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Centered on TAIPEI

Dec 2013/Jan 2014, Volume 14, Issue 4

SoAkIng 101: Hot SprIng EtIquEttE The ImporTance of BeIng emoTIonal Themed resTauranTs In TaIpeI sInger naomI YohanI Bares her soul TaIpeI flashBack: mTVs organIc and susTaInaBle shoppIng In TaIwan

2014 sprIng & summer acTIVITIes caTalog InsIde Dec_13_Cover.indd 2

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CovEr imAGE: Forest Baths in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Park. By Serina Huang

CONTENTS

Dec 2013/Jan 2014 volume 14 issue 4

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LEttEr from thE EDitor

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riChArD rECommENDs NAtioNAL thEAtEr & CoNCErt hALL: DECEmbEr 2013

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EvENts About towN EvENts At thE CENtEr

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CENtEr GALLEry typhooN hAiyAN rELiEf Effort

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off thE bEAtEN trACk Dragon Phoenix Waterfalls

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outLook The Importance of Being Emotional

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bLoG of thE moNth Shu Flies

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Ask tAiwANxifu Hot Spring Etiquette

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photoGrAphy People at Play

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CoffEE CorNEr CafĂŠ Junkies

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ChArity Orphanage Club

Special Supplement 2014 spriNG & summEr ACtivitiEs CAtALoG

21 32 Centered on Taipei is a publication of the Community Services Center, 25, Lane 290, ZhongShan N. Rd., Sec. 6, Tianmu, Taipei, Taiwan Tel: 02-2836-8134 fax: 02-2835-2530 e-mail: coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw Correspondence may be sent to the editor at coteditor@communitycenter. org.tw. Freelance writers, photographers and illustrators are welcome to contact the editor to discuss editorial and graphic assignments. Your talent will find a home with us!

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book rEviEw China My Other Country

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ArouND tAipEi Themed Restaurants in Taipei

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tCm CorNEr A Little Theory

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profi profiLE Naomi Yohani

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hEALth Organic and Sustainable Shopping in Taiwan

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ExpAt pErspECtivE Taipei Flashback: MTVs

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GENErAtioN y Why We Are Significant

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CommuNity TAS

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CommuNity Lessons from a Service Learning Trip

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ChiNEsE kitChEN Roselle

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CsC busiNEss CLAssifiED

Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Material in this publication may not be reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner. www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2013/JAN 2014

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expat perspective

CommuNity sErviCEs CENtEr publisher Editor Co-editor Advertising manager tel fax Email writing and photography Contributors

Community services Center Editorial panel

Community Services Center, Taipei Kari Schiro Richard Saunders Naomi Kaly 02-2836-8134 02-2835-2530

coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw

Leat Ahrony Yoram Ahrony David Barker Jennifer Chang Megan Chee Ivy Chen Terence Chiang Jude Clapper Aly Cooper Matt Fagen Craig Ferguson Rafael Garcia Shana Garcia Katharine Gill

Serina Huang Ting Ting Huang Leo Lopez Emilie Ma Reese McMillan John McQuade William Mooney Shaun Ramsden Richard Saunders Bethany Shieh Rosemary Susa Maria Tan Grace Ting

Siew Kang, Fred Voigtmann

printed by

Farn Mei Printing Co., Ltd. 1F, No. 102, Hou Kang Street, Shilin District, Taipei Tel: 02-2882-6748 Fax: 02-2882-6749 E-mail: farn.mei@msa.hinet.net

Director

Adam McMillan

office manager

Grace Ting

Counselors

Suzan Babcock, I-Wen Chan, Fawn Chang, Katherine Chang, Jung Chin, Chiao-Feng Chung, Wendy Evans, Ting Ting Ge, Cerita Hsu, Carol Lee, Eva Salazar-Liu, Emillie Ma, Ming-I Sun, Cynthia Teeters, Mark Yang

Newcomer orientation Consultant Accountant Communications programs Coordinator Events Coordinator it Coordinator program support Chinese teacher

Amy Liu Monica Cheng Heather Lowder Rosemary Susa Bianca Russell Shana Garcia Bunny Pacheco Gloria Gwo

volunteers

Jennifer Adelson, Alison Davis Bai, Vincy Chik, John Imbrogulio, Lily Lau, Gwang-Fen Mauer, John McQuade, Michael Mullahy, Monica Pillizzaro, Gloria Peng, Ruth Reynolds, Emmy Shih, Anita Town

benefactors

Bai Win Antiques European Chamber of Commerce Taiwan Hao Ran Foundation Nita Ing The Regent Taipei

premier sponsors

BP Taiwan Ltd. Concordia Consulting Costco Wholesale Taiwan HSBC ICRT

Kari Schiro Editor

Richard Saunders Co-editor

LETTER FRoM THE EDIToR

H

ere we are — winter at last! As this is the combined December/January issue, we’re straddling the calendars, with one foot in 2013, the other in 2014, and, as is so often the case at this time of year, we have a lot to pack in! I happen to love these first months of winter, when the crispness in the air still feels novel — a welcome break after the long, hot summer and fall. And then there are, of course, the holidays. While there is much to love about the festive season, for many it can be an emotional mixed bag. As such, Center counselor Dr. Emilie Ma’s Outlook article is a worthwhile read, as she debunks several myths about emotions and explains how embracing them can enrich our lives. Already feeling the need for a break from the hustle and bustle? Doesn’t a soothing hot spring soak sound pleasant? Serina Huang’s Ask Taiwanxifu column has everything you need to know about hot spring bathing. Read up, then grab your bathing suit (or not!) and head to the springs! If you’re like me, the chilly weather also provides the perfect excuse to hunker down with a hot beverage and a good book (or, better yet, magazine). This month, Aly Cooper has found yet another fabulous café where you can do just that! For those in pursuit of a quirkier outing, might I suggest one of the three establishments Megan Chee visited for her humorous themed-restaurant review? (Hint: the food may not be appetizing, but it’s sure to be an experience!) Staying in? Home-cooked meals are often a centerpiece of the season. While we ready our holiday shopping lists, Leat Ahrony gives us some food for thought in her piece on organic and sustainable shopping options in Taiwan. Perhaps this is the year to make your holiday an eco-friendly one! While out at your local market, why not pick up some roselle calyces — they’re sure to add the perfect splash of festive red to any holiday dish! In her Chinese Kitchen column, Ivy Chen offers a couple of roselle recipes to get you started…. Finally, the Center’s 2014 Spring & Summer Activities Catalog is out! Be sure to check out the fantastic offerings in our special supplementary section, and sign up for classes early — they often fill up quickly! With that, I wish you a very happy holiday season. I’ll see you back here in 2014!

the Community ser vices Center (CsC) is a non-profit foundation. CsC provides outreach and early intervention through counseling, cross-cultural education and life skills programs to meet the needs of the international community in taipei. CsC offers the opportunity to learn, volunteer, teach and meet others. Check out our website www.communitycenter.org.tw and drop by the Center to chat with us about our programs. you can also email us at csc@ communitycenter.org.tw.

Centered on Taipei is printed on 50% post consumer waste content stock. We have also replaced the glossy laminated cover with a softer aqueous based resin coating which makes it easier to recycle. By committing to post consumer paper stock we support the market for recycled fibers and reduce environmental impact. Recycling paper uses 60% less energy than manufacturing paper from virgin fiber. "Every ton of recycled paper saves enough electricity to power a 3 bedroom house for an entire year." (http://www.greenseal.org/index.cfm)

Please send email submissions, comments, and feedback to coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw. www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2013/JAN 2014

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Richard

T

Recommends

RichaRd SaundeRS

his year there’s a refreshingly different take on the traditional CKS Cultural Center Christmas concert, as Finnish folk fiddlers Jarvelan Pikkupelimannit come to town for a (misleadingly titled) Cozy Christmas Eve on December 21st, while that other annual end-of-year musical custom, a performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, occupies Christmas Eve itself. To get us into an appropriately celebratory mood, there’s also a chance to see superstars Jose Carreras (on December 7th) and Lang Lang (in a curious program coupling three Mozart piano sonatas with the showy Third Piano Concerto by Prokofiev, on December 17th). Equally uplifting, in a more exotic way, is Letters from Argentina, a concert of music by Hollywood film music composer Lalo Schifrin and Argentinian Astor Piazzolla, whose music has become enormously popular in the last decade or so. Among the Piazzolla works being played are a piece called Death of an Angel and his signature work, the touching Adios Nonino (written after the composer heard of the sudden death of his father). These two pieces highlight a rather less expected (and presumably accidental) aspect of the festive season musical line-up this year. The theme of death and the afterlife is a recurring one this month, connecting a number of its stand-out performances. Schubert’s sublime Death and the Maiden string quartet, written in 1824 as the ailing composer faced his own impending death (in the end he lingered for another four years), is being played on December 11th by the local AP String Quartet, who will be joined by memorably named American pianist Seymour Lipkin for a performance of a less unhappy masterpiece, the Brahms Piano Quintet . A week earlier, on December 4th, Lipkin performs an interesting solo piano recital program featuring Bartok’s gritty Suite, Chopin’s late, great Barcarolle, and Ravel’s Ondine, portraying the mythical water nymph who lures luckless sailors to a watery grave. The December 5th program (titled “The New World”) played by the Taipei Symphony Orchestra has managed to build a whole program around the Great Unknown, with Mussorgsky’s 1877 masterpiece Songs and Dances of Death and Tchaikovsky’s Francesca da Rimini. The latter (one of my very favorite Russian orchestral works) is an unflinchingly powerful depiction of unlucky Francesca and her lover Paulo, doomed (according to Dante’s Inferno) to eternally suffer the torments of the Second Circle of Hell after being discovered (and then immediately killed) by Fran’s enraged husband. The surprisingly intense music Tchaikovsky wrote to depict the couple’s horror has a far more realistic edge than the beautiful suffering of Swan Lake, and in a really great performance probably warrants some kind of PG certification. It’s not all swirling horror and chaos, however, as the glorious central section depicts the couple’s happier times, by way of one of Tchaikovsky’s most wondrously lovely melodies. Considering Mussorgsky’s depictions of dead children and the terrible sufferings of Tchaikovsky’s forbidden lovers, the title of the concert might seem rather cynical at first glance, but it’s explained by the remaining work in the program, Dvorak’s ever-popular ninth (and last) symphony, which was written in the USA, where the Czech composer spent three years near the end of his life. To start the New Year on a merrier note, we have another annual Taipei tradition: the NSO New Year Concert, which understandably revolves around the theme of “dance,” featuring works by local composer Gordon Chin, a selection of Dvorak’s lovely Slavonic Dances, and — of course — some Strauss waltzes. But our macabre theme of the month just won’t stop popping up in unexpected places: they’ll also be playing the Symphonic Dances from Bernstein’s West Side Story — and we all know how that story ends…! 6

national theater and concert Hall DECEmbEr 2013

NATIONAL THEATER

Rice

The world premier of Cloud Gate’s latest creation December 1, 3 – 7

Adapted from Kafka Metamorphosis

A “…collaboration between Chinese opera and technology” December 19 – 22

Wings of Desire and My Dear

Contemporary local dance theater December 27 – 29

Szymanowski Quartet Russian Night Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition for string quartet! December 13

The Authentic Classic

orchestral works by Bach, Mozart and Haydn December 14

Salute Maestro Peter-Lukas Graf

Music for flute by Doppler, Schubert and Martin December 15

Lang Lang Piano Concert EXPERIMENTAL THEATER

Works by Mozart and Prokofiev December 17

It’s Going to Get Worse and Worse and Worse, My Friend

A Cozy Christmas Eve

Seasonal cheer from Belgian choreographer Lisbeth Gruwez December 5 – 8

NATIONAL CONCERT HALL Seymour Lipkin 2013 Piano Recital

Jarvelan Pikkupelimannit (the Folk Musicians of Jarvelan) December 21

Back to Bach, Forward to Hindemith orchestral works by Bach, Telemann and Hindemith December 22

Music by Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Ravel and Liszt December 4 RR

Beethoven Symphony no. 9

The New World

Music by Beethoven, Prokofiev, Wienawski, Tchaikovsky and Ravel December 27

orchestral works by Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky and Dvorak December 5 RR

Letters from Argentina

Music by Piazzolla and Schifrin December 6

Jose Carreras

December 24 RR

Fumiaki Miura Violin Recital

NSO 2014 New Year Concert – Shall We Dance? Music by Dvorak, J. Strauss II, Bernstein and Gordon Chin December 31

December 7

Seymour Lipkin and AP String Quartet Works by Schubert and Brahms December 11 RR

RR: Richard Recommends

for full details, please log on to the Culture Express website at http://express.culture.gov.tw or take a copy of the monthly program from Cks Cultural Center, available from mrt stations, bookshops and ticketing offices.

TICKETING oFFICES: • NTCH: (02) 3393 9888 • ERA: (02) 2709 3788

DEC 2013/JAN 2014 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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csc news

events about town

Just a few of the things that are going on around Taipei this month...

National Museum of History Until February 16th Monet: Landscapes of Mind Galleries: 1F, Rooms 101, 102, 103 http://www.nmh.gov.tw/en-us/Home.aspx 49 Nanhai Road Taiwan Tourism Bureau Daily (a new bus tour) A Wander Through Hot Spring County: Traveling the Taiwan Tourist Shuttle, Beitou to Zhuzihu Venue: see website for times and locations http://english.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=6 8613979&ctNode=8557&mp=100002 MRT Xinbeitou Station Ming Hwa Yuan Tian Taiwanese Opera Company January 18th & 19th River of Love, Dream of Romance (aka Love River Dream) Venue: Taipei Cultural Center http://www.culture.tw/index.php?option=c om_events&task=view_detail&agid=1639&I temid=176&catids=13 25 Bade Road, Section 3 Taipei Rapid Transit Corporation Daily (weather permitting; see website) A Tree Top Ride Through the Clouds: Afternoon Hiking and Tea In Maokong http://english.gondola.trtc.com.tw Maokong Gondola (take the MRT Wenhu Line to Taipei Zoo Station) Nangang Exhibition Hall Until January 5th Cirque du Soleil: OVO http://express.culture.gov.tw/events_detail. aspx?ID=851&actDate=913&format=0&reU RL=Ta_en.aspx 1 Jingmao 2nd Road

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre November 22nd through January 19th Lin Huaimin’s Latest Creation: RICE , the World Premiere Venue: National Theater, Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall http://www.cloudgate.org.tw/eng/CG1/ index.html 21 Zhongshan South Road Taipei Astronomical Museum Through October 2014 Zambezia: From the Heart of Africa , TAM’s Newest 3D Movie Venue: TAM’s 3D Theater (see website for show times) http://english.tam.taipei.gov.tw 363 Jihe Road Museum of Contemporary Art Through December 22nd The Wishing Tree: Solo Exhibition by Reiko Nireki Venue: MOCA Studio http://www.mocataipei.org.tw/blog 39 Changan West Road Guling Street Avant-Garde Theatre Tuesday Through Sunday, 10 am to 10 pm Exhibition: A Place Where Art, Culture and Creativity Intersect Venue: 1F http://superspace.moc.gov.tw/en/ local_culture_page.asp?rid=219 2, Lane 5, Guling Street Kathleen Wu Art Show January 14 through February 24 Floral-themed exhibition Venue: Chini Gallery No. 46-48, Lane 128, Jinye First Road Riverside Live House Every Thursday through Sunday Mini Concerts: A Platform for Original, Nextgeneration Music

Call: (02) 2370-8805 for schedules and tickets http://www.riverside.com.tw/ 177 Xining South Road National Taiwan Museum Until June 15th Special Exhibition: The Crabs! Gallery: GG01 http://formosa.ntm.gov.tw/web/en/ exhibition.aspx 2 Xiangyang Road Taipei Fine Arts Museum Until February 16th Intersecting Vectors: Experimental Projects from TFAM’s Collection Galleries: 2A & 2B Until December 29th Imminent Sounds: Falls and Crossings – Presenting New Media Art Galleries: 1A & 1B http://www.tfam.museum/Index.aspx 181 Zhongshan North Road, Section 3 National Palace Museum Until March 16th Qianlong C.H.A.O. New Media Art Exhibition: A fantasy world of “Creativity” concept, to interpret the beauty of Qianlong’s “Heritage” and wrap it with “Art” – an “Odyssey” that needs exploring Gallery: Exhibit Area 1, G106 Until February 10th In Their Footsteps: Exhibition of Images and Documents on Indigenous Peoples in Taiwan Gallery: Exhibition Area 1, G104 http://www.npm.gov.tw/en/ 221 Zhishan Road, Section 2

* COMPILeD BY JOHN MCQUADe

events at the center BOOK CLUBS In December the Center’s book clubs will be reading Mrs. Kennedy and Me by Clint Hill, a memoir about Hill’s time as the Secret Service Agent assigned to guard Jackie Kennedy. The morning book club will meet Tuesday, D e c e m b e r 1 7, 1 1 a m o n w a r d s . F o r m o re i nfo r m at i o n, e m a i l c o te d i to r@ communitycenter.org.tw.

The evening book club will meet on Thursday, December 19, 7 pm onwards. For more information, email sharon. k.whitfield@googlemail.com.

DECEMBER SPECIAL TOPIC COFFEE MORNING Guilt-Free Holidays – Enjoy The Holidays Without Worrying About Your Weight Thursday, December 12, 10:30 am – 12 pm Salina Hong, author of Only When You're Full Can You Lose Weight, will talk to us about how to enjoy the holiday festivities while not gaining weight — and how to lose it if you do! JANUARY SPECIAL TOPIC COFFEE MORNING Celebrate Chinese New Year at the Center! Thursday, January 9, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm Come and learn all about the various holiday traditions and taste some of the special foods and snacks that are eaten at this auspicious time of year.

The 2014 Book Club Reading List has yet to be determined. Check www.communitycenter.org.tw for updates. www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2013/JAN 2014

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GALLERY Dec 2013/Jan 2014 Lemongrass House Luxury Home Fragrances The December and January Center Gallery offers a variety of holiday gift choices. Lemongrass House Luxury Home Fragrances is proud to present a selection of candles, room diffusers, and scented sachets to make every home smell delightful. With products by Jardin du Minuit and Sniff Soy Candles, there is a scent for everyone and every occasion.

Typhoon Haiyan Relief Effort: How to Give Throught heC enter

Patricia Kortmann’s jeweLry Also displayed is a collection of Patricia Kortmann’s jewelry. Patricia creates her pieces from a w i d e a s s o r t m e nt o f ge m s such as aquamarine, citrine, amethyst, fluorite, rose quartz, crystal quartz, and pearls. Her works are all one-of-a-kind creations, and blend the rich variety of contemporary-style gemstones with handcrafted ethnic silver and gold beads. Patricia also offers custom designs to create personalized pieces of jewelry.

I

emmanueL cHantebout’s sino gLyPH exHibition We are pleased to have Emmanuel Chantebout’s Sino Glyph Exhibition in our gallery as well. Chinese characters were originally figurative, but over time they have evolved from their original forms due to transcription mistakes and extensive use. Emmanuel is trying to do reverse engineering of the Kanji radicals, to make Chinese characters figurative again. This Sino Glyph show is a contemporary graphic translation of Chinese characters, and the aim of this artistic project is to determine by experiment if Chinese characters are intrinsically meaningful. For more information, please check www.sinoglyph.com. F i n a l l y, a b e a u t i f u l 2014 Calendar, featuring images by German photographer Klaus B a rd e n h a ge n, ca pt u re s t h e sights, culture, and people of Taiwan. The calendars are on sale for NT$600 each.

n the wake of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, the Center is serving as a donation point for the relief effort. There are several ways you can give through the Center. For the month of December, all proceeds from Center Gallery sales and publication sales will be donated to the Red Cross’s Philippines Relief Fund. In addition, the Center is collecting cash donations for the fund. Money is the quickest and most efficient way to get aid where it is needed, as the Red Cross has personnel on the ground in the Philippines who know the specific needs of those affected at this time. While cash donations are requested first and foremost, the Center is also accepting donations of canned goods, clothing, and tents. The Center asks that people thoroughly sort through any items they wish to donate to ensure that the items are in good condition and appropriate for conditions in the Philippines. It is our hope that together we can help our sister country recover. Please bring your donations to the Center anytime Monday – Friday, 9 am – 5 pm. No. 25, Lane 290, Zhong Shan North Road, Section 6, Taipei (02) 2836-8134

A percentage of all proceeds of items sold at the Gallery goes to the Center, so please remember that by displaying and shopping here you are helping us to provide much needed services to the international community.

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DEC 2013/JAN 2014 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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expat perspective

RICHARD SAUNDERS EXPLORES TAIWAN'S LESS-TRODDEN PATHS

N

DRaGOn pHOeniX WateRFallS

antou, Taiwan’s only completely landlocked county, lies at the island’s geographical center, and features some of its wildest countryside and its loftiest peaks (it shares Jade Mountain, the tallest peak in northeast Asia, with neighboring Chiayi County), so it’s a surprise to find that the county’s eponymous capital town is a large, bustling but unremarkable place sitting on one of the few flat plains in the far west of this most mountainous area of Taiwan. The mountains are but a distant background to the view in Nantou City, but jump in the car, and it takes just a short time to get to several places of very special and quite wild beauty. A favorite short excursion for locals from Nantou City (at least for those with their own wheels; public transport isn’t that comprehensive out here) is to the twin Dragon Phoenix Waterfalls (龍鳳瀑布), named after their very different characters and sizes, one gentle and graceful, the other much higher, more dramatic and powerful. Cascading waters are almost as ubiquitous as scooters in Taiwan, but these two beauties are definitely worth a few hours of your time. Leaving the noise and clutter of Nantou City behind, take route 14 north towards Changhua, and in a kilometer or so turn east onto local route 22, a wide and meandering country lane winding pleasantly through the low, forested hills of one of Nantou County’s gentlest landscapes. It’s an easy fifteen-kilometer drive to the trailhead for Dragon Phoenix Waterfalls, well-signposted and marked by a parking area next to a rushing stream. After parking, take the raised wooden footpath that follows the right bank of the stream up into the wooded valley above, protecting the fragile ecosystem of the gorge from the many feet that pass this way on the weekends. Later the path turns into a long series of stone steps (watch out: they’re covered with a thin film of algae and are extremely slippery when wet!), and about ten minutes after leaving the car park, the path crosses the white-water stream by a footbridge at the point where it is created by the meeting of two tributaries. Here, beside an ornamental resting pavilion, the path splits as well. First take the path up the tributary on the right. It’s a short, gentle climb of only a couple of minutes to the base of the Phoenix Waterfall, plunging a graceful thirty meters into the lush glen over a cliff covered in a green carpet of creeping plants. The slightly longer, steeper second path climbs up to the Dragon Waterfall in about five minutes. The waterfall comes

into view suddenly after rounding a corner, which makes it an even more impressive sight: a dramatic plunge of forty meters, falling free of the black cliff into a very large, deep pool. A large quantity of spray from the waterfall is whipped up by the breeze created by the falling water, and it’s difficult to view the waterfalls (unless the stream is unusually dry) without getting buffeted by the cooling waters, but it’s no great hardship. While Taipei is uncomfortably chilly this time of year, Nantou (like most lowland places in Taiwan south of Miaoli) has a far more comfortable climate, with a good chance of comfortably warm, sunny weather, even in January!

More information on Dragon Phoenix Waterfalls can be found on Off the Beaten Track at http://taiwandiscovery. wordpress.com/

Richard Saunders is a trained classical musician and writer who has lived in Taipei since 1993. He has written several books (available at the Center and in bookshops around Taipei), including Yangmingshan: the Guide (a complete guide to the National Park on Taipei’s doorstep) and Taipei Escapes I and 2, which together detail sixty day trips and hikes within easy reach of Taipei city. A fourth book, a guide to Taiwan’s offshore islands, is out now.

www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2013/JAN 2014

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outlook

The Importance of Being Emotional Learning to accept our feelings TexT: Dr. Yueher (emilie) ma

During the intake session, I sensed that Jane was trying hard to hold in her profound grief over her recent breakup. I could see her constant attempts to prevent tears from welling up in her eyes. Toward the end, she asked me for advice on how to get over the breakup sooner. I seized the opportunity and stressed the importance of emotion. Using my Note: It is highly recommended that favorite “sea wave” metaphor, I explained that emotions are like sea waves: they individuals with severe traumatic rise, intensify, peak, and eventually dissipate. At this very instant, Jane blurted out, experiences try to work through “But my feelings are like a tsunami; they destroy everything in their path!” After difficult emotions with a trained health voicing her fear over her own emotions, Jane started to sob uncontrollably and let professional. tears fall in torrents down her cheeks…. The UnThinkable Working with emotions is a crucial part of clinical practice. Over the years, my clinical experience has taught me that, in order to work effectively with clients’ emotions, it is vital to first help clients remove the roadblocks — the myths they secretly hold about emotions. One of the common myths, as demonstrated in the example above, is: “if I let myself experience/express [fill in an emotion], it will be unthinkable.” This results mostly from people’s previous encounters, or the lack thereof, with strong emotions. Some people’s negative, or even traumatic, experiences teach them only too well to avoid contact with certain emotions at all costs. These people firmly believe that certain emotions are unacceptable and, thus, feeling them will inevitably lead to disaster. A client once told me that the main reason she couldn’t allow herself to show sadness to her husband was because “then he will leave me.” However, the harder she tried to play the content wife, the more depressed she grew. As for those people with little experience with certain emotions, emotional experience/ expression IS unthinkable because they simply lack the proper real-life model. Such individuals tend to rely solely on their intellect to comprehend themselves, others, and the world. Some of them may be able to “talk about” their emotions, but don’t “feel” them. For them, entering their emotional world is like stepping into the vast (and usually frightening) unknown. Tides of emoTion Emotion is a natural process, with a beginning, middle, and end. Yes, eventually it ends. Contrary to popular belief, it is usually our attempts to meddle with the natural process that keep us stuck in certain emotions longer than we can bear. Different people try to stop the tide of emotion at different points. Some prevent the emotion from developing at all; some can’t stand its intensity; some wouldn’t allow it to reach its climax; others, interestingly, refuse to let it go. One client, troubled with years of clinical depression, felt so stuck in her sadness that she cried helplessly in every session at the beginning of therapy. Not until we realized that she was unconsciously using sadness to mask her disowned anger toward her family did her crying stop. She later came to the emotional insight that inability to access the power of her anger, along with other emotions, caused her paralysis in depressed moods. 10

To make an appointment with a Center counselor, please call (02) 2836-8134.

There are no Wrong emoTions For some, emotion equals behavior. I still remember my shock when one client remarked, “I never get angry in my life.” With disbelief, I immediately questioned, “Never!?” He emphatically replied, “Never!!! I think it’s wrong to feel angry. Don’t you think it’s wrong to yell at others, smash things, punch walls…?” It was then that I realized that he had mistaken emotions for the “inappropriate behaviors” of emotional expression. There are no wrong emotions, whether they be fear, anger, jealousy, disgust, shame...you name it. But there are appropriate and inappropriate behaviors to express emotions. We can certainly feel intense hatred for someone, but we’d better think twice before we lay our hands on them.

The imporTance of emoTion There are, of course, many more myths about emotions. I’ve listed three of them as a stimulus for you to reflect on your own. What is stopping you from experiencing and expressing the whole range of your emotions? At this point, some of you may wonder: why make such a fuss about emotional experience and expression? One reason is that emotion is an important part of us and is closely linked to our cognition and behavior. Denying or disowning it constricts who we are and who we can be. To put it in positive terms, emotion enriches us and broadens our lives. Through the release of emotions, we can tap into many of our unused potentials. Furthermore, emotion is a great aid in making connections with others, and can help us better navigate our interpersonal worlds. So next time you sense feelings bubbling up inside you, or when you feel “compelled” to turn to work, TV, internet, food, sex, alcohol, drugs, company, etc. as distraction from yourself, try sitting quietly alone for a little while and listening intently to the whispers, or roars, of your emotions. You may be surprised by what you discover.

Emilie Ma received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psycholo gy from the Univer sit y of Maryland – College Park, and is currently a counselor at the Center.

DEC 2013/JAN 2014 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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advertiseMent

Blog of the Month

www.shuflies.com TexT: LeAT AHRONY

W

hen Friday is just around the corner, do you start t h i n k i n g o f a we e ke n d t rave l d e st i n at i o n o r a place to fill your grumbling stomach? Blogs offer an interesting and easy way to discover niches, delicacies, and the secret alleys of Taipei. The blog Shu Flies is one such blog that offers a personalized peek at Taiwan. The author, Catherine Shu, moved to Taiwan from the US to find her roots and, like many, stayed on this unique island. Shu, a writer by trade, has an eye for the unique, and her blog features just about anything Taiwan-related (and sometimes not) that tickles her fancy. With a focus

on interesting sights and attractions around Taipei, especially indie shops and retro designs, the blog also showcases Shu’s stunning photography. You’ll find mouthwatering entries in the “Glorious Food” section of the site, interesting travel destinations under “Places I’ve Been,” glimpses at Taiwan’s past in “Retro Taiwan,” and much, much more. Shu also does not shy away from the personal, sharing her experiences dealing with depression and living as a TaiwaneseAmerican expat in Taiwan. If you’re in the mood for some blog browsing or want a fun new place to explore, head over to Shu Flies and have a look for yourself!

Leat Ahrony is a business u n d e rg ra d u a t e student at the University of Victoria (UVic) in Canada. She began her journalism career in high school writing for the Centered on Taipei magazine. She has a weekly online column for the UVic newspaper, T he Martlet, and regularly writes print news and culture articles. She plans to earn her B.A. in Commerce and continue a side career in Journalism.

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2013/11/27 11:55:48 AM


ask taiwanxifu

Soaking 101: Hot Spring Etiquette

Q:

I am keen to try bathing in Taiwan's hot springs, but I’m a bit scared. Do I need to go naked, as at hot springs in Japan? And are there any rules I should follow? – Margaret

TexT & IMAGeS: SeRINA HUANG

A:

Taiwan is rich in thermal activity, and one of the p o s i t i v e b y-p r o d u c t s of this is its many wonderful hot s p r i n g s, k n o w n i n M a n d a r i n a s wēnquán (溫泉). Hot spring bathing b e ca m e p o p u l a r d u r i n g Ta i wa n's J a p a n e s e co l o n i a l p e r i o d, a n d i n recent years there has been an upsurge in hot spring tourism here. bathing oPtionS Most hot spring resorts and bathing h o u s e s i n Ta i wa n g e n e ra l l y ta ke inspiration from the Japanese model, but there are some distinct differences. There are four main types of hot spring bathing:

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1. Communal bathing (sometimes re fe r re d t o i n E n g l i s h a s “S PA”). This type of hot spring is the most common in Taiwan and incorporates a combination of indoor and outdoor areas. In the larger resorts, there are often a variety of different pools, of varying temperatures, and even saunas and steam rooms. Some resorts may also have pools of fish that nibble at your feet! Most resorts have various massaging water jets (great for sore shoulders) and pools with healthpromoting fragrances. Patrons wear bathing suits, and most resorts will insist that patrons wear a bathing cap as well. The mood is much less “zen” than the traditional Japanese bathing experience. 2. Private room hot springs (湯屋; tangwu). This is a popular option for people wanting privacy, and we often find this convenient when bathing as a family (especially with very young children). Many hot spring hotels will allow you to rent out one of their rooms for just a few hours to take a soak, while some hotels even have special private rooms for this purpose. The tubs in these rooms are like a private bathtub, so you fill up when you arrive and pull the plug out when you are done. Often the hotel will have packages that include afternoon tea or lunch. They often

discreetly (or not so discreetly) knock on the door when your time is nearly up. 3. Male and female segregated bathing (大眾池; dazhongchi). This type of bathing is more common in traditional, Japanese-style bathing establishments. Women and men use separate bathing areas and generally bathe nude. It can sometimes be difficult to tell if you are entering into a communal or segregated bathing experience at first as changing rooms are always separated by gender. But usually the changing area is either part of, or very close to, the pools, so you can observe what people are wearing (or not) as you get changed. I have bathed at these types of places several times, and it is surprisingly relaxing and nonvoyeuristic. 4. “Dip your toes in” hot springs. Many tourist centers in hot spring towns have places where visitors can dip their feet in the water. This is a good way to get a feeling for hot spring bathing without having to go the full monty, or get wet all over. Usually these pools are free as well. Immersing your lower legs in hot water also has reputed health benefits, such as aiding sleep. 5. Wild (undeveloped) hot springs. There are still quite a few open-air, completely natural hot springs in

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2013/11/27 11:55:50 AM


expat perspective

SUGGESTED HOT SPRING EXPERIENCES ● Forest Baths in the Jiaosi Hot Spring Park (礁溪溫泉公 園): These are peaceful, Japanese-designed, and segregated (clothing optional, bathing cap mandatory) baths run by the Yilan County Government. ● The Great Roots Forestry Spa Resort (大板根森林遊樂區): Set up in pristine rain forest not far from Sanxia, this resort offers spa, private room, and open-air bathing options. ● Marshal Zen Gardens in Beitou (小帥禪園): Here you’ll find interesting history (a KMT general was kept under house arrest on the site) and beautiful views from the private rooms. ● Toong Mao Spa Resort, Guanziling (關子嶺統茂溫泉會館): In Tainan County, these springs are famous for their green mud.

Taiwan, although most require a guide or good map to find, and can be a considerable distance from the nearest road. Unless you know you are truly in a private location, it is best to wear bathing gear. SoaKing tiPS According to onsen and spa expert Windy Yang (aka The Spa Lady), there is no right or wrong way to enjoy soaking in hot springs. Do what feels right, and avoid overheating to the point of discomfort — especially if bathing late at night — as overly hot soaks can make it difficult to sleep. Similarly, do not plunge from super hot to icy cold water if you have a heart condition. The most important piece of hot spring etiquette is to ensure that you wash yourself thoroughly before getting in. There are generally showers available for bathers to soap themselves down and wash their hair before entering the pool. It is okay to bring a bottle of water in with you, and it’s important not to get dehydrated while soaking. Finally, avoid drinking alcohol or eating while in the water. It is, however, okay to bring in some simple snacks to eat if there is a separate 'picnic'-style eating area. I’m always ravenous after taking a hot spring soak!

Ask Taiwanxifu is a new question and answ er column by Serina Huang, a writer who runs the popular Taiwanxifu.com (Taiwan da ug h te r - i n - la w ) c u l t u re a n d lifestyle blog. Serina writes about Taiwan food, culture and family issues. If you have a question for Serina, you can visit her blog, Taiwanxifu Facebook page or email her at taiwanxifu@gmail.com.

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2013/11/27 11:55:52 AM


photography

People At Play TexT & Image: CraIg Ferguson

O

ne of the key elements of a culture that I, as a travel photographer, look for is the manner in which people play. People are at their most relaxed during leisure and recreation time, when we can often get a glimpse of a person’s true nature. When I’m engaged in photography in Taiwan, moments like these afford a deeper look at the culture of Taiwan, one that is more than just old temples and Chinese food. Seeking out images of people at play is easy enough. Parks, public squares, beaches, and the like are full of local people relaxing and enjoying their time off. Head down to these areas and you’ll have a wealth of opportunities. Here are a few pointers to keep in mind. Do some pre-depar ture research. Just as you research the tourist sights and best restaurants, also read up on the local culture as it exists today. Use Google image search to give you some ideas as to what you can expect. Take your time. If you just rush in and expect to get great photos with minimal effort, you’ll be sadly disappointed. Go slow and ease your way in. Chat to a few people if possible. Even if you don’t speak the language, there will often be

someone who can speak some English, and quite often they will approach you and strike up a conversation. Don’t get in people’s way. Most people are quite open to you photographing them as long as you don’t intrude. Capture them naturally rather than making them pose. Move yourself into a better position instead of trying to move your subjects. If you know the game, you might even be able to join in. Among other amazing experiences, I’ve played cricket with students in Varanasi, India; football (soccer) with monks in Lhasa, Tibet;

and sepak raga with fishermen in Kuala Terranganu, Malaysia. Don’t worry too much about getting everything technically just so. It’s the expression and mood you’re looking for, more than a technically perfect but stilted exposure. A little blur or some other kind of “rule breaking” may, in fact, add something to the final photograph. Most of all, have fun. Don’t take y o u rs e l f t o o s e r i o u s l y, d o n’t p a s s judgement about what people are doing, and don’t feel disappointed if the old, wrinkled Chinese grandma is wearing Nike.

Craig is a professional photographer and has worked with the likes of Lonely Planet, Monocle, Asia Business Traveller, Asian Geographic and many more. In addition, he also teaches regular photography workshops and individual classes in and around Taipei. Visit his website at www.craigfergusonimages.com.

Worship Directory anD community Groups Listings are now available online at http://communitycenter.org.tw/life-in-taiwan/worship-directory and http://communitycenter.org.tw/life-in-taiwan/community-groups.

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DEC 2013/JAN 2014 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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2013/11/27 11:05:35 PM


coffee corner

Café Junkies TexTT & IIMAGeS: MAGeS e : ALY eS LY CCOOPeR OOPeR

Junkie: A person who gets an unusual amount of pleasure from or has an unusual amount of interest in something. (Merriam-Webster)

T

hat definition is spot on, my friend. A great cup of joe does give me an unusual amount of pleasure. Just another reason why Café Junkies, in my humble opinion, is such an incredible name for a coffee shop. It draws out a natural curiosity in the caffeine addict, practically begging them to come out, try their beans, and see if “the fix” can be met. By “them” I mean me, and yes — the fix was met. Still following? When Rick Rabon so kindly handed me the information to try out this coffee shop, I was more than hopeful that the space itself lived up to its fabulous moniker. As with all recommendations I get from fellow coffee lovers, it was the total package and worth the multiple visits I paid them (literally) to feed my habit. the atmoSPheRe This crazy cool café is a deconstructed, brightly lit space with a concrete ceiling, track lighting, and a midnight blue accent wall with a huge backlit bear head as a focal point. Yes, a bear head (animal rights activists, take a seat: it’s not real), and while it may read as being random, it looked perfectly at home hanging on that blue wall. The barista’s domain greets you upon entry with its rich wood counter and brick wall, replete with a large chalkboard listing their multiple coffee options. Counters and bar stools line the front of the shop and, to the side, Café Junkies sells its own mugs and beans for those who need to bring their little pick-me-ups home. The bonus item for those of you who are interested: this is another coffee shop that sells beer, this time with a specialty brew of sorts. In comparison to last month’s coffee shop, Junkies feels almost minimalist. However, like Notch, this café has unique details that draw you in. One feature that I found to have a high level of visual appeal was the bookcase that covers the expanse of one entire wall. This shelving unit appears to have been painstakingly constructed by using old windowpanes. Painted with light pastel colors and antiqued, it adds an element of surprise to the space. Within the display was a tasteful assortment of knickknacks; whether it was a license plate or an old camera, its placement appeared intentional and well thought-out.

the beveRageS Over multiple visits, my orders ranged from a latte to a cappuccino — and an Americano for good measure. The mugs are a great size, leaving you with a feeling of smug satisfaction that not only are you drinking an adequately sized cup of coffee, but also you’re getting what you paid for to boot. As is one of my main requirements, the latte and cappuccino were not overly milky — which already puts this café in my top list of contenders. When ordering my cappuccino, I requested for it to be very hot, as I can be a bit snobbish when it comes to temperature. Honoring my request, the cappuccino was like a big sigh of relief upon the first sip. Let me clarify what I mean. You know that feeling when you ask someone for something but don’t hold out much hope that it will actually happen? Yeah, well particularly in the arena of coffee requests, until actually met, I tend to be a bit of a pessimist. (Hence the sigh of relief!) I found the coffee here to be bold. There was no need for the milk to compete, instead it merely complemented. In fact, despite being the self-proclaimed queen of sweet, I felt none of my usual compulsions to dump in the sugar and mess with what I thought was already a stellar product. (This, my friend, is HUGE.) Well, OK. If I’m being entirely honest, the pumpkin pie added just the right amount of sweet that I was looking for. I know this is not a dessert review, but … ORDER THE PIE!!! In short, this proved to be a lovely place to catch up with girlfriends (twice!) and to enjoy an open, airy, welcoming space over a cup of fabulous coffee (and pie...). Safe to say, as with any junkie, I will certainly be back. Price Point: NT$60 for an espresso, with the highest price being NT$140 for the Caramel Macchiato.

Café Junkies Coffee Roasters n’ Bagels 9 Jiankang Road (near Taipei Arena) (健康路9號) Monday – Thursday: 7:30 am – 8 pm; Fridays: 7:30 am – 9 pm; Saturdays & Sundays: 8:30 am – 9 pm (02) 2717-4747 cafejunkies@gmail.com Aly Cooper is an expat wife of three years who enjoys adventures with her six-year-old son, reading, eating, blogging, having A LOT of coffee with friends, volunteering and spending free weekends exploring what the island has to offer with the family. http://caffeinatedblisstaiwan.blogspot.tw Got a suggestion for our resident caffeine addict? Send them in via coteditor@communitycenter.org.tw.

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charity

t

ORpHanaGe club Angel Trees In early November, we set up “Angel” Trees in both lower and upper school areas. We invite anyone to select an “angel” card and buy the item written on it, which has been requested by an orphan or needy child. Requests range from simple electronics to shoes and clothes. The gifts will be given to the guests attending our annual Pearl S. Buck party on December 2 2 n d, as well as to the children at our Cathwel and Chungyi orphanage Chinese New Year Parties in January. Please return the gifts, with the angel card attached, by December 9th! Raffle Tickets OC members have started selling raffle tickets for our 44th annual raffle drawing,

16

w h i c h w i l l t a ke p l a c e o n February 20th, 2014. Tickets will be sold in packets of six for NT$100 and individual tickets for NT$20 each. We are also still adding to our list of raffle prizes. If you have any vouchers, products, samples, tickets, or any other item(s) suitable for a prize, please contact us. We appreciate your support and hope you will win one of our fabulous prizes! Christmas Party Preparations From December 19th through December 21st we will be having workdays to prepare for our annual Pearl S. Buck Christmas Party. Every year Orphanage Club hosts a Christmas party, attended this year by five hundred guests. During the workdays we will be decorating the cafeteria, making posters, wrapping

gifts, making goody bags, and running through the event. During the party, we will be catering and serving a feast for our guests and providing a variety of performances to entertain them! As previously mentioned, gifts from Angel Trees will also be handed out to the children. We always need help both on the day of the party and during the workdays, so please email us if you’re interested. Cathwel Outing O n J a n u a r y 1 1t h we w i l l have our 4th Cathwel babies and boys outings. As usual, m e m b e rs a n d o u r g u e st s from Cathwel will spend a day playing sports and other a c t i v i t i e s. We a re a l ways looking for adult chaperones for outings, so please contact us if you’re interested.

TexT: BeTHANY SHIeH

Chinese New Year Shopping On January 16th and 17th we will have our Carrefour and Di Hua Jie shopping trips. We will be buying Chinese New Year goodies and traditional Chinese foods for poor families in Taiwan. If you would like to help us and get to understand local culture more, please feel free to join us!

All questions and comments should be directed to tas. orphanageclub@gmail.com. Also try contacting our club sponsors Mr. Arnold at 2873-9900 ext. 239 or arnoldr@tas.edu.tw and Ms. Koh at weehueykoh@yahoo. com.

DEC 2013/JAN 2014 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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2013/11/27 11:55:57 AM


2014 Spring & Summer Activities

CE_Spring 2014.indd 1

2013/11/28 12:05:21 AM


Welcome To The Center December 2013

Dear Friends,

By the time you see this catalog, we will already be thinking about the next one! However, when you look over the list of activities that we’ve scheduled for the 2014 Spring-Summer semester, we hope that you get as excited about it as we are right now. We’ve added some brand new activities this semester and of course, brought back some old favorites. Our goal is to offer a selection of classes and tours that will appeal to you whether you’ve been here for one year or ten. In terms of our tours and cultural activities you might notice that we’ve taken a bit of a historical turn—in so many of the places we will be visiting, the past will be included as part of what you will get to learn about and explore. It might be coincidence, but it probably came about due to an insatiable desire to delve deeper into the culture and history of this lovely island where we all currently make our home. Although it’s been said before, whether you arrived last week or have been here for ten years, the Center is a great place to find information about living in Taiwan; learn how to get and stay connected; participate in activities and tours which are conducted in English; and find support and professional counseling help for you or a family member, should you need it, while you are here. Read through this catalog. Find something to do. Sign up and enjoy. And, come see us at the Center.

Grace Ting Office Manager

Rosemary Susa Programs Coordinator

P.S. Be sure to mark our monthly special topic coffee mornings on your calendar. For dates and topics, please see our ad on page xi of this catalog. These monthly Center events are a great way to connect with other members of the foreign community in Taipei while listening to interesting speakers and enjoying a cuppa!

CE_Spring 2014.indd 2

Registration Information Advance registration and payment is required for all Center activities. Regi st ration may be done by phone, email or in per son; online pre-registration is also available via the Center’s website. Please go to www.communitycenter.org.tw/whats-on/pre-register. Payment for most activities is due at least one week prior to the start or actual date. Should a class become fully subscribed and a wait list created, payment is due upon request. Please note that we cannot guarantee your place until full payment is made. If you are unable to visit the Center, please call us for alternative payment options.

Center office hours are Monday - Friday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. Cancellations The Center reserves the right to cancel any activity or program that does not have sufficient enrollment. We make every effort to notify registered participants promptly. Refund and Credit Policy Activities cancelled by the Center: • Full refund will be issued. Refunds may be collected until the last day of the semester. When a participant cancels a tour or activity registration, no refund will be issued. However, credit is available on the following terms: • A full credit will be issued if you cancel your registration at least one week prior to the first meeting. After that time, we are unable to give credits. • Credit may be applied to other Center activities within the current term or to the term that immediately follows.

Tel: 02-2836-8134

E-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

http://www.communitycenter.org.tw

2013/11/26 10:37:21 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan Description

Arts, Culture and Tours in Taiwan 1

Real or Repro: How to Recognize Whether that Piece You Want to Buy is Old or New

2

Celebrating Chinese New Year: Di Hua Street Tour

3

4

5

Longshan Temple, Bopiliao and Wanhua Herb Street Tour

Tour of Radio Taiwan International (RTI): Taiwan's National Broadcaster

Taoyuan County: Daxi Old Street, Lake Tzuhu and the Garden of Generalissimos

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 3

Wed

Wed

Tue

Mon

Wed

Jan 15

Jan 22

Feb 11

Feb 17

Feb 19

Lunch or meal included

1

1

1

1

1

12 noon 2:00pm

9:45am 12noon

9:30am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

8:30am 3:30pm

$500

Bai Win Antiques

$500

Shuanglian MRT Sta. Exit 2

$500

Longshan Temple MRT Sta. Exit 1

$ 500

$1300

Radio Taiwan International

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 & Lane 290

Faye Angevine

Join Faye for a practical and informative talk about how to distinguish the difference between true Chinese antiques and the myriad of reproduction (often beautiful) pieces available for sale. Learn what the experts look for when choosing a piece and how to recognize old from new. Bring your packed lunch.

Ivy Chen

Macy's at Christmas. Harrod's at Easter. Di Hua Street at Chinese New Year! Join Ivy for a tour of the famous Di Hua Street market area and enjoy the sights, sounds and tastes of the holiday. Included will be a quick walk around the fabric market, making this your one-stop tour of the neighborhood.

Jennifer Tong

Lantern Festival marks the end of the Chinese New Year celebration. Visit the very old and atmospheric Longshan Temple where you will not only learn about its history but also be able to view colorful lanterns made especially for this auspicious occasion. Included in this tour is a visit to the Bopiliao Historic Block and the nearby Wanhua Herb Street.

Rosemary Susa and RTI Staff

Don't confuse this station with the one you listen to each day. RTI does not broadcast its programs here. Originally founded in Nanjing, China in 1928, the station moved to Taiwan when the KMT came to the island in 1949. For nearly 60 years, the station kept the world informed about the state of the nation very much along the same lines as the "Voice of America" has done for the USA. Today, RTI is one of the world's oldest radio stations, broadcasting via short wave in 13 different languages and offering a wide variety of programs that promote the culture and lifestyle of Taiwan.

Richard Saunders

Daxi was once an important hub for trading indigo and tea, but now boasts two of Taiwan's finest remaining old streets. After touring Daxi we will continue on to nearby Lake Tzuhu where Gen. Chiang Kai-shek and his son Chiang Ching-kuo lay in state in a pair of impressive mausoleums, connected by a 1.8 km walkway. We will finish our day in the unusual Garden of Generalissimos, a grassy park studded with several hundred busts and statues of the late CKS.

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [iii]

2013/11/26 10:37:22 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

6

7

8

9

10

The Shi Dong and Local Market Tour or "What Is That Vegetable and How Do I Cook It?"

Rixing Type Foundry: Preserving the Culture and History of Traditional Printing

A Brilliant Little Gem in Old Dadaocheng: Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum

Beitou Museum Tour and Lunch

Yangmingshan Cultural Tour: Zhongshan Lou and Lin Yu-tang House

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 4

Day(s)

Thu

Mon

Wed

Wed

Wed

Dates

Feb 27

Mar 03

Mar 05

Mar 12

Mar 19

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

1

1

1

1

1

Time

9:30am 11:30am

9:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:30am 2:00pm

8:30am 2:30pm

$$$

$500

$800

$700

$1400

$1200

Meet@

Shi Dong Market Entrance 2

Zhongshan MRT Sta. Exit 2

Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum

Xinbeitou MRT Sta.

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 & Lane 290

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan Description

Ivy Chen

Bright, colorful and noisy, the Shi Dong Market is the place for all your produce needs. Join Ivy and learn some helpful hints and tips on what to buy, where to buy it, and how to be sure it's fresh. Ivy will also show you how to select fresh fish, seafood and other items of interest.

Jennifer Tong and Chang Chieh-kuan

Movable type is almost obsolete in the modern world of computer printing. Chang Chieh-kuan, owner and founder of Rixing Type Foundry, is working to preserve this traditional craft and teach it to new generations. Join us for a tour of this remarkable workshop, which houses over 150,000 character molds that make up the traditional Chinese character matrix, and is one of the last centers creating traditional movable type molds left in the world.

Robin Ruizendaal

Used for religious, entertainment and communication purposes, puppetry holds a significant place in Chinese and Taiwanese history. The Lin Lui Hsin Puppet Museum is dedicated to preserving and sharing this piece of local cultural heritage. Join the Center for a tour with the curator whose passion for puppetry brings the museum to life. After the tour, enjoy a delightful puppet show.

Rosemary Susa

Housed in one of Taiwan's largest surviving Japanesestyle wooden structures, this small museum boasts one of the country's leading collections of aboriginal artifacts and Taiwan folk art. Join us for a guided tour of the museum which, at the time of our visit, will be exhibiting a selection of their most exquisite traditional folk crafts and aboriginal relics. Then enjoy a delicious lunch in their lovely tea house and restaurant.

Jennifer Tong

Our tour begins at Zhongshan Lou, which was built in 196566 to commemorate the centennial of Dr. Sun Yat-sen's birth and served until 2005 as a convention site for the National Assembly of the ROC. This impressive building, designed by a female architect, offers an interesting glimpse into Taiwan’s political history. Afterwards, we will tour the nearby Lin Yutang House, a small and beautiful historic site, allowing time to linger in the lovely cafÊ.

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [iv]

2013/11/28 12:06:54 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

11

12

Coffee, Coffee, Buzz, Buzz, Buzz

Confessions of an Antique Dealer

13

Battleship Rock and Lovers' Temple Hike

14

Ecologically Grown: Farm Tour and Vegetarian Lunch

15

Shilin to Neihu Hike

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 5

Day(s)

Tue

Tue

Wed

Wed

Tue

Dates

Mar 25

Apr 08

Apr 09

Apr 30

May 06

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

1

1

1

1

1

Time

8:30am 12noon

9:30am 12noon

9:00am 12noon

8:30am 3:30pm

9:00am 2:00pm

$$$

$800

$600

Meet@

In front of BMW Dealership, Tianmu

Faye's Beitou Home

$500

Qilian MRT Sta.

$1500

Corner of Zhongshan N. Rd., Sec. 6 & Lane 290

$700

Jiantan MRT Sta. Exit 2

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan Description

Aly Cooper

Join Aly for a fun and highly caffeinated morning as she takes you on a tour of three of her favorite downtown java haunts where you can enjoy great coffee while learning about what you are drinking. Between cafĂŠ stops, Aly will walk you through the neighborhood filled with lovely shops and eateries. The final stop on this tour will be at the Toasteria where you may stay on for an optional lunch. Cost of your first cuppa included. Bring your Easy Card for the bus ride downtown.

Faye Angevine

Have you ever wondered what antique dealers have in their own personal collections? Here's your chance to find out. Join Faye in her Beitou home to see all the pieces she has chosen for herself and discover why certain pieces never made it to the sales floor. You may be surprised! Coffee and a light breakfast provided.

Richard Saunders

This short hike in the rocky, wooded hills above Beitou and Wellington Heights connects the well-known landmarks of Battleship Rock (or 'Dog's Head Rock') and the unique Lovers' Temple, following a network of trails with commanding views over the city below. The route finishes at Xinbeitou with a short visit to the amazing Hell's Valley, a large natural pool of near-boiling hot spring water, and one of Taipei's most unusual tourist attractions. Wear sturdy shoes; bring water, snacks and rain gear--just in case.

Ivy Chen

Join Ivy on a visit to an ecologically friendly farm, established by a local eye doctor in search of a source of pesticide-free food. Learn all about the special techniques they use to grow their rice, fruits and vegetables. Tour the farm, pick some vegetables and enjoy a delicious vegetarian lunch.

Richard Saunders

This fine, surprisingly unspoilt ridge hike on the edge of the city connects the Grand Hotel with central Neihu, and follows the ridge of steep, wooded hills that rise above the Keelung River. Climbing over a string of small peaks, the trail finishes with an exciting climb down the rocky slopes of Mount Jinmian and ends at the Xihu MRT station (Brown Line). The trail is steep, rough and rocky in parts. Proper shoes with a good grip are a must. Bring water, lunch and rain gear--just in case.

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [v]

2013/11/28 12:07:41 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

16

Sanxia Old Street, Temple and Indigo Dye Center Tour

Day(s)

Wed

Dates

May 14

# of Sessions

1

Time

9:30am 3:30pm

$$$

$800

Meet@

Yongning MRT Sta. Exit 4

Instructor

Arts, Culture & Tours in Taiwan/ Family, Fitness & Health

Description

Jennifer Tong

Join Jennifer for an adventure to Sanxia, with its endearing old street and beautiful Zhu Shi Taoist Temple. Included in this tour is a visit to one of the town’s indigo dye centers where you will have the option of creating a hand-dyed item of your choosing (cost not included). Explore Taiwan the way the locals do—using MRT and public bus. Bring your Easy Card and a packed lunch.

Colleen Peterson

Join Colleen for a high intensity workout aimed at getting your heart pumping and building strength. This class incorporates a warm-up, three circuits and a cool down, taught at three levels. It's fun, fast and really works! This is not a beginner class and requires a reasonable level of fitness. Bring plenty of water, a yoga mat and towel. First class meets in front of the Tianmu Takashimaya at 9:15am.

Irit Fichman

Enjoy the benefits of yoga in a non-competitive environment where everyone is encouraged to practice within their own abilities and to find balance between effort and ease in every pose. This course will help to gently improve circulation and joint freedom, lengthen muscles, release areas of tightness, build strength and stability and leave you feeling refreshed, relaxed and rejuvenated. Bring water, yoga mat and towel.

Colleen Peterson

Prenatal Fitness is for expectant mothers, whether one month in or in the third trimester. Led by qualified prenatal fitness instructor (American Professional Fitness Association) Colleen Peterson, these classes include strength and endurance training, birth preparation exercises, light cardio and some Pilates core work. Give your baby the best start to life...a healthy and happy mother! Your doctor's written permission is required to attend this class.

Jennifer Chau

Kindermusik is a developmentally appropriate music and movement class that enhances the bond between parent and child. Your toddler will thrive on musical and rhythmic activities designed to lay the foundation for a lifetime love of music. High-quality digital materials are included.

Family, Fitness & Health 17

Fitness Boot Camp Session I

Gentle Yoga Session I

18

19

20

Prenatal Fitness Session I

Kindermusik II 18 mos.-3yrs.

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 6

Tue

Tue

Tue

Thu

Jan 07 to Feb 18

Jan 07 to Feb 18

Jan 07 to Feb 18

Jan 16 to Mar 20

Lunch or meal included

5

5

5

8

9:30am 10:20am

9:30am 11:00am

11:00am 11:50am

9:30am 10:20am

$2250

$2250

$2500

$4200

Tianmu Baseball Park

The Farès Academy Dojo

The Center

The Center

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [vi]

2013/11/26 10:37:23 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

21

22

Kindermusik I 0-18 mos.

Self-Defense for Women and Girls

Day(s)

Thu

Fri

Dates

Jan 16 to Mar 20

Jan 17 to Feb 21

# of Sessions

8

5

Time

10:45am 11:35am

5:30pm 6:30pm

$$$

$4200

$2000

Meet@

The Center

The Farès Academy Dojo

Instructor

Family, Fitness & Health Description

Jennifer Chau

Kindermusik is a developmentally appropriate music and movement class that enhances the bond between parent and baby. Your baby will thrive on musical and rhythmic activities designed to lay the foundation for a lifetime love of music. High-quality digital materials are included.

Antoine Farès

“Self-defense” is not just a set of techniques; it’s a state of mind, and it begins with the belief that you are worth defending. Any woman has the power within to defeat an attacker, and this program will bring it out. In this class, you will learn the most common strategies recommended to cope with both stranger and non-stranger assailants. This is a great class for friends, moms and daughters to take together. For ages twelve and up.

7

10:30am 11:30am

$2800

The Center

Bridget Snider

Bond with your baby while improving your own health and well being. Don't worry if your baby cries, gets squirmy, needs to be fed or changed. The class is designed so you can hold your baby (great toning for the arms) or place him or her next to you, or any combination of both. Bring a yoga mat, a blanket or infant seat, a few small toys and an open mind. Suitable for moms who are at least three weeks postpartum. (Doctor's permission required for anyone less than two months postpartum.)

Feb 25 to Mar 25

5

9:30am 10:20am

$2250

Tianmu Baseball Park

Colleen Peterson

Please refer to Activity # 17 for course description.

Tue

Feb 25 to Mar 25

5

9:30am 11:00am

$2250

The Farès Academy Dojo

Irit Fichman

Please refer to Activity # 18 for course description.

Prenatal Fitness Session II

Tue

Feb 25 to Mar 25

5

11:00am 11:50am

$2500

The Center

Colleen Peterson

Please refer to Activity # 19 for course description.

27

Kindermusik II 18 mos.-3yrs. Spring Break Mini-Session

Thu

Apr 03 to Apr 24

4

9:30am 10:20am

$2100

The Center

Jennifer Chau

Please refer to Activity # 20 for course description.

28

Kindermusik I 0-18 mos. Spring Break Mini-Session

Thu

Apr 03 to Apr 24

4

10:45am 11:35am

$2100

The Center

Jennifer Chau

Please refer to Activity # 21 for course description.

23

Mom and Baby Yoga Session I

Mon

Feb 10 to Mar 24

24

Fitness Boot Camp Session II

Tue

25

Gentle Yoga Session II

26

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 7

Lunch or meal included

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [vii]

2013/11/26 10:37:23 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Family, Fitness & Health/ Hobbies & Skills

Description

29

Mom and Baby Yoga Session II

Mon

Apr 28 to May 26

4

10:30am 11:30am

$1600

The Center

Bridget Snider

Please refer to Activity # 23 for course description.

30

Fitness Boot Camp Session III

Tue

Apr 29 to May 27

5

9:30am 10:20am

$2250

Tianmu Baseball Park

Colleen Peterson

Please refer to Activity # 17 for course description.

31

Gentle Yoga Session III

Tue

Apr 29 to May 27

5

9:30am 11:00am

$2250

The Farès Academy Dojo

Irit Fichman

Please refer to Activity # 18 for course description.

32

Prenatal Fitness Session III

Tue

Apr 29 to May 27

5

11:00am 11:50am

$2500

The Center

Colleen Peterson

Please refer to Activity # 19 for course description.

33

Kindermusik II 18 mos.-3yrs. Summer Mini-Session

Thu

May 01 to May 22

4

9:30am 10:20am

$2100

The Center

Jennifer Chau

Please refer to Activity # 20 for course description.

34

Kindermusik I 0-18 mos. Summer Mini-Session

Thu

May 01 to May 22

4

10:45am 11:35am

$2100

The Center

Jennifer Chau

Please refer to Activity # 21 for course description.

Bunny Pacheco

This course is for adult learners who already have some knowledge of English and who want to improve their conversational skills. The course will focus on helping students speak with confidence, fluency and accuracy using structured dialogues, pair practice, current events discussions and grammar exercises.

Jennifer Tong

In this class, Jennifer will teach you the basic skills of Chinese brush painting and calligraphy. If you have already taken a class with her, then here’s your chance to improve your technique and form. She will then guide you to paint a beautiful paper lantern that you can hang in your home--just in time for Chinese New Year and the Lantern Festival. Cost of all materials included.

Hobbies & Skills 35

36

Intermediate English Conversation

Lantern Painting

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 8

Mon

Thu

Jan 13 to Mar 24

Jan 16 to Jan 23

Lunch or meal included

9

2

12:30pm 2:00pm

12noon 2pm

$3600

$2000

The Center

The Center

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [viii]

2013/11/28 12:09:38 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

37

38

39

Intermediate Spanish Conversation

Chinese Knotting

Decorative Fruit and Vegetable Carving

Day(s)

Thu

Fri

Tue

Dates

Feb 06 to Mar 20

Feb 07 to Feb 21

Mar 11 to Mar 25

# of Sessions

6

3

3

Time

12:30pm 2:00pm

12:30pm 2:00pm

12:30pm 2:15pm

$$$

$2400

$1800

$2500

Meet@

The Center

The Center

The Center

Instructor

Hobbies & Skills Description

Ana Palazuelos Berasategui

This course is for adult learners who already have some knowledge of Spanish and who want to improve their conversational skills. The course will focus on helping students speak with confidence, fluency and accuracy using structured dialogues, pair practice, current events discussions and grammar exercises.

Lily Chim

Learn the ancient art of Chinese knotting and decorate your home Chinese-style. During this three-session class, you will learn how to make two types of knots (pan chang and butterfly) and a tassle which will give you the skills to create two lovely hand-crafted wall hangings. If you've already had some knotting experience, Lily will work with you to expand and develop your skills. Cost of all materials included.

Sally Duh Chu

With surprisingly little time and effort, you can make meals more fun to prepare, serve and eat. Learn to dress up food, choose garnishes that complement the main ingredient of the dish, and create the mood you want to establish--dainty, elegant or casual. Cost of all produce and a small carving knife is included. Students will be given a short list of basic kitchen utensils to bring from home.

40

Porcelain Painting

Thu

Mar 13 to Mar 20

2

10:00am 12noon

$2100

The Center

Michelle Tan

Whatever your level of expertise, this workshop will teach you all the steps required to produce a beautiful piece of painted porcelain. Learn the basic techniques of pen work and how to apply colors to create a beautifully painted china plate. If you are looking for a new hobby, this may be the perfect course for you! Cost of all materials and firing included.

41

Intermediate Spanish Conversation

Thu

May 01 to May 22

4

12:30pm 2:00pm

$1600

The Center

Ana Palazuelos Berasategui

Please refer to Activity # 37 for course description.

Jennifer Tong

This class is an introduction to the traditional style of Chinese writing using brush and ink. Jennifer will instruct you on the correct way to hold the brush and maneuver it to produce beautiful results. If you've taken calligraphy or brush painting before, Jennifer will work with you to improve your technique and form. Cost of all materials included.

42

Chinese Calligraphy

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 9

Fri

May 02 to May 23

Lunch or meal included

4

12:30pm 2:15pm

$2400

The Center

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [ix]

2013/11/26 10:37:24 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Learn Chinese Description

Learn Chinese With Gloria Gwo 43

44

Survival Chinese I

Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Mon & Wed

Jan 13 to Mar 05

Jan 13 to Mar 05

12

12

9:10am 10:30am

10:40am 12noon

$4800

$4800

The Center

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Would you like to be able to communicate with shopkeepers, taxi drivers and co-workers? Whether you've just arrived in Taiwan or have been here awhile, this is the class for you. Learn spoken Mandarin in a relaxed and informal environment right here at the Center. Course materials included. This class is also suitable for anyone who has taken some basic Chinese lessons and would like to continue with his or her studies.

Gloria Gwo

This course builds upon the skills learned in Survival Chinese I (or any other basic Chinese course) and offers approximately 20 hours of language instruction for people who would like to upgrade their basic skills and go one step further with Mandarin. Course materials included.

45

Advanced Chinese Study Group

Mon & Wed

Jan 13 to May 14

25

12:10pm 1:30pm

$10000

The Center

Gloria Gwo

This is an advanced Chinese language course for students who have completed our Beginner Chinese Study Group course, or already have a foundation in writing and reading characters and wish to continue their studies. Books not included in course fee.

46

Evening Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Jan 13 to Mar 05

12

6:00pm 7:20pm

$4800

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #43 for course description.

47

Evening Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Jan 13 to Mar 05

12

7:30pm 8:50pm

$4800

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #44 for course description.

Gloria Gwo

This class will finish off any sections of Survival II left undone from last semester, then continue forward with a focus on advancing your study of spoken Chinese. New topics will be introduced and classroom time will be supplemented with occasional outings to local shops, restaurants and businesses. Sound like fun? Then sign up and join this practical, task-based class.

Gloria Gwo

This is an intensive Chinese language course that focuses on learning how to read and write characters. You need to have attended Survival Chinese I and II or completed approximately 40 hours of language instruction. Books not included in course fee.

48

49

Survival Chinese III/ Chinese Conversation

Beginner Chinese Study Group

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 10

Tue & Fri

Tue & Fri

Jan 14 to Mar 04

Jan 14 to May 16

Lunch or meal included

11

23

9:10am 10:30am

10:40am 12noon

$4400

$9200

The Center

The Center

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [x]

2013/11/28 12:10:05 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

Learn Chinese Description

50

Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Mar 10 to May 14

13

9:10am 10:30am

$5200

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity # 43 for course description.

51

Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Mar 10 to May 14

13

10:40am 12noon

$5200

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #44 for course description.

52

Evening Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Mar 10 to May 14

13

6:00pm 7:20pm

$5200

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #43 for course description.

53

Evening Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Mar 10 to May 14

13

7:30pm 8:50pm

$5200

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #44 for course description.

54

Chinese Conversation

Tue & Fri

Mar 11 to May 16

12

9:10am 10:30am

$4800

The Center

Gloria Gwo

This class will help you to advance in your study of spoken Chinese. New topics will be introduced each lesson and classroom time will be supplemented with occasional outings to local shops, restaurants and businesses. Sound like fun? Then sign up and join this practical, task-based class.

55

Summer Survival Chinese I

Mon & Wed

Jun 09 to Jul 23

14

9:10am 10:30am

$5600

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity # 43 for course description.

56

Summer Survival Chinese II

Mon & Wed

Jun 09 to Jul 23

14

10:40am 12noon

$5600

The Center

Gloria Gwo

Please refer to Activity #44 for course description.

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 11

Lunch or meal included

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [xi]

2013/11/28 12:10:21 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

Day(s)

Dates

# of Sessions

Time

$$$

Meet@

Instructor

What's Cooking Description

What's Cooking 57

58

59

60

61

62

Fabulous French

Delectable Dumplings

Italian Cooking With a Twist

Taiwanese Please II

Indian Vegetarian: Perfect Paneer

EVENING CLASS! Delectable Dumplings II

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 12

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

Tue

Jan 17

Jan 24

Feb 07

Feb 14

Feb 21

Mar 04

Lunch or meal included

1

1

1

1

1

1

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

6:30pm 8:30pm

$1200

$1200

$1200

$1200

$1200

$1200

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

Christopher Bach

We have a new chef in the house! Join Christopher for a French cooking experience as he shares with you some of his favorite recipes: Quiche Lorraine, Chicken Cutlets in Cream Sauce, and for dessert, a delicious seasonal Fruit Tart.

Ivy Chen

Here's your chance to try your hand at dumpling making. In this hands-on class, learn how to make delicious Boiled Dumplings with Pork and Cabbage and Fried Dumplings with Assorted Vegetables. In addition, Ivy will also prepare her delicious Hot and Sour Soup and a seasonal vegetable.

Heather Martin Lowder

Looking for ways to spice up your meals? Join Heather for some of her family's favorite Italian dishes--all with a twist. Start off with an enticing appetizer of Sweet & Savory Bruschetta, followed by a delicious Pasta e Fagioli soup (great for the cooler winter weather) and Heather's famous Firecracker Pork Fusilli for the main course.

Ivy Chen

In this class, Ivy will demonstrate how to prepare some delicious and easy Taiwanese-style dishes that your family will love: Mushu Pork served with homemade Chinese pancakes, Sauteed Cabbage with Garlic, and Braised, Family-Style Tofu. She will also share her recipe for those delicious spring onion pancakes, Cong You Bing.

Shakha Gupta

Paneer, a staple in Indian vegetarian cooking, can be served in a variety of ways. Shakha will teach you how to make your own fresh, homemade paneer, then use it to prepare Butter Paneer (a sauce you can also use with chicken), Palek Paneer (with spinach) and Paneer rolls.

Ivy Chen

Join Ivy, at night, for one of her most popular daytime classes: hands-on dumpling making. Starting with homemade wrappers, we will be rolling, stuffing and eating delicious Steamed Dumplings with Shrimp and Seasonal Vegetables and Fried Pot Stickers with Pork. In addition, Ivy will also prepare her delicious Hot and Sour Soup and a seasonal vegetable to round out the meal.

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2013 Spring & Summer Activities [xii]

2013/11/28 12:10:56 AM


The Community Services Center | Tel: 02-2836-8134, e-mail: ce@communitycenter.org.tw

Activity

#

63

64

65

66

67

Tasty Thai

Spring Fling: Cake Baking and Decorating

Classic Colombian Cuisine

It's All in the Sauce

Chinese Salads and Starters

Transportation included

CE_Spring 2014.indd 13

Day(s)

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

Dates

Mar 21

Apr 11

May 02

May 09

May 16

Lunch or meal included

# of Sessions

1

1

1

1

1

Time

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

10:00am 12noon

$$$

$1200

$1200

$1200

$1200

$1200

Meet@

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

The Center

Instructor

What's Cooking Description

Saithip Tantiwongkorn

Fragrant and flavorful, Thai food is always popular at the Center. Saithip returns with another delicious selection of her favorite recipes: Thai Beef Salad, Tom Ka Kai (Chicken with Coconut Milk Soup), Steamed Fish with Red Curry, and Spicy Stir-Fried Pork, Shrimp, and Squid with Basil.

Lee Ming Yeh

Join the Center for a spring-themed baking and decorating extravaganza. Lee Ming will begin the class by sharing her delicious Lemon Yogurt Cake recipe; once that is in the oven, the rest of the class will be spent learning how to decorate your own cakes and cupcakes using butter cream frosting and fondant. When the class is done you will be able to take home six beautifully decorated cupcakes of your own creation.

Catalina Ford

Join Catalina for her own special recipe of Arroz con Pollo, a Columbian-style chicken with rice dish. To accompany this one-dish meal, she will also prepare a couple of tasty appetizers: Avocado stuffed with Shrimp (Aguacates Rellenos de Camarones) and Fried Yucca with two dipping sauces--Spicy Mayo and Salsa Rosado. Delicioso!

Sally Duh Chu

The secret to many a tasty dish is in the sauce. Join Sally who will teach you how to make five different sauces: Sweet & Sour, Ginger Vinegar, Oyster, Red Chili and Spicy. She will also show you how to prepare your own chili oil and pepper salt, two major staples in Chinese cooking. Then, enjoy a feast as she demonstrates how to use these delicious sauces on a selection of appetizers, salads and main courses.

Ivy Chen

Eaten as appetizers before meals, these cold salads, or Xiao Cai, are great as side dishes in the hot summer months. Enjoy Cucumber Salad, Cabbage Salad, Chicken Salad with Sesame Dressing and Tofu Thread Salad. A delicious way to include tofu in your family meals--if you don't tell them they aren't "noodles," we won't!

Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2014 Spring & Summer Activities [xiii]

2013/11/26 10:37:26 AM


Suzan Babcock

Counselors Since its inception in the mid-1980s, the Community Services Center has been blessed with an exceptional team of professional counselors. All counselors at the Center have at least a Master’s level degree in their field; most have more than five years of experience delivering face-to-face counseling, and some hold special qualifications. To s c h e d u l e a c o u n s e l i n g appointment, simply call the Center at (02) 2836-8134. We’re open Monday through Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm. For new clients, an intake counselor will ask you for some basic information about your preferences and needs. For example, will the counseling be for an adult or child, whether you require spoken English or Chinese, if you prefer a male or female counselor, when you are available for counseling and if you prefer a particular counselor. Then, as soon as possible, you will be contacted to set up an appointment. For urgent or after hours counseling and intake, call 0932-594-578. The following is a brief introduction to each counselor to help familiarize you with their backgrounds and areas of expertise. More detailed information is available on our website at www. communitycenter.org.tw/counseling.

M.C. Ed., MIIM

Suzan Babcock has a Master’s in Counselor Education from St. Lawrence University (U.S.A.), along with a Master’s in International-Intercultural Management from the School of International Training Graduate Institute (World Learning, Washington, D.C.). Sue works with adults on issues pertaining to: the LBGT community, cross-cultural adjustment, self-esteem and women’s issues.

I-Wen Chan

Ph.D.

I-Wen is a Licensed Counseling Psychologist both in Taiwan and Maryland, U.S.A. She received her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Afterwards, I-Wen spent two years working as a post doctor at the Counseling and Psychiatric Services of University of Georgia and the Asian Clinic of Cambridge Health Alliance, respectively, as well as the Mental Health Services of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I-Wen uses an integrated model in counseling, which includes: Satir Model, cognitivebehavioral therapy, and interpersonal approach. I-Wen’s professional interests include panic attack and other anxiety disorders, depression, interpersonal issues, and adjustment issues.

Fawn Chang

M.A., LMFT

Fawn holds a Master's Degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from the University of Southern California. Fawn has 18 years of clinical experience working in both the US and Taiwan. Fawn holds licenses in Marriage and Family Therapy in the US and in Counseling Psychology in Taiwan. Fawn's practice consists of working with children, teenagers and their families on behavioral/relationshiprelated difficulties, cultural adjustment, parenting, and career planning. Being a trained Marriage and Family Therapist, Fawn uses family system and Adlerian therapy in her practice. She has extensive experience working with couples of mixed cultures and has associated herself with a diverse range of ethnicities and is sensitive towards multicultural issues.

Katherine Chang

M.S.

Katherine has an M.S. in Counseling, specializing in School Counseling from San Diego State University. She also holds an American School Counselor (PPS) credential. Her areas of professional interest include school-aged children with emotional, social or academic difficulties, working with teachers on behavioral and classroom management strategies, and providing support to parents in addressing their children’s social and emotional development. Katherine has been in Taiwan since 2009 and has experience working as a Lower and Middle School Counselor at the Dominican International School in Taipei.

Jung Chin

Psy. D.

Jung has a Doctor of Psychology from the University of Denver. Her areas of professional interest include psychotherapies (including comprehensive evaluations and professional treatments) for sexually abused children, adolescents and adults; sur vivors of domestic violence; and children, adolescents and adults who are experiencing emotional and behavioral problems. She is also interested in assessment (intelligence, emotion and personality) for children, adolescents and adults. Jung has also studied in Melbourne, Australia, where she earned a Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology from Deakin University, and at Western Michigan University, where she earned her M.A. in Counseling Psychology.

Chiao-Feng Chung

Ph.D.

Chiao-Feng received both her Master’s and Doctorate in Counseling from the University of North Texas (UNT). Specializing in play therapy, she works with children who demonstrate emotional and/or behavioral concerns. She works closely with parents to offer support and feedback in order to assist them in becoming agents for their children’s changes. Chiao-Feng also works with adults who have encountered various life challenges and difficulties such as grief/loss, depression, anxiety, trauma/abuse, cultural adjustment, and relationship issues. Chiao-Feng provides psychoeducational assessment services to children 2014 Spring & Summer Activities [xiv]

CE_Spring 2014.indd 14

2013/11/26 10:37:26 AM


ages 6 to 16. She selects instruments that offer an overall assessment of a child’s strengths and areas of improvement.

Wendy Evans

MSW, ACSW, RD

Wendy holds a Master's Degree in Clinical Social Work and an undergraduate degree in Nutrition and Health. Wendy has about 15 years of clinical experience and was accepted into the USA’s Academy of Certified Social Workers. In addition to being a Certified Counselor, Wendy is also a Registered Dietitian. Wendy works primarily with adults and teens and provides individual, couples, and family counseling. Her areas of interest are issues pertaining to marriage, depression, eating disorders, emotional eating, parenting, anxiety, and addiction. Through raising five children internationally, Wendy has a deepened understanding of the challenges of cross-cultural living.

Ting Ting Ge

M.A.

Ting is a Licensed Counseling Psychologist in Taiwan. She received her Master’s Degree from National Taipei University of Education. She has had six years of training in a hospital setting; therefore, she understands and is sensitive to mental disturbance and is well trained in crisis intervention. Ting works closely with children and adolescents and provides supportive and effective parenting skills and classroom management strategies to parents and teachers, which help improve children’s social and emotional development.

Cerita Hsu

M.A., M.S.

Cerita Hsu is a Licensed Counseling Psychologist in Taiwan. She received her two Master's degrees in Psychology and Marriage and Family Therapy from Boston University, Massachusetts and Cal Poly Pomona, California. Cerita has clinical experience working with children, adults

and families in both the US and Taiwan, and has counseled adults in individual, couple, and family therapy. Some areas that her work focuses on include anxiety, depression, emotional disturbance, trauma, cultural adjustment, loss, and family and relationship issues. Her experience in child, adult, marriage and family counseling covers diverse cultural groups in the expatriate setting.

Carol Lee

M.A., NCC

Carol is a certified counselor through the National Board for Certified Counselors in the United States and has a Professional Counseling License from Taiwan. She received her Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology from George Fox University in Oregon, and has been working in the mental health field for 14 years. Carol prefers a goal-directed approach in her counseling practice, and is experienced working on both short and long term models. Her areas of focus include trauma/PTSD, couple/ family issues, chronic repression or suppression of anger, depression, anxiety, mood swings, and addictions (not requiring inpatient treatment).

Emilie Ma

Ph.D.

Eva Salazar-Liu

Ph.D.

Eva has a Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology from the University of Toledo, Ohio. Her areas of professional interest include marital relationships, divorce, women’s issues, grief, cross-cultural relationships and issues. Eva has been associated with The Center since 1987 and returned to the Center's Counseling staff in 2012 after a four-year leave of absence. Eva is concurrently teaching Psychology, Educational Psychology and Graduate Research as an Associate Professor at Ming Chuan University.

Cynthia Teeters

MSW, LMSW

Cynthia has a Master’s degree in Social Work from Columbia University and is a Licensed Social Worker in New York. She works primarily with adults and teens and provides counseling to individuals, couples, and families. Her areas of expertise are depression, anxiety, emotion regulation, borderline personality disorder, substance abuse, relationship issues, bereavement, sexuality, and HIV/AIDS. She also conducts adoption home studies and counseling for adoption-related issues.

Emilie received her M.S. in Counseling/ Counselor Education from Indiana University-Bloomington and her M.A./ Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from University of Maryland-College Park. She offered counseling services to adolescents from 1995 to 2003 and, since 2003, has been providing psychotherapy mainly to the adult population. She has clinical experience in the United States, Canada, and Taiwan and works with individuals, couples, and families. Her professional interests include personal growth, existential concerns, stress/anxiety/mood management, family/relationship issues, career exploration, multiculturalism, trauma recovery, self-harm/suicide, disordered eating concerns, and personality disturbances, especially borderline personality. 2013 Fall & Winter Activities [xv]

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— Kobe Bryant, LA Lakers

— Fred Couples, 2012 Senior Open Champion

Transportation included

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Lunch or meal included

— A-Rod, NY Yankees Please check www.communitycenter.org.tw for the most recent updates.

2013/11/26 10:37:29 AM


A Charmed Life – in the Fast Lane

book review

As China moves to the global center stage, numerous books ranging from the country’s role in everything from investment to geopolitics have dominated bestseller charts around the world. However, there is clearly more to China than business and politics, and Gioietta Kuo’s memoir, China My Other Country, is a welcome antidote to the fray. TexT: Jennifer Chang images: CourTesy of gioieTTa Kuo

Kuo’s story is a fascinating study of beauty, brains, and bravado across three continents from before WWII to recent times. However, this autobiography is as much the story of her illustrious parents as her own adventures in war-torn China and post-war Europe.

EARLY YEARS Ku o’s fat h e r Ku o Yü-S h o u (郭有 守) received his doctorate in Paris in the early 1920s, and upon his return to China, he married the daughter of Yang Dou (楊度), a monarchist who served as an advisor to autocrat Yuan Shikai (袁世凱) and died as a staunch ally of the Chinese Communist Party. Kuo Yü-Shou’s overseas education enabled him to master English, French, and German, thereby allowing him to rise quickly within the ranks of the Kuomintang (KMT) government to become the Minister of Education of Sichuan Province. By 1945, he was based in Paris as Counselor of Education at UNESCO for the Republic of China (ROC), while Kuo’s mother Yang YuenHwei (楊雲慧; known also as Nancy Yang) moved the children to live with their maternal grandmother in Shanghai and set off for Yale University to study dramatic arts. In 1947, Kuo’s father sent the children to attend boarding school in the UK. Not one to be challenged by life’s vicissitudes and shifting landscapes, Kuo learned English quickly and excelled in academics. She gained admission to study physics at Cambridge University and lived with her father’s friend Professor Joseph Needham (李約瑟) and his family. In Kuo’s words, she was the “honorary daughter” of the esteemed scholar best known for his research and writing on the history of Chinese science and technology. Kuo then earned a Ph.D. in nuclear physics at Birmingham University and, upon

graduation, moved to Paris to work for the French Atomic Energy Commission. A LIFE OF INTRIGUE Kuo reflects on trips during school holidays to visit her father in Paris with fondness and amusement. “My father was very charming and a good cook too, so naturally, we had parties at his apartment in Paris all the time. Our home became a refuge for Chinese students, artists, musicians, and more.” Kuo’s father was close with many international Chinese artists including Chang Dai-Chien (張大千), Pan Yuliang (潘玉良) and Sanyu (常玉), among others. According to Kuo, her father played a critical role in orchestrating Chang’s famed meeting with Pablo Picasso in the south of France in 1956. While life in Paris was replete with champagne and roses, Kuo felt restless, opting instead for a future with Goran Petravic, a Croatian physicist whom she had met in the UK. In her book, Kuo recounts that not one of her encounters with dashing dignitaries, scientists, and even the heir to the Olivetti empire in Italy could stop her from being united with her true love. To the disappointment of her father, she married Petravic and moved to Yugoslavia at the peak of the Cold War in 1959 and remained there for three years. However, most sensational was when Kuo’s father vanished from Europe in 1966 and escaped to Beijing after being furiously pursued by Taiwan agents for having committed treason and espionage. To this day, Kuo’s father’s

information remains classified in both China and Taiwan. THE AUTHOR NOW Now a retired nuclear physicist based in northern California with over seventy scientific publications and several patents, Kuo reflects upon her life with wonder and even amazement that a Chinese girl who grew up in a privileged household in southwestern China could journey to such great heights in her career and personal life. She has over forty years of research experience i n n u c l e a r p hys i c s, p l a s m a a n d thermonuclear physics, astrophysics, numerical analysis, computer software, automatic code generation, and large scale numerical modeling of plasmas. K u o’s p r i m a r y i n t e r e s t i n r e c e n t years has been in climate change and environmental conservation. She avidly contributes articles to scientific journals and institutional publications such as the World Future Society (WFR) in the US as well as to People’s Daily in China. For more information about Gioietta Kuo and her memoir, China My Other Country, visit www.gioiettakuo.com and www.wfs.org.

Jennifer Chang is the E xecutive Director of the Archives of Modern Chinese Art (AMCA) based in Taipei.

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around taipei

Funky Feasts

Themed Restaurants in Taipei

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to dine in an establishment wholly devoted to toilet bowls and their inevitable contents? If your answer to that question is “Um, what?” then you are probably not alone. But bizarre though it may be, the concept of a toilet-themed restaurant is certainly an original and intriguing one. It’s no surprise that the Modern Toilet Restaurant has attracted a myriad of curious and slightly disgusted customers over the years. However, Modern Toilet is not alone. TexT & IMAGeS: MeGAN CHee

Taipei is home to many quirky themed restaurants, and every tourist and expatriate should try to visit a couple. Don’t expect a gourmet feast, but do prepare for an evening of bewildered laughter and novelty entertainment. Bring your friends, your camera, and a sense of fun.

modeRn toiLet ReStauRant

Modern Toilet Restaurant 2F, 7, Lane 50, Xining South Road, Taipei 西寧南路50巷7號2樓 Tel: (02) 2311-8822

You can’t miss it. Really. You can’t. Not with the giant tenfoot toilet bowl sticking out of the building wall, announcing loud and clear exactly what is being served at the restaurant within. Okay, so they don’t really serve you ... you know ... that, but the urinal-shaped cups, bathtub-shaped dishes, and brown swirls of chocolate ice cream served in mini toilet bowls certainly help with the illusion. It’s kind of cute. And kind of ew. The restaurant is decorated in much the same way as the food — with lots and lots and lots of poop. Even the sinks in the real bathrooms are shaped like toilet bowls, which gives the disturbing impression of washing one’s hands in toilet water. The whole experience is wonderfully, gleefully gross. It will transport you back to an age where poo-poo and pee-pee jokes were still the funniest things ever. The food is a little pricey, but not unreasonably so. Expect to cough up around NT$300 for a meal and a drink. But remember — it’s the experience you’re paying for, not the food. Where else but in Taiwan would you be able to dine on edible replications of bodily waste in a restaurant furnished like a lavatory?

baRbie ReStauRant Once your eyes have adjusted to the hot pink walls and silver glitter, as well as the distinct feeling of being watched by an army of plastic dolls, the Barbie Restaurant is actually quite a charming café. The restaurant boasts a wide selection of Barbie-inspired food, from Barbie macaroons to Barbie cakes and Barbie ice cream. One particularly unique dish is the toast box: a cube of bread stuffed with anything from mushroom stew to a fruit medley. Beware, though — these toast boxes do not come cheap, with prices reaching a mind boggling NT$500. Patrons might be better off with one of the many desserts offered. They serve a huge variety of cakes, all endearingly decorated with Barbie’s signature ponytailed silhouette. These prices are in a more affordable range, with most one-person portions between NT$100 and NT$200. From mango mousse cakes to green tea red bean cakes, Barbie has it all. Whether you are nine or thirty-nine years old, this restaurant is sure to please any fan. Barbie does not judge.

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Barbie Restauramt 2F, 128 Zhongxiao East Road Section 4, Da’an District, Taipei 忠孝東路128號2樓 Tel: (02) 2752-8711

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Hello Kitty SweetS

Hello Kitty Sweets 90 Da’An Road (opposite the Sogo at 45 Zhongxiao East Road, Section 4) 大安路90號 Tel: (02) 2711-1132

Painted in shades of baby blue and pastel pink, Hello Kitty Sweets is a crowd-pleaser for sure. Unlike the Barbie and Modern Toilet restaurants, it really is a café that you might just wander into for a snack, and not out of a desire to see with your own eyes a restaurant revolving entirely around toilets or dolls. Although the prices of some foods are admittedly steep, there are many cheaper options available. The Oreo cheesecake, for example, is a fairly large and filling snack quaintly shaped like Kitty’s head, and is reasonably priced at NT$100. Hello Kitty Sweets is perhaps the tamest of Taiwan’s outrageous themed restaurants, but it is not to be missed. Interestingly, it’s only a couple of streets away from the Barbie Restaurant, so if you’re in the vicinity, why not give them both a shot?

Megan Chee has lived in Singapore and Hong Kong, and is currently a senior at Taipei American School. She spends an inordinate amount of time dreaming up stories, which has resulted in an unfortunate tendency to mutter under her breath in inopportune situations.

A Little Theory: Taoist Philosophy, Acupuncture, and Meditation

TCM Corner

TexT: Shaun RamSden

“T

aoism" is a banner word under which many different schools of thought and religion are grouped together. In China, there are two main Taoist paths, which are very different. One is Taoist religion (道教) and the other is Taoist philosophy (道 家). China is, and has always been, like a sponge soaking up everything from both its close neighbors and far beyond, and Taoist religion is no exception, being much influenced by Buddhism, Hinduism, Yoga practices, and old Tibetan religions. Sometimes these schools are nothing more than Chinese folk religion that developed in a certain area (typically in the south of China). The practices are highly esoteric, mystical, and sometimes ghostly. Taoist philosophy, on the other hand, is the opposite; it is scientific, mathematical, and completely based on two principles. The masters of Taoist philosophy developed Chinese medicine, feng shui, meditative techniques, health exercises, and many other things based on these principles. The two principles were called the Wu-ji (無極, which means “emptiness”) and Tai-ji (太極; the name for yin and yang). These three ingredients — emptiness, yin, and yang — created the Taoist philosophers’ universe. Yin meant anything that was physical and yang represented energy. From the Tai-ji, Taoist philosophers created a mathematical binary system called the Yi-Jing (易經). Without getting into complex mathematics, the binary system is used to explain the workings of the body and provides the theory on which acupuncture is based. According

to the binary system, the body is divided into pairs — two feet, two hands, one left side, one right side, one top, one bottom — that are interconnected. The body is always divided into opposite yin and yang pairs. For example, the top of the body is yin and the bottom is yang. The right arm is yang, and its diagonal opposite is the left foot, which is yin. This system was used by the ancients to find useful acupuncture points, and helps explain why an acupuncturist might treat pain in a patient’s right middle finger by focusing on the left middle toe. Meditative practices are also deeply rooted in the Taoist principles. The philosopher Laozi took yin-yang and the Wu-ji and explained how to use these theories in day-to-day life. He taught that if the mind is still and empty, there is nothing one cannot do; this was his Wu-ji and the core of his system. Ironically, the meditative practice that most closely reflects the techniques of the Taoist masters is found in Japanese Zen Buddhism (which originally came from China), where practitioners sit in cross-legged meditation focusing on the dantian (or, loosely translated, one’s energy center). Shaun Ramsden is a native Australian. He has a Bachelor of Medicine from the Beijing Chinese Medicine University and numerous Diplomas in Remedial Massage T herapies. In addition to running his own Physical T herapy and Massage Clinic he enjoys training in different styles of martial arts. classictcm@gmail.com

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PROFILE

Naomi Yohani Bares Her Soul TexT: MArIA TAN IMAges: DAvID BArker; courTesy of evocATIve recorDs

W

Taiwanese pop/R&B singer Naomi Yohani has made a very brave move: she’s compiled an album in which the songs are about her experience coping with Bipolar Disorder. This may not sound so dramatic to those from a culture where it’s considered normal for people to see a therapist and talk openly about their personal struggles. In Taiwan, however, where speaking about mental issues is often considered taboo, Naomi is nothing but bold.

Maria has a background in Business and Communications. She teaches English in Taiwan to both adults and kids alike. In her free time, she does freelance writing, a lot of reading, and shopping. You can reach her at maria.tan@outlook.com.

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hat is Bipolar Disorder? Medical News Today defines it as “a mental disorder characterized by extreme shifts in mood, as well as fluctuations in energy and activity levels…also known as manic-depressive illness.” In short, someone suffering from the disorder may feel he or she is on top of the world one moment, and then suddenly nothing looks or feels right; depression kicks in. Imagine going through a spectrum of emotions in a matter of days, hours, minutes, or even seconds. All these extreme fluctuations in energy and activity levels? Naomi has gone through them, and is still going through them. This is why I felt privileged that she was willing to share her story. THE ROOTS OF HER MUSIC Naomi is part of the Amis tribe. She started singing in church at the early age of six. Her voice always shined in church, but she did not start taking proper singing lessons until she was 14. She played the piano, with the encouragement of her Mom, but it was the drums that she loved, and after a lot of pleading, her mom let her learn. In college, Naomi won a singing competition and worked with rappers and producers at an independent Taiwanese label. Working for an indie recording studio was quite an eye-opener. Everyone had to do their part, writing their own lyrics and finding their own vocal parts. Despite the long hours, however, Naomi was inspired and loved every second of it. SETTING OUT ON HER OWN Naomi ultimately left the studio after realizing it wouldn’t help her development as a solo artist. Her husband Alex Trup suggested they produce an album independently. Alex had already recorded and produced some tracks with friends back in high school, and had always wanted to produce a full album. Thus, working with his wife on a project seemed very appealing. As a music enthusiast and marketing expert himself, Alex searched for the best technology for setting up a home studio, a qualified producer to mix and master the album, and photographers, and he organized all the minute details of producing an album. BARING HER SOUL When I asked Naomi why she openly wrote about her condition, she said, “Alex was the one who suggested writing about Bipolar Disorder — narrating every mood I had, feelings and thoughts. At first, I thought he was out of his mind. Not only is it a taboo to talk about private things, people wouldn’t understand what the disorder is. I slept on the idea, and finally I told myself that if I didn’t speak out about the struggles someone suffering

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from this can face, then who would? People just don’t understand. My friends kept their distance from me. They thought I was a downer. even my parents didn’t take me seriously. Whenever I tried to open up about how I felt, they shrugged it off with a ‘You think too much’ (妳想太多了). I kept a diary. I recorded every up, every down, every good, every bad, every feeling, every thought, and every situation I encountered. Then I started writing lyrics. Over time song after song came together…until I had a complete album.” Making the album has had a therapeutic effect on Naomi. Though there were dark days, she felt more at peace with her condition. Rather than fight the condition, she accepts it and works around it. She still takes Prozac whenever she feels she needs it, but she’s no longer dependent on it. In this world full of noise and clutter, we don’t take enough time to listen to people. Phone conversations are significantly shorter, as they’re replaced with instant messages riddled with emoticons and stickers. It’s easier to turn a blind eye to the situations around us. But it takes only one daring soul to tell us, “Hey, listen. Feel. See.” This is what Naomi Yohani did.

Naomi Yohani’s debut album Bipolar is available for purchase via her website: www.Naomi.tw You can also like her Facebook page where she regularly posts photos and her thoughts: www.facebook.com/NaomiYohani Contact her label for performances or collaboration opportunities at Contact@evocativeRecords.com

[photos by David barker, hair and makeup by wig Chen, edited by pixel Deep, provided courtesy of Evocative records.]

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HealtH

Good for Nature, Good for You: Organic and Sustainable Shopping in Taiwan TexT: LeaT ahrony Images: LeaT ahrony & yoram ahrony

“W

hat should I eat?” and “Who should I believe?” are two questions that are being asked a lot these days. Even more important is the issue of: What is healthy? Consumers are confused by the mixed messages coming from research papers, the media, magazines, company advertisements, labels, and even the definitions of government regulations and labels. We are hit by heaps of information only to find ourselves no wiser. We also now have the burden and guilt of being "unsustainable consumers." Should you buy strawberries shipped by air from a foreign country? How much will this one purchase influence your personal carbon footprint? How can you become a responsible and sustainable purchaser? As someone who strives to live as sustainably and healthfully as possible, let me share my tips for healthy eating and purchasing habits. The GrowinG PoPulariTy of orGanic ProducTs in TaiPei Taiwan's demand for organic produce and shelf products is booming. Tse-Xin Organic Agriculture Foundation (TOAF) is at the forefront of organic farming in Taiwan. The organization, which helps farmers convert conventional farms into organic ones, is influenced by deep Confucian roots. The foundation believes the goal of the organic farmer is to develop a fair trade success model where respect, ethics, and social values are enforced. TOAF offers farmers packages that include training and service, and in 2011 the foundation launched an initiative to bring organic vegetarian lunches to schools in Taiwan. The popularity of organic products is also evidenced by the growing number of organic-specific vendors in Taipei. Organic stores, such as the Santa Cruz chain (聖德科斯), offer a variety of products: fresh organic non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) soy milk, tofu, fish, and personal care products.

Learn more about the Tse-Xin Organic Agriculture Foundation at http://toaf.org.tw/en/ 26

Know your farmer One of the greatest benefits of living in Taiwan is the abundance of diverse traditional fresh food markets. My family has been purchasing from Shi Dong Market in Tianmu for more than 20 years. If you are new to Taiwan, I suggest going with a local person because they know exactly from whom to purchase. Also, remember to go early! There are limited amounts of produce, and markets usually begin wrapping up by 11 am. Some excellent produce can also be bought from sellers without a stall, with their produce spread out on the concrete floor. I learned to select the freshest sweet potato leafy greens by breaking the juicy stem. The crisper, the fresher. Another place to buy is on the roadside in places such as Yangmingshan, where you can buy produce from farmers who still have soil under their nails. This remains my favorite organic purchasing experience. cosT-conscious orGanic shoPPers Given Taiwan's combination of subtropical climate, a traditional love of fresh produce, and technology, the country has a strong agricultural industry. However, herbicides, pesticides, and insecticides are used in limited amounts on fruits, vegetables, rice, tea, dry beans, sugarcane, and other crops. Demand for organic products is rising, but prices for these remain higher than conventionally farmed products. We often forget that a century ago “organic” was the norm.

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The point of eating organic produce is for its long-term health benefits, and not to fit into a new shopping trend. Should you empty your cupboards and stick to a strict organic purchasing rule? That is the dream, but it might drive an individual with an average salary into debt. The key is moderation. Balance out your food priorities. I recommend spending extra for fresh vegetables and non-GMO soy bean products. Items such as milk, shampoo, clothing, nuts, and seeds are lower priority. Try to find local retailers who sell organic seeds, nuts, or beans in bulk for better deals and prices. When you pick up a product, make sure to study it. Don't be fooled by advertising and marketing labels such as "natural" or "local." Make sure they have organic certified labels or, even better, purchase from the person who put their effort and sweat into growing the food. Why Should We Care? You are what you eat. Not only does the food you eat affect your health, but also your purchasing choices influence business practices. Before putting anything in your mouth ask yourself these questions: ● Where and how was this grown/produced, and by whom? ● Were humane and ethical practices in place? ● What are the ingredients and nutritional value? As consumers, we must realize we have power in our hands. If we demand certain products and practices, companies will invest to deliver them to us, because we are at the end of the line; we are the purchasing power. you are empoWered To make a differenCe Take advantage of the great love and appreciation Taiwan has for farmers, agriculture, and sustainable growing practices. Feel empowered. Make a difference and create a ripple effect throughout your community. Taipei is a relatively easy place to start. When my parents tell me over Skype about the farmers on Yangmingshan asking about where I am, I begin to feel the happy tears drop down my cheeks. It is more than purchasing from the individuals that grew your vegetables; it is about relationships and investing in your health and community.

Looking to go organic? Here are some of Leat’s favorite health food stores (websites in Chinese): 自然園 (Natural Garden) http://www.wretch.cc/blog/pinkcy/14098613 柑仔店 (Orange Market) http://www.orangemarket.com.tw/about.htm 里仁 (Leezen) http://www.leezen.com.tw/big5/index.asp 素食生活網 (Vegelife guide website) http://www.vegelife.com.tw/vege/ organ04_index.asp?pg=1&serialRtr=O13547614 05168

Leat Ahrony is a business undergraduate student at the Univ er s it y of Victoria (UVic) in Canada. She began her journalism career in high school writing for the Centered on Taipei magazine. She has a weekly online column for the UVic newspaper, T he Martlet, and regularly writes print news and culture ar ticles. She plans to earn her B.A. in Commerce and continue a side career in Journalism.

LEARN MORE ABOUT LOCAL MARKETS AND SUSTAINABLE FARMING WITH THE CENTER! The Shi Dong and Local Market Tour or "What Is That Vegetable and How Do I Cook It?" Thursday, February 27, 9:30 – 11:30 am NT$500; registration required

Ecologically Grown: Farm Tour and Vegetarian Lunch Wednesday, April 30, 8:30 am – 3:30 pm NT$1,500; registration required

Bright, colorful, and noisy, the Shi Dong Market is the place for all your produce needs. Join chef and Taiwanese food expert Ivy Chen and learn some helpful hints and tips on what to buy, where to buy it, and how to be sure it's fresh. Ivy will also show you how to select fresh fish, seafood, and other items of interest.

Join Ivy Chen on a visit to an ecologically friendly farm, established by a local eye doctor in search of a source of pesticide-free food. Learn all about the special techniques they use to grow their rice, fruits, and vegetables. Tour the farm, pick some vegetables, and enjoy a delicious vegetarian lunch.

To register, please stop by the Center, call (02) 2836-8134, or visit www.communitycenter.org.tw. www.communitycenter.org.tw DEC 2013/JAN 2014

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expat perspective

Still noi conv a sta

Taipei Flashback: TexT: WILLIAM MOONeY

s V T M

Long before otherwise law-abiding citizens began downloading pirated movies, otherwise law-abiding citizens used to watch pirated movies at MTVs. In Taipei, once upon a time, these cozy establishments briefly rivaled KTVs in popularity. Now only a few remain and a comeback is unlikely. Nevertheless, for many long-time Taipei residents, MTVs recall a time of simpler, if slightly illegal, pleasures. For me, they represented much more.

O

rigins are murky, but the MTV was apparently made in Taiwan. The concept was simple enough: think KTV but instead of singing, you watch movies. MTV, in case you were wondering, isn’t an abbreviation for “Movie TV.” At least it wasn’t at first. A c co rd i n g to a 1989 L o s A n g e l e s Times article, MTVs originally showed m u s i c v i d e o s f ro m t h e A m e r i ca n cable TV network of the same name. Only later, when feature-length films became available (and easy to copy) on VHS, VCD, and LD, did MTV become synonymous with movies. Hollywood cried foul, but movie lovers in Taiwan continued to flock to MTVs.

e than MTV, for me, was far mor ol. a fad. It was my film scho J u s t h o w p o p u l a r w e r e t h e y? Consider this. According to the same LA Times article, 1989 was a banner year for Hollywood. Attendance soared at movie theaters around the world. Yet, in the booming economic miracle that was then Taiwan, attendance at movie theaters somehow decreased by 40%. The primary culprit, of course, was the MTV, where individuals, couples, or large groups enjoyed the everincreasing (and sometimes copyrightinfringing) selection at much cheaper prices than they’d pay at theaters. Then, faster than you can say “BB call,” MTVs became passé. Even in their heyday, MTVs never enjoyed the same cachet as KTVs. A few had dubious reputations as nothing more

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than brothels. Most, however, simply provided space-challenged Taipei movie-lovers with a cheaper alternative to theaters. Eventually, crackdowns on piracy did affect the selection, but the Internet caused their ultimate demise. Thanks to shady websites in China, otherwise law-abiding citizens could download pirated movies from t h e c o m fo r t o f t h e i r o w n h o m e. After all, MTVs for most people were nothing more than a place to watch a movie. Once a more convenient option appeared, MTVs went the way of Fido Dido. That was the case for most people. MTV, for me, was far more than a fad. It was my film school. Of course, actual film school should have been my film school. That was the original plan. At the time, however, top US film programs adhered to a rather strict (and, in my opinion, unfair) policy requiring applicants to prove they had talent before they were accepted. So, instead of going into debt at UCLA or NYU to learn the difference between “cut to” and “dissolve to,” I gained my education at MTVs. The dream of film school lingers, but I have few regrets. Flash back to the late 1980s and tuition at NYU was still about US$30,000. Meanwhile, at Barcelona, my favorite MTV, a movie and a drink set me back about US$6. Popcorn and (this being

Taiwan) instant noodles were extra. My own snack of choice — this being Taiwan — was spicy pea crackers. Add NT$30 for the one-way bus fare from my apartment in Shilin to the main Barcelona “campus,” near the intersection of Hsinyi and Tunhua South Road. Barcelona offered coupon books for real movie junkies that made the price even cheaper. Hollywood eventually succeeded in preventing MTVs from showing f i rst-r u n m o v i e s. M y e n j o y m e nt, nevertheless, remained undiminished. Never a fan of big budget blockbusters, I sought instead the obscure, classic, and black and white. As a film school reject, I naturally subscribed to the auteur theory. Barcelona stocked not only the films from the great modern American directors — Allen, Altman, Kubrick, Scorsese, and Tarantino — but luminaries from the past — John Ford, Billy Wilder, and Orson Welles. What really made MTVs a cineaste’s dream, though, was their selection of films by directors from around the world. At Barcelona, I learned about the Italian neorealists Rossellini and De Sica. Equally important, I learned what neorealism meant. I could soon reel off the names of movies from François Truffaut, the founder of the French New Wave. The low angle “tatamilevel” shots of Japan’s Yasujiro Ozu

So many times did I watch Wang Kar Wai’s Chung King express that the modern Chinese city narrative depicted on the screen and my own life dissolved into one big, blurry neon montage.

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scuro light of my ro ia ch e th in g n ki Still bas streets of Taipei, e th it h I’d , d o o m noirish ard-boiled cred — h y, ar lit so y m f o r convinced in the neon glow fo g in ch ar se y gu p a stand-u the score. a dame who knew became part of my film vocabulary. It was at Barcelona that I also became acquainted with the films of Tsai Ming-Liang, the Malaysian-Chinese director who was educated in Taiwan, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, and, of course, Ang Lee. My personal favorite from this era remains Wang Kar Wai’s Chung King Express. So many times did I watch this film that the modern Chinese city narrative depicted on the screen and my own life dissolved into one big, blurry neon montage. Barcelona also triggered my obsession with film noir, the black and white hard-boiled films made during and just after World War II. The Third Man; Criss Cross; Sunset Boulevard; Detour; Lady from Shanghai; Out of the Past. Barcelona had them all. Occasionally, in desperate need of levity, I would relish one of the glorious Technicolor MGM musicals. Mostly, however, I chose to lose myself in the fatalistic world of film noir. This probably also explains why I often went to the MTV alone. How could I expect anyone, much less a local girl, to share my joy in watching the audacious threeminute, twenty-second opening single-take tracking shot of Orson Welles’s Touch of Evil? After a night of film noir, I actually became disappointed to discover that the world outside remained in color. Nevertheless, still basking in the chiaroscuro light of my noirish mood, I’d hit the streets of Taipei, convinced of my solitary, hard-boiled cred — a stand-up guy searching in the neon glow for a dame who knew the score. Only when the 285 bus arrived to take me back to Shilin did the self-delusions fade out. Phillip Marlowe I was no more. It’s difficult to feel hard-boiled on a bus. A train, maybe. Not a bus. A few MTVs remain, mostly in Hsimending, but they resonate with the young and hip about as much as that other 90s staple, the “disco pub.” Nowadays, technology makes it too convenient for otherwise lawabiding citizens to indulge in piracy. Back in the 90s, you at least had to leave home to break the law. MTVs did have flaws. Walls were thin. I challenge anyone to fully appreciate the nuanced dialogue of, say, The Sweet Smell of Success while in an adjacent room a group of teenage boys insists on watching, at full volume, a masterpiece like Battlefield Earth. Imperfections aside, I still miss Barcelona MTV, especially the tactile thrill of thumbing through row after row of Laserdiscs, encased in thick plastic album covers. There’s just something about the smell of plastic, popcorn, and instant noodles. A digital download or even film school will just never compare.

William is from the US and is a long-time resident of Taipei. He is a teacher at Chinese Culture University. In his free time, he enjoys photography and writing.

www.communitycenter.org.twNOVEMBER OCTOBER 2013 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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generation y

WHAT ARE THE ODDS?: Why we are significant

W

Curious about how Ali Bianzir got his numbers? Check the math here: https://blogs.law.harvard. edu/abinazir/2011/06/15/what-are-chances-youwould-be-born/

TexT: ReeSe MCMILLAN

ithin the past year, I have heard from many people who hear of the vastness of the universe, and think of themselves as unimportant and insignificant. This sort of attitude has led many people to turn away opportunities or to not try as hard because they think it does not matter. The idea that these people do not matter is simply not true. I’ll start from the beginning, with your parents. According to author Ali Bianzir, the probability that your mother would meet your father is roughly 1 in 20,000. The probability they stayed together long enough to have kids is 1 in 2,000. So far the chance of you being here is 1 in 40,000,000. Now, what are the odds that one sperm cell, out of the seven trillion a male can produce in his lifetime, met up with one specific egg from your mother? It’s 1 in 400 quadrillion. Now, let’s consider the fact that you have multiple grandparents and relatives dating back to the beginning of mankind. The chances of you existing are 1 in 102,685,000. Ali Bianzir tells us to think about it like this: it is more likely for two million people to gather together, each roll a trillion-sided dice, and get the exact same number, than for you to have been born as you. I think it is safe to say that by definition, you are a miracle, and you are only as insignificant as you make yourself. Don’t take the self-defeatist approach that nothing matters, because we are all significant. Reese is a freshman at Taipei American School. He is passionate about drums and drama, and has spent the last few summers volunteering with Heart 2 Heart.

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SOME MORE FOOD FOR THOUGHT... What are the chances of Earth existing in the first place? Scientists estimate that around one hundred billion years ago, everything in our solar system was nothing but a bunch of dust particles in empty space. These particles attracted each other and started to form a spinning disk, which separated into rings. The fast motion made the particles extremely hot. The center of the spinning disk became a star — our Sun — and the others turned into large balls of gas and molten liquid that slowly cooled to take on a solid form. Billions of years ago, they became the planets in our solar system. One of these planets was Earth, a ball located at just the right distance from the Sun, neither too cold nor too hot, for life to exist. The surface of Earth continued to reshape over a period of hundreds of millions of years and the supercontinent of Pangaea broke apart 180 million years ago, settling into the continents we know today. Just think about it: what are the odds that those particular dust particles landed in the same areas of empty space and attracted specific other dust particles to form our solar system in the order it is in today?

DEC 2013/JAN 2014 www.communitycenter.org.tw

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community

STEAM in the

Taipei American School Upper School TexT: TAS Upper School TeAcherS JUde clApper, MATT FAgen, rAFAel gArciA, And leo lopez iMAge: TAS

Today at Taipei American School (TAS), we see a commitment to STEAM — science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics — everywhere on campus. We see that commitment in the dance, music, and fine arts that take place in the Liu Lim Arts Center; in the Computer Science and Robotics Department, with its advanced manufacturing facilities and its own course for 3D design, sculpture, and robotic art; in our math department where students learn the beauty of logic and the art of problem solving; and in our Scientific Research Department where students learn to use genetic engineering techniques to design and build biological machines. RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY This year, we have extended our scientific research offerings to include Research in Chemistry. Students in this course have the opportunity to experiment with university-level instrumentation in our research laboratory. Students conduct their own research project in order to apply the concepts they learned in class. At the end of the course, students write a scientific research paper and present it at one of the scientific research symposia at the end of each semester.

mathematical talents of our students who have completed Honors Linear Algebra and Honors Differential Equations. A small class size affords flexibility in curriculum. We can focus on students' interests, such as cryptography (code-breaking), chaos theory, and more. Students are able to progress at their own pace, which ensures a deeper understanding for each topic. Advanced Topics is a good opportunity for students to push beyond the boundaries of traditional high school mathematics.

IGEM COMPETITION TAS students in the Advanced Scientific Research courses will have the chance to compete in the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition. The iGEM competition was created at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as a way to incorporate microbiological research with engineering principles into a field called synthetic biology. Our students are currently learning about this field. To do so, they are using MIT's BioBuilder curriculum, the very first international students ever to do so. For the competition, they also will be using a kit to produce a synthetic biological system in a living cell. TAS has a partnership with National Yang Ming University (NYMU) to develop our iGEM team. TAS student Rohan Sinha ’15 is a member of the NYMU iGEM team and presented to the university president in October. He also participated in the Asia regional iGEM competition in Hong Kong and was the only high school student among participants from 78 teams. During the competition, Rohan’s team received four of the nine awards including Best New Engineered Bio-Brick, Best Biological Parts Collection, Best Improvement on a Biological Part, and Best Presentation. Rohan’s team was also one of the five finalists — finishing as the first runner up — and competed in the world championship at MIT in November. TAS will compete with their own team in June 2014 at the iGEM competition at MIT with approximately 35 other high schools from around the world.

ART MEETS TECHNOLOGY The 3D Design, Sculpture, Robotics, and Programming course interlaces science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics. Using art to learn about technology is the core objective of this course. For example, in Media Arts, students have the opportunity to combine knowledge from many fields of study to create interactive multimedia electronic projects. Student projects can span a wide range of scope and purpose. Many students choose direct artistic expression, such as light shows, drawing robots, or 3D immersive installation art. Other students choose service-oriented projects, such as electronic assistance for disabled persons to aid in artistic or athletic activities. Regardless, art is an essential part of STEAM, especially in the engineering process.

ADVANCED MATHEMATICS Students do not have to wait until college to explore highlevel math concepts either; TAS offers Advanced Topics in Mathematics. The course is designed to foster the

ROBOTICS We are fortunate at TAS to offer not one but two levels of Advanced Robotic Engineering courses. These classes focus on the three main areas of robotic engineering: computer programming, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. It is likely that a student will specialize in one area or another; however, it's important that students are experienced in all of these areas. For example, it's important for the mechanical engineer to understand programming and the programming team needs to understand the limitations of the mechanical design. By being creative, determined, and resourceful, TAS students are taking STEAM to new heights. As a community, we are inspired by our students’ achievements in STEAM and recognize that they are receiving an education that is unmatched by many high schools around the world.

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community

How Can I Help?: Lessons from a Service Learning Trip TexT & Images: Terence chIang

In the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, relief efforts and service projects have been mobilized around the globe to help areas devastated by the disaster. But, without first-hand knowledge of a situation or culture, it is sometimes difficult to know how best to help. TAS student Terence Chiang offers this timely essay about his experiences on a recent community service trip to Phnom Penh, Cambodia and what he learned about helping others.

P

hnom Penh, at first glance, doesn’t look very unique or interesting. The land is completely flat and regularly flooded by the Mekong River. In the city, small buildings squat next to vast stretches of dusty road constantly filled with hundreds of motorcycles. It gives every impression of a residential area, just as one might see when going around Tianmu or Shipai; the average house is only two stories high. But beneath this dull exterior lies a vivid and remarkable history, yet one that is stained with blood. Many of you may have heard of the Khmer Rouge, the party that ruled Cambodia for four brutal years, and was directly responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands. The country is trying its best to recuperate from this catastrophe, but poverty is still prevalent everywhere. When we arrived at the village we were greeted by roads made of

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mud, houses made of leaves, and children whose stomachs were swollen with poverty. The villagers looked upon us, some curious, some happy, some expressionless. These people were not sad, they were resigned to hopelessness. The difference between the privileged and the poor is simple: the privileged have choices, the poor do not. There is a common mindset among the people we worked with in Cambodia: that change is impossible. So they never change. Poverty is something they have been born into; something they have lost all hope of altering. If we want to resolve this problem, if we want to defeat poverty, we need to demonstrate that change IS possible. Community service is the act of helping people to better their lives. Our service trip set out to do exactly that. We built ten houses, and donated 35 laptops. But it seemed that there was

something more to the trip — another reason why we were there. As we progressed through our journey and learned more about the culture and the history of the people we strove to help, I realized that the villagers were not the only ones benefitting. By assisting them, we aided ourselves with personal growth and a deeper understanding o f t h e s i t u a t i o n. We l e a r n e d t o collaborate and cooperate, to all work together for a common cause. And most importantly, we were exposed to an environment and culture we had never seen before. In this way, the true purpose of the trip was in fact service learning. We may have noble intentions and we may really want to create change, but one thing that we need to think about is: are we truly helping those we try to serve? Of course, putting in the effort to help definitely is a good thing, but how big of an impact are we really making? And then: how can we make sure that we actually help? These were the questions we asked ourselves. The questions we all should ask ourselves. Community service is when you do charity work. Learning through the service is another step forward.

Terence Chiang is a junior at Taipei American School.

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RoSeLLe

洛神花 [luoshen hua] TexT: IvY CHeN IMAGeS: TING TING HUANG & ROSeMARY SUSA

Roselle is originally from tropical Africa, and was introduced to Taiwan a century ago. It is mainly grown in the east and the south of Taiwan, and is in season from October to January. The whole plant can be used for food or medicinal purposes, including the flowers, leaves, roots, and seeds. Moreover, the stem is a source of bast fiber, and the calyces are used for food coloring. In Taiwan, the flower calyces (sepals) are used in drinks, jam, juice, jelly, sauces, and sweetened pickles. Roselle calyces contain protein, malic acid, vitamins A and C, and iron. They are effective against hypertension, can lower triglycerides, and are also rich in antioxidants.

RoSeLLe gRanita 洛神花冰沙 [luoshen hua bingsha] [Ingredients] 100 grams roselle calyces 5 Tbsp sugar 500 ml water 1 Tbsp brandy

ducK bReaSt with RoSeLLe Sauce 香煎鴨胸佐洛神醬 [xiangjian yaxiong zuo luoshen jiang] [Ingredients] 1 piece duck breast salt and ground black pepper to season [Sauce] 50 grams roselle calyces 2 Tbsp sugar 4 Tbsp water ¼ tsp salt [Directions] 1. Place sauce ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer for 5–7 minutes until roselle calyces are soft. Allow to cool slightly. 2. Blend sauce in blender until smooth, then set aside. 3. Score duck skin in a crisscross pattern. Season with salt and pepper. 4. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Place duck skin side down and cook for 5–6 minutes until skin is browned. 5. Turn over and cook over medium low heat for another 5–6 minutes. 6. Place duck breast on a warm plate for another 3–4 minutes. 7. Slice duck and serve with roselle sauce and a green salad.

[Directions] 1. P l a c e r o s e l l e calyces, sugar, and wate r i n a p o t, bring to a boil, and simmer for 5–8 minutes until calyces are soft. Turn off heat. 2. Allow the mixture to cool down. Place in blender and blend until smooth. 3. Stir in brandy. Pour juice into a container and place in the freezer for 1–2 hours until the edges are frozen. 4. Mix half-frozen juice with a fork until well blended. 5. Freeze juice again overnight. 6. Remove from freezer five minutes before serving. Break up ice with a fork. Serve with sour cream.

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cSc buSineSS cLaSSiFied RecReation

beauty

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haiR dReSSeR

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| Telephone 2871-1515 | GP168@hotmail.com.tw

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December 2013/January 2014 Centered on Taipei  

An English-language lifestyle magazine produced for the International Community in Taiwan.

December 2013/January 2014 Centered on Taipei  

An English-language lifestyle magazine produced for the International Community in Taiwan.