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TYSON BIRD

jea high school journalist of the year portfolio ‘13

‘13

‘13

‘13

CONTENTS ‘13

Application Materials | 2

‘13

Writing | 11

‘13

Design | 17

‘13

Photography, Multimedia | 41


‘13

APPLICATION MATERIALS

tyson bird // p. 2

HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR

APPLICATION

DATE

February 10, 2014

NAME FIRST

Tyson

MI

Sagle

E-MAIL ADDRESS

STATE

ID

ZIP

83860

ID

ZIP

83864

bird.tyson@gmail.com

HOME PHONE NUMBER

(208) 265-5505 Ray and Mary Bird

PARENT(S) OR GUARDIAN(S) NAME

Sandpoint High School

SCHOOL NAME

410 S. Division Street

SCHOOL STREET ADDRESS CITY

Sandpoint

STATE

(208) 263-3034

SCHOOL PHONE NUMBER ADVISER’S NAME

William Love

ADVISER’S PHONE NUMBER

(208) 890-6975

ADVISER’S E-MAIL ADDRESS

william.love@lposd.org

HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER

Bonner County Daily Bee

NEWSPAPER STREET ADDRESS

310 Church Street

NEWSPAPER WEBSITE/NEWSROOM EMAIL CITY

Sandpoint

bonnercountydailybee.com STATE

FOR HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED IN JOURNALISM?

Bird

LAST

318 Birch Haven Drive

HOME STREET ADDRESS CITY

A

ID

ZIP

83864

6 years

IF YOU ARE CHOSEN AS THE JOY STATE WINNER, WILL YOU BE ABLE TO BE IN ATTENDANCE AT THE CLOSING AWARDS CEREMONY AT THE JEA/NSPA SPRING CONVENTION?

Verification: The examples submitted are the student’s original work. _____________________________________________ Adviser’s Signature

______________________________________________ Student’s Signature


APPLICATION MATERIALS

tyson bird // p. 3

Has any of your work been used by the professional media? If yes, please explain. Annually, I write an article titled “Q & A with Dr. Meyer, SHS Principal.” During the fall of 2011 in my sophomore year of high school, this article was republished by the Sandpoint Newsline, a local monthly magazine.

What aspect of journalism and mass communication is your career goal? My career goal is the graphic journalism field of journalism and mass communication. As much as I enjoy writing articles, my true passion is for the design and presentation of news in a way that is visually appealing and entertaining to readers. In addition to infographics and news layouts, I plan to pursue digital journalism including e-book and tablet publications.

Do you plan to enroll this year in a university journalism degree program? This year, I plan to enroll at Ball State University with a journalism degree program in Journalism (Graphics).

List the colleges which you are considering attending in order of preference. If you have definitely decided which school you will attend, list only that college. Ball State University

31‘


‘13

tyson bird // p. 4

APPLICATION MATERIALS

Self-analytical evaluation of your “journalistic life”. My entire life, I’ve enjoyed jobs that dealt with people. In elementary school student council, the middle school newspaper, high school student council, and the high school newspaper, I have considered myself the cliché “people person”, because I enjoy working with and meeting new people. Originally, I thought this people-centric mentality meant that I would pursue a career in the political realm. I remember for my sophomore English report, I researched and wrote about a career in political science, which I thought was interesting, but not clear enough to become a real passion of mine. At the end of that same sophomore year, I applied for and was selected as the next Editor-in-Chief of my high school newspaper, the Cedar Post. Though this made me more involved in journalism as I quickly rearranged my schedule to take more journalism classes, I still never saw journalism as a career, mostly because I was never too interested in writing, and couldn’t imagine what journalism would look like in the future. As I worked and learned as Editor-in-Chief, my entire perspective changed. Attending the NSPA San Francisco convention in the spring of my junior year inspired me to continue journalism after high school--I learned about digital and graphic journalism and saw modern-day professionals passionate and interested in what they do. Though this inspired me to become even more involved in journalism, I still didn’t see myself as a “journalist”. The true shift in my perspective occurred when I attended two summer camps before my senior year: one at Ball State University with peers interested in journalism, and one in central Washington for leadership. I discovered that journalism students and professionals are exactly the type of people I want to work and associate with. After spending hours in a classroom, my peers and I would return to the dorms and never stop creating...filming video, writing articles, and creating graphics that we would proudly present to the class the next morning. Leadership camp, however, was a different collection of people, more focused on “one-upping” one another, and doing the minimal amount of effort to achieve the supposedly desired result. After that summer, everything clicked. I enjoyed working with people, something journalists do every day. I enjoyed making and thinking about design and art, a field that is rapidly emerging in the field of journalism. I enjoyed using technology, something that I knew I would do frequently in the modern journalism field. Journalism was, and still is, the logical choice for a focus in my life. During my final year of high school, I have become as fully involved in the journalistic process as possible, creating videos, news layouts, photographs, articles, infographics and social media. With each new challenge in journalism, I find more and more that it is the perfect passion and career for me.


APPLICATION MATERIALS Action photo of you doing something journalistic.

tyson bird // p. 5

31‘


‘13

tyson bird // p. 11

WRITING

Access gets green light Students, staff plan for new schedule, class for 2011-12 The 2011-12 school year will bring about a new schedule for SHS students, all centered around a new 38-minute time period for students to have access to their teachers for additional help in subject areas. At the beginning of the year, each student will be assigned a teacher that they will report to during this time, called Access Your Potential, or AYP. After a 3-week introduction period at the start of each year, students will have the option of going to work with a teacher other than their assigned AYP teacher to receive extra help or make-up an assignment that they may have missed. This new time will also be used once monthly for assemblies, once monthly for seniors to work on senior projects, and twice monthly for club or group meetings. “I’m not sure about the new schedule,” said freshman Jared Presnell. “It will be good if I need to get caught up on work, but otherwise I think it could be boring.” The amount of restriction regarding student placement will be determined by a three-color system put in place by the administration and voted on by the school’s department chairs. Students will be broken down into red, yellow, or green-light students. If an SHS student is all caught up in their work, hasn’t recently missed a day of school, they will be green-lighted. Green-light upperclassmen will have the option to leave campus after checking in with their AYP teacher. “Access will be nice for working with my teachers, but the possibility of an earlier release will, literally, be the greatest thing I

have ever heard of,” said junior Riley Hadeen. Sophomores will have the time to work on homework, or participate in intramural sports or potentially leave campus on special 10th-grade incentive days. “We want being a green-light student to be seen as an incentive to students who are falling behind,” said SHS principal Dr. Becky Meyer. “We want students to see that if they work hard, and make an effort to work, they will be rewarded for it.” Students who have recently missed a day of school and need to make-up work will be yellow-lighted. The administration feels that this 38-minute time will be especially helpful to athletes, who often miss days of school but find it hard to make time to make-up work due to busy schedules. Red-light students will be those who are very behind, and students who are intentional non-learners will also be given the red-light. These are students who are capable of working, but are choosing to fail. Meyer said that choosing to fail will no longer be an option, which aligns well with the federally-mandated Response to Intervention ideals. “Access Your Potential will accommodate Tier 2 interventions at Sandpoint High School, Meyer said. “This is a step between the high-quality curriculum and instruction and the intensive Response to Intervention classes that SHS offers. Studies have shown that approximately 5-10 percent of students will be directly affected by these interventions, but [the administration] anticipates an even bigger affected group.”

PUBLISHED JUNE 2011 SHS CEDAR POST

This was my first work ever published in the SHS Cedar Post. I wrote it without even being in the class, but was officially on staff. It shows how far I’ve come as a writer because looking back I see obvious mistakes that I wouldn’t make now.


WRITING Page 2

September 2011

New Law?

City council contemplates law proposal

Molly RickaRd

PHoto By Dylan Vogel

News Editor

S

Phone use while driving may be banned within city limits

andpoint City Council has recently if the driver has committed a primary offense. proposed that the use of mobile deAccording to the proposed ordinance the vices while driving be banned from fine for vehicular cell phone use will be an addiSandpoint. In mid July the ban passed its first tional ten dollars added to the primary offense reading, followed shortly by the second, how- fine. “This is only a small step of addressing ever, is still in the process of a third the probreading before it can be an adopted law lem,” says Texting while driving M in the city of Sandpoint. arsha is blatant disregard for the Ogilvie, a When the ban was first proposed, it was to be considered that texting while safety of our friends, families m e m b e r of the city driving would be a primary offense, and neighbours. meaning that this alone can warrant council, Gretchen Hellar a traffic stop. However, after tweaking “but it is Mayor of Sandpoint and transforming this ordinance, the a begincity has proposed that all or any uses of ning.” a cellular device while operating a veOgilhicle, with the exception of a hands free v i e , device, will be a secondary offense. This means whom is currently running for the new that the secondary offense will only be cited Sandpoint city mayor and is up for elections

cont’d from front page

Tyson BiRd

had a meeting with the police and fire chiefs of Sandpoint, and they “are on the same page.” Three design alternatives are being considered: a three-lane scenario, a five-lane scenario, and a mini-couplet scenario suggested by a citizen. The plans also include a possible round-a-bout at the intersection of Boyer Avenue and Highway 2. The public is being given the opportunity to provide input, and according to recent newspaper reports, the public is favoring the mini-couplet alternative. The alternatives will be considered by the Sandpoint Public Works Committee on September 7 followed by the entire City Council on September 21. Construction is anticipated to begin in 2013, which means that “The Curve” will be completed by the time this year’s freshmen and sophomores graduate from Sandpoint High School.

Web Editor

Entering her sixth year as Sandpoint High School principal, Dr. Becky Meyer has seen many changing policies, attitudes, and students come through Sandpoint High. As the 2011-12 school year kicks off, Dr. Meyer shares her thoughts on the year ahead and provides insight to the SHS

Q: A: Q: A:

Q: A:

Q: A:

g Associate

states, including DC, have passed a law to ban texting while operating a vehicle. states, including DC, prohibit all citizens to use cellular devices while driving.

9 6%

of car crashes are a result of cell phone use while driving.

6,000+

drivers a year are killed in a texting while driving related accident in the U.S. alone.

Statistics from Governers Highway Safety Association

student population. For students, perhaps the largest change in the coming year is the addition of the 38-minute multipurpose ‘Access’ time period, in which students can catch up on work, meet with teachers, or participate in other clubs and activities. Building on the path left by the previous Response to Intervention (RtI) mandates, the SHS Administration is confident that Access will be a benefit to all students.

Last year’s ‘catch phrase’ for the year was “212- increasing your potential one extra degree”. Does the Administration have anything in mind for this year’s motto?

PHoto By Brooke rockHolm

Nothing final yet. We are considering something that combines our relatively short mission statement with our other SHS motto from few years ago: Unleash Your Potential. This year we are really focused on building community and spirit, so the motto will likely involve building a community at Sandpoint High. What are you looking forward to the most in this coming school year? I am excited that this year students will have an incentive and a motivation to follow SHS expectations. Even students who are academically unmotivated can get the help they need to succeed during the new Access Your Potential time period. Sandpoint High School now has a way to give support to students who both want AND need it. Are there tools in place to monitor the success of Access? If so, what will happen if success is not found? Our first indicator of the success of Access will come in the form of progress reports and report cards. SHS has a total of eight times that grades are finalized, and we will hope to see in increase in student performance. The second indicator will be teacher feedback. The Administration is expecting there to be some bugs and things to work through in the first year, but we hope that as Access is implemented more fully, the ultimate goal of students wanting to get help will be achieved. What would you say to a senior about to enter their last year at SHS? Don’t get ‘senioritis’. Take advantage of opportunity while you can, because this is your last year for free education and fun. Enjoy your last moments of your youth, and enjoy your community. Relish this last year before everything changes.

Off the beaten path with a great vibe. Monarch Mountain Coffee is Sandpoint’s local spot. (208) 265 - 9382 208 N 4th Ave Sandpoint, ID

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2011 SHS CEDAR POST FROM THE SHS CEDAR POST

AME

nd ld

34

Q & A: with dr. becky meyer

curve Sandpoint Urban Renewal Agency in designing the project. The design challenge for those working on the project has been to blend community desires with state and federal design policies. ITD prefers wider lanes, whereas the City of Sandpoint has requested narrower lanes to shorten pedestrian crossing distances and to help calm traffic. How the project will affect community livability is also a major consideration, so visual appeal and how bicyclists and pedestrians can be accommodated are being considered as well as smooth traffic flow. SURA representative Eric Paull is quoted in a recent SURA press release as stating, “There is no perfect solution, and the consultants are trying to strike a balance between highway through-put and community needs.” Van Dyk noted that the consultant in charge of the design of the project has

in November, feels that this ordinance would improve the driving conditions in Sandpoint and decrease the number of deaths, injuries and accidents. Current Mayor, Gretchen Hellar agrees that “texting while driving blatant disregard for the safety of our friends, families and neighbors” however she does not feel that this particular situation requires an ordinance. “If there should be a texting law,” she said, “it should be statewide.” This item will be on the next council agenda for its third reading. If passed there will be a ninety day grace period before it comes into effect. This council meeting will be held on Sept. 21 in the council chambers. The meeting will be called to order at 5:30 PM and will be open to the public.

Q and A with Dr. Meyer, Sandpoint High School Principle

SHS

Article by Tyson Bird

E

ntering her sixth year as Sandpoint High School principal, Dr. Becky Meyer has seen many changing policies, attitudes, and students come through Sandpoint High. As the 2011-12 school year kicks off, Dr. Meyer shares her thoughts on the year ahead and provides insight to the SHS student population. For students, perhaps the largest change in the coming year is the addition of the 38-minute multipurpose ‘Access’ time period, in which students can catch up on work, meet with teachers, or participate in other clubs and activities. Building on the path left by the previous Response to Intervention (RtI) mandates, the SHS Administration is confident that Access will be a benefit to all students. Q: What are you looking forward to the most in this coming school year? A: I am excited that this year students will have an incentive and a motivation to follow SHS expectations. Even students who are academically unmotivated can get the help they need to succeed during the new Access Your Potential time period. Sandpoint High School now has a way to give support to students who both want AND need it. Q: Access Your Potential (AYP or Access for short) is new this year. Since the Cedar Post previously reported on it, has anything changed? A: The schedule is now final, and the Administration has assigned students to Access classes, purposefully creating a good mix of the types of students, and also ensuring that teachers of math and english did not have too many students, because they would be helping others. Q: Are there tools in place to monitor the success of Access? If so, what will happen if success is not found? A: Our first indicator of the success of Access

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will come in the form of progress reports and report cards. SHS has a total of eight times that grades are finalized, and we will hope to see in increase in student performance. The second indicator will be teacher feedback. he Administration is expecting there to be some bugs and things to work through in the first year, but we hope that as Access is implemented more fully, the ultimate goal of students wanting to get help will be achieved. Q: How does 2011-12 enrollment compare to previous years? A: At this point, the numbers are about the same, but every year we gain about 100 students in the fall. Throughout the course of the year, this number changes as students move to online schools, charter schools, or out of Sandpoint. I expect the enrollment to be pretty much the same, though. THANK YOU to our sponsors for supporting the Sandpoint High School Cedar Post: Advocate Insurance LEFTYS Dual Throttle Control Selkirk Chiropractic Zany Zebra Sun Rental Hydra Restaurant 2nd Wind Fitness Skeleton Key Art Glass Walmart Vision Center Dominos Pizza Rokstad Ford Klondyke Cafe Les Schwab North Idaho Lock & Key Dairy Depot Panhandle State Bank

tyson bird // p. 12

31‘

Q & A with Dr. Becky Meyer Entering her sixth year as Sandpoint High School principal, Dr. Becky Meyer has seen many changing policies, attitudes, and students come through Sandpoint High. As the 2011-12 school year kicks off, Dr. Meyer shares her thoughts on the year ahead and provides insight to the SHS student population. For students, perhaps the

Q.

largest change in the coming year is the addition of the 38-minute multipurpose ‘Access’ time period, in which students can catch up on work, meet with teachers, or participate in other clubs and activities. Building on the path left by the previous Response to Intervention (RtI) mandates, the SHS Administration is confident that Access will be a benefit to all students.

Last year’s ‘catch phrase’ for the year was “212- increasing your potential one extra degree”. Does the Administration have anything in mind for this year’s motto?

Nothing final yet. We are considering something that combines our relatively short mission statement with our other SHS motto from few years ago: Unleash Your Potential. This year we are really focused on building community and spirit, so the motto will likely involve building a community at Sandpoint High.

Q.

What are you looking forward to the most in this coming school year?

I am excited that this year students will have an incentive and a motivation to follow SHS expectations. Even students who are academically unmotivated can get the help they need to succeed during the new Access Your Potential time period. Sandpoint High School now has a way to give support to students who both want AND need it.

.A

.A

Cedar Post Editor-in-Chief Mackenzie Jones

Finance Manager Nichole Pagano

News Editor Molly Rickard

Advertising Manager Allyson Armstrong

Opinion Editor Maria Guida

Staff Writers George Wood Paula Reed Arts & Culture Editor Katie Gustafson Brooke Obaitek Jenna Faude Nick Nelson Sports Editor Kristin McPeek Bill Meyers Photographers Photo Editor Brooke Rockholm Savannah Pitts Dylan Vogel Adviser Graphics Editor Andy Meyer William love Sandpoint High School Web Editor Tyson Bird 410 South Division Sandpoint, Idaho 83864 Copy Editor 208.263.3034 Kelsey Anderson shscedarpost@gmail.com

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SANDPOINT NEWSLINE

18

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2011 SANDPOINT NEWSLINE

This became an annual article that I wrote for the Cedar Post. The questions varied from year to year but my approach was essentially the same.

Q.

Are there tools in place to monitor the success of Access? If so, what will happen if success is not found?

Our first indicator of the success of Access will come in the form of progress reports and report cards. SHS has a total of eight times that grades are finalized, and we will hope to see in increase in student performance. The second indictor will be teacher feedback. The Administration is expecting there to be some bugs and things to work through in the first year, but we hope that as Access is implemented more fully, the ultimate goal of students wanting to get help will be achieved.

Q.

What would you say to a senior about to enter their last year at SHS?

Don’t get ‘senioritis’. Take advantage of opportunity while you can, because this is your last year for free education and fun. Enjoy your last moments of your youth, and enjoy your community. Relish this last year before everything changes.

.A

.A


‘13

tyson bird // p. 13

WRITING

Prime-time for a sandwich sign Albertson finds new ways to reach students In a place as crowded and chaotic as the commons, getting a message out effectively to the hundreds of stu- dents eating lunch can be a daunting task. Activities and athletics director Tom Albertson has been trying out a new way to reach students this year through the use of a sandwich sign hanging from his neck. The sign serves as a passive announcement to students in the commons reminding them to keep the tables clean, adver- tise an upcoming event, or give posi- tive messages about Sandpoint High School. “I originally started wearing the sign as a way to get kids to clean up their lunch tables when they were finished eating,” said Albertson. “I saw kids notice the sign and give me a thumbs-up, which showed that the signs were effective.” Though the administration is posi- tive about the influence of the sand- wich signs, some students and other staff members think the sign may not be the real reason things are staying cleaner in the commons. Head cus- todian Kathy Robison feels that the signs may be helping the mess in the commons, but she is not sure of the extent of their usefulness. “I have noticed a difference in how clean the commons is this year, but whether that is just because of Mr. Albertson’s sign is

hard to tell,” Robison said. “I think just the presence of administrators like Mr. Albert- son, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Miles and Dr. Meyer help to keep kids behaving in the commons. Regardless, it is a big improvement from previous years,” said Robison. Some find the signs to be more of a joke than a helpful reminder and doubt their effectiveness. Freshman Emily McKay believes that the signs aren’t having any impact on the be- havior of students in the commons. “He’s wearing a funny-looking sign in a room full of high school kids. Even if people do pay at- tention to what it says, I don’t think they are really going to take it to heart,” said McKay. Albertson plans to continue wearing the sign and hopes it will continue to serve as an effective non-verbal announcement. He encourages clubs or activities to submit school-appropriate messages to Beth Dean and her assistants, and they will get the notice onto his sign. “My colleagues might like to make fun of me for it, but I think it is an effective way to advertise. It’s nice to avoid going around talking to each table and giving reminders.” said Albertson.

Page 2

October 2011

Homework Overload?

Study shows too much homework can be detrimental to students

SAVANNAH PITTS | PHOTOGRAPHER

Kelsey Anderson Copy Editor

I

t’s 10 p.m. on a Tuesday night. Having just rounded off your fourth hour of homework, you look desperately at an English book waiting to be analyzed. As you resentfully reach for it, your eyes drooping and your brain throbbing in your skull, you begin to ask yourself, “What’s the point?” Don’t worry — you’re not alone. This question is asked daily by students across the country who find themselves overwhelmed by the heavy workload imposed upon them. According to a study by the American Psycho-

25%

logical Association, today’s students report more anxiety than child psychiatric patients did in the 1950s. “I start on my homework when I get home at four and work until 11 at night,” junior Kaitlin Miller said. “I feel stressed out with AP History and Algebra II Honors, but the other classes aren’t too bad. Some classes just require more work, but that’s what you sign up for.” So how do U.S. students compare to their international peers? In countries with students scoring highest on achievement tests, such as Japan, Denmark, and the Czech Republic, teachers generally assign little homework. Countries with the lowest averages, such as Thailand, Greece, and Iran, tend

C

of parents believe excessive homework infrindges on family time

the alendar:

ASVAB Testing Date End of Qtr 1- Non Student Day

5 SAT Testing Date 7

Visit from a Montana State University

Conference9 1Parent/Teacher Hour Early Release

minutes per grade level per night rule (excluding Fridays) for homework. If that was the case a freshman could expect 90 minutes of work; for seniors, a maximum of two hours. With each student having a unique schedule, maintaining such a limit would be difficult. It would require a lot of inter-teacher communication, and a timetable would have to be tailored individually to each student. “I’ve heard of the 10 minute rule,” teacher Mary Bird said, “I think we may have had a school policy in the past, but I’m not sure if it’s still in affect. I just try to take into consideration that other teachers assign work, too. But overall, I don’t believe that students here get too much homework.”

1/4

of students use their parents help on homework when overloaded Statistics from University of Nebraska study

Prime-time for a sandwich sign Albertson finds new ways to reach students Tyson Bird Web Editor In a place as crowded and chaotic as the commons, getting a message out effectively to the hundreds of students eating lunch can be a daunting task. Activities and athletics director Tom Albertson has been trying out a new way to reach students this year through the use of a sandwich sign hanging from his neck. The sign serves as a passive announcement to students in the commons reminding them to keep the tables clean, advertise an upcoming event, or give positive messages about Sandpoint High School. “I originally started wearing the sign as a way to get kids to clean up their lunch tables when they were finished eating,” said Albertson. “I saw kids notice the sign and give me

a thumbs-up, which showed that the signs were effective.” Though the administration is positive about the influence of the sandwich signs, some students and other staff members think the sign may not be the real reason things are staying cleaner in the commons. Head custodian Kathy Robison feels that the signs may be helping the mess in the commons, but she is not sure of the extent of their usefulness. “I have noticed a difference in how clean the commons is this year, but whether that is just because of Mr. Albertson’s sign is hard to tell.” said Robison “I think just the presence of administrators like Mr. Albertson, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Miles and Dr. Meyer help to keep kids behaving in the commons. Regardless, it is a big improvement from previous years,” said Robison. Some find the signs to be more of a joke than a helpful reminder and

doubt their effectiveness. Freshman Emily McKay believes that the signs aren’t having any impact on the behavior of students in the commons. “He’s wearing a funny-looking sign in a room full of high school kids. Even if people do pay attention to what it says, I don’t think they are really going to take it to heart,” said McKay. Albertson plans to continue wearing the sign and hopes it will continue to serve as an effective non-verbal announcement. He encourages clubs or activities to submit school-appropriate messages to Beth Dean and her assistants, and they will get the notice onto his sign. “My colleagues might like to make fun of me for it, but I think it is an effective way to advertise. It’s nice to avoid going around talking to each table and giving reminders.” said Albertson. SAVANNAH PITTS| PHOTOGRAPHER

10

Parent/Teacher ConferenceNon Student Day

11

Professional Workday — Non Student Day

from Gonzaga University and 15 Visit Pacific University

23

10

minutes times your grade level is a healthy limit on homework

hours of homework has no impact on a student’s oerformance

Important dates to remember

November 4

2+

to have it piled on. “In Thailand, I study much harder,” exchange student Pin Boontara said, “I don’t have much free time. I have to work [on homework] once I get home, unless I finish it in school.” American students do just as much homework, if not more, yet achievement scores remain around the global average. All that hard work isn’t always for nothing, however. A review of over 120 studies by Duke University found that performance moderately improves for high school students who work on homework for up to two hours a night. But after two hours, scores actually begin to drop. A Duke University professor recommends 10

1-Hour Early Release

24 Thanksgiving Break Begins

‘Occupy’ movement now local

Students join national protest against corporate greed Paula Reed Staff Writer Around the beginning of October, home-schooled senior Josh Johnson heard about the national and international movement called Occupy Together. He grew interested and began looking into the movement and engaging his family and friends to join. Deciding he would like to create an Occupy Sandpoint, he registered on the Occupy Together website to have a meeting at Farmin Park.

Two days later 51 people met to begin organizing for the Occupy Sandpoint community. At the second meeting there were around 150 people, showing the strength in numbers principle that the Occupy Together movement employs. Among the wide vaLucas riety of people to show up were four Sandpoint High School students, and several alumni. The group introduced them-

selves and took turns voicing their opinions and what they hope to achieve, which is one of the main features of the movement: the ability for everyone to have a voice without overpowering each other or having one definite McCoy allegiance to political parties or viewpoint. “I feel like there isn’t equality anymore, that there is too much greed in corporate America,” senior Lucas McCoy

said. Student involvement highlights the representation of the “99 percent”, which is the slogan of Occupy Together, pointing out the growing disparity between the wealthy one percent of people who have more money than the 99 percent combined. One major reason for the movement is a general discontentment with the failing national economy and corporations influencing government. For more information check out “Occupy Sandpoint” on Facebook.

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PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2011 SHS CEDAR POST

This was one of the most fun pieces I’ve ever written. The subject was a little sandwich board the assistant principal was wearing, and student perspectives were entertaining. It also is representative of my early work.


WRITING Page 3

April 2012

the age of nostalgia Brooke Rockholm Photographer

A

s minutes tick away from our teenage years, I can’t help but to think about my childhood. With graduation so soon, I find myself wanting to go back to my years of carefree living. I wish that I could go back to relive the time in which the worst thing I could imagine was a scraped knee. As I grow older, I am determined to remember that I am still that little child somewhere inside of me.

Photographer Brooke Rockholm reflects on the innocence of the past and hopes to always remember the subtle impact of simpler times.

The Kony 2012 Scam: Do your research, learn a valuable lesson

W

e’ve all been taught not to believe Tyson Bird everything we read on the internet. But what about the things we see? Lately, I have watched some of my closest Facebook friends and fellow students fall victim to something that I will gladly label a scam. Jason Russel and his “notfor-profit” organization Invisible Children have been taking advantage of social media and Internet press to spread the word for a cause dubbed “Kony 2012”. Though I think it is fantastic that a movement like this has taken

hold, the emotional backing should be put toward something that really needs support-not a California filmmaker taking a personal salary of over $90,000 per year. There is a difference between emotion and reason. Watching the 30 minute video titled ‘Kony 2012’ makes an incredibly emotional appeal to viewers. Yes, Kony and his organization is terrible and should be stopped. However, there are facts that are notably absent from Invisible Children’s video. First

Teach us something we need to know

Brian Millar

M

}

Kony and the LRA has turned into soldiers has dropped 80% since the organization first began taking over Africa. The 30,000 children the video states the LRA organization has represents the number of children abducted during 25 years of the organization. If you want to continue to support the Invisible Children, just remember that for every dollar of the money you give to buy posters or T-shirts to raise awareness, only 32 cents will ever make it even close to Africa. As for me, I’ll find an organization that gives money and support to something that truly needs help - not just the guilt of millions of tech-savvy Americans.

VIEW our

The Editors’ colloquy

odern eduwill be more successful cation push- in life because of their es everyone experience. to be at the same level After middle school, rather than focusing on students should be able what the student excels to decide what career in. We all want students area they are interested in to get a well-rounded and study classes based education. However, that on that area. This is a approach to education trend that has already may hinder their abilities picked up in Europe. The in other aspects of students will gain experischool. ence, Students are taught makThe reason that they need to reach the ing it being same achievement bar as benis that eficial their peers. modand ern less educational standards say stressful in college, that a teacher is doing because you will have a well when their students greater understanding have all reached the same of what you are studylevel. ing. By shifting its course Students are taught more towards a tradethat they need to reach school-type training, the same achievethen education might ment bar as their peers. also see student particiHowever, forcing them pation and performance to do so can potentially greatly increase because extinguish creativity. If students will be studying we focused on harnessing something that they are what students do well in interested in, and rather (what they do well in is than wasting time on most likely the path that classes that they don’t feel they will pursue after apply to them. high school) then they

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of all, the United States has not done nothing to stop this. Since September 11, 2001, the United States has recognized the Lord’s Resistance Army (Kony’s organization) as a terrorist group. In November of 2008, President George Bush signed a directive to provide financial and logistical assistance to the Ugandan government. In May of 2010, President Barack Obama signed into law the LRA Disarmament and Northern Uganda Recovery Act that is directly aimed at stopping Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army. Also, the number of children that

The Cedar Post Editors have embraced local changes

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any of us have grown up in Sandpoint our whole lives, or at least a fair enough amount of time to truly call it home. We have made attachments to cute downtown Sandpoint, scenic views, and those secret romantic spots in the woods that you share with only the best of the best. Whatever memories you have made here, this town is where the heart is. And we don’t like changes. Naturally, we don’t want anyone coming in and changing up the scenery when we are otherwise comfortable. But we are kids growing up, and sometimes, we need a reality check. The Sand Creek arch, the Bypass and other small (and big) changes have come to the humble city of Sandpoint. Many mixed feelings have been shared about the fresh additions, and many are completely disapproving. It seems that no matter how these things may enhance the area, people are just plain stubborn. But we should

disapproving and pessimistic will only embrace these changes! Instead of focushold you back as we are advancing and ing on how the way it used to be, why not becoming, in reality, a very, very cool think about how new memories can be place to live. made. Don’t worry about the future of this The changes have only increased the place; the downbeauty, town will still be artsy the cute organic vibe area it always and was. Those sceoverall nic views won’t quality change, seeing of the as the lake still city to holds all its visitors, glory. And those so try secret spots in seeing the woods will it from still be there a newZACH ENVIK & NICHOLE PAGANO | CARTOONISTS when you need comer’s the experience, for everywhere we look we perspective. Look around and appreciate see beautiful greenery. A little sprucing up that we are being treated to this remodel. can’t hurt anyone, and you’re memories This is still good ole’ Sandpoint, just one are still forever safe in Sandpoint. that is growing up, just as we are. Being

INTERESTED IN BEING PART OF THE CEDAR POST CREW? APPLY NOW! who: you when: by may 4th where: room E8 why: to join the party how: pick up an application

Zach dreams big...

Zach is proactive...

Zach is successful!

Cedar Post editorial policy Photo Editor

dylan vogel Editor-in-Chief

macKenzie Jones News Editor

molly ricKard Opinion Editor

maria guida

Arts & Culture Editor

Jenna Faude

Asst. Arts & Culture Editor

Katie gustaFson Sports Editor

Bill meyers

Graphics Editor

andy meyer Web Editor

tyson Bird

Staff Writers

george Wood Paula reed BrooKe oBaiteK

Copy Editor

nicK nelson

Finance Manager

cole Kennelly

Kelsey anderson Nichole Pagano Advertising Manager

allyson armstrong

Ben dreier Brian millar

Photographers

BrooKe rocKholm savannah Pitts Kristin mcPeeK Cartoonist

zach enviK Adviser

William love

The Cedar Post is governed by the same legal rights as the professional press. Under the First Amendment, we reserve the right to free expression and freedom of the press. The student newspaper of Sandpoint High School is an open public forum for the students of Sandpoint High School and the community of Sandpoint, Idaho, with its editorial board making all decisions concerning its contents; it is not subject to prior review by administration, faculty, or community members. Unsigned editorials express the views of the majority of the editorial board. Letters to the editor must be signed, although the staff may withhold the name upon request. The paper reserves the right to edit letters for grammar and clarity, and all letters are subject to law governing obscenity, libel, privacy and disruption of the school process, as are all contents for the paper. Opinions in letters are not necessarily those of the staff, nor should an opinion expressed in a public forum be construed as opinion or policy of the administration, unless so attributed.

The CP strongly encourages you to voice your opinion through the student paper. E-mail your letter or bring it by E8.

PUBLISHED APRIL 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

As an assignment once, everyone was required to write an opinion piece. This ended up being my first published opinion work and I enjoyed this different type of writing, though the majority of my written pieces are news.

tyson bird // p. 14

31‘

The Kony 2012 scam Do your research, learn a valuable lesson We’ve all been taught not to believe everything we read on the internet. But what about the things we see? Lately, I have watched some of my closest Facebook friends and fellow students fall victim to something that I will gladly label a scam. Jason Russel and his “not-for-profit” organization Invisible Children have been taking advantage of social media and Internet press to spread the word for a cause dubbed “Kony 2012”. Though I think it is fantastic that a movement like this has taken hold, the emotional backing should be put toward something that really needs support-- not a California filmmaker taking a personal salary of over $90,000 per year. There is a difference between emotion and reason. Watching the 30 minute video titled ‘Kony 2012’ makes an incredibly emotional appeal to viewers. Yes, Kony and his organization is terrible and should be stopped. However, there are facts that are notably absent from Invisible Children’s video. First of all, the United States has not done nothing to stop this. Since September 11, 2001, the United States has recognized

the Lord’s Resistance Army (Kony’s organization) as a terrorist group. In November of 2008, President George Bush signed a directive to provide financial and logistical assistance to the Ugandan government. In May of 2010, President Barack Obama signed into law the LRA Disarmament and Northern Uganda Recovery Act that is directly aimed at stopping Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army. Also, the number of children that Kony and the LRA has turned into soldiers has dropped 80% since the organization first began taking over Africa. The 30,000 children the video states the LRA organization has represents the number of children abducted during 25 years of the organization. If you want to continue to support the Invisible Children, just remember that for every dollar of the money you give to buy posters or T-shirts to raise awareness, only 32 cents will ever make it even close to Africa. As for me, I’ll find an organization that gives money and support to something that truly needs help - not just the guilt of millions of tech-savvy Americans.


‘13

tyson bird // p. 15

WRITING

Abolitionist Society of North Idaho presents ‘Front Line Project’ on street in front of SHS As students and staff returned to school from winter break, they were met with more than the standard back-to-school routine. The Abolitionist Society of North Idaho, a chapter of the national organization Abolish Human Abortion or AHA, stood at the intersection of Division and Michigan Street holding signs opposing abortion as a part of what they call the “Front Line Project”, essentially “a propaganda campaign...making people aware of who we are and getting information into their hands,” co-director Scott Herndon said. Herndon and his friend Jeremiah Smedra began the Abolitionist Society of North Idaho a little over a year ago, after learning about the national AHA group which is based in Norman, Oklahoma. Herndon and Smedra were initially inspired by their Christian faith to bring a movement like this to Sandpoint, though abortion was not their main focus. “Both [ Jeremiah] and I would tell you that we had no heart for abortions specifically,” Herndon said. “I did years ago...but I never saw anybody who was bringing the Gospel into the equation.” Herndon described AHA as having a “common approach using the Bible to the subject of abortion”, and emphasized that AHA is not a national controller but rather a “tightly-knit” collection of active abolitionists all across the United States. “There is no organizational control at all,” Herndon said. “There’s probably less than a thousand active abolitionists in the country.” The group refers to themselves as abolitionists because they reference the American abolitionist movement and their tac-

tics to change public opinion on slavery. “In order to turn public opinion, you have to create media, essentially. Images do that, writing does that,” Herndon said. One of the most controversial details of the group’s presence in front of the high school has been their use of graphic imagery, including pictures of aborted fetuses. “I was very angry because that’s not an appropriate thing to have at school,” sophomore Katelyn Bruhjell said. “That’s very opinionated, it’s a religious issue, they took some feminist lines, and I’m very upset about that.” However, Herndon emphasized that graphic imagery is only one part of the campaign they are displaying. “Our real opinion on the graphic imagery is it won’t change opinion on abortion,” Herndon said. “The reality is that our goal is to agitate the culture. It’s actually to shock people out of their current comfort zone and spark a dialog and debate.” SHS principal Becky Meyer said the school has received numerous complaints about the graphicness of the display on the street. One citizen referred to the signs as “really inappropriate”, especially for middle school students who are potentially as young as 12. Though some are offended by the imagery, others feel that the images are no different than other media that students see on TV, the internet, or elsewhere. “I think that high schoolers and middle schoolers can deal with those graphics and that type of thing, especially with what we choose to watch and what we choose to see,” senior Katie Mares said. “We have to be tolerant...because people are going to have their opinions, and if you don’t be-

PUBLISHED JANUARY 2014 SHS CEDAR POST

AWARDED HONORABLE MENTION NEWS STORY BALL STATE UNIVERSITY MONTHLY CONTESTS

This piece was incredibly controversial, as an anti-abortion group was protesting outside the school. I took pictures and wrote the story, which was published that night on the Cedar Post website. It was later re-run on the news page.


2 FEBRUARY 2014

Sick at school Local officials weigh in on impact of flu Alicia Walker Staff Member

The number of states reporting widespread influenza has only grown, and is now classified as widespread in a total of 41 states, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly flu report last Friday. "Widespread" means that more than 50 percent of geographic regions in a state -- counties, for example -- are reporting flu activity. Health care officials have said this years flu has been relatively typical in comparison to last years strain, which was categorized as severe. According to local physician Scott Dunn, there have been 12 confirmed cases of Swine Flu in Sandpoint, but there are most likely many more unconfirmed cases. Officials from The Panhandle Health District Epidemiology Center said that as of right now, the percentage of positive flu tests has declined in the last few years. Although the numbers are declining, the flu season is not over yet, so there is no way to be sure. The CDC reports that the only irregular thing seen this year is that H1N1 (Swine Flu) is the most common virus this season. The best way to prevent the flu is to get a vaccine. It is recommended to get vaccinated as soon as the vaccination comes out in early October. However, the virus is still circulating, so it is encouraged to go in and get vaccinated. Junior Taylor Martin said “Being sick made it hard for me to do any activities at all including volleyball, and it also made it hard to keep up with my school work. I found myself laying in bed all day not being able to move without aching or increasing my temperature.” It is crucial to wash your hands often and disinfect surfaces in your home. It is also important to avoid touching your eyes and mouth as well as keeping any open wounds covered.

WRITING Sandpoint community review Idaho Rural Partnership surveys students, citizens to improve city

Bryce Lambert Staff Member

With a review completed by the Idaho Rural Partnership, Sandpoint’s best and worst aspects are laid out for all to see. The review was submitted through an application in order for Sandpoint to gain “many positive changes [to come] in the future” said Kate McAllister, CEO of the Greater Sandpoint

Chamber of Commerce. The review consists of three main areas: economic development, downtown revitalization, and sustainability. Along with these three focus topics, the review had a community survey and some listening sessions. Each listening session based the main topic on what community members do and do not want in the future for the city of Sandpoint.

Many of the aspects that community members would like to continue in the future were also marked as positive aspects by the review board. The study emphasized a few key areas, including protection of the water quality with the lake and the river, developing higher education and workforce training, as well as the positive support of locally produced

foods. However, there is also room for improvement according to the review team and citizens of Sandpoint. These include, improving the energy and operating efficiency of buildings, reducing waste, and creating a dynamic, year ‘round downtown for both residents and visitors. All of which were surveyed, discussed, and

voted on in order to give a base idea of what Sandpoint should expect in the future. Not to mention that numerous ideas were also expanded upon to give a deeper look into how each will affect the community. Overall, the review of Sandpoint by the Idaho Rural Partnership provided a neutral insight to just what the city and community await.

Abolition group continues originally published on shscedarpost.com

‘Abolish Human Abortion’ group an ongoing presence Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

The Abolitionist Society of North Idaho, a chapter of the national organization Abolish Human Abortion or AHA, stood at the intersection of Division and Michigan Street numerous times during the month of January. The group held signs opposing abortion as a part of what they call “a propaganda campaign...making people aware of who we are and getting information into their hands,” co-director Scott Herndon said. Herndon and his friend Jeremiah Smedra began the Abolitionist Society of North Idaho a little over a year ago, after learning about the national AHA group which is based in Norman, Oklahoma. Herndon and Smedra connected to the organization because of their use of the Gospel. The group refers to themselves as abolitionists because they reference the American abolitionist movement and

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

n ROADSIDE RALLY: A young member of the Abolish Human Abortion group stands in front of the driveway to Sandpoint High School and Middle School. Some citizens were concerned by the graphic imagery associated with the signs.

their tactics to change public opinion on slavery. “In order to turn public opinion, you have to create media, essentially. Images do that, writing does that,” Herndon said. One of the most controversial details of the group’s presence in front of the high school has been their use of graphic imagery, including pictures of aborted fetuses. “I was very angry because that’s not an appropriate thing to have at school,” sophomore Katelyn Bruhjell said. “That’s very opinionated, it’s a religious issue, they

took some feminist lines, and I’m very upset about that.” However, Herndon emphasized that graphic imagery is only one part of the campaign they are displaying. “Our real opinion on the graphic imagery is it won’t change opinion on abortion,” Herndon said. “The reality is that our goal is to agitate the culture. It’s actually to shock people out of their current comfort zone and spark a dialog and debate.” SHS principal Becky Meyer said the school has received numerous

complaints about the graphicness of the display on the street. One citizen referred to the signs as “really inappropriate”, especially for middle school students who are potentially as young as 12. Though some are offended by the imagery, others feel that the images are no different than other media that students see on TV, the internet, or elsewhere. “I think that high schoolers and middle schoolers can deal with those graphics and that type of thing, especially with what we choose

to watch and what we choose to see,” senior Katie Mares said. “We have to be tolerant...because people are going to have their opinions, and if you don’t believe in it, it’s still there and you have to acknowledge it.” The group plans to continue their demonstration “a few more times” during the rest of the school year, especially during the month of February. “AHA as a collection of abolitionist societies have designated a few days in February to do this nationally,” Herndon said.

America lacking in education? New report ranks United States behind Asian, European countries Brighten Miller Web Director

According to NBC News, in the Fall of 2012 America participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) with dozens of other countries. The students were tested on math, reading and science, with these tests being based on a 1000 point scale. Overall, the Eastern Asian countries dominated and the U.S. trailed behind. U.S. students

scored 481 of 1000 on the math portion, China scored 613 out of 1000. In science, however, the U.S. scored 497 and China scored 580 which is a smaller gap between the scores. Mónica Olaso, a sophomore, is a foreign exchange student from Spain. “In Spain I have 11 subjects, and every day of the week has a different schedule. We cannot choose our classes.” says Olaso, “ You are always in the same classroom, the teachers come in for

one hour and then the next teacher comes in.”

exams, and if we do they are not hard.”

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GRAPHIC BY TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Olaso also stated how high school is easier here, “ We do not have many

In the reading portion, the U.S. scored 498 and China scored 570.

The PISA appears to indicate that the United States is further behind other countries in math. “Some of the other countries might only be showing the top 40 percent of their students, whereas the U.S. shows all of their students,” SHS math teacher Nachele Search said. Felice Caven, a freshman stated that we need a new way of teaching. “Out with the old and in with the new.”

502 N. Second Avenue

PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2014 SHS CEDAR POST

tyson bird // p. 16

31‘

Abolitionist, continued lieve in it, it’s still there and you have to acknowledge it.” The first amendment to the United States Constitution allows for the right to peaceably assemble, meaning that the group is not breaking any law or regulation by being on the public sidewalk in front of the school. The group purposely targeted this location near the school, mainly to share their message with teenagers but also to spread awareness in the Sandpoint community. “By the time people get to college, some of their views are more cemented...getting to people in high school is an opportunity to hopefully get some more open minds,” Herndon said. “As far as return on investment, you have a higher return on investment with the younger audience.” Not everyone agrees that this is the correct audience to target. “If their goal is to teach younger kids what their beliefs about this issue are, in my opinion they should work with families, because I think families are the ones who are responsible for teaching this to students,” Meyer said. “I don’t feel as though this is going to sway any high school students one way or the other to change their opinion.” Herndon admitted he didn’t know too much about the current practices for this type of education in public high schools, though said “what we [abolitionists] teach is generally very different from what they receive in public education.” The group plans to continue their demonstration “a few more times” at SHS during this second week in January, and also has plans to return in February. “AHA as a collection of abolitionist societies have designated a few days in February to do this nationally,” Herndon said. Both Meyer and Herndon encourage citizens or students with comments to

bring them to the attention of the Abolitionist Society of North Idaho, not Sandpoint High School. “I love it when people come up. If they disagree, if they support us, either way, I’d love to have a conversation,” Herndon said. “That’s my main goal, to have a conversation. If they don’t like what we’re doing, I would encourage them to engage us on the subject and we can have a dialog about it,” Herndon said. The Abolitionist Society of North Idaho can be reached on Facebook at facebook. com/AHANorthIdaho. The group also has a radio show on Sundays at 5pm on KYMS 89.9 “The Bridge”. More information about the national AHA organization is available at abolishumanabortion.com


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 17

‘13

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2011 SHS CEDAR POST Page 6

September 2011

Dearest freshmen, High school is great. I don't care what anyone tells you, so far learning experience and I know that as much as angsty teenagers it has been an awesome part of life. Of course, as with anything, it has its ups and downs protest, it is still a fun was the worst of my life, let me tell you. Junior year but now that I'm months away from the end of high school, I realize how much I've grown not only as a person but also as a student eager to learn as much as possible. I'll only give two tips right now on to the end with style. One, remembe how to get r all of the big moments. Whether you create a scrapbook, keep a journal, or make a bunch of YouTube videos; do something to record all of the good times. If you're not into all of that work, just make a bunch of CDs throughout the years. I guarantee that those songs will take you back in time faster than any journal, and they'll be a whole lot more fun 10 years from now. Two, take advantage of your free education while you can. Take as many classes as you can, discover your passions, and build off of those. I can't even begin to describe how important an education is to your future, so work hard now to be rewarded l a t e r . Your freshman year Dylan Vogel does matter three years down the road. Most of all, enjoy these years! You'll never get them back so much fun as possible and you pack them with as won't be looking back with regret! Sincerely, Jenna Faude

ause it’s Mainly bec but smirk! nce? Figure en, can’t help ice? Guida . . this. I . Dear freshm adv of nt rs wa and I mean vice? You . . . four yea burnt out, , not I. Ad Four years , dom, I’m U my friend ool is awful rds of wis rs for YO lie, high sch standing wo n’t out wo f o u r yea no I fer your life. be done. rself! I Of r years of g. Ready to it out you self worst fou my of everythin the ve ed ha be y Tir to . nt out lt, and I onl it is going really bur t’s my fau rds for it, through the really no wo w what? Tha at coasting there are , but you kno a master obligae a bit of ignments, was for me dates, ass I know it I’ve becom t I due , tha ies nk elligent, so ponsibilit d like to thi oss as int all major res to blame. I’ I come acr ough my ve shirked Yet thr I’ y. y . wa wa tem sys ve lied my r come my I’ eve education d. “Oh ve .’ car ha ted t time’ is corrup studies tha a waste of a thumb drive tions and system is can see my n stress as ‘education toppled upo les, as you can play the rry Mr. Mi and stress I regret e wasted, career. ‘So thing, and a Tim ool .’ an sch me rch h hig Mr. Sea self and they didn’t got my for like for I rs s ss use h these yea well I gue making exc it to you to fted throug t stopped . I leave result. I dri I had jus n better off 0, I wish ative ease would’ve bee ght’s 20/2 k with rel go here, I to sit bac i t . Hindsi e ngs ht it, abl thi y ng you can fig to the wa ury of bei with it, or ve the lux conformed want to go en you ha you shm if e fre your choic decide. As result. it’s the w, flo for rself d to the me but you and get use else to bla ve no one but you ha Sincerely, Dylan Vogel

Dylan Vogel

t ting, bu me, intimida eshman s, so Pretty Dear fr h school. other kid ng many time. Hig d whini It’s go boat as nd in be same lf ou se ar the ur on t yo rolling you’re and ge , stop about ringing, ck it up rrying wo clock is just su p rm are, e sto u’re ala y. Pleas ar. You ye da while yo st an fir eshm p tryr your your fr well sto ready fo little kid might as actually like a al. You learn to feeling ly norm shot. need to perfect me big le. You so it is being so s peop from f es of ay pr im aw you go ing to to keep . Or before trying th him urself out wi other is like yo ng br ha ur working y yo . Don’t it. Stop That gu d news ret ba about ll reg actually . You wi nk cares es thi you IS on u yo st let er ral oth person nded. Ju pty ha the seve ess the g an away em Stop spendin to impr to walk ce. the so hard e going into pla and by ll , ar fa u res ca you. Yo give. ionships e really t don’t of relat ir. No on t you jus and ha all kinds k like tha ce loo fa lize y your u rea when the rgirl ior, yo hour on ns ve jun me Co a eci of sp u are bucket cooler n’t time yo nerally ad in a And do are ge work. their he People dunked ish home it’s an sport; n’t just ur Span yo ur yo do the have th athlete , also, ing an Stick wi . Be ess. Oh . sn try u ar os ye gr ter. Yo gonome senior line tri non-quit g it to atake on proud g makin a combin I am, a e feelin reer is t here ed awesom chool ca s-induc t it, bu h-s es ge I hig str , your ks ments, is hard ntially, eat mo as brea it. Esse nts, gr Christm k can do d mome kups, a brea awkwar urself ns, brea Kat give yo tion of eakdow br Kit it s a mean nervou it’s not eaks. I if tears, br e en r ev ng on Kat ba choice, forgivi of un and Kit , py ra rce me the is a fie with so ahead t e road les, bu bar. Th ite pudd me defin ad on with so your he ep ke just straight.

Dearest freshmen, As you begin your long four year journey to somewhat success, I’m already four years ahead of you basking in the glory of knowing I only have nine months left in this “institute.” And yes, I could tell you to do your homework and listen to your parents … but that’s a l little cliche don’t you think? I’ll just tell you the straight honest truth. If you don’t do your homework you won’t pass. If you don’t pass yaou’re stuck in classes next year with kids you really don’t want to be with and you might get so lost in your dysfunction of failing that you may not be able to graduate. If you think ditching your friends for upperclassmen is cool, you’re wrong. You’re friends are the ones that will be walking with you through graduation so don’t screw it up. And don’t even begin to fathom that dating a senior boy is praiseworthy, sorry but you and I both know what’s going to happen and all us upperclassmen will say is “I told you so.” This is the beginning of the end, and you have the power to choose what sort of ending you want. I’ve been through it all, the older boyfriend, the senior friends who ditched me for college, losing some of my best friends since elementary school, and partying till it bit me in the butt. I barely pulled my you know what together in order to graduate while working the education system to pass tests. So why waste your time trying to play catch up while you could be ahead of the game and spend a little more time laughing with friends then stressing if you can even graduate? Which ever path you choose know that at the end of your four years you’ll be wishing you could have tried harder. So why don’t you try and stand out and be an individual and try your hardest from the start? Love always, Nichole Pagano

Student Special Large Slice of Pizza & Can of Soda $3 Mon-Fri 11am-4pm

The first page design I ever had published in the Cedar Post, this concept was a fresh take on “letters of advice” to incoming freshmen. The letters are actual pieces of paper with text placed on top of them for readability.


thursday, october 13 Freshmen Football 5:00 pm at memorial Warm up your spirit and cheers for tomorrow night’s varsity match r

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Friday, october 14 Club Carnival shs Front Lawn 3:00-5:30 pm Games, food, and fun put on by various SHS clubs. Relax, refuel, and refresh before the parade to the football game. homecoming parade after the Club Carnival March with fellow Bulldogs to Memorial Field from the Club Carnival. Show Lakeland what we’re made of. Varsity Football 7:00 pm at memorial Field The football game of football games. SHS battles Lakeland, Homecoming Royalty is revealed, and a halftime show by the band and dance team.

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8:30-11:00 pm at the sandpoint events Center Pre-sale tickets $12 for singles, $20 for couples; $15 for singles and $25 for couples at the door. Semi-formal, red and white theme.

saturday, october 15

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school-wide testing Freshmen take the EXPLORE, Sophomores take the PLAN, Juniors take the PSAT or ASVAB, Seniors go to Coldwater Creek for a business presentation.

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Class spirit t-shirts Purchase at the bookkeeper’s window for $13. Show class and school pride all week long!

monday, october 10

powderpuff practices 5:30-8:30 pm Seniors at the SMS field, Juniors at the track, Sophomores and Freshmen at Pine Street Field

tuesday, october 11

PhotoGraPhy By dylan voGel

October 2011

Page 8

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2014 SHS CEDAR POST

DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 18

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DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 19

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PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2011 SHS CEDAR POST Page 8

November 2011

Two student journalists, Paula Reed and Kristen McPeak, travel the town of Sandpoint in search for the best cup of joe. This is what they discovered:

Cafe Bodega

Evans Brothers What makes them special: Step into a cafe filled with organic coffees roasted right on site. Even check out studio 524 which offers art, clothing, and other creations. When: Monday through Friday 7-4, Saturday 8-2, Sunday closed Where: 524 Church Street Why you should go: Try not even coffee, but a taste of culture as well. Coffees come from places such as Kenya, Ethiopia, Costa Rica, and El Salvador, you can also see the beans roasted right on the spot.

Monarch Mountain

What makes them special: Most coffee places you find are an independent shop, but Cafe Bodega can be found walking through fosters crossing, an antique mall. When:Monday through Saturday 105:30, Sunday 11-4 Where: 504 Oak Street (inside Fosters Crossing) Why you should go: Cafe Bodega has unique treats such as sipping chocolate, a thick chocolate drink.

What makes them special: A take-abook-leave-a-book library and local music performances. When: Monday through Thursday 6:305:30, Friday and Saturdays late nights, Sunday 6:30-4:00 Where: 208 N Fourth Ave Why you should go: Coffee from all around the world is offered with local art, music, and baked goods that give off a homey atmosphere.

Cedar Street Bridge Cafe What makes them special: Organic coffees, and teas that go great with gelato. Cedar Street Cafe is the only place in the area that make their own gelato. When: Monday through Sunday 8-6 Where: Cedar Street Bridge Downtown Sandpoint Why you should go: Good coffee from Hayden Idaho, roasted in a Diedrich roaster from Ponderay Idaho, Taste local goodness while supporting the local economy

TYSON BIRD | GRAPHIC DESIGNER

TAKE A

HOUSE

STAND

FAVORITES

No time for a sit-down place? Try these drive-through stands for a quicker coffee fix!

Every cafe has a local favorite. Baristas let us in on what drink makes them stand out

Kessa’s Coffee

120 S. Division Avenue Monarch Mountain

Heavenly Latte

Geridelli Choclate Mocha

120 Cedar Street

Cedar Street Bridge

Monarch Mountain

Evans Brothers

Cafe Bodega

Crème Brûlée Latte

Gehridelli Choclate Mocha

Pour-Over Coffee/ Latte Art

Gelato Affogato

Java Junkies Espresso 624 North Fifth Avenue

Bongo Brew Hut

830 Kootenai Cut-Off Road

Rejavanate 1009 Highway 2

This is one of my all-time favorite page designs. I incorporated a variety of story telling devices, including the map, coffee photos, and listing of coffee stands. This was my first use of a clear, dominant design element.


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 20

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 2011 SHS CEDAR POST Page 6

]

[

make it

December 2011

friendship bracelet

With inexpensive materials and directions from the internet, it is easy to make a personalized bracelet for anyone on your list.

cookie plate

Roll up your sleeves and break out the mixer. Whipping up a batch of cookies (or a variety of snacks) is a great homemade gift.

How to Traumatize Your Children $11 on knockknock.biz Category: Humor Perfect for: Parents Part of the ‘Self-Hurt’ series, this illustrated manual contains important instructions for parents who want to learn the best ways to traumatize their children.

mix cd

Create a cd of your recipient’s known favorites or make a cd full of new tracks for them to try out! Simple, yet very thoughtful.

The ideal gift for skiers or snowboarders, a knit beanie is sure to keep heads warm, dry, and colorful all winter long. Knit beanies can be purchased on numerous websites, or can even be made by hand if you have the know-how and time.

[ ]

Fans of the computer and video game Portal will appreciate this plush version of this important game element. The cube measures 6 inches per side.

TYSON BIRD Web Editor

Here are some gift ideas for everyone on your list this holiday season. Although it’s the thought that counts, sometimes a little present helps too.

(or less)

Ninjabread Cookie Cutters $5.50 perpetualkid.com Category: Humor Perfect for: Everyone Forget the traditional gingerbread man, add some excitement to this year’s holiday baking with cookies in ninja shapes! Pack of 3 cookie cutters.

I was overall very pleased with this page, mostly because of the use of color. It doesn’t have a lot of content, but the blue color appears in multiple places and also works with the winter season in which this page was published.

Extremely comfortable and fashionable slip-on shoes that are available in various colors and designs for both men and women. Available locally at Finan McDonald or on various websites. Plus, for every pair of shoes purchased, Toms donates a pair of shoes to a child in need.

Star Lamp $30 at Zany Zebra Category: Functional Perfect for: Everyone Hang it in the corner of your bedroom, over your desk, or take it with you to college! This is the perfect addition to any stylish room in your house. Buy one or start a collection of the night sky!

Stanley Thermos $20 Wal-Mart Category: Useful Perfect for: All Keep hot liquids hot and cold liquids cold in this functional and vintage thermos. With a lid that also functions as a cup, the uses for this bottle never runs dry!

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? $15 on amazon.com Category: Humor Perfect for: Friends Toms Shoes $45-90 on toms.com Category: Fashion Perfect for: Everyone

Let your creativity and interior design flair flourish as you decorate a custom edible house for your friend or family member.

Knitted Ski Beanie $5.50 urbanoutfitters.com, various Sandpoint stores Category: Functional Fashion Perfect for: Everyone

FANTASTIC GIFTS FOR $50

Plush Weighted Companion Cube $30 on thinkgeek.com Category: Geeky Toys Perfect for: Everyone

gingerbread house

Mindy Kaling (The Office, Despicable Me) talks about what makes for good friends, maintaining the perfect amount of fame, and other lessons from her life. A light and humorous read for anyone on your list.

Toasted Coasters $14 on urbanoutfitters.com Category: Humor Perfect for: Everyone These fun coasters are sure to keep your drink toasty all winter long. Made from durable cork, these coasters will not only protect your furniture from drink rings, but will also add fun flair to any gathering. Set of 8.

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 21

‘13

PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2012 SHS CEDAR POST Page 8

February 2012 2012 Summer Olympics July 27August 12

Luna Legislation ‘Students Come First’ up for vote

Decision 2012 Republican candidates vs. Obama Sand Creek Bypass Scheduled for completion

Continued Revolutions Across the country and world End of the World? Conspiracy theorists prophesize

Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II 60 years on the throne

New Movies from classic books Google Products becoming more and more popular

Facebook Goes Public Expected soon in ‘12

• 2012 Movies and TV 2012 holds plans for film adaptations of several books, including “The Great Gatsby,” “The Lorax,” “The Hunger Games,” and “The Hobbit.” Several sequels are also slated for a 2012 release, including a fourth “Paranormal Activity,” “Men in Black III,” and “Step Up 4.” Television will see the end of the long-running dramatic series, “Desperate Housewives,” as well as others, and also the introduction of NBC’s “Smash” as well as ABC’s “GCB”. • 2012 Games Though no earth-shattering gaming systems are scheduled for a 2012 release, sequels of popular games will make their debut in the coming year. “Mass Effect 3”, “Halo 4”, “Assassin’s Creed III”, and “Guild Wars 2”, which is said to be the killer of virtual role-playing game “World of Warcraft”.

2012:

The year in preview Tyson Bird • Web Editor

“ to be a big year for Apple as well, with the anticipation of the iPad 3 and iPhone 5 sometime this year. • 2012 Sports 2012 is the year of the XXX Summer Olympics in London, England. The games will take place July 27 through August 12, with athletes from around the world competing in 302 various events in 26 sports. Super Bowl 2012 takes place Feb.5 with a re-match of the New York Giants and New England Patriots. • 2012 Politics 2012 is an election year in the United States, and several candidates are on the campaign trail working hard to rally against incumbent Barack Obama. Continuing with the trend of the 2011 ‘Arab Spring’, revolutions and political movements, it is expected that uprisings around the world and the United States will be the forefront of the media focus.

• 2012 Music In 2011, Adele, LMFAO, Katy Perry, Pitbull, Bruno Mars, Lady Gaga, and Nicki Minaj topped the Billboard charts. These artists and others are likely to be the hit-makers of the year yet again. It is likely that online music service Spo- • 2012: The End? For years, the media and Hollywood have fictionalized the tify will gain popularity in the coming year, as its United States fan base grows. end of the Mayan ‘Long-Count’ calendar that reaches its conclusion near Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Maya and modern-day conspirators have only predicted a cata• 2012 Technology Already, Facebook is making headlines in 2012 by announcing clysmic or transformative social event, many fear that the end of 2012 may be the their road map to becoming a public corporation, making all aspects of the popular so- end of human existence. 2011 generated media hype with the fear of ‘The Rapcial media site a product that they can ‘sell’ to investors. Google has already been making ture’, and though nothing became of this supposed apocalypse scenario, only time headlines as they introduced a new privacy policy that was created in the hopes of making will tell if 2012 truly is the end of the world. Regardless, planned events and predica more unified connection between their many products and services. 2012 is predicted tions have 2012 mapped out to be both an eventful and exciting year all around.

Post scriPt

I wanted to use photography on this page, though it was difficult because it was a preview of a year that hadn’t happened yet. I found images from the past that were symbolic of future predictions. I also liked the use of white space.


DESIGN PUBLISHED JUNE 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

Page 16

2 3 4 5

Feature

2012

inspirational seniors

TOPFIVE

1

tyson bird // p. 22

Kevin Hutchens

STAFFOPINION

“He’s got superior school spirit, is a great person, really cares, and makes it a great day to be a Bulldog!”

Ryan Schwartz

“Even though he has been through a lot this year, he keeps his grades up and follows through in all of his activities with grace and excellence.”

Cody Grover

Kevin - “He has a positive attitude ... Deep down he’s just a really good kid that looks for the best in people.” -Barb Oler Ryan - “He’s an amazing kid, considering what he’s been through... He’s second in the class!” -Patsy Sletager

6 Harry Pugesek

7 Chelsea Cable

8 Riley Hadeen

“He is a great friend and is super strong, even though he has been battling cancer.”

Cody - “I think he’s incredibly brave.” -Luera Holt

9 Emily Briggs

Emma Lee Bowman

“She is always happy and has an inspiring saying for any occasion... she can always raise my spirits when I’m down.”

Veronica Aispuro

“She’s the most beautiful, relentlessly sweet and happy lady I know.”

10

Emma Lee - “She’s a very resilient person, and she’s always smiling. She’s just a really hard worker.” -Deb Nusbaum

Adam Couch

Veronica - “Veronica’s always very positive and [is] a spirited person.” -David Miles

Holly McGarry

11 12 Paul Hill The Cedar Post polled government classes to collect data on the top 12 inspirational seniors of the Class of 2012. Those polled were asked to name the “one senior that sticks out in your mind as most inspiring, and your reasoning behind it.” BROOKE ROCKHOLM | PHOTOGRAPHER SAVANNAH PITTS | PHOTOGRAPHER

12

This was my first design of a tabloid-size page, which I did for the senior special edition of the Cedar Post. Though it was an anonymous survey, I wanted to have quotes on the page, so I decided to interview staff about the students.

2

3

4

5

GEORGE WOOD | STAFF WRITER TYSON BIRD | DESIGNER

31‘


Page 5

Spot light

October 2011

the

kristen McPeek Staff Writer

This year our school has the most full year foreign exchange students as opposed to a semester, with a total number of eight. The students are, Pong Boontara from Thailand, Felix Ehmke, Julia Schreier and Charlotte Luckner from Germany, Lauri Pesch from Belgium, Sofy Gordillo from Equador, Iago Zanetti from Brazil, and Paula Paños from Spain. “The exchange students love being a part of all things the school has to offer” said counselor Linda Sprinkle. Pong Boontara came to the U.S. because she has heard many things about it. She is most excited about skiing this winter, because she likes the colder weather. Another student interested in skiing is Felix Ehmke. He really likes the landscape of the mountains and lake in Sandpoint, because he doesn’t have much of that in Germany. The students came from all sorts of foreign exchange programs, but they all are interested in our culture. The new interact club will help the exchange students and SHS students, “form relationship platforms to know each other and get involved with the world,” said club administrator Erica Haynes. New experiences are what the kids are sure to gain. Paula Paños is most excited for Homecoming, Halloween, and possibly some tubing. She is looking to have fun because she heard that “a year in America is the best year of your life.”

Page 5

Spotlight

October 2011

photoS By Savannah pittS and BrooKe rocKholM

School Spirit

Staff Writer

This year our school has the most full year foreign exchange students as opposed to a semester, with a total number of eight. The students are, Pong Boontara from Thailand, Felix Ehmke, Julia Schreier and Charlotte Luckner from Germany, Lauri Pesch from Belgium, Sofy Gordillo from Equador, Iago Zanetti from Brazil, and Paula Paños from Spain. “The exchange students love being a part of all things the school has to offer” said counselor Linda Sprinkle. Pong Boontara came to the U.S. because she has heard many things about it. She is most excited about skiing this winter, because she likes the colder weather. Another student interested in skiing is Felix Ehmke. He really likes the landscape of the mountains and lake in Sandpoint, because he doesn’t have much of that in Germany. The students came from all sorts of foreign exchange programs, but they all are interested in our culture. The new interact club will help the exchange students and SHS students, “form relationship platforms to know each other and get involved with the world,” said club administrator Erica Haynes. New experiences are what the kids are sure to gain. Paula Paños is most excited for Homecoming, Halloween, and possibly some tubing. She is looking to have fun because she heard that “a year in America is the best year of your life.”

photo By dylan voGel / Graphic By tySon Bird

Two new classes add to arts at SHS

Artists-in-residence and glassblowing programs create artistic outlets

Paula reed Staff Writer

artists-in-residence

Five years ago Dr. Becky Meyer saw something stunning: a glass tile mosaic mural in the San Diego airport, which left a lasting impression. After some investigation, she found the $6,000 price tag to be too much for school funds to cover. Instead, she decided to use money from soda machines and parking tickets for the project. Collaboration with the Pend Oreille Arts Council lead to the appointment of art instructor Lynn

Guier to be the “artist-in-residence.” She will teach seven AP art students how to make a glass tile mosaic mural work as real life artists, create resumes, propose a design, and do commissioned public art. “I feel like this is an important chance we are being given and it will be a good challenge,” said participating senior, Breik Stockdale. Meyer’s hope for the mural is that it will contain the bulldog “unleashing its potential” and/or the slogan “It’s a great day to be a bulldog.” This huge school mural will be on the left wall of the foyer, and they hope to be done with it January 27.

photo By dylan voGel / Graphic By tySon Bird

Two new classes add to arts at SHS

Artists-in-residence and glassblowing programs create artistic outlets

Paula reed Staff Writer

artists-in-residence

Five years ago Dr. Becky Meyer saw something stunning: a glass tile mosaic mural in the San Diego airport, which left a lasting impression. After some investigation, she found the $6,000 price tag to be too much for school funds to cover. Instead, she decided to use money from soda machines and parking tickets for the project. Collaboration with the Pend Oreille Arts Council lead to the appointment of art instructor Lynn

Guier to be the “artist-in-residence.” She will teach seven AP art students how to make a glass tile mosaic mural work as real life artists, create resumes, propose a design, and do commissioned public art. “I feel like this is an important chance we are being given and it will be a good challenge,” said participating senior, Breik Stockdale. Meyer’s hope for the mural is that it will contain the bulldog “unleashing its potential” and/or the slogan “It’s a great day to be a bulldog.” This huge school mural will be on the left wall of the foyer, and they hope to be done with it January 27.

on

5

glassblowing

New teacher Zabrielle Dillon is now teaching one period of glassblowing. Dillon has been working with glass for 13 years and is now teaching the basic aspects of glassblowing, marketing the artwork and studio management. Glassblowing is a class rarely offered in high schools due to the expense of supplies and a studio. Dillon, however, is partnering with Pend d’Oreille Winery to recycle their used glass bottles. funding a portion of the class in exchange for students to make water glasses and tumblers out of the recycled wine bottles. Panhandle Alliance for Education is also helping with funds. Parts of the class will take place in Yogi Vasquez’s shop classroom. “I’m very excited for when the studio is ready for use and I know I will be able to make a lot of really cool things.” said junior Marina Vanderkarr. Dillon profusely thanks all of the contributors who have made this class possible, including the custodians. “Too many students aren’t excited to go to school, why can’t they find something that they love and are passionate about?”

photo By Savannah pittS

simple steps to:

n bLown away: Senior Buddy Chambers displays bits of blown glass.

by Maria Guida

BIG the

idea

Graphic and Story By Jenna Faude and Katie GuStaFSon

Here are some ideas the Cedar Post staff thinks are just great

reverse fashion

We are going back in time. People can’t believe we braved the 90’s and 2000’s era, complete with sweatshirts tied around waists, zipoff pants/shorts combos and fanny packs. We are realizing that true tactical fashion lies in the retro look. Vintage clothing, comfortable clothing, cheap clothing. I say we keep going back - imagine our school walking around in men‘s capris and long socks, flapper dresses, bow ties and bowler hats, all the way to Victorian style gowns. -Maria G.

4

Go to the Sasquatch Music Festival, pretend to love bands you have never even heard of, and be sure to advocate behavior that erases your memory of the whole $350 ordeal. Then post pictures on Facebook to annoy everyone else.

5

2

by Maria Guida

idea

Here are some ideas the Cedar Post staff thinks are just great

reverse fashion

We are going back in time. People can’t believe we braved the 90’s and 2000’s era, complete with sweatshirts tied around waists, zipoff pants/shorts combos and fanny packs. We are realizing that true tactical fashion lies in the retro look. Vintage clothing, comfortable clothing, cheap clothing. I say we keep going back - imagine our school walking around in men‘s capris and long socks, flapper dresses, bow ties and bowler hats, all the way to Victorian style gowns. -Maria G.

Puzz Packs As much fun as math and science are, we all know it’s easy to fall asleep. Some people are fortunate enough to find Puzz Pack on their graphing calculators. Although this may sound boring, anything is better than solving problems using the quadratic equation. Simply press the APPS button and scroll up until you reach Puzz Packs. Then you have four options of games for your math entertainment. So next time you’re drooling in your Pre-Calc or Physics class, just bust out some Puzz Packs. -Nichole P.

club hopping With a million new clubs to choose from this year, now is the perfect time to take advantage of all the creativity our school has to offer. Instead of settling for just one club, go to a new club each month. You will get a fun mixture of many different people and the diversity will make you feel less guilty about not committing. -Jenna F.

being a hipster

Hipsters according to Wikipedia: A contemporary subculture; characters who like “hot jazz.” Unfortunately, we can all say we have witnessed our share of fakers in Sandpoint.

1

4

Get some big squarish black glasses with no lens. If you’re pretty blind like me, use that as an excuse to get lenses and feel like less of a goof.

Go to the Sasquatch Music Festival, pretend to love bands you have never even heard of, and be sure to advocate behavior that erases your memory of the whole $350 ordeal. Then post pictures on Facebook to annoy everyone else.

5

2

Get a couple of sick shirts, preferably with either an extremely obnoxious pattern or some wolves howling at the moon. Tuck em’ in.

3

Act either super passionate or super passive. Either way you’re a liberal, right?

Get really defensive when someone calls you a hipster, because acknowledging the stereotype is never hip.

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

club hopping With a million new clubs to choose from this year, now is the perfect time to take advantage of all the creativity our school has to offer. Instead of settling for just one club, go to a new club each month. You will get a fun mixture of many different people and the diversity will make you feel less guilty about not committing. -Jenna F.

Get a couple of sick shirts, preferably with either an extremely obnoxious pattern or some wolves howling at the moon. Tuck em’ in.

Get really defensive when someone calls you a hipster, because acknowledging the stereotype is never hip.

photo By Savannah pittS

n bLown away: Senior Buddy Chambers displays bits of blown glass.

BIG

Puzz Packs

Hipsters according to Wikipedia: A contemporary subculture; characters who like “hot jazz.” Unfortunately, we can all say we have witnessed our share of fakers in Sandpoint. Get some big squarish black glasses with no lens. If you’re pretty blind like me, use that as an excuse to get lenses and feel like less of a goof.

5

glassblowing

New teacher Zabrielle Dillon is now teaching one period of glassblowing. Dillon has been working with glass for 13 years and is now teaching the basic aspects of glassblowing, marketing the artwork and studio management. Glassblowing is a class rarely offered in high schools due to the expense of supplies and a studio. Dillon, however, is partnering with Pend d’Oreille Winery to recycle their used glass bottles. funding a portion of the class in exchange for students to make water glasses and tumblers out of the recycled wine bottles. Panhandle Alliance for Education is also helping with funds. Parts of the class will take place in Yogi Vasquez’s shop classroom. “I’m very excited for when the studio is ready for use and I know I will be able to make a lot of really cool things.” said junior Marina Vanderkarr. Dillon profusely thanks all of the contributors who have made this class possible, including the custodians. “Too many students aren’t excited to go to school, why can’t they find something that they love and are passionate about?”

the

As much fun as math and science are, we all know it’s easy to fall asleep. Some people are fortunate enough to find Puzz Pack on their graphing calculators. Although this may sound boring, anything is better than solving problems using the quadratic equation. Simply press the APPS button and scroll up until you reach Puzz Packs. Then you have four options of games for your math entertainment. So next time you’re drooling in your Pre-Calc or Physics class, just bust out some Puzz Packs. -Nichole P.

being a hipster

1

October 2011

the

kristen McPeek

simple steps to:

lM

DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 23

‘13

3

Act either super passionate or super passive. Either way you’re a liberal, right?

For this photo illustration, the photographer and I took a group picture with each student holding a white piece of paper. I then used Photoshop to place the flag of their country in their hands.


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 24

0.1%

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL VOLUME 89, ISSUE 7 MARCH 2012

pacific islander theft at School

VOLUME 89, ISSUE 4

PAGE 2

Idaho to hawaII

PAGE 3

Experiencing ethnic

SHS

the

list

diversity

Best Albums

dancIng SISterS

0.2%

PAGE 7

black/african american

NOVEMBER 2011

0.8%

Need New Music? The Cedar Post staff asked one teacher and seven students what their all-time favorite albums are. Here are their responses.

asian

Exile on Mainstreet by The Rolling Stones From: Terry Christianson Science Teacher

1.3%

PHOTO BY DYLAN VOGEL | PHOTO EDITOR

n MuLTicuLTuRALiSM iN THE POiNT: Given the unvaried ethnic population in Sandpoint, minority students can often feel initially separate from the rest of the student body. However, many come to feel more acceptance than the region is otherwise known to offer.

Students share their personal experiences as a minority

Days by Real Estate

Paula Reed Staff Writer

From: Dylan Vogel Grade: Senior

21 by Adele

From: Abigail Nelson Grade: Sophomore

Megalithic Symphony by Awolnation

From: Chandler Brewington Grade: Freshman

Science & Faith by The Script From: Kendall Stratton Grade: Senior

Waking the Fallen by Avenged Sevenfold From: Nick Eckoff Grade: Junior

Sandpoint High School’s location has numerous benefits for its students: outdoor opportunities, family-like bonds, a quiet atmosphere. However, its remoteness does come at the cost of a severe lack of diversity in our schools. Sandpoint’s disproportionate ethnic makeup lends itself to a variety of experiences, both positive and negative, for minority students. Discrimination manifests in every form imaginable, from uninhibited abuse to off-color jokes and everything in between. In the most extreme cases, violent outbursts are not uncommon. Junior Kristina Gall was night skiing at Schweitzer with her mother when an inebriated stranger approached them. “She fell and a drunk guy came and kicked snow at her, called us ‘damn Japs’ and then threw his beer on us,” said Gall, who is of Korean descent. “We don’t go night skiing now.” Native American junior Daniel Tifft witnessed a substitute make racist comments while watching a historical video involving Native Americans. “I couldn’t believe he did that,” Tifft said. “It was not okay at all.” Even those who have come to feel comfortable in their environment may become the victims of intolerance. “I grew up in Sandpoint, so I never really had much trouble,” said Taiwanese senior Alina Terry. “But sophomore year

Sandpoint High School ethnicity demographics

native american

0.1%

pacific islander

1.7%

0.2%

black/african american

0.8% asian

1.3%

native american

1.7%

multiracial

multiracial

3.9%

hispanic/latino

91.9% white

national averages

3.9%

white - 52.9%

hispanic - 22.6% black/african american - 16.4% asian/pacific islander - 4.9% american indian/ alaskan native - 1.2%

hispanic/latino

GRAPHic BY TYSON BiRD | WEBSITE EDITOR

tion of 2012. Alumni too can utilize the website if they wish to catch up on the current high school In a persistent effort to provide the most news. timely news for the Sandpoint High School In collaborating, the Cedar Post staff student body, the Cedar Post is expanding has created this website which incorporates beyond print publications. We are available news from the newspaper and stories that on twitter, facebook and issuu. will not be available in our print publicaThe Cedar Post tions. website has been The Cedar dormant since Post plans to be2007. Ron Paul comes to Sandpoint gin updating the However, now website weekly, the Cedar Post website is back in full swing. and aspires to eventually transcend into The Cedar Post Website Editor, Tyson Bird daily updates. The Cedar Post website URL began constructing the website at the incep- is shscedarpost.com.

Mackenzie Jones Editor-in-Chief

This is Blue by Trevor Hall From: Jacelyn Lawson Grade: Sophomore

Online

twitter.com/ shscedarpost

shscedarpost.com

Endless Summer by G-Eazy From: Kristen Steiger Grade: Freshman

there was this kid in geometry who just wouldn’t leave me alone. Finally, I couldn’t take it.” Speech and Communications teacher Lisa Barton said this insensitivity may be attributed to the lack of exposure students in North Idaho have to diversity. Barton said that while most students appear interested in getting to know different people, the “novelty” of minorities in Sandpoint turns simple interactions into unknown territory guided only by preexisting stereotypes. Some ethnic students receive more negative attention compared to other minorities. Tifft notes that Hispanics appear to be discriminated against the most, perhaps due to the stigma which surrounds Hispanic culture in the United States. “My friends always crack jokes about it,” said Ecuadorian senior Yamil Tyler Ariss,.”Even I joke about being Spanish. I don’t mind unless its someone I don’t know,” Some students, however, note a positive difference in the way that Sandpoint as a whole treats them compared to other places they’ve lived. “I was actually really surprised when I came here from a larger town in Utah,” black junior Neisha Johnson said. “Even though there was much more diversity there, people directed rude racial slurs at me all time. But students here are pretty nice for the most part.” Although Sandpoint’s population is predominantly white, all the minority students who were interviewed said they feel mostly accepted at the school.

facebook.com/ shscedarpost

issuu.com/ cedarpost

91.9%

WebExclusive

PUBLISHED MARCH 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

white

august

05

national averages white - 52.9%

hispanic - 22.6% black/african american - 16.4% asian/pacific islander - 4.9% american indian/ alaskan native - 1.2%

With this graphic, I tried to show the difference between my high school’s ethnic diversity (or lack thereof) and national averages. Rather than comparing pie charts, I felt that this showed a more apparent example of the difference.

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 25

‘13

1 9 2 2 - 2 0 1 2 - 9 0 Y E A R S O F P U B L I C AT I O N

VOLUME 90, ISSUE 1

FIRST DAY 2012

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT ID

p.6

MEETING MEYER>>p.2

p.4

FALL FALL PREVIEW PREVIEW

LUNCH BUNCH

p.8<<

ACCESS takes new form in 2012-2013 Afterschool teacher office hours to provide new form of support for struggling students Kennedy Search Staff Member

JULIE MENGHINI | CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER KRISTEN McPEEK | A&C EDITOR • A NEW BEGINNING: New staff and administration are abundant in this 2012-13 school year. From left to right, Records Coordinator Amanda Skinner, Activities Director Kris Knowles, Superintendent Shawn Woodward, Mathematics Instructor Jill Jacobs, and Girls Soccer Coach/Social Studies Insturctor Conor Baranski.

2012-13: THE NEW FACE OF SANDPOINT HIGH

School year brings new administration, teachers, and staff, but big changes are not expected in the coming school year

Cymbre Martin Staff Member a principal, and four years as an assisJust as the newly completed Sand IN WITH THE NEW Creek Byway changed the face of Sand- 2012-13 Staff Additions tant superintendent in Western Washpoint’s downtown, new administrators, ington. Though still adapting to a new ADMINISTRATION teachers, and other staff are changing the environment, Woodward and his famKris Knowles-Activities Director face of the Lake Pend Oreille School Dis- Derek Dickinson-Educational Assistant ily are already loving Sandpoint after just six weeks. Woodward rose from trict. At the district level, Shawn WoodENGLISH teacher to Superintendent because he ward has replaced Dick Cvitanich as suKelli Knowles perintendent. desired to facilitate continuous acaMATHEMATICS At Sandpoint High School, Tom Aldemic improvement outside of his own Cindy Smith bertson has become the Assistant Prin- Nanette Brothers classroom. Jill Jacobs Mike Givens cipal for Student Management and AcaWoodward researched communiSOCIAL STUDIES demics, with Kris Knowles serving as ties across the nation and was attracted Conor Branski to Sandpoint because of the beautiful Assistant Principal for Student Activities outdoors, strong academic tradition, and Athletics. Derek Dickinson has reSPECIAL EDUCATION placed David Miles as Educational Asand community support of education. Mike Givens sistant as Miles returns to the classroom Activities Director Kris Knowles OFFICE/SECURITY STAFF has been acquainted with Sandpoint full-time. Campus Security Monitor Skinner-Records Coordinator (CSM) Dennis Sanford will no longer be Amanda his entire life, having been raised in Paul Mares-Campus Security at Sandpoint High School, and students Coeur D’Alene. Knowles spent the last can expect Paul Mares to be roaming the SUPPORT/CUSTODIAL STAFF year in Bonners Ferry as Athletic DiBill Kent-Behavior Intervention rector, and prior to that taught history halls in his place. Cindy Dillard-Custodian With so many shifts high up on the ad- Henry Machado-Custodian and coached multiple sports at Lake ministration pyramid, huge changes to City. Knowles and his wife Kelli cited SHS would be expected, but Activities Director Knowles Sandpoint’s superior academics, leadership and athletics as their reasons for applying for their respective positions. states this is not the case. “Tom Albertson did a great job. There’s no need for me “This is a place we want to raise our daughters, we want to change things,” Knowles said. to become a part of the community,” Knowles said. Campus Security Monitor Paul Mares has a similar Superintendent Woodward doesn’t plan on any huge changes for the District in the near future either, though attitude toward Sandpoint and Sandpoint High School. he does hope to facilitate continuous academic improve- Mares has lived in Sandpoint for the past seven years with ment at SHS. his wife, son, and three daughters. Paul Mares plans to stick with former CSM Sanford’s Mares looks forward to the opportunity to work with methods until he becomes aware of changes that better teens, and to keep them safe. suit his strengths and weaknesses. “If parents don’t feel safe sending their kids to school, New superintendent Shawn Woodward brings a wealth and if students and teachers don’t feel safe at school, the of experience and knowledge to his position. He has seven school can’t be effective in what it needs to do,” said Mares. years of teaching experience combined with nine years as

Basically

Speaking If you could change one thing about SHS, what would it be? “I would change the size of the lockers.”

“The lunch tables.”

Sophomore

Freshman

Alex Baker Mitch Wallace SEptEmBEr 2012: DAtES to rEmEmBEr S 2 9 16 23 30

M

T

W

T

F

S 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 complete calendar on pg. 5

“I wish we had the same ACCESS as last year”

4 School Begins 7 Varsity Football, 7pm 8 XC@Silverwood, 8:30am 10 Open House, 5:30pm 11 Boys Soccer, 6:30pm 13 Girls Soccer, 6:00pm 17 Volleyball, 6:00pm 19 1:15 Early Release

Junior

Aaron Crossingham

“Have the school day start later”

As the 2012-2013 school year begins, students at Sandpoint High School will have to adjust to a new school schedule. ACCESS will still be in effect, but with new procedures. The school day will now start at 7:50 a.m. and end at 2:30 p.m., with buses coming to pick up students at 3:00 p.m., rather than 2:50 p.m.. The shift in time schedule all revolves around new policies and procedures for ACCESS. ACCESS will now take place after school hours, from 2:30p.m. untill 3:15 p.m.. Unlike last year, ACCESS will not be mandatory for students to attend. Students can visit a teacher during ACCESS office hours of their own volition, or they may be requested by a teacher. Similar to last year, students will be expected to go see the teacher that has requested them and will be held accountable if they refuse to meet the teacher that has sent a request for them. Science teacher Mike Martz says he is glad that he only has to worry about the students he requests and who really want extra help. Because students are not assigned an ACCESS class, teachers will not have to worry about managing an ACCESS in addition to providing help to the students that want and need it. Assistant Principal for Student Management and Academics Tom Albertson said ACCESS is being changed this year, “To add more instructional minutes back into the classroom, with students still having the ability to seek assistance from teachers.” The new ACCESS time slot was chosen by a vote that consisted of SHS staff members, the majority of which supported increasing the number of instructional minutes in the school day. Albertson believes having ACCESS benefits students by letting them get extra help from teachers and letting those absent get caught up on their schoolwork. Since ACCESS ends later than when school ends, activities/ practices will not start until 3:30, allowing students involved in extracurricular activities to get help and get caught up on their work without missing their activities and practices. Junior Brighten Miller enjoys how ACCESS really benefits students that are in sports and activities. “If you were gone for sports, it helps you get caught up [on your work].” Miller is also glad that all students can leave after school ends, instead of essentially having another extra period of school, a complaint shared by students regarding the original ACCESS. “The after school ACCESS is an intervention for all students to keep their grades in good standing and maximize learning,” Albertson said. 2012-13 SHS BELL SCHEDULE 7:00-7:45 Early Bird 7:50-9:18 1st Period

9:23-10:55 2nd Period 10:55-11:29 1st Lunch 11:29-12:57 3rd Period 11:00-12:28 3rd Period 12:28-1:02 2nd Lunch

Buses arrive at 2:50 for pick-up Practices may begin at 3:30

1:02-2:30 4th Period

Senior

Molly Lorden

TEN CHANGES FOR THE 2012-2013 YEAR as compiled by the SHS Cedar Post staff

1. New Superintendent

6. The locker rooms switched

2. New Activities Director

7. The lunch halls switched

3. School day ends at 2:30

8. Spanish IV isn’t offered

4. ACCESS isn’t mandatory

9. C.A.R.E. parent program

5. SHS is on Facebook/Twitter 10. School board has new chair

2:30-3:15 Afterschool ACCESS (Teacher Office Hours)

NEW CONTENT TODAY ON THE ALL-NEW SHSCEDARPOST.COM

• Photo gallery from the Bonner County Fair • The first day in pictures

and more exclusive content!

facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

For my first-ever cover page, I needed to find a way to show all of the new faces at the school without a generic group photo. The split panel photo is a good dominant element and fits well with the horizontal rectangle teaser photos above.


DESIGN PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

POST SCRIPT

page 6

DOWN TOWN DINING

tyson bird // p. 26

First Day 2012

Spud’s Waterfront - 102 N. First

Pita Pit- 116 N. First

Potatoes, rotisserie chicken, salads, soups, sandwiches, oh my! Spud’s is just under a ten minute drive from campus and offers a great lunch for $5-10.

Just about seven minutes from Sandpoint High, Pita Pit offers made-to-order pita sandwiches, salads and a selection of soups. Try a chicken caesar pita for about $6!

the longest drive, but some great food options

Starbucks - 108 N. First

Joel’s- 329 Church

This national chain coffeehouse offers more than just espresso drinks and is a great spot to relax before driving back to SHS. Try their sandwiches and pastries that pair perfectly with a great cup of coffee.

A Sandpoint standby for generations, Joel’s offers delicious and fresh Mexican food for a really reasonable price. Try their enormous burritos, fish tacos, specialty plates or just some chips and salsa to go!

LOOKING FOR LUNCH

first avenue

restaurants are QUICK these less than a 5 minute TRIP journey from SHS ZONE

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

New to Sandpoint High School? Not sure what to do with your off-campus privileges? Wanting something new for the new year? Let the Cedar Post guide you in your quest to find the finest cuisine-from school hamburgers to Spud’s baked potatoes.

Dub’s Drive-In - 703 Highway 2 A Sandpoint classic for generations. Cheap ice cream, huge burgers, great fries and more, with a location that is perfect for a SHS lunch period. Grab the chicken strips and fries basket for about $6.

-REMEMBER: ONLY JUNIORS AND SENIORS ARE PERMITTED TO LEAVE CAMPUS DURING LUNCHTIME-

Dairy Depot - 1105 Michigan Hamburgers, ice cream, Arizona tea, bags of chips, candy bars, gasoline and other convenience items. Stop by if you are in the mood for snacking, but not necessarily a big lunch.

-THIS MAP IS NOT DRAWN TO SCALE-

Bab’s Pizzeria - 1319 Highway 2

quite as close as A not the “quick trip”, but LITTLE still not too far to go FARTHER in a lunch period Tango Cafe - 414 Church

A taste of New York within walking distance of Sandpoint High School! Serving up New York-style pizza by the slice, hero sandwiches, salads, pasta and a large selection of desserts. Subway - 1319 Highway 2

In the same building as Panhandle State Bank, Tango Cafe serves up salads, sandwiches and pasta. They also offer a variety of baked goods and espresso drinks to go.

Kessa’s Coffee - 120 S. Division

Serving savory cheesesteaks, quarter-pound hot dogs, third-pound burgers with fries. They also offer madeto-order hoagies with your choice of toppings. Less than ten minutes from SHS, this is a great spot for a sandwich!

2

Right across 5th Avenue from Tango Cafe, the Pie Hut offers sandwiches, soups, grilled paninis, and of course, fresh-made pie! Plan on under ten minutes of travel time, and expect to spend about $5-10.

Walk or drive to this national chain sub shop. Endless madeto-order combinations of meat, cheese and vegetables served at great speed. Can you sing “Five Dollar Footlong?”

way

The Pie Hut - 502 Church

high

Winter Ridge Natural Foods - 703 Lake Located off of Highway 2 by Dub’s as you head toward Sandpoint, Winter Ridge serves organic and natural foods to grab for lunch. They offer a daily salad bar as well as made-to-order sandwiches and a juice bar! Joe’s Philly Cheesesteak - 102 Church

Super 1 Foods - 624 Larch

In front of the bowling alley (but still walking distance from SHS) is Kessa’s Coffee stand. Try delicious drinks like a quad-shot Snickers latte, or grab a muffin for something more substantial.

The nearest grocery store to SHS, Super 1 has everything under the sun! Pre-made salads, soups, sandwiches, candy, doughnuts, soft serve and more!

division street

ch ips

Bulldog Grill

Another one of my proudest pages, this was my first real attempt at drawing all my own vector graphics. I thought the use of color and line made for a map that was dynamic and interesting to readers, still containing plenty of content.

The Red Zone

Run entirely by the SHS Business Program, the Red Zone offers pizza sticks, fresh baked cookies, slushies, and more!

Deli Central

Located in front of the trophy cases on the East wall, Deli Central serves up sub sandwiches, salads, sack lunches, Pop-Tarts, and a wide variety of drinks, including Snapple.

ON CAMPUS OPTIONS

Campus Cuisine

In the same line as ‘Daily Specials’, the Bulldog Grill serves cheeseburgers and chicken sandwiches with fries on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with bean and cheese burritos with chips on Tuesday and Thursday.

Located by the Bookkeeper, look here for Arby’s Melts, Domino’s Pizza, and soup.

Daily Specials

On the West wall of the Commons, the ‘Daily Specials’ line serves up schoollunch classics like chicken noodle soup, chicken nuggets, ravioli and more. Selection changes daily, calendar available at lposd.org

Local. Natural. Delicious. 703 W. Lake Street (208) 265-8135

-

Sandpoint, ID 83864 www.winterridgefoods.com

“the lawn”

During the warmer months, don’t limit yourself to the crowded Commons! Bring your sack lunch or cafeteria food outside and enjoy the sunshine! Just remember to “pack it in, pack it out”, and keep the noise down...classes might be going on just inside those windows.

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 27

‘13

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2012 SHS CEDAR POST

VOLUME 90, ISSUE 3

HALLOWEEN 2012

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT, ID

TOM TEEN p.4 LUNA>>p.2 HALLOWEEN p.4 What the 2012-2013 Supplemental <<

LEVY

>>

MEGHAN O’HARA | STAFF MEMBER MADEY LYNCH | STAFF MEMBER TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DATA COLLECTED FROM “BUDGET - FISCAL YEAR 2013” AVAILABLE AT LPOSD.ORG

In March of 2013, the Lake Pend Oreille School District will vote on a supplemental levy dealing with the school’s money and budget for the next two years. The supplemental levy is solely based on student enrollment. Student numbers have been at a steady decrease in the Lake Pend Oreille School District since 2006, and because numbers have been down, the district receives less funding from the state. Therefore, the district must raise the amount asked for in levies to continue funding the same things.

means for LPOSD stakeholders

Where do you think basically money comes from to speaking:

urces - 6 te So 6% Sta

urces - 7 te So 3% Sta

fund our school?

2013 LPOSD Revenue Sources

2010 Idaho Average Revenue Sources

“From fundraisers and cutting all the good elective classes.”

Local Sources 6%

Federal Sources 0%

Federal Sources 11%

Taxes 10%

SPORTS RECAP

p.7<<

Taxes 28%

Local Sources 0%

Senior

“Taxpayers.”

Junior

Michael Stormo

These two sources are fully funded by LPOSD supplementary levies.

003 - Stafng - 8 77, 6% 8 , $5

Brittany Esparza “Taxes and people who live in Sandpoint.”

“Estate owners or taxpayers.”

2012-2013 LPOSD Proposed Supplemental Levy

Sophomore

Freshman

Brent Buchmiller

Baylee Webster

$208,000 Maintenance - 3% $150,000 Technology - 3% $133,809 Curriculum - 2% $289,500 Student Activities - 4%

$6,864,088

percentages approximated to the nearest integer dollar amounts are exact

What this money funds Maintenance includes • Custodial staff • Utilities • Snow plowing • Building maintenance

Technology includes • License fees

Curriculum includes • Consumables

Student Activities includes

*the levy also includes $40,776 in “Fund Balance” and $155,000 in “Contingency/Transfers” which make up about 2%

“Each student that attends Sandpoint High is worth $6,000.” explained Lisa Hals, budget manager for the school district. This may not seem like a lot of money but a good analogy is a classroom setting. If you were to take away a class of 25 students, the school district would lose about $150,000. “When you lose that much money, we can’t afford to keep that teacher.” Hals said. With this supplemental levy, the district is expected to ask for ap-

• Bus rentals • State competitions • Facility rentals • Coaches supplies • A 2.5 percent cut

proximately $6.8 million and with enrollment down, the school is heavily depending on this. Another thing to be aware of is that the first thing to go when the budget is cut are electives and teachers. In a supplemental levy, $6 million of the levy goes to paying teachers and other employees of the district. $823,000 goes to instructional support. If this supplemental levy does not pass, the district will lose onethird of their funding, which comes out to about $1-2 million per year.

Staffing includes

• Staff, general, upper quartile and “k intervention paras” • Staff IT • Coaches salaries • Trip salaries • Custodial staff

The red area below shows the number of students enrolled in the Lake Pend Oreille School district, 1999-2012. As schools across the state of Idaho have lost students, state funding has been reduced. The yellow area indicates the average amount of money funded by levies in Idaho. 4,147

4,117

4,061

4,130

4,155

4,098

4,076

(in millions of dollars, from idahocfp.org)

4,073

4,028

135

3,933 110

101

55

1999-2000

60

60

60

62

2000-2001

2001-2002

2002-2003

2003-2004

NOVEMBER 2012: DATES TO REMEMBER S

M

T

4

5

6

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

2 No school, end of Q1 6 Drama & Dessert, 7pm 8 No school for students 7 9 No school for students 14 15 16 17 16 Fall Jazz Concert, 7pm 21 22 23 24 22 Thanksgiving break 28 29 30 23 Thanksgiving break 27 Boys Basketball, 7pm W

T 1 8

F 2 9

S 3 10

AWARDED DESIGNER OF THE YEAR NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE ‘THRILLS AND SKILLS’ JOURNALISM CONVENTION

65

70

2004-2005

2005-2006

76

79

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009

SHS LIST : WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE CANDY? compiled by Desi Storks, staff member

1. Butterfinger - Kailee Stevens 5. Fast Break - Mindi Griggs senior

sophomore

2. Twizzlers - Alvaro Garcia

6. Sour Melons - Jared Cooper

3. Skittles -Samantha Bates

7. Reese’s Pieces - Calvin Crossley

4. Candy Corn -Laurel Flood

8. Kit Kat - Ashley Young

senior

junior junior

3,656

sophomore

freshman freshman

• • • •

2009-2010

140

115 3,693

3,699 3,556

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

NEW CONTENT THIS WEEK ON SHSCEDARPOST.COM Video interview with State Supt. Tom Luna How Pep Band affects school sporting events The differences between the left and right brain Savannah Pitts’ photo column on seasons facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

and more exclusive content! issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

For this design, I needed a way to explain a very complicated school budget story in a way that students would understand and want to read. I think the dominant charts and pull-out quotes make for a page packed with useful information.


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 28

PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

VOLUME 90, ISSUE 5

FEBRUARY 2013

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT, ID

ART ALLEY>>p.2

VALENTINE p.8<<TIME

p.6

>>

SPORTS PROFILE

Recently at SHS

AcaDeca to host regionals

SHSafety

SHELBY BAUGHN | STAFF MEMBER

n SECURITY STAFF: (above) School Resource Officer Ian Hoyland and Campus Security Monitor Paul Mares stand in front of their wall of security camera feeds. Video surveillance is just a single part of the existing and new security procedures in place.

In the wake of recent school shootings, SHS has begun to analyze the procedures in place to keep all students safe. Alexus Ahrens Copy Editor

local law enforcement to review and have asked them to give us feedback. Principals have also met with district adminisith the recent shooting tration to share concerns and to request at Sandy Hook Elemen- technology and/or facility improvements tary, millions of Ameri- to make our schools safer. Our Board of cans are putting more pressure on school Trustees will be reviewing this informasafety. Sandpoint High School and the tion at an upcoming school board meetLake Pend Oreille School District have ing,” said Shawn Woodward, LPOSD Suspent time over the past few months perintendent. analyzing the effectivity and preparedBoth locally and nationally, the idea of ness of their plans for school safety. The arming individuals in the school has bequestion remains: what come an issue would have happened if note. Section I believe that our of Adam Lanza, famed San18-3302C of dy Hook shooter, had atschools are safe. the Idaho code tempted his plan here at allows individSandpoint High? uals authorized “I believe he would Shawn Keough by the school have been successful,” Idaho Senator, District I district to carry said Eric Ahrens, a Critia firearm. Curcal Infrastructure Specialist who assessed rently, LPOSD code states that “...there is vulnerability in a couple of LPOSD zero tolerance for the possession, threat schools. Considering that, is SHS school of use, or actual use of weapons on any truly safe? District property.” “I believe that our schools are safe. Assistant Principal Tom Albertson is I also know that the School Board, the not sure more firearms are the answer to administrators and the teachers are con- safety concerns. stantly assessing ways to keep schools “Having firearms in class is more of safe and making changes to do so. It is a security issue. Securing firearms for an ongoing process,” said District One classroom teachers would be difficult,” Idaho State Senator Shawn Keough. Albertson said. LPOSD recently made headlines The SHS administration has already about examining school safety and cur- begun internal improvements to school rent emergency procedures. safety. Building on the existing 44 secu“Currently we are reviewing all of the rity cameras, the next plan is to add night school safety plans. We have also asked

vision cameras. Soon, all staff will be required to wear a school ID and eventually, all non-student visitors will be given a visitor name badge. The goal is that every adult in the building will be identifiable. Along with Ian Hoyland, an armed School Resource Officer, “Paul Mares is our set of eyes. His job isn’t just writing citations and parking tickets, he’s here to keep watch,” Albertson said. On the state level, Idaho governor Butch Otter has recently hired former head of Idaho State Police Colonel Jerry Russell to conduct a comprehensive review of school safety across the state. “Col. Russell is a solid individual with many years in law enforcement. I look forward to his review and suggestions.” Keough said. Idaho State School Superintendent Tom Luna’s budget proposal for 201314 includes $150,000 for this review of school safety. What can students do to keep Sandpoint High School safe? “Awareness of your fellow students and good communication is essential,” Ahrens said. Albertson said students should,“make sure to report anything out of the ordinary. Conflicts, bullying, harassment, don’t try to keep it from the authorities.” “It is important that we not be reactive to the tragedy at Sandy Hook but rather we should take a proactive approach,” Keough said.

W

Safe and Sound 1

PHASE

Current and future plans for maintaining safety at SHS

EXISTING SECURITY

n Providing staff with information about school safety and procedure n Two yearly school-wide lockdown drills in fall and spring n Over forty security cameras spanning entire school building n Full-time uniformed School Resource officer from the Sandpoint Police Department n Campus Security Monitor who patrols the entire campus grounds

2

PHASE

NEW PROCEDURES

n Locking of front office doors to prevent unauthorized access n Requiring all staff to wear ID badge for identification at any time n Students who are aides or part of school organizations must wear ID badges while in the hallway n Moving spring “active shooter” lockdown drill to February n Installing night-vision cameras

Basically

I am most proud of the use of color on this page. Gold is not an easy color to replicate in CMYK, but I wanted to pull the wall color in the dominant photo.

Speaking Do you feel safe at Sandpoint High School? Why or why not? “Yes, because it’s a nice school.”

Freshman

Sophomore

Ravyn Smith S 3

“Definitely. It’s a nice school.”

Austin Laiche

FEBRUARY 2013: DATES TO REMEMBER M

T

W

T

F 1

4

5

6

7

8

S 2

1 Pretty Kitty, 7:00pm 6 9th/10th parent night

9 12 Tennis info meeting

15 Golf info meeting 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 Presidents Day 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 20 PLC Early Release, 1:15 24 25 26 27 28 21 Jazz concert, 7:00pm all sports events on page 7 23 Dance districts @ SHS

“Yes, there’s not room for exclusion.”

“Yes, it’s a small community.”

Junior

Bailey Tomazich

SHS LIST : HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT VALENTINES DAY? compiled by Kaitlin Wallis, Business Manager 5. Regular day

1. XOXO -Caroline Suppiger, Freshman 2. Holiday for couples -Ben Reich, Freshman 3. Happy and depressing -Pilar Herrera, Sophomore 4. Girls get presents -Tyler Harris, Sophomore

Senior

Michelle Barley

-Emma Liband, Junior 6. It’s neat -Paul Meyer, Junior 7. Hallmark trap -Caleb Starritt, Senior 8. Love people every day -Devan Fitzpatrick, Senior

Sandpoint High School will host the regional Academic Decathlon meet on February 2 against Priest River, Wallace and Clark Fork High School. Students will compete in ten subject areas, eight of which are focused on this year’s curriculum theme, Russia. Additionally, competitors will give a prepared and impromptu speech and conduct a formal interview. Decathlon coach Mary Bird is predicting great things for the team as they prepare for future competitions. “I am pretty sure we will place either first or second [at State] and we may have the opportunity to go to Nationals,” Bird said. The United States Academic Decathlon association decided this year that 50 teams would be invited to the national championship, giving Idaho a good chance of sending two national competition teams to Albuquerque, New Mexico, this spring.

-Kaitlin Wallis, Business Manager

Dance scores in Lakeland

On January 26, 2013 the Sandpoint High School dance team earned first place in all categories at their first competition of the year at Lakeland High School. The team competed with a hiphop, kick and upbeat jazz routine, along with a small routine of eight members, a captains’ dance and a solo performance by senior Summer Weidler. Sandpoint will host the district tournament on February 23 in hopes of qualifying for the state tournament. The team will also compete in the PNW tournament in Boise this March. -Tyson Bird, Editor-in-Chief

Counselors meet parents

The Sandpoint High School counseling staff has been working all year to achieve further parent involvement in the education of SHS students. Over the past few months, the counseling department has held numerous parent nights. On December 3, the counselors put together a Free Application for Federal Student Aid night, otherwise known as the FAFSA night. Parents were able to receive information on the FAFSA and learned how to apply. In January, the counselors hosted a FAFSA open house where they assisted parents and senior students while applying for the FAFSA. Another parent night held in January was directed towards junior parents. The PSAT results were viewed and explained at this event. There was a dual credit information meeting in January as well. Jeralyn Mire, SHS Post-Secondary Counselor is already seeing the benefit of these parent nights. “We have had a superb turnout. Parents have been very appreciative of these informational meetings. Students have been relieved that they are not solely responsible for relaying this abundance of information back to their parents.” Another meeting is coming up shortly for freshmen and sophomore parents on February 6th regarding the EXPLORE and PLAN tests that were taken in the fall. -Brooke Obaitek, Web Editor

NEW CONTENT THIS WEEK ON SHSCEDARPOST.COM

• All letters to the editor • A survival guide to finals - how did you do? • Info about upcoming Grad Nite fundraisers

and more exclusive content!

facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 29

‘13

PUBLISHED MARCH 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

9 0 t h A N N I V E R S A R Y S P E C I A L C O M M E M O R AT I V E E D I T I O N

VOLUME 90, ISSUE 6

MARCH 2012

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT, ID

Senior Leadership decides Electorate votes Pastime Building for prom to renew LPOSD

supplemental levy

Kaitlin Wallis Finance Manager

T

he Sandpoint High School student leadership has already made some key decisions regarding the 2013 senior prom. The location of this year’s dance will be in the building known as the “Pastime Building”, formerly The Dive, at 207 N. First Ave. The dance will be held on June 1 and the times will be from 8-11:30 p.m. The date for the prom was decided upon by the administration during the 2011-12 school year to avoid conflicts between all the other events scheduled for the student body during the final months of the school year. Many students and parents tried earlier this year to move the date of the prom to avoid any conflict with finals week. However, the only other date available would have fallen within Memorial Day weekend and resulted in many students not being able to attend due to prior family or travel plans. “There is really no earlier time we could have prom due to scheduling of other events,” Senior Class President Anna Andruzak said. The theme for the prom is Old Hollywood, incorporating old fashioned elements including the building mixed with new style and elegance. “We want a red carpet out front and everything inside to look fancy and extravagant,” Andruzak said. Student leadership members who have been in charge of the event’s planning also considered locations such as the Sandpoint Event Center, Panhandle State Bank, the Elks Golf Course in Ponderay and the old Bellwoods building. Discussion among the Senior class

Meghan O’Hara Staff Member

D

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DEAN KNAGGS | STAFF MEMBER

■ DIVE IN: Formerly known as “The Dive”, the Pastime Building at 207 N. First Ave.

downtown will be the location of the 2013 “old hollywood” themed senior prom.

has remained predominantly in favor of this year’s theme and location; many students, though, agree that the Pastime’s cleanliness and availability of parking are some key deciding factors in how they will form their opinions of the dance. “I thought it was weird at first, but it will be cool with the balconies,” senior Alex Charvoz said. However, while many students like the theme of this year’s prom, there are many who feel that the decision should have been placed before the student body.

“I feel like it is meant to be too glamorous, and people should have been allowed to vote,” senior Shellbie Montgomery said. Tickets will go on sale after spring break, beginning on April 8. Between April 8 and 19, tickets will be $20 for singles and $35 for couples. From April 22 to May 17, $25 and $45 for singles and couples, respectively. Tickets will run $30 singles and $50 couples between May 20 and 31. Due to the fact that all attendees need a signed permission slip, tickets will not be sold at the door.

2012-13 valedictorian, salutitorians named Kaitlin Wallis Finance Manager As the end of the year approaches, it becomes time to recognize the valedictorian and co-salutatorians for the 2013 senior class. The valedictorian this year is Maddie Suppiger and co-salutatorians are Nicolette Jessen and Tim Redford. “I am very honored to be co-salutatorian; however, it is not something that I brag about because that is just not me.

Seniors complete expo and project

I have worked very hard all throughout high school, and I guess it paid off,” Jessen said. The selection of the Valedictorian and Salutatorians is based off of the class rankings of the Senior class. Suppiger, Jessen and Redford are ranked the top three in the class of 226 students. Suppiger holds the first place rank with a weighted 4.427 grade point average (GPA). When asked if achieving this honor was a goal of his Redford said, “No, I worked hard to get good grades. If I got it awesome, if not, then I did my best.” As graduation approaches more and more Seniors are finding themselves reminiscing over the events of the past and their favorite High School memories. "My favorite memory is of my four years of cross country, the teams have been great and I have loved being a part of it," said Redford.

DESI STORKS | STAFF MEMBER

■ EXPOSITION: Senior Jordan Speelmon stands with her senior project board titled

“Women in our Society”. The senior project expo was open for all to attend.

Mayla Millar Staff Member

Seniors in the class of 2013 are the first to complete a senior project based on statewide requirements. SHS seniors were required to create a presentation based on a passion or career focus. Nancy Miller, a substitute teacher was pleased with the senior project outcome. “I have to say I am really impressed by the variety of topics, they seem to be

O

n Tuesday, March 5, Sandpoint High School seniors presented their senior projects to members of the Sandpoint community and members of the SHS student body.

90 1 9 2 3 -2 0 1 3

ye a r s of

New Building Progresses Fast throwback to November 3, 1922

Remember when you do break this habit, there will be enough in store for your annoyance. We will have no more crowded assemblies, for the new auditorium will seat all of us and then some. The library will not be troubled with a class. The gym, which we look forward to most of all, will be a large one with an indoor track. So the annoyance won't count. Do you suppose it's really true that the new high school building will be completed some time in January? That is the last report and it certainly sounds good. The plumbers are busy fitting pipe and the electricians are busy wiring the building these days. The other workmen have been hindered by one of the weather men's Hallowe'en pranks. One blessing though is that there are no "wobblies" among them. One disadvantage of having to change our early morning walk in the middle of the term will be the habit we have formed of directing our footsteps very well done for the most part.” Topics and amount of time spent varied from person to person, but all seniors had to complete the project in order to receive a diploma this June. Though opinions varied during the beginning of the year about the project, seniors did see the value of presentation. “It was a fun project and you learn

Honor flight club works to honor veterans Melissa Mione Staff Member

T

here is a new edition to the SHS club inventory: the Honor Flight Club. This club is made up of a group of students that are dedicated to helping send local World War II veterans to the WWII Memorial in Washington D.C. “I came up with this club because students need to know about the sacrifices these veterans made for us in WWII,” said John Nitcy, teacher and club founder. “It’s a good cause to raise awareness about the veterans that are still here. This may be some of the last chances we have to thank them for what they did for our country.” The club meets every Tuesday during ACCESS, and anyone is welcome to join. “We need to preserve their history,” said junior Katie Harvey, one of the heads of advertising. “The veterans will very soon not be here anymore; we need to save what they saw and what they know, so that we can take from their experiences and learn from it.” Other officers include president Mia Schroeder, secretary Madie Slaton, and head of social media, Sadie Nitcy. The Honor Flight Club is currently sending out letters to famous WWII advocates, such as Angelina Jolie and Steven Spielberg, asking for memorabilia that can be auctioned off. All proceeds will go to funding for the veteran’s trip. The club is currently planning to host a documentary film, “Honor Flight”, on Friday, April 19 from 1:00-2:30 pm. Right now, tickets can be bought from the bookkeeper which are a donation to the veterans’ fund in D.C. The first 300 students to purchase a ticket will be released from class on that day. Public showings of this documentary will be on Friday, April 19 at 7:00 p.m. or Saturday, April 20, at 2:00 p.m. Veterans and their spouses are admitted free. Visit http://honorflightatsandpoint.eventbrite.com for more details.

tecuptur? Ucillest omnimusci dolorem que voloreius ad quo mo inulparum velis dolorerum et optur si optas rerunda veriae ipsum, esequas dolum doluptus, sitis secusap edioremqui te reperepudae officius quis pelliquis pedis doluptat unture est quibus eium qui odi iur aria des eumquam facearunt fuga. Bor magnatur? Temperf erferrovit officiur mostecae nit re aut volores simenda pro excersp ersped quiasped maximus et fuga. Os sDolupti te quunducienis estibus aspe vendigene nosa volore nullor minus, apita volupta porem nis peditatur sandis nos et magnatius molupta speraerit lis molupta ecepudio consed ut as int aut videm sequo opta nimillandis inciis et que nonseque explab ipiciur? Luptat ellabor eiciis quo mo vellam, sequam exerum at di is id quibus elenist, sequo odi officipid quid magniam evel mo tem comnihic tecuptur? Ucillest omnimusci dolorem que voloreius ad quo mo inulparum velis dolorerum et optur si optas rerunda veriae ipsum, esequas dolum doluptus, sitis secusap edioremqui te reperepudae officius quis pelliquis pedis doluptat unture est quibus eium qui odi iur aria des eumquam facearunt fuga. Bor magnatur? Temperf erferrovit officiur mostecae nit re aut volores simenda pro excersp ersped quiasped maximus et fuga. Os sArio. Ut aceperum repe es est, ut fuga. Namust autenti scitiis aut essin reritat emporestrum nat earcill aturisquis rehendi gendit voluptatur? Aximi, con consecum nitatur magnam, apis escipietur? Qui autem haruptatium vellabo ra-

A note about this special edition

from Tyson Bird, Editor-in-Chief It’s not every day you get to celebrate something like a 90th birthday. The SHS Cedar Post staff made this paper to not only report news as we always do, but give you a glimpse into the past and history of Sandpoint High School and Cedar Post. Take this front page, for example. Design of this page was based on a 1962 newspaper from Oregon State University. By today’s standards, it may be hard to follow and confusing, but it is consistent with historical news page design. 1923-2013 As you read the paper, look for our special 90 year graphic (shown at left) next to articles. This means that the story y e a r s of is a reprint of an article from Cedar Post past--the date of original publication will appear next to the story. Thanks for being a part of Cedar Post’s proud past and exciting future.

90

Upcoming Events MARCH

15 - Yearbooks $60 (last day) 16 - Grad Nite auction 20 - Early Release, 1:15 PM 26 - College Power Hour towards the old building. There is no doubt that some one will find himself 29 - End of Q3, no school entering the old building before he finds that it has been directed by the force of habit. Although, if the school board is as kind in the future as it has been in the past, they will probably furnish guilds. Don't let this annoy you too severely though. about a lot of different things. The time they give you to present is really nice,” senior Rylee Langton said. Senior Levi Speakman also discussed the time aspect of this project. “It was easy and not much work,” Speakman said. “This project really helps me find out what my career possibilities can could be, it really defined

Spring Break: April 1-5

APRIL

8 - First Generation mtg 17 - School-wide SAT 19 - “Honor Flight” movie

it for me.” Communications teacher Lisa Barton was equally impressed with the outcome. “I think they’re using their public speaking skills well. For some of them, what they lack in appropriate communication they make up for in ability and depth,” Barton said.

To celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Cedar Post, I modeled the design of this page after a 1950s issue of the Oregon State Barometer. Readers did not like the strange format, though it is historically accurate.


DESIGN PUBLISHED APRIL 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

Also a budget story, in this layout I wanted to show multiple student perspectives without singling out just one. Instead of a dominant photo, I have a graphic comparing prices on the left and a variety of student cutouts and illustrations.

tyson bird // p. 30

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 31

‘13

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

VOLUME 91, ISSUE 1

FIRST DAY 2013

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT ID

SUMMER SNAPSHOTS>>p.4

HOMECOMING p.8<<HUNGER

>>

FALL PREVIEW p.6

Recently at SHS

SHS retains five-star status

Following submission of information to the state of Idaho, Sandpoint High School can again referr to themself as a “Five-Star High School” for the 2013-2014 school year. Idaho schools with a grade 12 are measured based on academic growth and proficiency, postsecondary and career readiness and student participation in testing. “I’m happy to report we don’t have to take the banner down out front!” SHS principal Becky Meyer said. Additionally, Meyer explained that the banner will be able to stay up for two more years. “Idaho is in transition to the Smarter Balanced Assessment this year instead of ISATs,” Meyer said. “Every student except seniors will take it this year as a pilot year. Whatever students DESI STORKS | PHOTO EDITOR received last year on the ISATs will n LANE LINE: Junior Sara Ahern rides her bike down the bike lane at the corner of Oak street and Third Avenue. This particular intersection is the meeting of two routes (City Loop and carry forward and this year the SBAC will just be piloted to norm and referEast West) on the new “Explore Sandpoint!” bike route around Sandpoint. Explore Sandpoint! also includes a route from downtown to Sandpoint High School. ence the new test.” Meyer also expressed excitement to report that SHS’s SAT results increased in all three areas over the previous year.

‘EXPLORE SANDPOINT!’

ENHANCES BIKE ROUTES

City committee of volunteers in cooporation with City Council strive to enhance bicycle safety in the Sandpoint downtown core and outlying areas including SHS Emily Chatburn Staff Member

Explore Sanpoint! is a collaboration of city council and Sandpoint pedestrian and committee volunteers, who have been working to designate bike routes in order to improve the safety of bike transportation. The main designated route that they have created is to get people from residential areas into either the downtown core or city beach. This route consists of 3rd street going north and south, and Oak Street going east and west. However, there are other routes throughout Sandpoint such as Ella Avenue and Boyer Road going north and south. Sandpoint High School and students biking to school were considered during the planning and implementation of the Explore Sandpoint! plan. Division Street connects with downtown via Larch street on the north side and Ontario/Lakeview at the south. Students are encouraged to take this route on the way to school. The goal of these routes are to provide a safer way for bicyclists to move between Sandpoint’s downtown core and outlying areas. “The question was: how could we get a 10-year old from a residential area to city beach safely?” Bruce Robertson from the City of Sandpoint Public Works Department said. A sign that is used to help designate bike lanes is the “sharrow”. The sharrow is a symbol of a bike with a chevron on the top that goes on roads without bike lanes. It also can

be put on roads with lanes, but the chevron is taken off the top. The purpose of this symbol is to inform cars and bikes that the street is shared for use. According to Biology teacher and avid biker Jim Barton, the painted lines have been a huge help. “I have noticed that the painted bike lanes encourage drivers to give you more room, and they do not seem to crowd you to the edge as much.” Nevertheless, there are still some safety issues that need to be addressed. A certain issue is the education of both cyclists and drivers. Both need to be aware of when the other one is required by law to stop, and when one is not. For example, a bicycle is required to come to a complete stop at a stoplight but then can continue on, whereas a car must wait for the light to change. This is among other rules that both participants of the road should be aware of. Although there is some education that needs to be shared, the awareness of bikes on roads throughout Sandpoint is improving greatly. Senior Austin Diercks is comfortable with Sandpoint as a bike and car friendly town. “I do feel safe. I feel like the drivers around here are pretty courteous and aware of bikers,” Diercks said. Robertson encouraged students to ride their bikes to school whenever possible, describing what a “great deal that is” and how the Explore Sandpont! committee is “delighted to see kids on bikes.”

STOP

MYTH: Bikes must stop for stop signs in Idaho. FACT: Idaho code allows bikes to treat a stop sign like a yield sign.

MYTH: Bikes must obey traffic lights in the same way that motor vehicles do.

1

Everything except the dance has a Hunger

2

There’s a food drive this year, and food will

be collected in your 2B class. Football plays Timberlake on Friday at 7. The Dogs beat them last year.

Remsen leads dance team

FACT: Bikes may completely stop and then continue through the intersection. MYTH: Motor vehicles must stop for bicyclists on their bikes in a crosswalk. FACT: Motor vehicles do not need to stop for a cyclist UNLESS they are off and walking their bike.

MYTH: Bikes are allowed to ride on the sidewalk in Sandpoint FACT: Sandpoint code prevents bikes on the sidewalk in the downtown core, but bikes may be on sidewalks in the rest of the city.

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

SIX THINGS TO KNOW FOR HOMECOMING 2013

Games theme.

3

Bike Myth v. Fact

4 Powderpuff practices are on September 16 and 18 at 5:30 pm 5

The dance is at the Events Center. Tickets are $5 presale and $8 at the door.

6 The dress-up days all start with the same letter as the day (i.e. “twin Tuesday”)

Teachers recieve class iPads

As part of a district-wide program called “Technology Infused Classrooms”, the Lake Pend Oreille School district will equip 30 classrooms district-wide with full sets of Apple iPads. 61 teachers applied for the Technology Infused Classroom though only 30 received the grant. Eight Sandpoint High School teachers received one of these class sets for this year: Jim Barton, Mamie Brubaker, Kelli Knowles, Mary Bird, Mike Martz, Amy Yost, Erica Haynes and Lori Bocksch. The selected teachers three days in August training and learning how to best use the iPads in their class. “My ultimate goal is to connect with another classroom someday,” Spanish teacher Lori Bocksch said. “Whether through FaceTime, Skype, I’m not sure, but that is my end goal for the iPads. I still have a lot to learn before I get to that step, though.” Following the departure of longtime Sandpoint dance coach Cindy Smith, Alyssa Remsen has been installed as the new dance coach for Sandpoint High School. Remsen has been a longtime Sandpoint resident and was a member of dance team herself, dancing under the direction of Cindy Smith. “I spent four years with coach Smith when I was in high school,” Remsen said during Meet the Bulldogs. “I’m excited to carry on the tradition she started.” In addition to dancing for SHS, Remsen also spent last year as assistant coach, teaching technique, helping at events, and getting to know the team. Along with a new coach, dance is also under leadership of new captains. Senior Hailey Nutt leads as captain, Brelylan Martin as co-captain and Katie Maddux and Jordan Garrett as lieutenant captains.

2013 SHS DAILY BELL SCHEDULE 7:00-7:55 8:00-9:28 9:33-11:04

EARLY BIRD FIRST PERIOD SECOND PERIOD

11:04-11:37 11:37-1:05

FIRST LUNCH THIRD PERIOD

11:09-12:37 12:37-1:10

THIRD PERIOD SECOND LUNCH

1:10-2:38 2:38-3:15 3:00-3:10

FOURTH PERIOD AFTERSCHOOL ACCESS BUSES ARRIVE

I liked this page because of the use of color and also the balance created by the large, two-column graphic. I designed both the page and the graphic so I made certain to use similar colors.


2

DESIGN

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

FIRST DAY 2013

ON THE WEB n Fair recap 2013 (video) n SHS myths and facts n Exclusive content all year

tyson bird // p. 32

ACCESS adjusts again for 2013-14 Administration chooses format that blends years one and two Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

“The best way to think of it is a blend of the first two years,” assistant principal Tom Albertson said of the new format for ACCESS. Albertson, along with the rest of the Sandpoint High School administration have once again tweaked the format for afterschool academic

intervention. Similar to the 2012-13 academic year, students will not be assigned a teacher or classroom where they attend ‘mandatory’ ACCESS. Instead, students not in good academic standings will be assigned ACCESS and will be excused a few minutes early from their fourth period class and sent to the class where they need im-

provement. Students in good academic standing will be released and free to leave campus at 2:38 pm, the official end of the school day. Students who are assigned ACCESS, however, will be required to stay and work until 3:00 pm. “[ACCESS] relates back to our RTI process,” said Albertson. “It doesn’t mean students

can’t miss schoolwork, but it helps with our Tier II and III strategies of helping students at risk of failing or failing classes.” Like the inaugural year of ACCESS (2011-12), teachers will be able to request students specifically in a queue. There will not be a posted spreadsheet, but requests will go through what Albertson

called an “ACCESS coordinator”, who will assemble a daily queue of students needing to be brought to an ACCESS class. Senior Jared Presnell feels that the new format will better than the past two years. “I think this year’s ACCESS program is greatly improved over previous designs,” Presnell said.

Bringing the brush to the beach at www.shscedarpost.com

Guthrie and students paint mural as part of SURA grant.

Emily Chatburn Staff Member

The Sanpoint Urban Renewal Agency (SURA) is always looking for ways to improve our great city of Sandpoint. One of the recent projects that they have funded is a mural at the City Beach. They asked Heather Guthrie, art teacher at Sandpoint High School, to work on this mural. “I was approached by Carol Deaner, from the city council to work on this project,” Guthrie said. Deaner has lead a number of public works projects in Sandpoint, most notably the Sand Creek Arch. Guthrie then asked seniors Maya Goldblum, and Sierra Scott to assist her in painting this new decoration to City Beach. “The mayor and SURA really want to get students from Sandpoint High School

n ART TO HEART: Seniors Maya Goldblum and Sierra Scott discuss the next steps in painting their mural at Sandpoint City Beach. The two girls were selected by art teacher Heather Guthrie to be a part of this community art project. The scene depicts an iconic view from City Beach, with a painted camera taking a picture of the sunset. TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

involved in projects like this,” Guthrie said. “They asked if I knew of any students who would want to paint a mural, and I said ‘I’ve got the girls!’” They asked if I knew any students who could paint a mural and I said ‘I’ve got the girls!’ - HEATHER GUTHRIE SHS Art Instructor

Seniors Scott and Goldblum have participated in the SHS art program for three years, and plan to continue onto a fourth. The mural is on the west side of the snack shack at City Beach. It depicts what you would see if you were looking out at Lake Pend Oreille from the other side of it. There is the scenery of the mountains and water with big colorful

umbrellas to show the beach. On the left side there is a hand holding a camera. Guthrie said that this is because, “people come and take a picture of what they see and then they move here.” The students and Guthrie finished the mural in just one week. “I had to get back to work, so the timeline was very short,” Guthrie said.

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

n NEW AND IMPROVED: From top left: Paul Mauel, Kate Keinert, Arlene Mitton, Renee Lorden, Effie Gooding, Scott Fitchett. Bottom left: Cory Ulrich, Darla Dwinell, Chris Mulgrew, Kristin Hawkins, Tish Mullen, Mary Imaz

n Funded by the Sandpoint Urban Renewal Agency n Painted by SHS art instructor Heather Guthrie and students Maya Goldblum and Sierra Scott n Located on the West wall of the concession stand at Sandpoint City Beach n Completed in one week

Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

The 2013-2014 school year brings a number of new staff to Sandpoint High School, as well as some returning staff and changes in position. Arlene Mitton has joined the office staff as the 2013-14 receptionist and AD assistant. Patsy Sletager has moved to Attendance Officer. Cory Ulrich has joined the math department, which is under leadership of new department chair Wendy Auld. The English department will also see the installment of a new department chair, Kelli Knowles, and the addition of

A. B. C. D. E.

How long has Dr. Meyer been the principal of Sandpoint High School? Three years Five years Eight years Ten years Fifty years What does Dr. Meyer have her PhD in?

instructors Kate Keinert and Paul Mauel. Social studies will see the return of former student teacher Kristen Hawkins, now as a full-time instructor. Scott Fitchett will also join the social studies staff. Mary Imaz and Tish Mullen are both returning to Sandpoint High School. Imaz will teach Spanish and Mullen will teach science. Renee Lorden has joined the Special Education staff. Darla Dwinell, Effie Gooding and Christine Mulgrew were all hired as paraprofessionals.

A. B. C. D. E.

Principaling Biochemistry Educational Administration Sports Medicine Counseling Psychology

A. B. C. D. E.

Where did Dr. Meyer want to work when she started her doctorate? Sandpoint High School A prison Moscow High School A beauty salon University of Idaho

A. B. C. D. E.

What sport did Dr. Meyer play for just one year her senior year? Basketball Football Golf Wrestling Cross Country

What is Dr. Meyer’s husband’s name?

A. B. C. D. E.

Tom Kris Derek Ian Jeff

A. B. C. D. E.

What is the most rewarding part of Dr. Meyer’s job? Watching students progress June, July and August Living in Sandpoint Her parking space Going to meetings

A. B. C. D. E.

What year did Dr. Meyer first start living in Sandpoint? 1903 1986 1993 1998 2010

A. B. C. D. E.

How long has Dr. Meyer worked for the school district? Five years Ten years Fifteen years Twenty years Twenty-five years

What is the most challenging part of being principal? A. Remembering names B. Saying the pledge of allegiance and announcements C. The amount of time it takes to do everything well D. Scheduling appointments E. Meeting parents

A. B. C. D. E.

When did Dr. Meyer start hosting Student Klatches? This year Last year 1999 2002 2010

What is Dr. Meyer’s favorite thing about living in Sandpoint? A. Community support of the schools B. Lake Pend Oreille C. The weather D. The small community E. Sandpoint High School

A. B. C. D. E.

What does Dr. Meyer like to do in her free time?

Travel Boat Spend time with friends Spend time with family All of the above

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Score

0-5 correct: Meyer mindless

5-8 correct: Meyer mediocre 8-10 correct: Meyer mindful 10-13 correct: Meyer master Answers

1) C, 2) E, 3) B, 4) A, 5) D 6) C 7) A, 8) E, 9) C, 10) B, 11) A, 12) E, 13) B

start here

I think this page best shows my ability to design a black and white inside page. The large dominant photo breaks up a textheavy news page, and the quiz adds an alternative story format to an otherwise repetitive story.

glance the city beach mural

at a

Find out your Dr. Meyer IQ 9 8 1 10 7 New year brings in new, returning staff 2 11 6 3 12 5 13 4 How well do you know Sandpoint High School principal Dr. Becky Weller Meyer? Find out with this quiz!

Guthrie, Scott and Goldblum all emphasized the benefits of taking art as a four-year program. “You never know, you might just end up getting to paint city beach!” Goldblum said. This addition to City Beach funded by SURA was a chance to get more students involved, as well as, improve upon the beautiful sights of Sandpoint.

What is Dr. Meyer’s favorite drink at Starbucks? A. Tall no water chai latte B. Venti soy no whip white mocha C. Grande Pike Place with room D. Venti passion tea lemonade half sweet E. Grande nonfat iced caramel macchiato

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 33

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

OCTOBER 2013

FOREIGN EXCHANGE>>p.5

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT ID

WISHES WALL

SEASON STANDINGS p.7 >>

VOLUME 91, ISSUE 2

p.8<<

Recently at SHS

9th grade tech class

NEW TECHNOLOGY

DOES NOT COMPUTE Students and staff adapt to new software and DESI STORKS | PHOTO EDITOR

platforms for grades, assignments and more basicallyspeaking:

Emily Chatburn Staff Member Alicia Walker Staff Member

The Lake Pend Oreille School district rolled out three major technologies for the 2013-14 school year: Schoology, Google for Education, and FamilyLink. LPOSD tech director Randy Wittwer said Schoology is what is known as a learning management system, abbreviated LMS. “It’s a platform that allows the communication between teachers and students and students and peers,” Wittwer said. One of the biggest advantages of Schoology is that it allows students to see all assignments and classes in one place. Junior Kenny Kovalchuk has logged in and liked what he found. “I think that School-

ogy is a great tool for learning and staying organized ... it is like an agenda book you can’t lose, and and already filled out for you!” Eventually, students will also be able to access grades on Schoology as well. “The move to FamilyLink will transition to Schoology by the first of next year,” Wittwer said. Though the technologies provide new features, students such as junior Paul Sundquist have met frustration with the multiple log-ins required and lack of directions for using the new programs. “Honestly I haven’t even tried it yet because I have no idea how it works, I never received any instructions,” Sundquist said. Whittwer said the district is working toward a more unified login system in the future.

LPOSD is also joining school districts across the country who are rolling out email addresses to students, through Google for Education. “It allows students and staff a place to communicate and work in a safe environment. We have plans to expand way beyond Gmail and Drive in the future,” Wittwer said. Google Drive replaces student U:\ drives by providing students 30 gigabites of cloud storage. The district has also replaced Schoolmaster PASS with a new program called FamilyLink. “FamilyLink is what’s called Web 2.0 compliant and also allows parents to access different information than students,” Wittwer said. FamilyLink also allows families with multiple students in the District to see all progress with one login.

WHICH WEB IS WHICH Applies

What do you think of Schoology? “I don’t like Schoology and I didn’t even know we had a Gmail account. I liked the old system--it was easier.” KATIE SMITH • Grade 9 “It’s confusing. I don’t exactly understand how to use it.” ERIC ULBREDTCH • Grade 10 “I think they should have kept it the same as last year. It sucks.” RIKKY JO JOHNSON • Grade 11 “I like Schoology. I like having assignments in one place and online ... I also like the Gmail accounts.” SPENCER FREEBAIRN • Grade 12

Keeping track of which website or service is for which purpose. TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Ac as ces sig sin nm g en Ch ts e gr ck ad in g es Lo g las in: lp t.firs os t d. @ or g Sa pa me ss w or O d nl st ine or ag e Av a at ilab ho le m e Cr e do atin cu g m en Co ts n pe ta c er tin s g Co te nta ac ct he ing rs

‘13

May apply Does not apply

Schoology Google Apps FamilyLink S

OCTOBER 2013: DATES TO REMEMBER M

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No School SAT Senior project draft due MUN international dinner School-wide testing day Early Release (1:15 pm) Volleyball Regionals/ACT Halloween

SHS LIST : WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT FALL?

“Sweaters.” “Drinking cocoa again.” -Sage Jeffries, Grade 10 -Kaylee Kiebert, Grade 12 “The smell of the leaves.” “The colors of fall.” -Dawna Townsend, Grade 11 -Rachel Seifert, Grade 11 “I like the trees.” “PSL’s, baby!” -Ben Leas, Grade 12 -Katie Maddux, Grade 12 compiled by Jordan Garrett, Staff Member

This year freshmen are strongly recommended to take a technology class. The recommendation is intended to prepare students for the upcoming SBAC test. However, students are not required to take a technology class. If a student believes they have the skills they should know, parents can sign a sheet to excuse their child from the class. These courses cover a variety of topics, including Google Drive, Microsoft Word, web design and more. Students use resources like newer versions of Microsoft Office and high-end computers to teach technology skills as well as earning a PTE credit.

-Dylan Kuzmich, Staff Member

SHS surpasses SAT Last year, Sandpoint High School placed first in the three categories of the SATs for a 4A school in Idaho. SHS earned an average 500 on the reading portion of the SAT, beating the state average which was 454. SHS students tested in math at 490, again beating the Idaho average of 453. Writing averaged 492 at SHS, and 447 in Idaho. Post-Secondary transition counselor Jeralyn Mire said, “It shows how committed our students are. They really took advantage of their resources to do their best.” This year, all students except Seniors will take a preperatory standardized test on October 16 to prepare for exams like the SAT.

-Dylan Kuzmich, Staff Member

Senior project expo Seniors this year will again complete a senior project to fulfill a state graduation requirement. Students choose a topic of interest to them, ranging from career exploration to news topics. Seniors will present their projects at an expo on Nov. 6 at Sandpoint High School. Advisers have been assigned to groups of seniors. They will meet with the groups on October 10 and 30.

-Dylan Kuzmich, Staff Member

• • •

NEW CONTENT THIS WEEK ON SHSCEDARPOST.COM Social media tagged #shhoco2013 Archives of all SHS Today announcement videos “Is lunch too short?”

facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

and more exclusive content! issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

I have always had a hard time using black in design, but I feel I used it well in this design. The colors in the graphic come from the photo, and the “basically speaking” breaks up the body text well.


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 34

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

VOLUME 91, ISSUE 3

HALLOWEEN 2013

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT ID

WIKEL WONDER>>p.4

FALL FUN

>>

DISTRICT CHAMPS p.7

p.8<<

UNDER THE GUN

Proposal to arm staff triggers controversy among staff, students and the community.

basically

speaking: What’s your opinion on arming staff? PAYTON EZELL Freshman “I don’t think it’s okay... teachers could go crazy and shoot up the school.”

EVAN TAYLOR-GIPSON Junior “It’s scary. There are only a few teachers I would trust with a gun.”

DEIANIRA BAKER Sophomore “It could be good if teachers went through training...I’m in the middle.”

CARMEN AYALA-MORRIS

Alicia Walker Staff Member A proposal to arm staff in the Lake Pend Oreille School District has generated much discussion and changing ideas as multiple parties weigh in. Many themes emerged at the recent October 22 meeting. Trustee Mindy Cameron suggested that the board takes a closer look at board policy. “For going forward, we should follow standard board policy where Superintendent Shawn Woodward would explore the options rather than individuals on the board

This was an incredibly detailed story regarding arming school staff. The large gun cutout makes a strong dominant element, and the student cutout quotes and survey help break up a long article.

doing their own research.” Cameron also asked if arming teachers was now out of the question because there were other options to consider. In response, Youngdahl said, “We are not just going to sweep (arming staff) under the carpet. We still have many options to explore.” Youngdahl brought up the issue of a 20 minute response time to Clark Fork High School. Instead of arming CFHS staff, Youngdahl said Tuesday he thinks it would be effective to utilize the retired policemen and veterans in Sandpoint. “I think it could be a really good solution,” Youngdahl said. “It would reduce cost and response time.” Young-

dahl added, “It will only cost $15,000 for the squad car as opposed to the $41,000 it would cost to hire a full-time SRO.” Last week’s commentary is all related to the arming staff issue the board and community have been discussing for several weeks. “Bringing up this issue now makes me feel less safe,” senior Katie Maddux said at the October 8 board meeting. “Kids with a plan will follow that plan strongly and do it [whether there are guns or not].” Brian Smith, Lake Pend Oreille Education Association president and teacher at SHS, shared results of a staff survey at the October 22 meeting. “I do not feel comfortable with staff being

BRENT BUCHMILLER JUNIOR

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KATIE MADDUX SENIOR

Senior “To an extent it would be good to have bats but guns and Tasers could be bad.”

“I would trust a teacher I’ve known for 3 years more than some new guy brought in...”

S

“Bringing up this issue now makes me feel less safe.”

armed as a staff member, and especially as a mother of a child who attends a school in LPOSD,” English teacher Kelli Knowles said. “I think arming staff opens too many doors for mistakes.” Though the proposal has met many opponents, supporters are also in strong numbers, as shown by the public comments made at the October 8 meeting. Junior Brent Buchmiller is in favor of arming staff. “I think I would trust a teacher I’ve known for 3 years more than some new guy brought in to pat me down and take my freedom rights away,” Buchmiller said. Senior Justin Ryckman also supports the proposal. “If arming teachers

could save at least one life, then wouldn’t it be worth it?” Ryckman said. He added, “are you going to hunt the deer if it has a gun?” Senior Sammi Myers attends Clark Fork and Sandpoint Hi g h School. “Since Clark Fork doesn’t have a town police department, we don’t necessarily have any form of protection at CFHS,” Myers said. “There is no other option but to train and arm selected teachers at the school.” Myers believes that “for a school like Clark Fork, it’s necessary to arm teachers, but I don’t think it is as important for Sandpoint because they already have an SRO.” The suggestion of

arming staff came about when former school board trustee Vickie Pfeifer brought up school safety during a January board meeting. see “Guns” p.2

Question 1: “Do you support arming staff?”

Question 2: “What is the best option?”

Staff Survey conducted by Brian Smith

Certified Staff

includes teachers and administrators

Classified Staff

4%

SHS LIST : WHAT ARE YOU DOING FOR HALLOWEEN?

“Trick-or-treating” “A Halloween party” -Taran McLaughlin, Grade 9 -Kayla Neumann, Grade 9 “Hang out with friends” “Carving pumpkins” -Carlos Collado, Grade 10 -Abby Shepard, Grade 10 “Dress up and eat candy” “Probably nothing” -Jared Cooper, Grade 11 -Harley Newhart, Grade 12 compiled by Darbey Scrimsher, Staff Member

92%

80%

Certified

Certified

includes bus drivers, kitchen and office staff, custodians All LPOSD staff were invited to participate in this survey via email. These data were shared with Cedar Post on October 23, 2013.

8%

16%

29% 71%

Classified Yes

• • •

No

Undecided

14% 86% Classified

Arming staff Other (SROs, etc.)

NEW CONTENT THIS WEEK ON SHSCEDARPOST.COM “Brotalk” podcast with Kuzmich and Russo Video interviews with Youngdahl and Cameron State and district sports wrap-ups

facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

and more exclusive content! issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

31‘


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 35

PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

NOVEMBER 2013

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT ID

DRAMA DISTRICTS>>p.2

>>

HOME FOR THE

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

x

TRAVEL TIME

12 hours (plane) | Sandpoint to Alaska

14 hours (driving) | Sandpoint to North Dakota 15 hours (driving) | Sandpoint to Wyoming

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01 New Year’s Day

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to be at home -Alex Baker

Both Idaho and North Dakota have seen an increase in GDP - Gross Domestic Product over the past several years. However, North Dakota has increased at a rate much higher than the national average. source: worldbank.org and bea.gov United States North Dakota Idaho

2010

2011

2012

7.2

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SHS LIST : WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS

FOR THANKSGIVING? 4 Grad Nite Meeting (6 pm) “Going to Seattle & Florida” “Going to a BSU game” 11 Winter Band Concert -Nycole Moreland, Grade 9 -Taylor Martin, Grade 11 13 Drama & Dessert (7 pm) “Getting together with family” “Going to Seattle” 13 14 14 ACT -Ellis Gaddie, Grade 10 -Skyler Speakman, Grade 11 20 21 18 Choir Christmas Concert “My brother is coming home” “Celebrating my birthday” 20 Moose Madness @ SHS 27 28 -Sarah Ahern, Grade 11 -Bree Jones, Grade 12 23 Winter Break begins january 6 School resumes compiled by Jordan Garrett and Michelle Cooper, staff members F

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ly for me and my mom, but as a family unit I think it’s brought us closer-Jessica McPeek

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-2.8 -3.1

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HOME SWEET HOME

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hard

15 10 5 0 -5

ALASKA

Though no two work schedules were exactly alike, all students interviewed said that their parent works for a few weeks and comes home for a few weeks. The diagram below shows how a two-weeks on, two-weeks off schedule would line up with major U.S. holidays in the year 2013. Date values are approximate, with each mark representing slightly more than one day. days at work days at home r ja n u a ry em be d ec What is the first thing your parent does when they get home? feb “First he sleeps a full day, r maximum hours (per ru be then does yardwork.” week) that can be -Breylan Martin worked before “He always opens overtime pay is the door and yells required ‘HELLO!!!’”

It’s been

source: 2011 census data, census.gov

James Martin

Perry Baker

ha

6.1% or .6 in 10 Idahoans work in another state

father to Sam and Sage Levora (senior, freshman).

father to Cassie and Ashley Young (senior, sophomore).

T

11.7% or 1.7 in 10 North Dakota employees live in a different state

Brian Levora

Rick Young

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AWARDED BEST PAGE, SPREAD OR INFOGRAPHIC BALL STATE UNIVERSITY MONTHLY CONTESTS

A BALANCING WORK & PLAY

Information on this page was Tim McPeek collected from the following WYOMING father to sophomore students with parents who Jessica McPeek work in other states

INPUT/ OUTPUT

p.8<<

As the job market grows in states outside of Idaho, some students find themselves with parents far away.

HOLIDAYS CASE STUDY

CHAI IT OUT

FOREIGN SPORTS p.6

4 Independence Da

VOLUME 91, ISSUE 4

% change in GDP

‘13

• • •

NEW CONTENT THIS WEEK ON SHSCEDARPOST.COM The best place in Sandpoint for coffee Complete “getting to know teachers” article Brodeo Episode Three

facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

and more exclusive content! issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

This page was a delicate balance between student interviews and national data. Rather than write a traditional story, I created this full-page infographic to help readers understand the multiple stories to be told by students with parents who work hundreds of miles away.


á la MODE Students at Sandpoint High School voted for their favorite holiday pie on the Cedar Post website. Their results are below, along with easy recipes to use with the included “Basic Crust Recipe”. Tyson Bird | Editor-in-Chief Meghan O’Hara | Lifestyles Editor

Basic Crust Recipe

5 NOVEMBER 2013

11% - Marionberry

2 cups flour n 2 1/2 tablspoons sugar n 1/4 teaspoon salt n 1 3/4 sticks butter n

Ingredients: 1/4 cup cornstarch, 1 cup granulated sugar, 6 1/2 cups of marionberries Directions: Heat oven to 365° and in a large bowl mix cornstarch and sugar. Add the berries and mix, then pour into your pie crust and bake for 55 - 60 minutes.

Directions: Combine dry ingredients in mixing bowl, then add butter. Mix until the dough comes together and separate. Then roll out your crust and place in a 9-inch pan.

55% - Pumpkin

Ingredients: 8 oz. cream cheese, 2 cups canned pumpkin, 1 cup sugar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1 egg and 2 egg yokes, 1 cup cream, 1/4 cup butter (melted), 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon Directions: Preheat oven to 350° and beat cream cheese in a large bowl with a mixer. Add pumpkin and beat until combined. Then add sugar and salt and continue mixing. Finally, add eggs, cream, and melted butter. Pour into pie pan and bake for 50 minutes.

6% - Cherry

Ingredients: 2 cups of pitted cherries, 1 1/4 cups white sugar, 10 teaspoons cornstarch, 1 tablespoon butter, 1/4 teaspoon almond extract Directions: Preheat oven to 325° and in a saucepan place cherries, sugar, and cornstarch. Let the sugar draw the juice out of cherries and bring to a boil. Remove from head and add butter and almond extract. Pour into pie shell and bake for 45 minutes.

16% - Pecan

Ingredients: 1 cup sugar, 3 tablespoons brown sugar, 1/2 teaspoons salt, 1 cup corn syrup, 1/3 cup melted butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 3 whole eggs, 1 cup chopped pecans Directions: Preheat oven 350° and mix all ingredients into a large bowl and mix thouroughly. Pour into a pie pan and bake for 30 minutes

Happy Craftsgiving

A more mature approach to the traditional turkey craft There comes a time in most teenagers’ lives when we want to show Thanksgiving gratitude, but the traditional ‘hand-turkey’ is no longer the forté. Here is an alternative Thanksgiving craft that can still show appreciation without being childish. For a week leading up to Thanksgiving, each family member will write something they are grateful for on a piece of cardstock and put it in the box. When Thanksgiving dinner arrives, each person around the dinner table will pass the box around, reading the cards aloud until they are gone. This is a great way for a family to take time to appreciate the little things in life. You will need:

Students at Sandpoint High School voted for their favorite holiday pie on the Cedar Post website. Their results are below, along with easy recipes to use with the included “Basic Crust Recipe”. Tyson Bird | Editor-in-Chief Meghan O’Hara | Lifestyles Editor

SHAPE

9

FEATHERS

IN COLORED

Alicia Walker | Staff Member

CARDSTOCK

Ingredients: 1/4 cup cornstarch, 1 cup granulated sugar, 6 1/2 cups of marionberries Directions: Heat oven to 365° and in a large bowl mix cornstarch and sugar. Add the berries and mix, then pour into your pie crust and bake for 55 - 60 minutes.

Directions: Combine dry ingredients in mixing bowl, then add butter. Mix until the dough comes together and separate. Then roll out your crust and place in a 9-inch pan.

11% - Apple

Ingredients: 6 cups thinly sliced apples, 3/4 cup suar, 2 tablespoons flour, 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 tablespoon lemon juice Directions: Heat oven to 425° and thinly slice your six cups of apples. In a large bowl sift and mix all dry ingredients then add your lemon juice. Add apples to the bowl and mix together. Put filling in your pie crust and bake for 40 - 45 minutes.

PAINT

BOX

BROWN

CUT A

PEANUT SHAPE

IN BROWN

(BEAK)

IN

Desi Storks | Photo Editor

YELLOW

GLUE HEADTO THE FRONT FEATHERS TO

OF

BOX

OFB O X

EYES

GLUE

SHAPE

RED

GLUE BACK

IN

JELLYBEAN

(GOBBLER)

CUT A

NOVEMBER 2013

11% - Marionberry

2 cups flour n 2 1/2 tablspoons sugar n 1/4 teaspoon salt n 1 3/4 sticks butter n

(HEAD)

Small empty tissue box Cardstock (plain, red, orange, yellow, brown) Brown paint Glue Paint brush CUT A Scissors DIAMOND

CUT OUT

5

tyson bird // p. 36

á la MODE Basic Crust Recipe

11% - Apple

Ingredients: 6 cups thinly sliced apples, 3/4 cup suar, 2 tablespoons flour, 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 tablespoon lemon juice Directions: Heat oven to 425° and thinly slice your six cups of apples. In a large bowl sift and mix all dry ingredients then add your lemon juice. Add apples to the bowl and mix together. Put filling in your pie crust and bake for 40 - 45 minutes.

t t t t t t

DESIGN

BEAK

GOBBLER

ON HEAD

55% - Pumpkin

PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

Ingredients: 8 oz. cream cheese, 2 cups canned pumpkin, 1 cup sugar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1 egg and 2 egg yokes, 1 cup cream, 1/4 cup butter (melted), 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon Directions: Preheat oven to 350° and beat cream cheese in a large bowl with a mixer. Add pumpkin and beat until combined. Then add sugar and salt and continue mixing. Finally, add eggs, cream, and melted butter. Pour into pie pan and bake for 50 minutes.

6% - Cherry

Ingredients: 2 cups of pitted cherries, 1 1/4 cups white sugar, 10 teaspoons cornstarch, 1 tablespoon butter, 1/4 teaspoon almond extract Directions: Preheat oven to 325° and in a saucepan place cherries, sugar, and cornstarch. Let the sugar draw the juice out of cherries and bring to a boil. Remove from head and add butter and almond extract. Pour into pie shell and bake for 45 minutes.

16% - Pecan

Ingredients: 1 cup sugar, 3 tablespoons brown sugar, 1/2 teaspoons salt, 1 cup corn syrup, 1/3 cup melted butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 3 whole eggs, 1 cup chopped pecans Directions: Preheat oven 350° and mix all ingredients into a large bowl and mix thouroughly. Pour into a pie pan and bake for 30 minutes

Happy Craftsgiving

A more mature approach to the traditional turkey craft

t t t t t t

Small empty tissue box Cardstock (plain, red, orange, yellow, brown) Brown paint Glue Paint brush CUT A Scissors DIAMOND

SHAPE

CUT OUT

9

FEATHERS

IN COLORED

Alicia Walker | Staff Member

CARDSTOCK

CUT A

PEANUT SHAPE

IN BROWN

IN

Desi Storks | Photo Editor

YELLOW

GLUE HEADTO THE FRONT

SHAPE

RED

GLUE

FEATHERS TO

BA

IN

JELLYBEAN

OFB O X

EYES

E

CUT A

(GOBBLER)

There comes a time in most teenagers’ lives when we want to show Thanksgiving gratitude, but the traditional ‘hand-turkey’ is no longer the forté. Here is an alternative Thanksgiving craft that can still show appreciation without being childish. For a week leading up to Thanksgiving, each family member will write something they are grateful for on a piece of cardstock and put it in the box. When Thanksgiving dinner arrives, each person around the dinner table will pass the box around, reading the cards aloud until they are gone. This is a great way for a family to take time to appreciate the little things in life. You will need:

(HEAD)

This pie chart made of pie graphic is one of my favorite designs. The large composite pie makes for a strong dominant element that is also very informative. The recipes under the pie names make this design share more than just survey results.

(BEAK)

BEAK

PAINT

BOX

BROWN

31‘


‘13

tyson bird // p. 37

DESIGN PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

WINTER EDITION 2013 VOLUME 91 | ISSUE 5 SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL SANDPOINT, IDAHO

IN THIS ISSUE: Near Peer Sean Lyon .......................... 3 What to do in winter ........................... 4 Choir’s upcoming concert ................... 4 Student profile .................................... 5 Schweitzer’s 50th ............................... 5 All about Moose Madness ............... 6/7

Stories of Bill Bender .......................... 8 Wrestling workouts ............................. 8 Volleyball coach resigns ...................... 8 Our view: Holidays .............................. 9 Point/Counterpoint: Madness ........... 10 Holiday gift guide .............................. 12

For this cover design, I used a picture from the event the previous year and made this transparent overlay in Photoshop. I thought this combination showed the transition from old to new and was able to contain lots of information in a cover that was still very visual and appealing.


DESIGN 6 WINTER EDITION 2013

for tots $ 76 + toys # of students Br eaking

formula to win:

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

tyson bird // p. 38

possible spirit contest points

79.904

unlimited fundraising points

35

MOOSE MADNESS 2013

FACEBOOK.COM/SHSCEDARPOST

B-CUP WRESTLING

-1 +1 +5

Ba dger +2

137.33

Thursday night vs. Bonners Ferry Cheer on the Bulldog wrestlers and compete in an audience tug-of-war for spirit points. FREE ADMISSION!

56

Schedule of Events all times in p.m.

5 - Doors Open 5-6 - Moose art on display in the commons 5:50 - National Anthem 6 - Girls varsity tipoff Girls Halftime Spirit Contests n Cheer routines n Moose call n Decibel reading #1 Between Games Spirit Contests n Band fight songs n Stomp routines n Decibel reading #2 6:55 - Boys intro 7 - Boys tipoff Boys Halftime Spirit Contests n Alumni competition n Dance routines n Donation to charity n Decibel reading #3 End of Boys Game n Winner announced

AWARDED BEST PAGE, SPREAD OR INFOGRAPHIC BALL STATE UNIVERSITY MONTHLY CONTESTS

For the spread about our school’s annual spirit game, I designed this dramatic page with the hit show ‘Breaking Bad’ in mind. The red color in the photo illustration, headline, and player uniforms make a unified spread.

a Th lete P P rofile SS 232.04

30.97

90

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Senior Thomas Edwards is looking to bring a greater intensity and speed to the game and to his team. Edwards is looking to utilize his leadership and experience to move the Bulldogs to the state level.

32.006

16

Four-time varsity player Nikole Alamillo is starting for the Bulldogs and looking to bring strength to the team. Alamillo wants to bring experience and support to the team, and to bring them to state.

Q. What is your proudest accomplishment? “Being the waterboy on varsity my sophomore year”

Q. What is your proudest accomplishment? “Lettering all four years” Q. What is your favorite thing about basketball? “I like playing in the games, and being with my team”

Q. What is your favorite thing about basketball? “My favorite thing about basketball is Coach Love”

Q. What motivates you to be the best? “All the people watching me, I want to work hard to be impressive”

Q. What motivates you to be the best? “Every member of my team and how hard they work” Q. Do you enjoy playing at Moose Madness? “Yes I like it, I like the atmosphere and the crowd” Q. What is something unique about you? “I’ve only been pulled over four times”

Senior THOMAS EDWARDS

Senior NIKOLE ALAMILLO

interviews and photos by Makayla Sundquist sports editor

Q. Do you enjoy playing at Moose Madness? “Yeah, I like it, it is a chance to see how well you do under pressure” Q. What is something unique about you? “I really like old sweaters”

31‘

7 WINTER EDITION 2013

YOUTUBE.COM/SHSCEDARPOST


DESIGN

tyson bird // p. 39

PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2014 SHS CEDAR POST

VOLUME 91, ISSUE 6

FEBRUARY 2014

ABOLITION UPDATE>>p.2

SANDPOINT HIGH SCHOOL, SANDPOINT ID

COMPETITION SEASON p.6

Proposed color coding

RED

Overflow lot

art

division

GOLD

$20 Main lot

division

visitor

BLUE division

$35 South lot

$25

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

n SNOW PROBLEM: Campus Security Monitor Paul Mares keeps watch over the SHS parking lots. Mares hopes the proposed color-coded parking system will make the lot more accessible and orderly, especially during snowy winter months when students have difficulty reading space numbers.

LOTS OF IMPROVEMENT Mares proposes new parking lot plan based on color-coded, first-come-first-serve system

Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

On track to take effect in the 2014-2015 school year, Campus Security Monitor Paul Mares has created a proposal to simplify the Sandpoint High School parking lot. Rather than assigning each student to a particular parking number, the new plan allows students to purchase color-coded passes, enabling them to park in a particular lot on a first-come, firstserve basis. “It will eliminate all the numbers,” Mares said. “Whoever comes first really is going to get the best spot.” The plan divides SHS parking areas into three colored zones: blue, gold and red. Students purchase a colored pass allowing them to park only in that color lot. Gold parking passes will open first to seniors,

who have traditionally had priority parking privileges. “I think it will turn out pretty well,” junior Jolene Dixon said. “Some people might get a little aggressive over it.” Though the passes allow parking in any space in the zone, the passes are not transferable. “Everybody will have a number on their new pass, and that will match with their plates,” Mares said. When I walk through the lot... there are at least 40 spots that are vacant at all times - PAUL MARES, Campus Security

Mares began to develop the new system after identifying a number of frustrations with the current parking system. During the win-

ter months, snow cover makes the parking space numbers very difficult to see, and students park in the wrong space. “What happens is one person moves over, another one moves over... you have the domino effect and everyone is in the wrong spot,” Mares said. Additionally, Mares observed on his daily walks through the lots that the current system is TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF inefficient at allowing as n ROUGH DRAFT: Mares worked with SHS drafting teacher many students a possible Malia Meschko to create detailed maps of the parking lots. to park. spaces. Student opinions on “When I walk through Staff spaces are not the new proposal vary. the lot every day, there included in the colored “I get here late, so it’s are at least 40 spots that system and will instead kind of a bad idea,” sophare vacant at all times,” be clearly marked with omore Jacob Williams Mares said. the word “Staff ” painted said. The proposed system on the ground. Red passes will sell for will allow Mares to sell “We’ve put a lot of $20, blue passes for $25, “about 20 or 30 more time and thought into and gold passes for $35. passes than there are it,” Mares said. “Because Pass holders in the main spaces,” ensuring that we have snow so many lot will be able to purmore students will be months of the year, it will chase an additional overable to park and reduc- make things a whole lot flow space for $10. ing the number of vacant easier.”

basicallyspeaking:

“What do you think of the new parking lot proposal?”

“Smart, because more people will be on time to class.” REBECCA SMITH | 9 S

“It will be crazy and hectic unless people aren’t rude about it.” ISAAC NELSON | 10

FEBRUARY 2014: DATES TO REMEMBER S 7 Pretty Kitty, 7 pm 1 8 AcaDeca regionals 8 17 Presidents Day

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“I just think it would be stupid.”

“I feel like it would be chaos.”

DUNCAN O’NEAL | 11 AMBER HUNTER | 12 SHS LIST : WHAT ARE YOU DOING FOR VALENTINES DAY?

“Not doing anything.” -Michael Johnson, Grade 9 “Packing for Mexico.” -Mitchell Rust, Grade 9 “Hanging out with Caiden.” -Baylee Webster, Grade 10

2013 RECAP

p.8<<

>>

‘13

“Just going to hang out.” -Paige Yates, Grade 11 “Taking a girl out.” -Chase Rodriguez, Grade 12 “I don’t know, ask Taylor.” -Jake Steen, Grade 12

compiled by Darbey Scrimsher and Jackson Russo

“I think it will be a better allocation of resources.” SCOTT FITCHETT

• •

Recently at SHS

LPOSD plan survey

This year a new strategic plan will be put into the Lake Pend Oreille School District. This plan is to show when and where the district wants to be in the long range. To find out what is best for the future of Sandpoint, the district is gathering input from multiple sources so that the community is all on the same page. Stakeholders, parents, administration, teachers and community members are all welcome to share their opinions on a survey on the LPOSD website. All seniors were given a survey consisting of eight questions. These questions are to find their opinions and what the district should do to change, add or to remove things from the old plan. Currently, there is a strategic plan in place, but due to the new superintendent, it has not been looked at for a couple of years. Superintendent Shawn Woodward wants the new plan to be published and out sometime in March.

-Dylan Kuzmich, Staff Member

Chemistry expo

Mamie Brubaker’s Honors Chemistry students have been working on independent science investigations and will present a showcase of their work on March 18. Local elementary school students will be invited to the SHS commons to view the science fair-type exhibits. “It’s a good idea if the kids actually get into it and have interesting projects, but it’s required so I feel like people may not work as hard,” sophomore Caroline Suppiger said. -Tyson Bird, Editor-in-Chief

Prom location set

On Jan. 14, the LPOSD school board voted unanimously to approve the Sandpoint High School prom at the Panhandle State Bank building, 414 Church Street. Senior class officers assembled a prom committee of 20 seniors who will meet throughout the year to decide the remaining aspects of prom. -Tyson Bird, Editor-in-Chief

NEW CONTENT TO LOOK FOR ON SHSCEDARPOST.COM Full story on the Abolitionist Society of North Idaho District and state results as they are available

facebook.com/shscedarpost twitter.com/shscedarpost

and more exclusive content! issuu.com/cedarpost instagram: cedarpost

In order to detail all the aspects of a totally new parking plan, I incorporated the graphic into the dominant photo. It was also very important to include multiple opinions on the topic, which the mugs and quotes provides at the bottom of the page.


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DESI STORKS| PHOTO EDITOR TYSON BIRD| EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Emily Chatburn Staff Member

Q

Following your passion takes dedication and self confidence, but freshman Sarrah Eberly is willing to do all of the above, and more, to create something beautiful with her dance. Eberly has invested time and energy, over the past year, to get En Pointe.

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What does dance entail for you? I feel that dance is a ton of commitment on my part being able to get to class on time and to be able to open up through dance when I am hurting. With pointe it is a lot harder and I really have to give more energy out to make it look beautiful.

rt to He

DARBEY SCHRIMSHER | STAFF MEMBER

CALIEGH WYZEVICH | STAFF MEMBER

Q

Why do you prefer ballet over other types of dance?

Q

Why did you choose to follow your passion for dance?

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I like ballet over other types of dance because I feel that it comes so much more naturally. Ballet is one of the more complicated types of dance but I feel like I am able to pick up things faster with ballet since I am more comfortable with it.

A

I chose to follow my passion with dance because it is a way to express myself and build up my confidence. I love how it is so calm but at the same time contains so many technical steps and moves.

1. Books

ar t

If your date is a big reader, a book can be the perfect gift. Books can show how well a person understands you; Flowers by choosing a thoughtful gift they Candy know you would Gift Cards enjoy.

Valentines Day is a historical holiday that contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. A popular legend says that St. Valentine was a priest who defied an Emperor Claudius law that young men could not marry and have a family so they would be better soldiers. Valentine continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Some claim that Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the middle of February to honor the anniversary of Valentine’s death where others claim that the Christian church dedicate a day to St. Valentine in an effort to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Students at SHS are planning for Valentine’s Day in a variety of different ways. If you are in a relationship, it’s always nice to hang out and spend quality time together. “I’m just saying in and hanging out with my boyfriend,” junior Reagan Rockholm said. Something as simple as ordering pizza and watching Netflix is also always a good option. “Jared and I plan to stay home and watch movies,” junior Kirana Haley said. “I’m going to make Crystal dinner and when she comes over I’m going to be wearing a suit with a bunch of candles everywhere with music playing,” senior Brycen Okon said. If you want to dress up and go out on a date, there are plenty of affordable and delicious restaurants in Sandpoint like MickDuffs, The Hydra, and Jalapenos. Some SHS students are doing something unique and out of the ordinary. Senior Hannah Neumann is planning on going to a volleyball tournament in Las Vegas over the holiday. Homemade Cards 3. Not all Valentine’s Day plans go according to plan. SHS drafting Homemade cards are a great teacher Malia Meschko shared a time when she planned a weekend way to get creative without getaway with her husband to Nelson, British Columbia. After spending money. A homemade checking into the hotel, Meschko’s husband experienced excard is always a nice gift. It cruciating back pain and they had to drive home that night. shows the love and compassion A weekend that was planned to be fun sadly ended with that person has for you for taking Meschko’s husband having to rest in the bed for the to time to make something by weekend. hand. Valentine’s Day is not supposed to make you sad about being single and spend your night eating chocolate by yourself. The holiday is about spending time with people that you care about. Sophomore Nick Rapoport said he plans to go to school then hang out with his friends that night. Junior Amy Shepard said, “I’m going to hang out with my best friends, play Just 2. Mug Dance, and watch movies.” Coffee and tea are popular drinks during the winter so mugs are perfect gifts during these chilly months.

4. 5. 6.

Mix Tape 7. Lotion 8. Jewelry 9.

Night Skiing 10. Homemade Dinner 11. Video Games 12. Movie Tickets 13. Cologne/Perfume 14.

14 gifts for

Feb.14

PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2014 SHS CEDAR POST

This photo illustration is four individual pictures of the dancer stitched together in Photoshop. This was especially challenging as the dancer wanted her poses to remain technically accurate.

DESIGN

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PHOTOGRAPHY

2 FIRST DAY 2013

ON THE WEB

n Fair recap 2013 (video) n SHS myths and facts n Exclusive content all year

ACCESS adjusts again for 2013-14 Administration chooses format that blends years one and two Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

“The best way to think of it is a blend of the first two years,” assistant principal Tom Albertson said of the new format for ACCESS. Albertson, along with the rest of the Sandpoint High School administration have once again tweaked the format for afterschool academic

intervention. Similar to the 2012-13 academic year, students will not be assigned a teacher or classroom where they attend ‘mandatory’ ACCESS. Instead, students not in good academic standings will be assigned ACCESS and will be excused a few minutes early from their fourth period class and sent to the class where they need im-

provement. Students in good academic standing will be released and free to leave campus at 2:38 pm, the official end of the school day. Students who are assigned ACCESS, however, will be required to stay and work until 3:00 pm. “[ACCESS] relates back to our RTI process,” said Albertson. “It doesn’t mean students

can’t miss schoolwork, but it helps with our Tier II and III strategies of helping students at risk of failing or failing classes.” Like the inaugural year of ACCESS (2011-12), teachers will be able to request students specifically in a queue. There will not be a posted spreadsheet, but requests will go through what Albertson

called an “ACCESS coordinator”, who will assemble a daily queue of students needing to be brought to an ACCESS class. Senior Jared Presnell feels that the new format will better than the past two years. “I think this year’s ACCESS program is greatly improved over previous designs,” Presnell said.

Bringing the brush to the beach at www.shscedarpost.com

Guthrie and students paint mural as part of SURA grant.

Emily Chatburn Staff Member

The Sanpoint Urban Renewal Agency (SURA) is always looking for ways to improve our great city of Sandpoint. One of the recent projects that they have funded is a mural at the City Beach. They asked Heather Guthrie, art teacher at Sandpoint High School, to work on this mural. “I was approached by Carol Deaner, from the city council to work on this project,” Guthrie said. Deaner has lead a number of public works projects in Sandpoint, most notably the Sand Creek Arch. Guthrie then asked seniors Maya Goldblum, and Sierra Scott to assist her in painting this new decoration to City Beach. “The mayor and SURA really want to get students from Sandpoint High School

n ART TO HEART: Seniors Maya Goldblum and Sierra Scott discuss the next steps in painting their mural at Sandpoint City Beach. The two girls were selected by art teacher Heather Guthrie to be a part of this community art project. The scene depicts an iconic view from City Beach, with a painted camera taking a picture of the sunset. TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

involved in projects like this,” Guthrie said. “They asked if I knew of any students who would want to paint a mural, and I said ‘I’ve got the girls!’” They asked if I knew any students who could paint a mural and I said ‘I’ve got the girls!’ - HEATHER GUTHRIE SHS Art Instructor

Seniors Scott and Goldblum have participated in the SHS art program for three years, and plan to continue onto a fourth. The mural is on the west side of the snack shack at City Beach. It depicts what you would see if you were looking out at Lake Pend Oreille from the other side of it. There is the scenery of the mountains and water with big colorful

umbrellas to show the beach. On the left side there is a hand holding a camera. Guthrie said that this is because, “people come and take a picture of what they see and then they move here.” The students and Guthrie finished the mural in just one week. “I had to get back to work, so the timeline was very short,” Guthrie said.

start here

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

New year brings in new, returning staff Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

Seniors Maya Goldblum (left) and Sierra Scott (right) plan the next step of the City Beach mural project. Both Goldblum and Scott have been in the SHS art program every year of high school, and this year will take AP Studio Art.

The 2013-2014 school year brings a number of new staff to Sandpoint High School, as well as some returning staff and changes in position. Arlene Mitton has joined the office staff as the 2013-14 receptionist and AD assistant. Patsy Sletager has moved to Attendance Officer. Cory Ulrich has joined the math department, which is under leadership of new department chair Wendy Auld. The English department will also see the installment of a new department chair, Kelli Knowles, and the addition of

instructors Kate Keinert and Paul Mauel. Social studies will see the return of former student teacher Kristen Hawkins, now as a full-time instructor. Scott Fitchett will also join the social studies staff. Mary Imaz and Tish Mullen are both returning to Sandpoint High School. Imaz will teach Spanish and Mullen will teach science. Renee Lorden has joined the Special Education staff. Darla Dwinell, Effie Gooding and Christine Mulgrew were all hired as paraprofessionals.

glance the city beach mural

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n Funded by the Sandpoint Urban Renewal Agency n Painted by SHS art instructor Heather Guthrie and students Maya Goldblum and Sierra Scott n Located on the West wall of the concession stand at Sandpoint City Beach n Completed in one week

Find out your Dr. Meyer IQ 9 8 1 10 7 How well do you know Sandpoint High School principal Dr. Becky Weller Meyer? Find out with this quiz!

n NEW AND IMPROVED: From top left: Paul Mauel, Kate Keinert, Arlene Mitton, Renee Lorden, Effie Gooding, Scott Fitchett. Bottom left: Cory Ulrich, Darla Dwinell, Chris Mulgrew, Kristin Hawkins, Tish Mullen, Mary Imaz

Guthrie, Scott and Goldblum all emphasized the benefits of taking art as a four-year program. “You never know, you might just end up getting to paint city beach!” Goldblum said. This addition to City Beach funded by SURA was a chance to get more students involved, as well as, improve upon the beautiful sights of Sandpoint.

How long has Dr. Meyer been the principal of Sandpoint High School? A. Three years B. Five years C. Eight years D. Ten years E. Fifty years

2

What does Dr. Meyer have her PhD in?

A. Principaling B. Biochemistry C. Educational Administration D. Sports Medicine E. Counseling Psychology

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Where did Dr. Meyer want to work when she started her doctorate? A. Sandpoint High School B. A prison C. Moscow High School D. A beauty salon E. University of Idaho

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What sport did Dr. Meyer play for just one year her senior year? A. Basketball B. Football C. Golf D. Wrestling E. Cross Country

What is Dr. Meyer’s husband’s name?

A. Tom B. Kris C. Derek D. Ian E. Jeff

What is the most rewarding part of Dr. Meyer’s job? A. Watching students progress B. June, July and August C. Living in Sandpoint D. Her parking space E. Going to meetings

What is the most challenging part of being principal? A. Remembering names B. Saying the pledge of allegiance and announcements C. The amount of time it takes to do everything well D. Scheduling appointments E. Meeting parents

A. B. C. D. E.

When did Dr. Meyer start hosting Student Klatches? This year Last year 1999 2002 2010

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A. B. C. D. E.

What year did Dr. Meyer first start living in Sandpoint? 1903 1986 1993 1998 2010

How long has Dr. Meyer worked for the school district? A. Five years B. Ten years C. Fifteen years D. Twenty years E. Twenty-five years

What is Dr. Meyer’s favorite thing about living in Sandpoint? A. Community support of the schools B. Lake Pend Oreille C. The weather D. The small community E. Sandpoint High School

A. B. C. D. E.

What does Dr. Meyer like to do in her free time?

Travel Boat Spend time with friends Spend time with family All of the above

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Score

0-5 correct: Meyer mindless 5-8 correct: Meyer mediocre 8-10 correct: Meyer mindful 10-13 correct: Meyer master Answers 1) C, 2) E, 3) B, 4) A, 5) D 6) C 7) A, 8) E, 9) C, 10) B, 11) A, 12) E, 13) B

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What is Dr. Meyer’s favorite drink at Starbucks? A. Tall no water chai latte B. Venti soy no whip white mocha C. Grande Pike Place with room D. Venti passion tea lemonade half sweet E. Grande nonfat iced caramel macchiato

PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

Though this picture went with an article about a mural, it does not contain the mural itself. Instead of photographing a halfpainted artwork, I chose to photograph the two students involved planning and show their faces.


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tyson bird // p. 42

LAISA ARI

HALLOWEEN 2013

Preview Review 5 movies to see based on their trailers

PHOTOS BY DESI STORKS

LIFE IN AMERICA Foreign exchange students adjust to a different culture Emily Chatburn Staff Member

Every year, Sandpoint High School’s Foreign Exchange program 1. The Hunger Games: strives to give students a Catching Fire taste of each others culThe second installment tures. However, this can of the series follows prove to be challenging Peeta and Katniss after for all cultures to be willtheir win at the games. ing to accept others. Panem has changed This year students since the last Hunger have brought to SandCLAUDIO Games, leading to many revolutions in the neighboring Districts. Realizing Katniss and her entourage is to blame for these occurrences, the members of the Capitol attempt to rid Katniss of her influence. Released November 22 This film is rated PG-13. Kennedy Search Copy Editor

point the cultures of Brazil, Germany, Spain, Japan, and Austria. A big difference between Sandpoint culture and others is the education. Fumiko Tokimori noticed that her schooling in Japan was much more strict compared to here. “Everyone is so much more friendly,” Tokimori FUMIKO

2. The Book Thief Set in Nazi Germany, Leisel tries to escape the harsh realities of the present. She befriends a Jew hiding in her house. He teaches her how books can take you to magical places. After Nazis invade her town, Liesel steals books and shares them with people. Released November 8 This film is not yet rated. Kennedy Search Copy Editor 3. Thor: The Dark Getting involved in the community through volWorld unteer work is very important and fulfilling. Many In the sequel to Thor, high school students are starting to get more inThor and his clan of gods embark on a jour- volved in their community. SHS clubs like National ney to face their biggest Honor Society or Key Club promote outside volunteer work in the community. enemy yet, saving the

Volunteer your time

Students gett involved in their community

1.

world and the love of his Get to know life. community Released November 8 members. Many This film is rated PG-13. are very willing to give students 4. About Time volunteering A young man learns he opportunities. has the ability to time travel. This enables him to go back in time whenever he pleases. When he meets the love of his life, Tim attempts to make his life complete but complications ensue. Released November 1 This film is rated R.

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5. The Delivery Man An underachieving delivery man learns he has accidently fathered 533 children through donations to a fertility clinic. He then tries to reconnect with as many as he can. However, he tries to not let the children know he is their biological father. Released November 22 This film is rated PG-13.

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VolunteerGet ining gives volved, you great expe- clubs great on rience for later college applicain life, as well as tions. creates a sense of accomplishment.

Tyson Bird | Editor-in-Chief

said. Everyone greets each other with a hug, whereas in Japan they greet each other with a handshake.” In Sophie Dorfer’s school in Austria, everyone has the same classes with the same people for 8 years. “There are less people, but we are all really close,” Dorfer said. LENA

“Anyone that talks to you would be your good friend.” On the other hand, Philipp Eckardt likes the social cultural change from Germany. “Here everyone is more open to new people, and that’s why it was easy for me to have a social life. Everyone likes you and doesn’t have any judgments

against you, which is different from Germany,” said Eckardt. All cultures have something different that make them special, and one can forget to think about what other people’s cultures are. With help and support we can learn from each other’s cultures and help other’s adapt to ours. MARIUS

JORDI

Back in business

Ian Breuner | Staff Member

Bowling alley re-opens as “Huckleberry Lanes” Michelle Cooper Staff Member Revived and back in business, Sandpoint’s local bowling alley has been taken over by new management and was officially re-opened October 5th, 2013. Now known as Huckleberry Lanes, new owners Corrie and Rayman Kinman have renovated the building and are making great effort for a more welcoming envi-

Caitlin Wikel

ronment. In doing so they’ve created bowling leagues, senior, mens, womens, mixed and youth, which are still accepting new members. Senior, Ashton Kinman, and Junior, Lily Martin, have both been contributing a lot of time and effort in restoring the building and are excited for the final product. “The bowling alley is going to be a great place

for kids to spend time and hopefully stay out of trouble.” says Martin. “We’re looking forward to events such as ‘Midnight Bowling’, which is coming soon.” The alley will also be featuring new, later hours, perfect for a student schedule. Tuesday, Thursday-Friday 3-10, Saturday 10-10 and Sunday noon to 8.

Being forced to participate in a school activity isn’t always a bad thing, for Senior Caitlin Wikel it was more than good. After having no choice but to do band in 6th grade, she has grown to have a passion for her instrument, the flute. “A lot of people call me a band nerd for it, you can call someone a jock if they play sports, but call me what you want I’m still going to do what I love.” Emily Chatburn Staff Member

Q

Q A

I’ve seen you conducting at some games, are you planning on doing this for a career? How?

I do plan on going A to a university and getting a degree in Music Education, specifically instrumental. I have an aide with Mr.Gordon all year long just to learn how to conduct.

Q A

Why did you choose this instrument? I wanted to play the clarinet but i couldn’t get a sound out of it, so the flute was my second option. The flute is absolutely my passion now.

How did things with this instrument progress for you after this? It was something I enjoyed doing in middle school, but it wasn’t until high school that I figured out that this was I wanted to do.

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2013 SHS CEDAR POST

This profile picture of Caitlin shows her with her instrument, not playing it. This was a challenge because the face made when playing looked unhappy, but this photo captures her true emotion.

Senior Caitlin Wikel poses with her flute. Wikel has been a member of the SHS band program for four years, and has plans to continue her education by becoming a music major at the University of Idaho next fall.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

2 FEBRUARY 2014

Sick at school Local officials weigh in on impact of flu Alicia Walker Staff Member

A young member of the Abolish Human Abortion group stands on Division street with a protest sign. All of the children who are part of the demonstration are home-schooled, according to group leader Scott Herndon.

The number of states reporting widespread influenza has only grown, and is now classified as widespread in a total of 41 states, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly flu report last Friday. "Widespread" means that more than 50 percent of geographic regions in a state -- counties, for example -- are reporting flu activity. Health care officials have said this years flu has been relatively typical in comparison to last years strain, which was categorized as severe. According to local physician Scott Dunn, there have been 12 confirmed cases of Swine Flu in Sandpoint, but there are most likely many more unconfirmed cases. Officials from The Panhandle Health District Epidemiology Center said that as of right now, the percentage of positive flu tests has declined in the last few years. Although the numbers are declining, the flu season is not over yet, so there is no way to be sure. The CDC reports that the only irregular thing seen this year is that H1N1 (Swine Flu) is the most common virus this season. The best way to prevent the flu is to get a vaccine. It is recommended to get vaccinated as soon as the vaccination comes out in early October. However, the virus is still circulating, so it is encouraged to go in and get vaccinated. Junior Taylor Martin said “Being sick made it hard for me to do any activities at all including volleyball, and it also made it hard to keep up with my school work. I found myself laying in bed all day not being able to move without aching or increasing my temperature.” It is crucial to wash your hands often and disinfect surfaces in your home. It is also important to avoid touching your eyes and mouth as well as keeping any open wounds covered.

Sandpoint community review Idaho Rural Partnership surveys students, citizens to improve city

Bryce Lambert Staff Member

With a review completed by the Idaho Rural Partnership, Sandpoint’s best and worst aspects are laid out for all to see. The review was submitted through an application in order for Sandpoint to gain “many positive changes [to come] in the future” said Kate McAllister, CEO of the Greater Sandpoint

Chamber of Commerce. The review consists of three main areas: economic development, downtown revitalization, and sustainability. Along with these three focus topics, the review had a community survey and some listening sessions. Each listening session based the main topic on what community members do and do not want in the future for the city of Sandpoint.

Many of the aspects that community members would like to continue in the future were also marked as positive aspects by the review board. The study emphasized a few key areas, including protection of the water quality with the lake and the river, developing higher education and workforce training, as well as the positive support of locally produced

foods. However, there is also room for improvement according to the review team and citizens of Sandpoint. These include, improving the energy and operating efficiency of buildings, reducing waste, and creating a dynamic, year ‘round downtown for both residents and visitors. All of which were surveyed, discussed, and

voted on in order to give a base idea of what Sandpoint should expect in the future. Not to mention that numerous ideas were also expanded upon to give a deeper look into how each will affect the community. Overall, the review of Sandpoint by the Idaho Rural Partnership provided a neutral insight to just what the city and community await.

Abolition group continues originally published on shscedarpost.com

‘Abolish Human Abortion’ group an ongoing presence Tyson Bird Editor-in-Chief

The Abolitionist Society of North Idaho, a chapter of the national organization Abolish Human Abortion or AHA, stood at the intersection of Division and Michigan Street numerous times during the month of January. The group held signs opposing abortion as a part of what they call “a propaganda campaign...making people aware of who we are and getting information into their hands,” co-director Scott Herndon said. Herndon and his friend Jeremiah Smedra began the Abolitionist Society of North Idaho a little over a year ago, after learning about the national AHA group which is based in Norman, Oklahoma. Herndon and Smedra connected to the organization because of their use of the Gospel. The group refers to themselves as abolitionists because they reference the American abolitionist movement and

TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

n ROADSIDE RALLY: A young member of the Abolish Human Abortion group stands in front of the driveway to Sandpoint High School and Middle School. Some citizens were concerned by the graphic imagery associated with the signs.

their tactics to change public opinion on slavery. “In order to turn public opinion, you have to create media, essentially. Images do that, writing does that,” Herndon said. One of the most controversial details of the group’s presence in front of the high school has been their use of graphic imagery, including pictures of aborted fetuses. “I was very angry because that’s not an appropriate thing to have at school,” sophomore Katelyn Bruhjell said. “That’s very opinionated, it’s a religious issue, they

took some feminist lines, and I’m very upset about that.” However, Herndon emphasized that graphic imagery is only one part of the campaign they are displaying. “Our real opinion on the graphic imagery is it won’t change opinion on abortion,” Herndon said. “The reality is that our goal is to agitate the culture. It’s actually to shock people out of their current comfort zone and spark a dialog and debate.” SHS principal Becky Meyer said the school has received numerous

complaints about the graphicness of the display on the street. One citizen referred to the signs as “really inappropriate”, especially for middle school students who are potentially as young as 12. Though some are offended by the imagery, others feel that the images are no different than other media that students see on TV, the internet, or elsewhere. “I think that high schoolers and middle schoolers can deal with those graphics and that type of thing, especially with what we choose

to watch and what we choose to see,” senior Katie Mares said. “We have to be tolerant...because people are going to have their opinions, and if you don’t believe in it, it’s still there and you have to acknowledge it.” The group plans to continue their demonstration “a few more times” during the rest of the school year, especially during the month of February. “AHA as a collection of abolitionist societies have designated a few days in February to do this nationally,” Herndon said.

America lacking in education? New report ranks United States behind Asian, European countries Brighten Miller Web Director

According to NBC News, in the Fall of 2012 America participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) with dozens of other countries. The students were tested on math, reading and science, with these tests being based on a 1000 point scale. Overall, the Eastern Asian countries dominated and the U.S. trailed behind. U.S. students

scored 481 of 1000 on the math portion, China scored 613 out of 1000. In science, however, the U.S. scored 497 and China scored 580 which is a smaller gap between the scores. Mónica Olaso, a sophomore, is a foreign exchange student from Spain. “In Spain I have 11 subjects, and every day of the week has a different schedule. We cannot choose our classes.” says Olaso, “ You are always in the same classroom, the teachers come in for

one hour and then the next teacher comes in.”

exams, and if we do they are not hard.”

United 1

China d

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481

Subject

Math

613

497

Science

580

498

Reading

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GRAPHIC BY TYSON BIRD | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Olaso also stated how high school is easier here, “ We do not have many

In the reading portion, the U.S. scored 498 and China scored 570.

The PISA appears to indicate that the United States is further behind other countries in math. “Some of the other countries might only be showing the top 40 percent of their students, whereas the U.S. shows all of their students,” SHS math teacher Nachele Search said. Felice Caven, a freshman stated that we need a new way of teaching. “Out with the old and in with the new.”

502 N. Second Avenue

PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 2014 SHS CEDAR POST

Many of the photographs I took when interviewing the abolitionist group show their graphic signs. However, I am most proud of this photo because it shows a young participant’s emotion, and has leading lines to his face from the power lines.


MULTIMEDIA

tyson bird // p. 44

Moose Madness 2013

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 2014 CEDAR POST YOUTUBE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDr_F_hY0c4 AWARDED BEST MULTIMEDIA STORY BALL STATE UNIVERSITY MONTHLY CONTESTS

This video was created in Apple iMovie as a promotional video for the school’s annual spirit contests. I interviewed student council officers and the administration to give viewers an idea of what to expect at the event.

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Tyson Bird JOY Portfolio