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Celbridge Camera Club

ExposĂŠ


Design and Layout - Colm Kavanagh Images are the property of the individual photographers that appear in this publication. They cannot be reproduced in any form without the knowledge and permission of the photographer. Published by Celbridge Camera Club October 2007 Celbridge Camera Club, The Slip Hall, Celbridge, Co Kildare www.celbridgecameraclub.net Š Celbridge Camera Club

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Cover photography by Peter Rossiter

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Design and Layout - Colm Kavanagh Images are the property of the individual photographers that appear in this publication. They cannot be reproduced in any form without the knowledge and permission of the photographer. Published by Celbridge Camera Club October 2007 Celbridge Camera Club, The Slip Hall, Celbridge, Co Kildare www.celbridgecameraclub.net Š Celbridge Camera Club

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It is with great pleasure that I introduce you to Celbridge Camera Club’s first venture into publishing. This Exposé represents the work of a variety of photographers within our club. This first venture is collective in nature and presents images that have been taken over a period of years. In future editions we hope to feature the current and most recent work undertaken by members. The purpose of the Club is to foster and promote the visual art of photography. Members are encouraged to express themselves through their photography in such a way as to presents their ‘eye on the world’. The photographs presented cover a vast array of subject matter and each photographer has placed their personal artistic stamp on each image. Many thanks are due to all the photographers who have chosen to display their work in this Exposé. Particular thanks is due to Colm Kavanagh who put this publication together and to Ciaran Whyte who opened the door and showed us the way. Thanks also to the ‘Book Committee’ who guided the process. I do hope you enjoy your visual journey through this Exposé and that it will enthuse you to make new and exciting images in the future. Edel Moran Chairperson Celbridge Camera Club 2007/2008

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EXPRESSION, VISUAL DESIGN, AND THE ART OF SEEING he expressive qualities of an image derive from the photographer’s ability to abstract, to select parts from the whole. The process of abstraction is seeing the basic form of a scene and recognizing the elements that comprise it. Good visual design can be developed by learning how to abstract from subject matter the important visual components of line, color, texture, pattern, and form. While the art of seeing involves the recognition and identification of things we see, such as a pine tree, ripples on water, or the petal of a flower, it is, more importantly, the ability to see their textures, lines, forms, patterns, and colors, not only as things in themselves, but also as the basic elements of visual design and composition. Expression is the primary content of vision and the photographer uses these elements contained in the subject matter to convey that expression.

We can control tension by the way we organize and balance objects, forms, textures, lines, patterns and colors in the image. Tension may not only be conveyed through visual design, but also through thematic content such as rising and falling, approach and withdrawal, weakness and strength, harmony and discord, etc., as it is part of our lives and occurs in the events of nature.

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Lines and color have great expressive power and are very important in visual design. Lines have position (horizontal, vertical, and oblique), length, and direction (they can move our eyes and attention through the picture space). The careful use of lines can bring both movement and simplicity to compositions. Few lines in an image can make it simple, and many lines are expressive when they work in unity. Horizontal lines imply stability and a sense of calm. Vertical lines can convey strength or rigidity. Oblique lines are perhaps most expressive because they bring movement and activity to a composition. Curved lines are not as strong as straight lines but are important to visual design because they can slow the viewer down by leading them more indirectly through the picture space. Images with great detail or subtlety benefit from the presence of curved lines because they induce the viewer to go slower, increasing the likelihood that these elements will be seen and appreciated.

These are the components of visual design or composition, but the energy that gives life to expression is visual tension. Expression is based on tension. It could be said that all physical objects possess tension and we perceive the tension between them when we look at an image. The relative size and placement of lines, forms, textures, patterns and colors interact to create visual tension. The photographer must use the balancing properties of order and stability to effectively control and direct the expressive forces of tension.

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When beginning to compose an image we are usually faced with the consideration of where to place the main subject of focus, also known as the center of interest. A helpful concept for this is called the rule of thirds. Simply put, if you divide the image space into thirds both horizontally and vertically, you have an area divided into nine boxes. By placing the center of interest on or near the intersecting lines you have moved it away from the static center of the image space. These locations allow you to work with the elements of visual design to create tension and movement in the composition. This is not a fast rule, but a useful place from which start.

The photographer’s challenge is the creative and appropriate use of visual design such that the subject and theme are clearly and effectively expressed. The subject matter we choose and the way in which we express it through visual design and techniques we employ (time exposures, telephoto lenses, extension tubes, etc.) is also an expression of ourselves. When our images begin to portray a consistent and discernible mode of expression, we have developed our own unique photographic style. One of the best way to learn and develop as a photographer is through practice and experience. The ideas and concepts discussed here may not be fully realized until you begin to see them appear in your photographic images. At that point, understanding and applying them in a conscious way begins the real process of developing and refining your creative and photographic abilities. The concepts and application of visual design are vital to clear and effective photographic expression. With practice, visual design can become a natural and integrated part of your seeing.

In landscape photography, because the photographer is presented with visual elements that already exist, he works with two kinds of design: the design he observes and the design he creates by abstraction and selection. When we find subject matter and begin to engage in the process of creating the image, we must first consider what the subject matter expresses (theme, subject, emotion, etc.). Then we must determine how that expression was achieved by means of the colors, lines, forms, patterns, and textures inherent in it. Finally, we must understand how we respond to it. Perhaps the quiet, placid lake expresses tranquillity and restfulness by its subdued colors and the long horizontal lines of the far shore and the undulating bands of stratus clouds reflected in the water. When we have answered these questions we can proceed to use and organize the elements of visual design to clearly express the subject and how we feel about it.

(Extract from ‘Photographing the Art of Nature’ by Bruce W. Heinemann)

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Pr e mier Secti on

Cyrus Sangari...page 8

Cliff Hutchinson...page 9

Declan Hancock...page 10

Edel Moran...page 11

Peter McCormack...page 13

Liam O’Reilly...page 12

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Vincent Mc Namara...page 14

Gerry Kerr...page 15

Lillian Webb...page 16

Joe Geraty...page 17

Dallas Camier...page 18

Mark Sedgewick...page 19

Derek Bennett...page 20

Colm Kavanagh...page 21

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Premier

Cyrus Sangari

8


Premier

Cliff Hutchinson

9


Premier

Declan Hancock

10


Premier

Edel Moran

11


Premier

Liam O’Reilly

12


Premier

Peter McCormack

13


Premier

Vincent McNamara

14


Premier

Gerry Kerr

15


Premier

Lillian Webb

16


Premier

Joe Geraty

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Premier

Dallas Camier

18


Premier

Mark Sedgewick

19


Premier

Derek Bennett

20


Premier

Colm Kavanagh

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Advanced Section

Aida Best...page 25

Chris Culreavy...page 27

Ciaran Whyte...page 26

Brendan Doyle...page 28

Judy Monahan...page 29

Deirdre Byrne...page 30

Bride Maughan...page 31

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Berni O’Reilly...page 32

Francis Monaghan...page 33

Fr. Pat Egan...page 34

Fran Byrne...page 35

Michael Davitt...page 36

Geraldine Pierce...page 37

Sean Shanahan...page 38

Trish Melvin...page 39

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Rita Nolan...page 40

Patricia Craigie...page 42

David Walsh...page 41

Lorraine Gilligan...page 43

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Advanced

Aida Best

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Advanced

Ciaran Whyte

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Advanced

Cliff Colreavy

27


Advanced

Brenden Doyle

28


Advanced

Judy Monaghan

29


Advanced

Deirdre Byrne

30


Advanced

Bride Maughan

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Advanced

Berni O’Reilly

32


Advanced

Francis Monaghan

33


Advanced

Fr. Pat Egan

34


Advanced

Fran Byrne

35


Advanced

Michael Davitt

36


Advanced

Geraldine Pierce

37


Advanced

Sean Shanahan

38


Advanced

Trish Melvin

39


Advanced

Rita Nolan

40


Advanced

David Walsh

41


Advanced

Patricia Craigie

42


Advanced

Lorraine Gilligan

43


Novice Section

Brid Liddy...page 46

Charles Meiklereid...page 47

Christine Taylor...page 48

Margaret Finlay...page 49

Mark Donavan...page 50

Mark O’Brien...page 51

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P.J. Hyland...page 52

Eoin O’Reilly...page 53

Susan McCartney...page 54

Frank Butler...page 55

David Giles...page 56

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Novice

Brid Liddy

46


Novice

Charles Meiklereid

47


Novice

Christine Taylor

48


Novice

Margaret Finlay

49


Novice

Mark Donavan

50


Novice

Mark O’Brien

51


Novice

PJ Nyland

52


Novice

Eoin O’Reilly

53


Novice

Susan McCartney

54


Novice

Frank Butler

55


Novice

David Giles

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Int e r medi ate Secti on

Adrain Doyle...page 59

Emer Prenderville...page 61

Peter Rossiter...page 63

Aoife Kerr...page 6o

Jolanta Rossiter...page 62

Merv Colton...page 64

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Toni Ireton...page 65

Michael Linehan...page 66

Robbie Francis ....page 67

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Intermediate

Adrian Doyle

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Intermediate

Aoife Kerr

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Intermediate

Emer Prenderville

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Intermediate

Jolanta Rossiter

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Intermediate

Peter Rossiter

63


Intermediate

Merv Colton

64


Intermediate

Toni Ireton

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Intermediate

Michael Linehan

66


Intermediate

Robbie Francis

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Exposé