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May 15, 2013


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T A B L E

Chantell’s Hip-Hop Journey…………………………………………………….1 Chanell’s Journey Through Hip-Hop………………………………………..4 The Buzz In Los Angeles……………………………………………..……………6 Featured Artist of the Month: Gino Haze…………………….………….7 Weekly Film Review…………………………………………………….………..10 Floetry Poetry………………………………………………………………..……..14 Culture vs. Commerce…………………………………………………..………16

O F H I P H O P

Book Review: Pimp’s Up Ho;s Down………………………….………….18 Hip-Hop History………………………………………………………………..…..20 Drugs & Hip-Hop…………………………………………………………………..22 Keeping Up With Casey Veggies…………………………..……………….24 Historical Time Periods of Hip-Hop………………………………..……..25 Flashback Artist of the Month: Pioneer of West Coast Rap….28 Black Women Pioneers in HipHop...........................................30 Hip-Hop’s Influence on African American Women……………….33 Evolution……………………………………………………………………………...34


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((*))Chantell’s hip-hop Journey!((*)) ((*))Chantell’s hip-hop Journey!((*))

My first experience with HipHop came before I was even born. My mommy said that when she was pregnant with my twin sister and I, our dad would always play Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, NWA, 2Pac, Biggie, etc. and hold up the earphones or radio to her stomach and we would kick and start moving. I grew up in studios because my auntie has worked in the music industry ever since I was born. Even though she worked with artist that sang R&B music like Janet Jackson, Boyz II Men and New Edition, I believe being in the studio made me want to explore all different kinds of music that is out there. I am very diverse when it comes to music; I listen to everything from Hip-Hop, Rock, Pop, R&B, Rap and all other kinds of music. I am very open when it comes to music and I don’t discriminate.

Two people that I think really formed and started Hip-Hop for a lot of people in my generation would have to be none other than Tupac “2Pac” Amaru Shakur and Christopher “The Notorious B.I.G.” George Wallace. They are arguably two of the best Hip-Hop rappers to have ever lived. I grew up listening to their music and have been listening to these two

rappers ever since I was a little girl. Of course when I was younger my parents would only let me listen to certain songs and the clean versions. When they thought I was old enough they let me listen to more stuff that was uncensored. I loved how 2Pac and The Notorious B.I.G. were really good friends at first. It sucks that they then became “enemies” or “rivals”.


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I think that Hip-Hop music to a certain extent had something to do with their feud and that it did add fuel to the fire. Especially when Biggie made “Who Shot Ya” after 2Pac was shot numerous times in a New York studio where Biggie was recording and then 2Pac’s reply song “Hit em Up” was released shortly after. I think that a lot of the west coast, east coast feud had a lot to do with the ending of their friendship. My favorite song by 2Pac would have to be “Dear Mama”. I think that this song really showed how he had a lot of respect for women, especially his mom and all the

One experience I had with Hip-Hop when I was younger, was one time my mom, dad, sister and I were going home (to Los Angeles) from dinner at a far out place (I don’t remember the location) but, my sister and I kept arguing with each other and asking my dad to change the song on the IPod. Finally, he got sick and tired of us and put on repeat 5 Minutes of

other moms in the world who did whatever they had to do to make sure their kids were okay. 2Pac’s lyrics had a lot of passion in them, he wrote about real life things that were happening, how he felt and things he went through. My favorite Biggie song is “Sky’s The Limit”. This song is a very positive song and lets you know that you can do anything you want to.

Funk by Whodini, released in 1984 all the way home. At first my sister and I were really upset and kept begging for him to change that song. After a while my sister and I started to get into the song. By the time we got home we fell in love with the song and we knew every word to


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One experience I had with Hip-Hop when I was younger, was one time my mom, dad, sister and I were going home (to Los Angeles) from dinner at a far out place (I don’t remember the location) but, my sister and I kept arguing with each other and asking my dad to change the song on the IPod. Finally, he got sick and tired of us and put on repeat 5 Minutes of Funk by Whodini, released in 1984 all the way home. At first my sister and I were really upset and kept begging for him to change that song. After a while my sister and I started to get into the song. By the time we got home we fell in love with the song and we knew every word to 5 Minutes of Funk. Today, it is still one of my favorite Hip-Hop songs.


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Aubrey “Drake” Graham, to me is one of the greatest artist to live already. One thing that I

love about Drake is that he is very diverse when he comes to his music. He has R&B songs, songs you play in the car, club songs, serious and playful songs. Drake has a song for any and every emotion or situation that you are going through. One of my favorite songs by him is “Miss Me” featuring Lil’ Wayne.


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When it comes to race and gender with my experiences with Hip-Hop, I always love to here and listen to rappers who are not black and who are female. Even though majority of the Hip-Hop community is African American male, there are many different races of Hip-Hop artist. One rapper that I love is MGK (Machine Gun Kelly) who is a white rapper. His flows and the way is delivers is crazy. Another rapper that I like is a guy who is white and is from London who goes by Dvnny Seth (pronounced Danny). I first heard him when I went to a small Hip-Hop show on La Brea. When it comes to gender, one of my all time favorite Hip-Hop artist is Nicki Minaj. In my opinion she is one of the best in the game right and she is keeping up with some of the guys in the industry.


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Dvnny Seth

I do think that a lot of HipHop artist now a days make many songs that are degrading to women, but I think that if you know that you aren’t a h* or a b*tch and the music does not pertain to you, you are good. I also feel that Hip-Hop artist and rappers can say and express whatever they want. I do not understand when people say that Hip-Hop music should not be played on the radio or it should be censored because it brainwashes people, it is a bad example for the youth, and makes people do crazy things. I say that if you don’t want your children to listen to it, don’t let them and don’t let them listen to the radio, but don’t try to prevent everyone else from listening to it. If you were raised right and

have sense even to not let the music make the person that you are and make it the things that you do in life then listening to Hip-Hop music, censored or uncensored should not be a problem.


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Today up and coming artist all across the country have a hard time getting their music heard. If you are not up to the standards of society, or selling out your music preference or talents to a corporation you do not receive a chances to share you music and help change the world. On December 14, 2009 Taylor Smith, along with a few of her friends launched the website Westsidestoryy. Their goals are to have a friend-safe website dedicated to unknown artist trying to get music heard, keeping the public informed on issues and new going on not only in the mainstream music industry, but also the underground, and to educate people not only in Los Angeles, but around the world about new music. Westsidestoryy.com is a place where artist can submit their music and a little bit about themselves, to get the music known to the public. Westsidestoryy is not only a place where you can find and download the new latest music, but you can also get updates on industry artist and news as well. As the years have progressed Westsidestoryy has even been able to get their own clothing line going where they offer t-shirts, sweatsuits, hats, and other items for very reasonable prices. Today they have evolved into a “West coast based multimedia, promotion, management, and advertising company. For more information on how you can keep up with the latest artist and music coming out of the west coast or even inquire about getting your music hear, you can: Visit their website www.westsidestoryy.com or follow them on Twitter @WestSideStoryy.


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Finally we get to now. My relationship with Hip Hop now is fully grown and I cannot live with out it. Hip Hop has definitely helped me get through somethings, and it is a stress reliever. I do not go a day without listening to it from all eras. I feel now that I am older I appreciate a lot more of the old school Hip Hop. The lyrics were so creative and actually meant something back then. Now Hip Hop to me focuses more on the beats, to my age group if you have a good beat then you have a good song, which is not always true.

Today up and coming artist all across the

Today I feel Hip Hop has turned more into club music or what my generation would call it “ratchet music”. Even though country have getting their music many people, especially older people do not believe this is real Hip Hop I personally love it a andhard think it istime music. Rappers you arerecently. not up to athe like Tyga, French Montana, and 2 Chainz have really put out whatheard. we would callIf“club bangers” I also love lot of standards of the artist that are played on the radio like Drake, Rick Ross, Nickisociety, Minaj, Wale, Lil’or Wayne, etc. I feel with the music and the selling out your music preference images today’s Hip Hop puts out, parents need to be involved in what kids listen too. A lot of parents need to teach their or talents to a corporation you do not receive children that it is music, and it does not necessarily have to pertain to you. Many people in society believe Hip Hop and Rap a chances to share you music and help is the cause of the problems occurring in inner cities or urban communities, but I do not believe that. Parents have to world. On December 14, 2009 start being more responsible in educating children in music and change the lyrics theythe listen to.

Taylor Smith, along with a few of her friends launched the website Westsidestoryy. Their Music should be listened to in moderation, as I was growing up I was introduced into all genres of music. That is a main goals are to have a friend-safe website reason why I believe Hip Hop does not affect me and my gender as a female in a negative way. My family raised me in a artist way were I know the things mentioned in songs does not pertaindedicated to me, because I amtonotunknown that kind of person. When trying to get keeping the public rappers rap about b*tches or h*s I know that is not who I am, somusic they are notheard, speaking about me. When rappers talk about informed on being models, Barbie’s, having a certain body shape, hair length,issues or being perfect doesnew not effect me because know who and going onI not only in the and what I am is beautiful enough for me. mainstream music industry, but also the underground, and to educate people not only inrace, Los Angeles, I do think Hip Hop today some what has a negative influence on my because people tend but to thinkaround Hip Hop causesthe world about violence in the black community and all they rap about is drinking, doing drugs, killing one another, or hooking up with the is a place new music. Westsidestoryy.com opposite sex. I don’t believe Hip Hop has really had an influence on how I viewartist race, class, sexuality, etc. because I think music and a where can submit their you should not judge these things on what is going on in a song. little bit about themselves, to get the music known to the public. Westsidestoryy is not Today I listen to a lot of underground artist such as YG, Dom Kennedy, Veggies, Problem, Overdoz, Travis Porter and and onlyCasey a place where you can find a new artist coming out named Gino Haze who has a mix tape called “Confident” outthe that isnew really dope. As of now I am download latest music, but you can more into underground artist than I am a mainstream artist. I feel like they have wonderful stories to tell, they are pure also get updates on industry artist and news and have not been tainted by industry people. as well. As the years have progressed Westsidestoryy has even been able to get their own clothing line going where they offer t-shirts, sweatsuits, hats, and other items for very reasonable prices. Today they have evolved into a “West coast based multimedia, promotion, management, and advertising company. For more information on how you can keep up with the latest artist and music coming out of the west coast or even inquire about getting your music hear, you can: Visit their website www.westsidestoryy.com or follow them on Twitter @WestSideStoryy.


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FEATURED ARTIST OF THE MONTH: DoubleTheHipHop: Tell us a little bit about yourself. Gino Haze: I'm Gino Haze, a recording artist out of Inglewood, California by way of Chicago, Illinois. DTHH: What and/or who inspired to want to get into music? This you week’s movie choice

Weekly Film Review!

was Dr. Theresa White’s

GH: I used to be good at writing as a kid, just starting flowing my words. And my film toand being accepted for it influences were just black men doing“From what theyBuckism wanted in life by a mass majority of people.Barakism”. She is

currently a professor at DTHH: Do you think music California has changed sinceState the beginning of hip-hip? If so, in what ways? University of Northridge.

GH: Yeah, because music is out soundtrack to life and as life change people change and as people change some things come irrelevant and some things become more relevant. I think the biggest things is the language and more freedom due to the Internet. DTHH: Do you think rappers lyrics should be censored? GH: No, but I think the hip hop cops select profile certain rappers just cause of what demographic they cater too. Rick Ross says something about a date rape drug and Tyler the creator can say the same thing but because Tyler


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+

fan base isn't black people mainly, he gets a pass. DTHH: In your opinion, who is the greatest rapper of all time, dead or alive? And why? GH: My answer is Jay-Z just cause he was putting out quality when ever legend was alive and has continued to this day. DTHH: If you could chose one artist to work with today, who would it be?

I attended the Second Annual African Studies Symposium and there I watched Dr. White’s documentary on black “buck”that originated the slavery times. GH: Maybe just singers, I don't really caremasculinity. to collab The withterm rappers much during but maybe singers just cause I likeThe making songs for women. slave masters created the African American men to be bucks. The stereotype of bucks was strong, muscular, ignorant, and uneducated. “Do what you’re told “boy” is what they DTHH: Do you believe there is a difference between hip-hop music in Los Angeles and were suppose to do. The slave masters would have the “bucks” get the women slaves hip-hop music in Chicago? pregnant so there was a better chance that their offspring was strong. Today many GH: Hell Yeah, Chicago is drill Musicmen ( Chief Lil Reese, King ) while LA African American believeKeef, that being masculine, youLmasculine, you is cannot show any ratchet music ( YG, Problem, Tyga ) emotion, be soft, cannot show any emotion, be soft, show no feelings or they will be female, a sissy, or gay. DTHH: Besides music,associated what elsewith dobeing you alike to do in your freeMasculinity time? means no fear, no insecurities, and no femininity. Sexism is involved in masculinity, because men believe that being a man GH: Shade up, shop, kick it. Imma you have to takesimple care ofguy. your Not too much interest me. I like finding ways to get money. If that counts as a hobby.

DTHH: What all have you done so far in your musical career? GH: 1 album, 7 shows, but my career hasn't even been going on a year yet lol. My first album dropped June 28, 2012. It isn't even May 28, 2013 yet lol. DTHH: What new projects are you currently working on? GH: My new album, entitled “Reality Replacin'” that’s all I'm focused on.

family and if you can’t, then you aren’t a real man. Today there aren’t a lot of black men that are portrayed positively in Hollywood. A lot of men have consumed a materialistic ideology of cars, money, and women. Now that African American men are allowed to have nice things and are doing better in life, then back in the slavery days, a lot of them go overboard in getting the nice things and purchase an excess of items. Many of the African American athletes today are compared to “bucks”. Many of them are strong, muscular, (being paid for being “strong”) and some of them are portrayed to be uneducated and ignorant. When Barack Obama became president a lot of the men were very glad. One man said that, “black men now have absolutely no excuse as to why they can’t do


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Anything in the world!” Obama relates to all generations and has inspired and opened up the door for a lot of black men and especially the younger generation. One of the men said, “the proper guidance of a man is to be a role model and show the young generation the right ways to DOWNLOAD HAZE in ALBUM OUT NOW: CONFIDENT live and how to do things GINO with integrity life.” Another man said a quote thatON his WWW.CAVIARCO.US father told him when he was young, “The day you teach a boy to become a man, you are a man.” That quote in my opinion is very true. -Chantell A. DanielsThis week’s movie choice

Weekly Film Review!

was Dr. Theresa White’s film “From Buckism to Barakism”. She is currently a professor at California State University of Northridge.


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On Tuesday, April 2013 I attended African Studies Symposium. I watched the screening of Dr. +“TheAnnual inspiration came from serendipity. I was Towards the end30, of the video it shows the Second doing interviewsBlack about westernized beautyDr withWhite’s a Theresa White’s film Buckism to Barakism: Re-Imagining Masculinity. film was about how African how President Obama has inspired few men and they shared their own stories with American men have transformed from Buckism Barakism; which me,”toWhite said. “I became very means interestedthey in have gone from being seen as hyperblack men to step up and be more it’s like to beloving, an Africansuccessful American boy ormen. The word “Buck” goes back to masculine, strong, big, barbaric type figures towhateducated, man, especially in the transitional era of Barack influential in society. How he is a good slavery days when the masters would see African American men just as muscles over mind, ignorant, loud, Obama.” attended Second African Symposium there I watched Dr.athletic White’s president inless thethan way he can relate to It Ithen uneducated, human “things”. goestheinto how Annual the term BuckStudies is very commonand in the professional Theresa White documentary on black -Dr. masculinity. The term “buck” originated during the slavery times. all generations. The media males does nottoday. Most of the team owners or managers are white men, that hire African world of African American The slave masters created the African American men to be bucks. The stereotype of bucks American men and they do not necessarily about the well being and of these athletes. typically thatthey take very well to President Obama, wascare strong, muscular, ignorant, uneducated. “Do They what you’re toldonly “boy”care is what these “Bucks” makethat themAfrican a lot of money.were The suppose film thentogoes to say how the media portrays as do. Theonslave masters would have always the “bucks” get theblack womenmen slaves because he shows rappers, athletes, or people in the hood. pregnant They never portray blackchance men who are doctors, lawyers, so there was the a better that their offspring was strong.professors, Today many and Americans are intelligent and can African American men believe masculine, you masculine, you cannot showhas any others who do positive works in black communities. Towards the endthatofbeing the video it shows how President Obama achieve things just the way whites do. emotion, be soft,in cannot show be soft, show noinfeelings theycan willrelate be to inspired black men to step up and be more influential society. Howanyheemotion, is a good president the wayorhe He inspires and pushes blacks withPresident being a female, a sissy, or gay.heMasculinity means no fear, no insecurities, all generations. The media does not take associated very well to Obama, because shows that African Americans are and no femininity. Sexism is involved in masculinity, because men believe that being a man especially become educated intelligent andmen canto achieve things just the way whites do. He inspires and pushes blacks

+

and better as a race. One of the guys

you have to take care of your

in the video goes on to say how minority children and people should not say they cannot do anything now that Barack Obama is president. He has shown that anything is possible, and just because you are African American or Latino does not mean you cannot do great and successful things in life.

family and if you can’t, then you aren’t a real man. Today there aren’t a lot of black men that are portrayed positively in Hollywood. A lot of men have consumed a materialistic ideology of cars, money, and women. Now that African American men are allowed to have nice things and are doing better in life, then back in the slavery -Chanell V. Daniels days, a lot of them go overboard in getting the nice things and purchase an excess of items. Many of the African American athletes today are compared to “bucks”. Many of them are strong, muscular, (being paid for being “strong”) and some of them are portrayed to be uneducated and ignorant. When Barack Obama became president a lot of the men were very glad. One man said that, “black men now have absolutely no excuse as to why they can’t do


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Anything in the world!” Obama relates to all generations and has inspired and opened up the door for a lot of black men and especially the younger generation. One of the men said, “the proper guidance of a man is to be a role model and show the young generation the right ways to live and how to do things with integrity in life.” Another man said a quote that his father told him when he was young, “The day you teach a boy to become a man, you are a man.” That quote in my opinion is very true. -Chantell A. Daniels

Floetry Poetry


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On Tuesday, April 2013 I attended African Studies Symposium. I watched the screening of Dr. +“TheAnnual inspiration came from serendipity. I was Towards the end30, of the video it shows the Second doing interviewsBlack about westernized beautyDr withWhite’s a Theresa White’s film Buckism to Barakism: Re-Imagining Masculinity. film was about how African how President Obama has inspired few men and they shared their own stories with American men have transformed from Buckism Barakism; which me,”toWhite said. “I became very means interestedthey in have gone from being seen as hyperblack men to step up and be more it’s like to beloving, an Africansuccessful American boy ormen. The word “Buck” goes back to masculine, strong, big, barbaric type figures towhateducated, man, especially in the transitional era of Barack influential in society. How he is a good slavery days when the masters would see African American men just as muscles over mind, ignorant, loud, Obama.” president inless thethan way he can relate to It then goes into how the term Buck is very common in the professional athletic uneducated, human “things”. -Dr. Theresa White all generations. The media males does nottoday. Most of the team owners or managers are white men, that hire African world of African American American men they do not necessarily care about the well being of these athletes. They typically only care that take very welland to President Obama, these “Bucks” makethat themAfrican a lot of money. The film then goes on to say how the media always portrays black men as because he shows rappers, athletes, or people in the hood. They never portray the black men who are doctors, lawyers, professors, and Americans are intelligent and can others who do positive works in black communities. Towards the end of the video it shows how President Obama has achieve things just the way whites do. inspired black men to step up and be more influential in society. How he is a good president in the way he can relate to He inspires and pushes blacks all generations. The media does not take very well to President Obama, because he shows that African Americans are especially become educated intelligent andmen canto achieve things just the way whites do. He inspires and pushes blacks and better as a race. One of the guys in the video goes on to say how minority children and people should not say they cannot do anything now that Barack Obama is president. He has shown that anything is possible, and just because you are African American or Latino does not mean you cannot do great and successful things in life. -Chanell V. Daniels


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CULTURE VS. Floetry COMMERCE

Poetry

This week’s segment of poetry features pieces from artist who have taken their talents and linked them with Hip-Hop.

Hip-Hop Ghazal Gotta love us brown girls, munching on fat, swinging blue hips, decked out in shells and splashes, Lawdie, bringing them woo hips. As the jukebox teases, watch my sistas throat the heartbreak, inhaling bassline, cracking backbone and singing thru hips.


Double The Hip-Hop! Like something boneless, we glide silent, seeping 'tween floorboards, wrapping around the hims, and ooh wee, clinging like glue hips. Engines grinding, rotating, smokin', gotta pull back some. Natural minds are lost at the mere sight of ringing true hips. Gotta love us girls, just struttin' down Manhattan streets killing the menfolk with a dose of that stinging view. Hips. Crying 'bout getting old—Patricia, you need to get up off what God gave you. Say a prayer and start slinging. Cue hips.

BY: PATRICIA SMITH What is it about you that is so different? Is it that booming bass,

Or is it those wavy synthesizers? Maybe it’s the way you flow,

Or how you say what you mean and mean what you say? Or it could be your wide range of influences. From rock and soul to jazz and reggae, Across the globe you are inspired. What is it?

It’s the change you’ve made. From beat-boxing, DJ-ing and breakdancing, You went on to become an activist,

Standing up for what you believed in.

You became a genius, lyrically telling your knowledge through all the struggles.

You never gave up; you stood tall and strong You have grown so much

But never forget where it all began Stay real

BY: TAJAHNIYA S.

Poetry-Hip Hop Saved My Life

COMMERC

CULTURE

Some say my E words are as deep as can be back in the day there was no peep out of me never was the


Double The Hip-Hop! type to try and stay focused but I could tell a lie and hang with the jokers If you knew me you didn't love me, at least not for long then something grew inside me, the beast became strong I put pen to paper and out came something poetic relished in hip hop,2 women named it floetic instead of holding onto a blunt in my mouth I hold now a pen and cast out my doubt Finding this easier than roaming the streets everyday I've become a man hoaning my talents in everyway encouraged to do this by those around me and in my life engulfed in darkness until poetry and hip hop shed some light would have done this sooner but the drugs delayed me thanking Got that (poetry) (hip hop) saved me

BY: GODBODY O.G

CULTURE could include the four elements of Hip-Hop. Commerce is the money VS. and materialism side of Hip-Hop, which seems to be happening more in COMMERCE today’s age. A sub question that is often

The culture/commerce question is a very popular, yet controversial one in today’s society. Culture is basically the pure and innocent form of Hip-Hop, which

discussed today is whether commerce is a choice in today’s music industry. Is there a way to be a successful artist and still maintain the cultural side of music? In the documentary Planet Rock: The Story of HipHop and the Crack Generation shows a great portrayal of the culture side of Rap and how the crack epidemic in the 80’s helped to influence the music rappers were creating at the time. It showed how many of the rappers were actual drug dealers and really grew up in ghettos and on the streets. Unlike today were we have many rappers that have never sold a drug in their life, grew up in nice neighborhoods, yet still rap about the “struggle”. Many of these young


Double The Hip-Hop! rappers tried to go down the right path and get legal jobs, but it was hard for them

Instead of them rapping about these things because they actually like them, they rap about them because corporations have paid them to shout them out in a song or have their product shown in the video. Rappers in our generation don’t even make real music anymore.

seeing all of their friends making double the money they were making by selling drugs. Referencing to the article “Shake It, Baby, Shake It: Consumption and the New Gender Relation in Hip-Hop” by Margaret Hunter definitely portrays the consumption side of Hip-Hop. In the 1970’s and 1980’s Hip-Hop was a culture and everyone participated in one of the four elements whether is be Dj’ing, Emceeing, doing Graffiti, or Break dancing. Today rappers are so consumed in selling their products to the world, and not really focusing on the real aspects of Hip-Hop. Today many rappers want to rap just to make money, and to get cars and women, not to tell stories, influence and encourage people or make it out the hood. Rappers have definitely lost the true meaning of Hip-Hop, and have gotten lost in the crazy luxury world. Many rappers only rap about certain objects because they are receiving money for it.

They just talk about the things they have, women they have, the cars they drive, and these fancy lives they are living. Nobody tells stories anymore about things going on in the world, or our own communities. Most big name rappers in the game don’t even need to make music anymore. They paved their ways musically, but now are neglecting that side for their business sides. Rappers like 50 Cent, Jay-Z, P.Diddy, and Birdman make most of their money from doing other things. For instance endorsing drinks, shoes, and clothes; starting production and management companies; or even writing books.


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COMMERC E

In the new generation hip-hop videos, video “vixens”, ho’s”, or whatever you chose to call them, are a hot commodity. It is rare today to see a hip-hop video without video girls in skimpy or little to no clothes on. Many people wonder why video vixens chose that career path. Some choose it to help support them,

CULTURE


Double The Hip-Hop! their children, and pay for things like school and rent. Others do it to try to land a “baller” and receive nice and expensive gifts and some hope that doing this will open up doors to bigger and better opportunities in acting, modeling and the entertainment business. Rappers have even made songs about video vixens. Tupac Shakur, Nate Dogg, and YDG Tha Top Dog made a song called “All about U”, the song is basically talking about how in every city they go to and every music video they see on television, they see the same ho’s in them. The majority of the women in the videos today are fairer-skinned or ethnically mixed with long, straight, or curly hair. Tiffany Patterson, a historian believes a lot of the video vixens are “ascriptive mulattas”; they have darker hues, full lips, and are mostly of mixed heritage. Many rappers use lighter skin women or women of a different race because they that is what they believe is “beautiful”. Women, (more African American ones) get things done to their bodies to try and get the look that they see the men want. They get colored contacts, breast implants, skin lighting creams, plastic surgery, and the new rave today is getting booty shots. In reality, those things do not make you beautiful they just make you fake and could in the long run cause many health issues. Women need to learn that they are beautiful just the way they are and all skin is beautiful. Rappers today have started taking their videos to more exotic places such as Brazil. Snoop Dogg, Pharrell, and Charlie Wilson shot their video “Beautiful” in Brazil. T.I. shot his video “Why You Wanna” in Rio de Janeiro and Ja Rule also shot his “Holla Holla” video in Rio. People, specifically men see these videos and immediately want to go to these places and find them an exotic woman with long hair. With that said, Brazil found that many African American men were starting to visit and wanted to take advantage of that. “In 2004, African Americans spent $4.6 billion on travel, lodging, and transportation . . .Brazilian government and African American media moguls like Essence magazine founder Clarence Smith have resulted in deal-brokering between Varig Airlines and Avocet Travel and Entertainment that now includes direct flights from New York to Salvador, Bahia. ”(p.45-46) There is even a list of do’s and don’ts for African American men when they go on these exotic trips


Double The Hip-Hop! because a lot of the women want to use the men to get back to the United States and find better lives for themselves.


Double The Hip-Hop! (DJ KOOL HERC & THE BEGINNING OF HIP-HOP) Clive Campbell was the first of six children born to Keith and Nettie Campbell in Kingston, Jamaica. His mother left Jamaica for New York City in the early 1960’s to create a better life for her family. They all joined her in 1966; Clive was 12 years old at this time. When Clive’s family moved to United States, it was not an “in thing” to be Jamaican. Herc began listening to R7B and lost his accent to fit in with “Americans.” Campbell and his friends began writing graffiti after TAKI 183. His tag was CLYDE AS KOOL: Clyde because people couldn’t pronounce Clive and KOOL from the cigarette commercial. He attended the Alfred E. Smith Career and Technical Education High School in the Bronx, where his height, frame, and demeanor on the basketball court prompted the other kids to nickname him "Hercules", but he shortened it to Herc. He stated in Jeff Chang’s Book Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop he says, “Between high school and the block, I put the two names together and I dropped the CLYDE. I started calling myself Kool Herc, and that was it.” During this time Herc began running with a graffiti crew called the Ex-Vandals.

Blacks at this time encountered wide-scale social disruption following the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway by Robert Moses (completed 1963, with further construction continuing through to 1972); it had uprooted thousands in stable

neighborhoods, displacing communities, and leading to "white flight" when property values dropped near the roadway. Therefore a lot of inner city kids had to travel far distances to visit friends across the highway. While they were in the different cities they would often hang out and listen to music with one another. Herc and his sister, Cindy, began hosting back-to-school parties in the recreation room of their building, 1520 Sedgwick Avenue. Herc's first sound system consisted of two turntables, a dual channel guitar amplifier and PA speakers, on which he played records such as James Brown's "Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose", The Jimmy Castor


Double The Hip-Hop! Bunch's "It's Just Begun" and Booker T & the MG's' "Melting Pot". DJ Kool Herc developed the style that was the blueprint for hip-hop music. He began to isolate the instrumental portion of the record, which emphasized the drum beat—the "break"—and switch from one break to another to yet another. Herc used the record to focus on a short, heavily percussive, part in it: the "break". Since this part of the record was the one the dancers liked best, Herc isolated, changed to the other, and later, prolonged it. This innovation had its roots in what he called "The Merry-Go-Round"—a switching from break to break done at the height of the party. An excerpt from DJ Kool Herc’s website states: “The birthplace of hip-hop took place on August 11, 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue recreation room. On the Westside of the Bronx, New York, it all began from a humble beginning. DJ Kool Herc and his sister Cindy organized her back to school party in the rec room charging 25 cent for girl and 50 cent for fellows. The first hiphop party would change the world, and is now known as hip hop culture.”


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In the documentary, “Planet Rock: The Story of Hip-Hop and the Crack Generation” it showed a lot about the culture and commerce and the connection between crack and hip-hop. Rapper RZA from WuTang said, “Crack culture influenced the music”. Rapper Snoop

Dogg said, “Most drug dealers had a hell of a story to tell.” These were two of many legendary rappers that started off selling drugs in the streets. When cocaine first

became popular in the 1970’s and 1980’s it was $80,000 to $100,000 per kilo. Only white people and well to do black people could afford cocaine at the time. In the early 80’s the price of cocaine dropped down, and the drug Lord Freeway Ricky Ross and others learned

Casey Veggies is a rapper from Los Angeles, California. He started rapping and released his first mixtape “Customized Greatly” in 2008. He has worked with many different rappers from Mac Miller to Juicy J.


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how to make

crack, which was

the teens were making money to feed their families, buy new clothes, shoes, a chain, and maybe even a car. They then realized that they did not need a normal job

On April 27, 2013, he opened his own store for his clothing line, “Peas & Carrots International”.

basically the poor people’s very of cocaine. During this time 75% of young black teens from the ages 16-18 were out of jobs, so a lot of them turned to drug dealing. Selling the drugs

the tape for a drug dealer, he bought the tape, and then everyone wanted one. Rappers

On January 22, 2013, Casey Veggies releases his fifth mixtape titled “Life Changes”. You can download Life Changes from www.caseyveggies.com.

because this was making them fast and easy money. Rappers like Too Short saw the lives that the drug dealers were living and wanted to live like that too, he was inspired by them and made a tape. Too Short played

started to dress like drug dealers with the flashy clothes and the big gold “dookie” chains. Drug dealers weren’t talking about


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the life they lived and the things that they did, but rappers started to make songs about the drug dealers lives and rapper became the voice for the drug dealers.


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Today a lot of rappers and hip-hop artist music and lyrics are still influenced by drugs. They rarely talk about “hard core” drugs such as cocaine and crack like rappers back in the 1980’s and 1990’s. Many of the hip-hop artists now a day talk about drugs like: marijuana (weed), mollies, and lean. Some rappers that have made songs about smoking weed are: Curren$y- Blown Away, Wiz Khalifa- In the Cut, who has many songs about smoking marijuana, Lil Wayne- I Feel Like Dying and the list, goes on. Molly is becoming a popular drug among hip-hop artist and a lot of the

youth today. A molly is a pure form of MDMA (the active ingredient in Ecstasy). Rappers like 2 Chainz, Kanye West, Future, Mac Miller, French Montana, and Wale have mentioned mollies in their songs. Trinidad James made the drug even more popular with his song “All Gold Everything” and his line, “Popped a molly, I’m sweatin’ WOO!” Rapper Problem even has two very popular mixtapes called “Welcome to Mollywood” and “Welcome to Mollywood 2”; on many of the songs he makes references to mollies. Rapper Future hosted a mixtape called, “Welcome 2

Mollyworld” where many different artist talked about drugs such as mollies and lean. Lean is the combination of prescription-grade promethazine-codeine cough syrup and Sprite. Lean is also referred to as “sizzurp” or “purple drink”, it is said to have originated in Houston, Texas. Artist such as: A$AP Rocky, Drake, Bun B and 2 Chainz have been seen on many occasions “sippin’ lean”. A few months ago when rapper Lil Wayne was hospitalized for numerous seizures, doctors found an abnormal amount of promethazine-codeine in his system.


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KEEPING UP WITH CASEY VEGGIES Casey Veggies is a rapper from Los Angeles, California. He started rapping and released his first mixtape “Customized Greatly” in 2008. He has worked with many different rappers from Mac Miller to Juicy J.

On April 27, 2013, he opened his own store for his clothing line, “Peas & Carrots International”.

On January 22, 2013, Casey Veggies releases his fifth mixtape titled “Life Changes”. You can download Life Changes from www.caseyveggies.com.

"Do I gotta sell me a whole lotta crack for decent shelter and clothes on my back? Or should I just wait for help from Bush or Jesse Jackson and Operation PUSH?" –A Bird in the Hand


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Historical Time Periods of Hip-Hop . . . Roots of Hip-Hop (1970’s) Hip-Hop is a music genre consisting of a stylized rhythmic music that commonly accompanies rapping, a rhythmic and rhyming speech that is chanted. It developed as part of hip hop culture, a subculture defined by four key stylistic elements: MCing/rapping, DJing/scratching, break dancing, and graffiti writing. Hip hop as music and culture formed during the 1970s when block parties became increasingly popular in New York City, particularly among African American youth residing in the Bronx. Block parties incorporated DJs who played popular genres of music, especially funk and soul music. Due to the positive reception, DJs began isolating the percussive breaks of popular songs. This technique was then common in Jamaican dub music, and was introduced in New York by an immigrant from Jamaica known as DJ Kool Herc, who is considered the father of hip hop. The percussive breaks in funk, soul and disco records were generally short; Herc and other DJs began using two turntables to extend the breaks. Turntables techniques such as scratching, attributed to Grand Wizzard Theodore, beat mixing and/or matching, and beat juggling eventually developed along with the breaks, creating a base that could be rapped over. Hip hop music in its infancy has been described as an outlet and a voice for the disenfranchised youth of low-economic areas, as the culture reflected the social, economic and political realities of their lives.

Old School Hip-Hop (1979-1984) This genre is also often spelled "old skool". It describes the earliest commercially recorded hip-hop music. Old school hip-hop ended around 1984 due to changes in rapping technique and beats. Some of the popular Old


Double The Hip-Hop! School artist include: Afrika Bambaataa, The Sugar Hill Gang, Slick Rick, Doug E. Fresh, The Fat Boys, Kurtis Blow, Grandmaster Flash, Fab Five Freddy, etc. Old school hiphop is often characterized by the simpler rapping techniques, and the general focus on party related subject matters. Old school hip-hop would often sample disco and funk tracks, and in some cases acts would use a live band.

New School Hip-Hop (1983-1989) The New school hip-hop was a movement that was arguably started by Run DMC and LL Cool J. They were some of the first people to put our records of “New School HipHop.� Like the hip-hop preceding it, it came predominately from New York City. The new school was initially characterized in form by drum machine led minimalism, often tinged with elements of rock. It was notable for taunts and boasts about rapping, and socio-political commentary, both delivered in an aggressive, self-assertive style. In image as in song its artists projected a tough, cool, street b-boy attitude. These elements contrasted sharply with the funk and disco influenced outfits, novelty hits, live bands, synthesizers and party rhymes of artists prevalent in 1984, and rendered them old school. New school artists made shorter songs that could more easily gain radio play, and more cohesive LPs than their old school counterparts. By 1986 their releases began to establish the hip-hop album as a fixture of the mainstream. Other figures during this age were: A Tribe Called Quest, Public Enemy, De La Soul, Eric B. & Rakim, etc.


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Golden Age Hip-Hop (1980’s-2000’s) This period is also given the name of mainstream hip-hop, and is usually cited as being a period varying over decades. Many of the artists mentioned above were a part of this era. New artist such as N.W.A., 2 Live Crew, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, Kid ‘n Play, MC Hammer, and artist of this kind were also a part of this era. Golden age hip-hop is characterized by its diversity, quality, innovation and influence on others. There were various types of subject matter, while the music was experimental and the sampling eclectic. The golden age is noted for its innovation; a time "when it seemed that every new single reinvented the genre" according to Rolling Stone magazine. One of the definitive characteristics of the golden age of hip-hop is the spread of sample-heavy music. These samples were derived from a number of genres, ranging from jazz to rock & roll. During this time was the explosion of “Gangsta rap” with NWA becoming popular in the late 80s and Dr. Dre & Snoop Doggy Dogg’s famous collaborations beginning in 1993. There was also often an emphasis on Black Nationalism hip-hop scholar Michael Eric Dyson states, "during the golden age of hip hop, from 1987 to 1993, Afro centric and black nationalist rap were prominent. MTV's Sway Calloway comments on this era saying: "The thing that made that era so great is that nothing was contrived. Everything was still being discovered and everything was still innovative and new".


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O’Shea Jackson, better known by his stage “Ice Cube” was born on June 15, 1969. He was born and raised in South Central, Los Angeles, California. He was a member of the group N.W.A. (Niggaz Wit Attitudes) along with Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, MC Ren, and DJ Yella. In 1988, N.W.A released their debut studio album, Straight Outta Compton. The three singles off of Straight Outta Compton were “Straight Outta Compton”; “Fuck tha Police” talked about racial profiling and police brutality and “Gangsta Gangsta”. After problems with manager Jerry Heller and group mates, Ice Cube decided that it would be best for him to leave the group. Chuck D and S1ws became Cube’s mentors and introduced him to the Nation of Islam, which later caused him to cut off his famous jerry curl. In 1989, Ice Cube recorded his debut solo album, AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted. He worked with Public Enemy’s producers, the Bomb Squad. This album Ice Cube discussed the issues that were going on in the African American communities and "Do I gotta sell me a whole lotta tales of corner hustling. In crack for decent shelter and clothes 1991, Ice Cube was casted to on my back? Or should I just wait for play Doughboy in John help from Bush or Jesse Jackson and Singleton’s film, Boyz n the Operation PUSH?" Hood. Ice Cube’s second solo –A Bird in the Hand album Death Certificate was released in 1991. The album sold 105,000 copies in its first week. This album is said to be one of the most controversial albums ever. Instead of telling tales of corner hustling, Ice Cube discussed political issues going on in the world and national politics. Singles released from Death Certificate were “Steady Mobbin” and “True to the Game”. He had more tracks on the album that were more controversial like, “Black Korea” and “No Vaseline”. In the early 1990’s, Cube became the primary endorser for the malt liquor, St. Ides. Many people were confused as to why he took this endorsement deal because he was “Muslim” and they were not allowed to drink alcohol.


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Ice Cube’s third album was released in November 1992. The Predator talked a lot about the Rodney King Riots that had happened earlier that year. The singles released from this album were: “Wicked”, “It Was a Good Day”, and “Check Yo Self”. Since then Ice Cube has released six more solo albums for a total of nine solo albums. In 1996, he formed a group Westside Connection with Mack 10 and WC; together they made three albums together. On top of his musical career, Ice Cube has acted in films from: Friday to Anaconda to Barber Shop to All About the Benjamin’s, and many more. He even has his own television show, Are We There Yet?


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Black Women Pioneers in Hip-Hop!

With the Hip-Hop industry being a predominantly male work place, it can be difficult for women to find work or even be taken serious when trying to pursue music. Some of the women listed below have paved a way for African American women to become MC’s.

Lady B Wendy "Lady B" Clark is a MC or rapper from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is one of the earliest female rappers in

hip-hop history, and one of the first to record a studio album. She began her career with the WHAT radio station in 1979, and recorded her first single later that year, "To the Beat Y'all". In 1984, Lady B moved to Philadelphia's Power 99 FM and started the legendary program, "The Street Beat," the program ran until 1989. She is now broadcasting for the premiere satellite radio entity – Sirius Satellite Radio in New York City, and WRNB 100.3. In Philadelphia.


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Sha

Rock

Sha Rock was the first female MC of Hip Hop and innovator of the B-Girl and Fly Girl Cultures. She was a member of the group “Funky 4 + 1”, they were founded in 1976 and were first HipHop/Rap group from The Bronx, New York, United States to receive a recording deal. They were highly notable for having a female MC, and were the first rap group to perform live on a national television broadcast. They made their debut on Enjoy Records with the 16-minute "Rappin and Rocking the House", which sampled elements of Cheryl Lynn’s “Got To Be Real”. The group's most significant hit was the 9-minute "That's the Joint" in 1981.

Salt N’ Pepper Salt-n-Pepa is a hip-hop trio from Queens and Brooklyn, New York that was formed in 1985. The group, consisting of Cheryl James ("Salt"), Sandra Denton ("Pepa") and Deidra Roper ("DJ Spinderella"), were one of the first allfemale rap crews. The group entered hiphop at a time when rap music was believed to be a fad and record companies were reluctant to sign rap artists. They originally called themselves Super Nature (on their first single), James and Denton debuted in 1985 with the single "The Showstopper", an answer record to Doug E. Fresh's hit single "The Show". The song utilized a melody from the 1984 film Revenge of the Nerds. The finished recording gained

some airplay on a New York City rap radio program. The independent Pop Art Records gave it an official release, and "The Showstopper" became a modest R&B hit. With the success of Showstopper, the group's name was changed to Salt-N-Pepa and they signed to the independent Next Plateau Records to record a full-length album. Roper then joined the group as the DJ, replacing DJ Latoya Hanson as Spinderella, and the group's first album Hot, Cool & Vicious was released afterwards in 1986.

MC Lyte MC Lyte is rapper who first gained her popularity in the late 1980’s. She was born in Brooklyn New York, and began rhyming at the age of 12. She became the first solo female rapper to release a full album in 1988 titled Lyte as a Rock, the album was noted for the hit "Paper Thin" and the battle rap "10% Dis."

Lauryn Hill In 1988, Lauryn Hill appeared as an Amateur Night contestant on It's Showtime at the Apollo. She sang her own version of Smokey Robinson's song "Who's Lovin' You?", where she was booed, but persevered and ended up with audience applause. The Refugee Camp also known as the Fugees” formed after Prakazrel "Pras" Michel approached Hill in high school about joining a music group he was creating. Soon after, she met Pras' cousin and fellow Haïtian, Wyclef Jean. During


Double The Hip-Hop! her time with the Fugees she began to convert her poetic writing into rap verses. Hill was the front woman and only women in the hip-hop group the Fugees. In 1998, she launched her solo career with the release of The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill. The album sold over eight million copies and earned five Grammy Awards for Hill, including Album of the Year and Best New Artist.

Queen Latifah She started beat boxing for the hiphop group Ladies Fresh and was one of the members of the original version of the Flavor Unit, which, at that time, was a crew of MCs grouped around producer DJ King Gemini, who made a demo recording of Queen Latifah's rap Princess of the Posse. He gave the recording to Fab 5 Freddy, the host of Yo! MTV Raps. The song got the attention of Tommy Boy Music employee Dante Ross, who signed Latifah and in 1988 issued her first single, "Wrath of My Madness". Freddy helped Latifah sign with Tommy Boy Records, which released Latifah's first album All Hail the Queen in 1989, when she was only nineteen years old. If it were not for them breaking the barriers in hiphop, a lot of women artist after them or today would not have been given the opportunities to work in music. Women MC’s back then did not receive as much

credit as they deserved for their efforts in the hip-hop world. Today female rappers are recognized much more than in the past, but still not as much as the male.


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Double The Hip-Hop!

Increasing concerns are being built in today’s society about the negative impact of mainstream hip-hop on African American women. Not only do rappers music negatively influence women, but also the videos. Black women now believe they have to have a certain body type, act a certain way, or even dress a certain way to be accepted by the black men. Hip-Hop today expresses mainstream ideas that have now been internalized and embedded into the psyches of American people of color. Many black rappers believe that being either Latina, Caucasian, a mixed ethnicity, or light skin, that you are more beautiful. You have to have long curly hair, blonde straight hair, light or blue eyes, with a big butt, a skinny waist, and to be obedient or controllable to fit the stereotype of the perfect women that they want to be with. By having these stereotypes they are not only degrading and disrespecting African American women, they are having a negative impact on young black girls self esteem and identity development. African American women now believe that there is something wrong with them, and they need to change their physical appearances to fulfill the standards of men. Not only are these rappers affecting black women, but also the regular population of men. Today’s

generation, and also some from older generations now believe the stereotypes of a “perfect women” from listening to the nonsense the rappers talk about. By affecting the thinking of the everyday African American man, you are affecting black relationships and love. Now certain black men will not even pursue a black women because she is “not good enough” for him, and he would rather have a foreign women who is obedient. Some of the rappers who insult or slander African American women are Consequence who says, “Light skin is the right skin.” Lil’ Wayne, “Beautiful Black woman, I bet that b*tch look better red” 2 Chainz “All my broads is foreign,” and the list goes on. Education is the first step in changing the way our people think about the issues going on within our communities. Hip-Hop music should never change the way you think, or your perception of someone, especially of your own race.

Double The Hip Hop  

Magazine for class pas 368

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