerance, are much more common than food allergies. diagnoSiS of food allergy Visit your doctor if you suspect you have a food allergy, which can be tested via a skin prick test, specific IgE and basophil histamine release. Once the allergenic foods are suspected, following a restricted or tailor-made diet should result in the disappearance of symptoms or at least a significant reduction. Such a diagnostic diet may be prescribed by a dietitian and should be supervised by the doctor. hoW to avoid an allergiC reaCtion Basic tips for take-away meals 1. Read the menu thoroughly 2. Ask the waiter/waitress if in doubt 3. Inform the chef if booking in advance 4. W a t c h o u t f o r h i d d e n ingredients -Peanut oil used in cooking -P e a n u t s i n s a t a y s a u c e, chocolate, ice cream or candy bars -Nuts in cakes or desserts 5. Always bring an emergency t r e a t m e n t k i t (i n j e c t a b l e epinephrine)

nutritional management Nutritional management is important for those suffering from a food allergy. Prolonged food avoidance may lead to specific nutrient deficiency and consequently a disorder may arise. Talk to a dietitian regarding the diet plan, which should include: 1. To t a l a v o i d a n c e o f f o o d allergens 2. Education on food allergy 3. Alternative nutrient sources 4. Sample meal plan A food challenge test may be given over a few weeks after which the suspected allergenic food will be reintroduced to the diet. Recording any allergy symptoms that occur when the food is reintroduced helps to confirm the diagnosis, although not if a severe reaction to the food has previously been noted.

Michelle C heung has recently arrived in Taipe i f ro m Hong Kong. She is currently a full-time mom to 2 but wa s previously working as a Dietician in Hong Kong.

www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2012/jan 2013

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2012/11/25 7:11:06 PM


ProFIle

Exploring the food-moods of Taipei –

Graci in the Kitchen TEXT: SERINA HUANG IMAGES: COURTESY OF GRACI KIM

he’s smart, she sassy, she loves to eat and loves exploring new places and new foods. Oh, and she has a beautiful singing voice and has authored an interactive children’s e-book, too. Meet Graci K i m, t h e v i v a c i o u s s t a r o f t h e online cooking series, Graci in the Kitchen, produced and filmed right here in Taiwan.

this year as a blog to record recipes. Having moved away from home to Wellington with work, Graci found herself homesick for family and ‘all the yummy food from home.’ Graci sees food as not just providing sustenance, but also having an emotional connection: ‘Food was what we always talked about as a family,’ she recounts. Before too long, friends began to hunger after her unique mood-based recipes and her private blog became public. As her website grew in popularity, she decided it would be easier to show people how to cook rather than write about it. She made some inquiries and, voila, Graci in the Kitchen was born.

a korean kiWi in taipei G r a c i i s a ‘K o w i’ – a K o r e a n Kiwi – who arrived in Taiwan in March 2012 for two years’ intensive Mandarin study at the National Taiwan University. Most people new to a country need a period of adjustment, but within a few months of arrival Graci had already started filming her own cookery and food series. Oh, and become Mom to her cute dog, Yoda, who also stars in her videos. According to Graci, Graci in the Kitchen started in January

mood-baSed Cooking Each Graci in the Kitchen episode is themed around a mood. ‘Imagine y o u e n t e r a r e s t a u r a n t,’ G r a c i explains ‘and on the menu instead of ordinary dishes like spaghetti bolognaise, there is a list of moods.’ Many of Gr ac i’s r e c ipe s utiliz e natural scientific remedies, for example if you have a headache she suggests trying a spicy meal rather than reaching for an aspirin, because chili i s a n a t u r a l p a i n k i l l e r.

S

Other recipes are more emotive, tapping into comfort foods, the elixir she craves when feeling stressed, homesick or vulnerable. Each mood-based episode is not just about food; it also includes an uplifting quote and a musical performance. So she aims to heal the body, the mind and also the soul. Her approach reminds me a little of the Chinese poem Eat, drink, man, woman (飲食男女, yǐnshí ná nnǚ), around which Ang Lee’s awardwinning 1994 film of the same name was based. The poem puts forth that since eating and drinking are fundamental part of our lives – and relationships – we may as well enjoy the very best. Life is, after all, for the living. ShoWCaSing taipei A l th o u g h m a n y e p i s o d e s a r e filmed in Graci’s quirky kitchen, filled with her many gadgets and adorned with positive quotes, several episodes venture out to showcase the vibrant fabric of Taipei life. In one recent episode Graci (and Yoda) buy

graci in the kitchen episodes can be viewed on her website (http://graciinthekitchen.com/), or online through youtube. it has also been picked up by four internet-based television networks, including being featured on koldcast tv network’s Food and Cooking Channel, and The Food Channel. She already has logged hundreds of thousands of views since her episodes were logged on the online channels last month, a sign that this rising star already has many fans.

20

DEC 2012/jan 2013 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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herbs at the Holiday Flower Market, and in another she samples local delicacies (including some unusual offal parts) at the Shilin Night Market. Through her eyes, the viewer glimpses her discovering life in Taiwan. ‘I love Taiwan,’ Graci gushes. ‘I love the mix of its crazy hustle-bustle underpinned by a homely feel. People are so friendly, and I love talking to people I meet on the street. In this respect, it reminds me a bit of being back in New Zealand,’ she explains. ‘And I am constantly discovering new things, like the Raohe Night Market and even things such as fresh Chinese water chestnuts (lingjiao).’ all in the family To Graci, family means everything. The Kims are all talented cooks, and their love of food has obviously rubbed off on Graci. Her father, a self-taught cook, is a restaurateur in Auckland (‘a labor of love’), and when she was growing up Graci worked as a waitress in the family business. Mum, a successful business woman who became a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit earlier this year, is also a dab hand in the kitchen, not to mention that six more of Graci’s relatives work in the food or restaurant industry. Not surprisingly, family features strongly in Graci in the Kitchen, both through recipes from home (witness Koreaninfluenced kimchi pancakes) and visually (one sister recently performed her own original song in an episode).

Ta i wa n xif u ( Ta i wa n daughter-in-law) is the pen name of Australian expatriate food , t ra vel a n d c ult u re blogger Serina Huang. Her blog is at: http://taiwanxifu.com

www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2012/jan 2013

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exPat PersPectIves

Te

B e t a f l o e l e B

TEXT & IMAGES: MARIA TAN

I

’ve been lucky enough to get invited to two weddings this year. Out of the blue, a colleague said, “I’m getting married next Saturday, can you come?” The invitation was so simply made that I didn’t think it was for real until I saw her holding a list of people she planned to invite. My colleague explained that she wanted to get married this year but that she had to do it so soon to take advantage of an auspicious day in the Chinese calendar. Apparently, it’s quite typical among Taiwanese to have their signs checked and the date chosen carefully so that any astrological clashes can be avoided. After consulting the masters, she discovered she should either get married the next week or wait for another six months. She chose to get on with it. The engagement was set to be in the morning and the wedding in the afternoon. I was very excited as it was my first time to take part in a Taiwanese wedding. I arrived early and was eager to see what the reception would be like. The venue was a special “reception only” place in one of those off-the-road places that display wedding pictures on its façade and is only open on certain days. There was a big wedding picture of the happy couple and some name card-sized photos for guests to take home. I went to register my name in the wedding book and went to the powder room to say hello to my friend. She was drop-dead gorgeous. Her make-up was exquisite, but it was that glow in her that made her look so beautiful. Taking my seat next to my other colleagues, we waited and chatted. The bride came out in a magnificent white gown with her father. When the groom met them, the bride kissed her father and the couple bowed as a sign of respect. Food was served lauriat-style – big plates or bowls placed on the Lazy Susan in the middle of each table and people helped themselves. As I was concentrating on the food and admiring the variety of dishes, trying each and every one, my newly-wed colleague materialized in another gown, this time

22

daffodil-yellow in color. She and her new husband went around and stopped at each table, toasting the beginning of their married life. When the reception was about to end, the couple once again disappeared, and when we were about to leave the place, I saw them at the door with a basket of candies. The bride was once again in another gown, this time in duke blue. I thought this mini-fashion show was unique to her wedding. After all, every girl’s dream wedding IS somehow unique on its own. However later I went to another wedding reception and this time the bride had not three but four gowns. She started with the classic bridal white dress, later changed into bright red, then maroon, and then bid us goodnight in a peachcolored gown. This perked my curiosity. I mean, FOUR dresses? Back home, it’s so hard to find the “right” dress and we have to choose just one. But here in Taiwan, brides don’t need to narrow down their choice to one. I learnt that usually brides will wear white at first but then change into something else during the meal, and can choose the colors they want for their other gowns. When asked what they symbolized, my friends told me they don’t really mean anything – brides just like to change dresses. The minimum number of changes is two and some wear up to five. Brides here in Taiwan need not worry about being upstaged. They truly are the belle of their ball!

Maria has a background in Business and Communicaitions. She teaches Eglish in Taiwan to both adults and kids alike. In her free time, she does freelance writing, a lot of reading, and shopping. You can reach her at maria.tan@outlook.com

DEC 2012/jan 2013 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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coFFee corNer

Glacio Ice Cream Specialties TEXT & IMAGES: ALY COOPER

I

have an undeniable sweet tooth. I just can’t help myself. So when my hubby and I passed by this ice cream shop on our date night we HAD to go in. Flipping through the menu I was faced with paralyzing indecision. Yet again. I think we’ve covered this before. Decision-making, well it’s just not my strong suit. As I kept flipping between the coffee desserts and the chocolate, my husband wisely abstained from assisting me, so that he couldn’t be blamed later. I asked the waitress what she recommended and without skipping a beat she s u g g e s t e d t h e Va n i l l a C o f f e e Affogato. My agreement with this suggestion was equally decisive. This particular coffee confectionary dream contains espresso, vanilla bourbon ice cream and Bailey’s irish cream liqueur. Oh. My. Gosh. Espresso, ice cream and alcohol? Some may call this the perfect trifecta. Some being me. It was presented to me (I kid you not) on a silver platter. O.K. So I’m not quite disillusioned enough to think they did this just for me, but

still it was pretty special. With the ice cream in the middle, the liqueur and the espresso remained in two separate carafes to be poured by the consumer onto the ice cream. I was giddy. My husband was laughing at me but I didn’t care. It was pure decadence. I mean, talk about a dessert that packs a punch. Whoa – it was so very good. I can’t attest to their coffee drinks, but really, why would you come here to get “just” coffee when you can get the silver platter of deliciousness? In addition to the Vanilla Coffee Affogato they also had a chocolate and orange option. The vanilla version on the menu, however, has a Humming Bird icon next to it, seemingly marking it as “extra special” (my words, not theirs). In terms of ambiance, when I actually didn’t have my head in my ice cream dish, I realized that Glacio was pretty cute. They had the black-and-white fancy-diner motif going on, there were blackand-white wrought iron chairs for the pub tables, single roses on each table and comfy booths at each corner of the shop. Overhead there

was funky black track lighting that made you momentarily forget you’re in a shopping mall. Then again, if a dessert is that yummy, who cares where it is? It’s pricey at NT$250, but a nice once-in-a-while treat.

glaCio | att 4 fun – 5th floor, 12 Songshou road, Xinyi district Aly Cooper is an expat wife of one year who enjoys adventures with her five-year-old son, reading, eating, blogging, having A LOT of coffee with friends, volunteering and spending free weekends exploring what the island has to offer with the family. http://caffeinatedblisstaiwan.blogspot.tw Got a suggestion for our resident caffeine addict? Send them in via coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw.

WorshIP DIrectory aND coMMUNIty GroUPs listings are now available online at http://communitycenter.org.tw/life-in-taiwan/worship-directory and http://communitycenter.org.tw/ life-in-taiwan/community-groups.

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2012/11/25 7:11:22 PM


photography

Snapping Fireworks Text & Image: Craig Ferguson

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ith the new year celebrations fast approaching, one thing you can count on seeing over the next couple of months is fireworks. So how do you go about photographing them? Well, the good news is that it’s quite easy, but there are a few things you’ll need. First, make sure that you have a camera that can be operated manually. Look for a “B” or bulb setting. You’ll also want to be able to focus manually. If you leave autofocus on and try to take photos like that, it’ll just hunt for something to lock onto in the black sky and you won’t get anything. Once you have the camera, you’ll need a sturdy tripod. This is a must as we are going to have exposure times of a few seconds and any camera shake will ruin the picture. Some kind of remote release is required as well. It doesn’t matter if it’s wired or wireless, as long as it’ll let you trip the shutter without needing to touch the camera. It doesn’t matter how many auto modes your camera has. All those little icons of flowers and mountains are useless for fireworks. With your lens set to MF, focus on something in the distance. Once you are happy, recompose so that the camera is pointing to the area of sky where the fireworks will be but make sure you don’t change the focus. You may not need to do this if you are in an area with buildings, bridges etc. If your camera doesn't allow you to focus manually, then see if it's possible to either lock the focus, or turn off the

focus. Check your camera manual for this as all cameras have different options for this. Then you can use autofocus once to get things set up, and leave it at that setting. With your ISO set to 100, shutter set to B, aperture between f8 and f16 and remote release in hand you’re ready. Selecting an aperture between f8 and f16 gives you plenty of depthof-field, and the shutter at B allows you to leave the shutter open for as long as you like. Press and hold the release button once to start the exposure and let go to stop it. A little trial and error may be required, so take as many shots as you can, with differing shutter times. If you can see the place where the fireworks are being launched from, you could try opening the shutter when you see the launch and closing it when the firework goes out. Or, you could leave it open and catch a few bursts

of fireworks on the same exposure – hold a black card in front of the lens between bursts to cut down on any stray light. A l l D S L R's a n d m a n y o f t h e better compact cameras have the a f o r e m e n t i o n e d “B” s e t t i n g. I f your camera doesn't have it, then look for the “M” setting. Select an aperture as mentioned above and for the shutter speed, dial in a speed of around 5-10 seconds and experiment from there. The photo that accompanies this article had a speed of three seconds, but that was because it was quite bright and I was fairly close. If you're farther away, or the fireworks are higher in the sky, you'll need a longer time. Good luck and remember to stay safe and warm when you’re out photographing fireworks on these cold winter nights.

Craig is a professional photographer and has worked with the likes of Lonely Planet, Monocle, Asia Business Traveller, Asian Geographic and many more. In addition, he also teaches regular photography workshops and individual classes in and around Taipei.

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2012/11/25 7:11:27 PM


ask bin

Fabric Market and Surroundings TexT: Bin Huang and naTalie KöHle images: naTalie KöHle

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ne important aspect of any interior decoration project is choosing fabrics that give the right accent to your overall style. You can use fabric to cover sofas and chairs, to make sofa cushions, bed sheets and covers, curtains, tablecloths, and napkins. Fabric can even serve as wallpaper.

DiHua Street Fabric Market The most important place to buy all kinds of fabric in Taipei is the Fabric Market located in one of the oldest parts of Taipei: Dihua Street. Spread across three floors, there are more than one-thousand stores inside the market selling everything from fashionable new patterns and designs to traditional Taiwanese and Japanese floral prints; silk for making traditional Chinese dresses to high quality uni-colored cotton imported from Japan; basic cotton for making bedsheets and blankets to tweed and other woolen fabrics for making warm jackets and overcoats. You can also find thin gauze for curtains, thick textured fabrics that can be used for upholstery and cushions, fake fur for lining winter coats and blankets, as well as kinds of other specialized materials for reinforcing and lining tailor-made clothing and bags. While some of the patterns and designs are quite Chinese in style, and may not match a more purist home or dress sense, you can also find high quality plain linens and cottons in the market. Many of these fabrics are imported from Japan. They may not be cheap, but the quality is excellent. ZHongyao (仲嶢) One of my favourite shops on Dihua Street Fabric Market 21 Dihua St., Sec. 1 Zhongyao (仲嶢) Stall 59, 2F., 21 Dihua St., Sec. 1 (台北市迪化街一段21號2F, 59號攤位)

the 2nd floor of the fabric market is No. 59, Zhongyao. It specializes in Taiwanese peony flower prints. Whereas most shops only carry a very li mited range of traditional color combinations – namely light blue, red, pink, green, and purple – this small store features an amazing variety of these prints in many different and unusual color combinations. It is the largest collection of these fabrics that I know of in Taipei. Using this fabric for interior decoration will give your home some unique Taiwanese accents – you can use it to make table clothes, cushions, and bed sheets. When you use it to make curtains, you don’t need to place flowers on the windowsills, as your windows will already seem to be in bloom! These traditional patterns also make very original carry bags, purses and dresses. If you don’t know how to sew, don’t worry! Conveniently situated on the third flood of the market are many tailor shops that are ready to help you. From table sheets to bed sheets, sofa covers, and curtains, to dresses and costumes, you name it, and they will make it for you. These tailor services come in especially handy if you want to use matching fabric to create different accessories for your home. My advice is that no matter what item you want to get made, go to the third floor first to check with the tailors how much fabric you need, and then buy the fabric after. If you are planning to make curtains for your new home, likewise you should first measure the width and height of your window and go to the third floor to chose a curtain style before purchasing your fabric.

Small Art Yard (小藝埕) 1F., 1, Lane 32, Dihua St., Sec. 1 02-25521321 (台北市迪化街一段32巷1號1F)

As the fabric market is in one of the oldest parts of town, it is definitely worth taking the time to discover the area nearby. In the immediate vicinity you will find plenty of stores that sell all kinds of accessories for dresses, costumes, handbags, and other DIY projects. An interesting feature of many of these stores is their professional dying service. They are able to dye any fabric to match the color of an already existing fabric. Of course this comes in extremely handy when you need to mend a dress. SMall art yarD (小藝埕) This is another favorite of mine in the area. It sells beautiful handprinted fabrics with modern designs. The stylish patterns and color combinations of these fabrics will harmonize perfectly with a more contemporary interior decoration. And if you are tired after so much fabric shopping you can enjoy a good cup of coffee in Luguo Café which is located on the second floor of Small Art Yard. You could also walk over to Art Yard (民藝埕), and enjoy Chinese-style tea with complementary traditional tea snacks and sweets (茶點), served in the cozy tea house on the second floor, which is tastefully furnished with retro furniture and retro décor.

Bin is an interior designer with almost thirty years of experience in Taiwan. In addition to running his own interior design studio (www.inkstone. ws), he recently started a small home maintenance service company (http:// housewizard.wordpress.com/), in order to share his local knowledge about the ins and outs of home decoration with the Art Yard (民藝埕) expat community of 67, Dihua St., Sec. 1 Taipei. Whatever your (台北市迪化街一段67號 ) household question may 02-25521367 be, he’d love to hear www.artyard.tw from you.

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2012/11/28 7:13:41 AM


generaation y

hanukkah TexT: LeaT ahrony

L

ong stretches of holidays throughout the year never seem to end, especially when you come from a background of mixed cultures. My Taiwan and Israeli heritage allows me to celebrate both Chinese and Jewish holidays, and one of my favorites is Hanukkah, which involves lighting eight-days’ worth of candles. The sTory of hanukkahh Every Jewish festival has a story behind it, and Hanukkah commemorates the mystical miracle of lights. Over 2,500 y e a r s a g o, t h e S y r i a n K i n g Antiochus forced the Jewish people to worship Greek gods by installing a statue of himself in the Jewish temple. This is a violation of one of the Ten Commandments, which forbids the worship of idols or statues. As a result, a small group of Jews called Maccabees rebelled. This is an important event in Jewish history - a three year war. The result was that Jerusalem was recaptured from the Syrians, but - devastatingly - the temple was destroyed. The Jews lit a lamp (a menorah) whilst repairing the temple - a symbol of God's presence - so that it could be rededicated to Him. They could only find one small jar of oil, enough to burn for one day, but the lamp miraculously stayed alight for eight days. The menorah (called a hanukiah in Hebrew) is a special candle holder with nine stemmed candelabrum (holding eight candles to be lit, plus one “servant” candle to light the others). Hanukkah is celebrated by Jews worldwide to remember how God looked after the Jewish people at a difficult time.

After saying a short pr ayer and singing the traditional H a n u k k a h s o n g s t o g e t h e r, candles are lit.

The TradiTions of hanukkah Growing up in Taiwan, our Jewish community arranged Hanukkah parties filled with music, dreidal g a m e s, a n d a n a s s o r t m e n t o f traditional Hanukkah foods. I must admit it isn’t the healthiest holiday as many traditional Hanukkah food items contain a lot of oil. However, it comes only once a year! Latkes, which are crispy pan fried potato strips, are a must. The trick is not to mush them into one lumpy patty because you want the edges to be golden and crispy. The other popular delicacy at this time is deep-fried, jelly-filled donuts, called sufganiot. Normally dishes like Israeli salad, star-shaped cookies, apple sauce, grilled salmon and fruit are added to the table. There is always something special for the children as well. Besides the parents’ Hanukkah gift, every child receives a bag filled with hanukiah-imprinted golden coin chocolates. Decorations are put up on the walls prior to the party and every family brings their hanukiah.

hanukkah in Canada Moving to university in Canada meant leaving my familiar celebratory traditions in Taiwan. But no matter where you go, traditions are traditions and variations are not drastic. Here in Victoria, the Jewish community holds several Hanukkah parties for singles and families, whether it is at the Chabad Center, the Synagogue downtown, or at private Rabbi parties. Christmas, Hanukkah and any high holiday is a time for celebration but is also a good excuse for a family gathering. This is the one part I missed most last year. It was during winter break, and my roommates went back home to spend time with family. With Skype and email though, I can feel connected to back home, and with the support of some local friends and the Jewish community, loneliness eventually drifts away. Before you know it, the eight days pass, and we look forward to the next holiday. Every Jewish holiday to me is special, but Hanukkah is mystical, and lighting the candles while singing the traditional songs lights up my heart. I find it interesting how both Christmas and Hanukkah involve the concept of “light”. I will not return to Taiwan this December, but my hanukiah, candles, and matches are already in place. No matter where you are placed, one should never feel lonely, so find friends and family, and embrace the warmth of the miracle of lights!

Leat Ahrony is a business undergraduate student at the University of Victoria (UVic) in Canada. She began her journalism career in high school writing for the Centered on Taipei magazine. She has a weekly online column for the UVic newspaper, The Martlet, and regularly writes print news and culture articles. She plans to earn her B.A. in Commerce and continue a side career in Journalism. 26

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2012/11/28 7:22:09 AM


tcM corNer

The Art of Building a Strong Constitution TEXT: SHAUN RAMSDEN

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reating a strong constitution for your child starts a long time before pregnancy. It is very important that the body has enough high quality materials to create life with. If you were to build a house the first step would be to find the best materials to use in constructing the foundation. In general, according to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the first son and second daughter take the mother's constitution, the second son and first daughter take the father's. But even though there is a strong genetic component we can still alter the foundation of the foetus' growth through correct preparation before pregnancy. Both the man and the women need to adjust their bodies. The female's adjustment is slightly more important, as she must carry the foetus. Correct preparation will not only help to prevent miscarriage but it will also increase the chances of a pleasant pregnancy with fewer complications. The single most important indicator for knowing the current state of the female reproductive system is through the observation of menstruation. It should be regular, come about every twenty-eight days, arriving about one week before the full moon. There should be no pain, diarrhoea, pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS), nausea or dizziness. In the middle of the cycle there should be no excessive discharge and most importantly there must be enough blood that is not dark, not purple and without clots. It is blood that is the basis of the female body and the most important to regulate. Once the period and the blood are fully regular then it is safe to become pregnant. It is possible to tell the strength of a child’s constitution by looking at the size of their wrists and ears. Most people who have a strong build tend to have a thick skeletal system and those with a weak constitution are thinner. The constitution in and of itself is similar to the foundation of a house. The house can be changed and altered but not the foundation on which it was built. In ancient China they believed that having children at a younger age was better in some ways as the body was internally more healthy. But they also understood that those who had children older had much better life skills. No matter what age you are the path to healthy children begins with having a healthy body long before pregnancy. Regulating the period is very easily done with Chinese

herbal medicine but the secret of keeping it regular lies in leading a healthy lifestyle. For women the single most dominant factor that disrupts the balance is anything that is cold. This means cold drinks, cold water and cold weather. It is especially important to stay away from anything cold during menstruation. For this reason it is suggested to dress warmly, to not use ice or to drink refrigerated beverages and never to swim leading up to, during, or immediately after menstruation. There are also certain foods and drinks that are cold in nature and should be avoided or at least not form a major part of your diet such as green tea, watermelon and ice cream. Eat with the seasons, sleep early, exercise daily, dress warmly and health will come naturally. Shaun Ramsden is a native Australian who spent eight years in Singapore and six years in China and has recently relocated to Taipei. He has a Bachelor of Medicine from the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and a Diploma in Massage from the Australian College of Natural Medicine. In addition to running his own TCM clinic (www. classictcm.net), he enjoys writing books on kung fu, TCM health cultivation and Chinese medicine. On the weekends he teaches martial arts and qi gong on Yangmingshan.

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csc

What the magazine means to

TEXT: NANCY ACHORN

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e’vv e b e e n e x p a t s f o r a long time, and although I always look forward to living in a new country, the actual transition is not always easy. After nine years in Asia, we were lucky to have three years in Europe, the last two of which were in Greece. There was so much more of Europe to see, and our time there had gone by too fast. I was not feeling ready to leave behind the beautiful scenery, amazingg history, and great friends I’d d made in Athens. Walking in the footsteps of history I’d read about all my life was a privilege I was not eager to give up. hard to Say goodbye My husband starting working in Taiwan a few months before the kids and I arrived, so he came back to Greece for our pack-out with an armload of reading material to help me get started learning about Taipei, our new home. I procrastinated. The pile moved from coffee table to bookshelf, and finally to my suitcase. Yes, it would be great to start thinking about the practicalities of living in Taiwan but no, I was not emotionally ready to leave Greece yet. So it was well after our house was packed and shipped, and we were on the beach on Skiathos Island soaking up our last few days of Greek sun, that I finally got out the stack of books, magazines, maps and brochures on Taiwan and started reading. the diSCovery of Community I was reluctant and ready to be disappointed at what my re-entry into Asian society would bring. Instead, my attitude changed completely that day, and it was all because of reading Centered on Taipei. Every article I read told me that I was about to become part of a thoughtful, intelligent, very switched-on community focused on enjoying and appreciating life in Taiwan. Not only that, but the central mission of those involved at The Center appeared to be so much more then just making friends, attending activities, or where to shop or go out to lunch. These people were actively supporting an organization dedicated to making sure that no-one who moves here does so without the resources they need to get connected, meet people, and share the common experience of living in a new place. These did not sound like people trying to survive their overseas assignments, but people who had made Taipei home and saw this as an opportunity and experience not to be missed. Some were people who had lived here for many years, but instead of leaving the welcoming of newcomers to others, they were leading hikes, running book groups, teaching classes,

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scouting coffee shops, scouti training volunteers and creating a safe place for people like me to join in. As I closed my Centered o n Ta i pe i magazine and lay back, the Aegean Sea was just as beautiful, the sadness of leaving friends just as bittersweet, but now I was also excited about Taipei. If so many people were finding great things to do in Taipei, how could I fail to do so? I breathed easier, the knot in my as I began to stomach releasing rele picture myself as a member of this community. I scanned the rest of my reading pile, but nothing there spoke to me like Centered on Taipei did. For me, this was the turning point in stepping way from Greece and moving forward, toward Taipei. a Safe plaCe for all The other day I was driving on Zhongshan North Road, trying to avoid motorbikes, find a parking place and get to a school meeting on time. My husband was traveling and I was stressed, feeling alone and uncomfortable. As I passed the entrance to Lane 290, I pictured Grace and Rosemary at their desks working away, and thought about how welcomed I felt the first time I walked into the Community Services Center. The same way I feel whenever I walk in The Center’s door. I thought of Jenni laughing as she signed me up for every class I’d circled on my list, and Gloria inviting me to join a Mandarin study group. I drove on down the road, comforted by the realization that here, in the midst of all the unfamiliarity, the busy traffic, and Chinese characters, The Center is a place I am connected to. I have resources available, emerging friendships, people to laugh with, and a way to contribute so these things will always be there for the next new people to arrive. Reading Centered on Taipei that day has made all the difference in the world. Because of it, I made The Community Services Center my first stop, and I suspect it will be my last when we leave. For now I can relax and take my time getting to know the beauty of Taiwan, its people and all the friends I will make here. Nancy, originally from America, has been living overseas for over 12 years. She and her family have had endless adventures living in Korea, China, Malaysia, Denmark and Greece, and are now enjoying making friends, exploring and learning about Taiwan.

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2012/11/25 7:11:45 PM


taiWaneSe SWeet SoupS TEXT: IVY CHEN

Ta i w a n e s e d e s s e r t s, u n l i k e t h e i r Western counterparts, can be served anytime. Taiwanese don’t have a specific teatime break, but tea snacks (both savory and sweet) are served with tea at any time during the day. Taiwanese desserts include cakes, sweet soups and others. This month we will look at sweet soups, perfect on a cold winter day. Sweet soups (甜湯, tian tang) are made of beans, roots, tapioca or nuts; most are cooked in water, with sugar added. Some examples of sweet soups are:

Red bean soup (紅豆湯, hongdou tang); Green bean (mung bean) soup (綠豆湯, ludou tang); Green bean and Job’s tear soup (綠豆薏仁湯, ludou yiren tang); Red bean and rice ball soup (紅豆湯圓, hongdou tangyuan); Peanut soup (花生湯, huasheng tang, made from shelled, bleached and cooked peanuts); Lotus seeds and white wood ear soup (蓮 子銀耳湯, lianzi yiner tang; wolfberry is usually also added); Red bean and tapioca soup (紅豆西米露, hongdou ximi lu; sometimes coconut milk is added for an exotic flavor); Taro and tapioca soup (芋香西米露, yuxiang ximi lu; made from cooked taro purée and tapioca in coconut milk and sugar); Sago in honeydew syrup (哈密瓜西米 露, hamigua ximi lu; made from cooked tapioca in honeydew juice with coconut

IMAGES: TING TING HUANG AND IVY CHEN

milk to serve); Black sesame paste (芝麻 糊, zhima hu; made from ground black sesame seeds cooked then thickened with rice flour in water, with sugar to serve); Sweet potato ball/taro ball soup (地瓜圓 /芋圓湯, digua yuan/yuyuan tang; made from cooked sweet potato or taro and mixed with tapioca to make balls, which are cooked in water and served with a sugar soup).

Just a few of the things that are going on around Taipei this month... taipei aipei City hall

the red room

December 31st at 7:00pm New Year’ss Eve Count Down Party Music, dancing, food, drinks, and fireworks from dusk til dawn. Be there or be square… Venue: Civic Plaza http://www.tvbs.com.tw/project/ tvbs_g/activity/2012_taipei_en/ News_1.aspx?code=20111209155128 1 Shifu Road, Xinyi

On the 3rd Saturday of every month from 6:30 – 10:30 pm http://www.redroom.com.tw/ 2F, 117 Da-an Road, Section 1

taipei fine arts museum Until January 13th Modern Monsters – Death and Life of Fiction Galleries: 1st, 2nd & 3rd Floors http://www.tfam.museum/ 181 Zhongshan North Road, Section 3 national palace museum Until June 20th Lifting the Spirit and Body – The Art and Culture of Snuff Bottles Gallery: 303 http://www.npm.gov.tw 221 Zhishan Road, Section 2

national museum of history Until January 8th A Special Exhibition - The Petit LOUVRE 1F Rooms 101, 102 & 103 http://www.nmh.gov.tw/en-us 49 Nanhai Road museum of Contemporary art (moCa) Until December 30th The VW New Beatle – A Modern Interpretation Until February 8th Wang Qingsong – The History of Monuments Venue | MOCA Taipei www.mocataipei.org.tw 39 Changan West Road

Taiwan's Gems – Wen Stone Exhibition Galleries: G301 & G302 http://formosa.ntm.gov.tw/web/en 2 Siangyang Road Spot taipei – film house Daily: Noon to Midnight, six showings Advant Garde Cross Cutural Films www.redhouse.org.tw 10 Chengdu Road, Wanhua District the red house Until December 2015 The Red House: A Century of Stories and Blessings www.redhouse.org.tw 10 Chengdu Road, Wanhua District International Community Choir's Christmas Concert December 9th 4pm onwards Guy Lott Auditorium, Taipei American School. NT$300 Available from choir members, the Center, or at the door.

national taiwan museum Until Febrary 24th www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2012/jan 2013

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CsC businEss ClassifiED Web ConSultant

beauty

eduCation

hair dreSSer

#14 Tienmu E. Road

| Telephone 2871-1515 | GP168@hotmail.com.tw

food and drink

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2012/11/25 7:11:56 PM


David gill David Gill is a long time resident of Taipei and travels frequently as the Asia-based representative of an aerospace company. A photography hobbyist since he was a teenager his favorite shots are everyday subjects or scenes that often pass unnoticed. “As an amateur photographer, I focus on shots that please my own eye. New and unusual sights and sounds are fantastic and many of us rightfully spend a lot of time and money seeking them out. For me that typically includes a camera around my neck and bag over my shoulder. But taking a moment to consider what’s at your doorstep, on the way to work, or right around the corner has every chance to be pretty fantastic too – and creates the opportunity for a photo that connects; at least with yourself, maybe a few others if you’re lucky.”

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A Haven of Comfort Located in the heart of Tunhua Financial District, Howard Green Garden combines the best of shopping with a relaxed living environment. Well served by a network of transportation for convenient access, the 52 well-appointed rooms and comprehensive facilities provide busy executives a delightful stay with total peace of mind.

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Centered on Taipei December 2012/January 2013