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NEW MEXICO HORSES

RIDES

TRAINING

PEOPLE

PLACES

New Mexico

MAR/APR 2019

HOW TO AUDIT A CLINIC,

RIGHT HORSE

IMPROVE YOUR GROUND WORK

WRONG HORSE HOW TO CHOOSE A GOOD MATCH

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IN PRAISE OF THE WALK VET CARE CHECKLIST

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I had been happily riding my mare Consuelo for seven years when she suddenly turned rogue on me last fall, rearing and spinning whenever I rode her away from my gelding Lance. Recently, her behavior was so bad -- and so embarrassing -- I decided I needed a quick fix. I will turn her out to pasture with other horses to break up the romance with Lance. I will sell her, priced to move! Turns out my thinking was flawed. Consuelo’s bad behavior wasn’t sudden. It had been coming on for months. And there was no quick fix. Instead there was only one fix -- ground work. I hate those two words. I always just saddled up and rode. Ground work stole my time in the saddle. I didn’t mind training or tuning up my horses, but I wanted to do it while mounted. Trainers Delford Daniels and Julie Phillips helped me see that what Consuelo needed could only be taught from the ground. They showed me three things that had brought on the problem. First, I had been increasingly asking my mare to expand her comfort bubble. Several years ago, we rode mainly at a slower pace, usually with Lance. But over the years, I had been asking more of her: gait, canter, different trails, longer trails, be the leader, be the follower. In early 2018, I started riding with members of Back Country Horsemen. Consuelo had to ride with different horses, not just Lance. Many of my new riding partners rode fast. Imagine how she felt when I opened the trailer door at a location unknown to her and asked her to ride with strangers at a gait and canter. Poor thing was way outside her bubble of comfort. Second, I had not kept up our relationship. At the same time I had been asking her to do more, I had not given her the tools to excel. Although she was physically prepared to ride longer and harder, she was not emotionally or mentally prepared to ride with strangers and not Lance. When things got scary for her, she did not look to me for leadership because we didn’t have a strong connection. And third, I had not been consistent or continuously engaged with her on the trail. I did not ask for a gait, insist she hold the gait, then support her in the gait. I rarely flexed her, or rubbed her. Maybe in the back of my mind I was thinking I was just trail riding. Now I understand that trail riding is a complicated, demanding sport, for both horse and rider. I was asking Consuelo to behave like a disciplined athlete, but was not giving her the training, support or feedback an athlete needs. In many ways, I was not being fair or respectful. Rearing and spinning undoubtedly was her way of dealing with my lack of knowledge and understanding. These days, you might spot me doing “ground work,” not running Consuelo round and round, but building a relationship with her. (Thanks to Delford and Julie, I am learning techniques I never knew existed.) I’m asking Consuelo to look to me for leadership and a safe place. This will take time and I have a lot more to learn. So my mantra for 2019 is: In true horsemanship there is no quick fix.

Cecilia Kayano

Consuelo carries me through Copper Canyon.

New Mexico Editor/Publisher CECILIA KAYANO Associate Editor PEGGY CONGER Facebook/Events SUSIE SPICER Manager Contributing Writers ROELIFF ANNON & Photographers KATE AUSTIN DR. ANDY CAMERON LYNN CLIFFORD SUZANNE DE LAURENTIS KAREN LEHMANN ALLAN POGUE TONY STROMBERG Photojournalist EVALYN BEMIS Graphic Design/Layout MARIE ANTHONY Advertising & Sales

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Well-written, informative articles and highresolution photos are welcome. Submissions will be considered and are subject to editing. The next issue, the Vacation and Travel Issue, appears at New Mexico outlets on May 1, 2019. The deadline for submissions is March 15, 2019. The deadline for ads is April 1, 2019. For information contact Cecilia Kayano, HANM Editor, 505-570-7377, HorseNewMexico@gmail. com, www.horsearoundnm.com

Need more trail riding details, horsey events and equine inspiration? Check out our expanded Facebook page. Make sure to like us! COVER PHOTO: Berkley Chesen keeping her focus down the gymnastic line while in a Richard Spooner clinic. Photo by Evalyn Bemis.


GET READY ISSUE

AUDITING CLINICS / THE POWER OF THE WALK / GROUND TRAINING

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8

FEATURES

8 Right Horse Wrong Horse

Tips to buying your forever horse and what to do if it's a mismatch

14 Watch & Learn

Why auditing a clinic can be just as effective as participating

21 Wisdom And Wonder Of The Walk

Walking may very well be the most important gait and the foundation of everything that comes next

26 Be Ready To Ride

Tips to get you re-connected with your horse for safe and enjoyable spring rides

34 Ground Training Brush Up

Just 30 minutes a day with your horse can get you the results you want!

36 Year-Round Health Plan For Your Horse

Know what to do and when to keep your horse in the best of health

PLUS

26

31 Horse Services Directory 34 Events

Horse Around New Mexico is printed five times per year: Mar/Apr, May/Jun, Jul/Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec. Submissions of articles and photos from all around NM are welcome! See our website or email/ call for submission standards/deadlines: www.horsearoundnm.com, HorseNewMexico@gmail.com, 505-570-7377.

Horse Around New MexicoŠ2019. All rights reserved. Horse Around New Mexico and Horsearoundnm.com are copyrighted, trademarked, and the sole property of Cecilia Kayano. Individual content copyright belongs to the author. All the opinions expressed herein are the sole opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect bias or belief on the part of the editor, publisher, distributors, printer, advertisers, or other contributors.


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Here’s a question horse people often hesitate to ask: When is it time to move a horse down the road? As horse lovers, many of us tend to view a horse as a beloved pet. And the idea of having to make the hard-eyed decision that your horse isn’t in the right situation -- for whatever reason -- can feel like a betrayal of the animal and your own ideals. On the other hand, sometimes a horse isn’t working out, and will never work out. We’ve all seen riders with too much horse, whether that’s an inexperienced rider with a green horse (where the old adage,”green on green makes black and blue” comes from) or a rider who has fallen in love with a horse well beyond their riding abilities. Sometimes you acquire a horse that isn’t right for your interests. A horse who’s spent its prior life in stalls and arenas might not make it as a trail horse, even though you have the best intentions. A horse who’s spent years moseying along on Sunday rides might not have the ability to become a barrel or dressage horse. Some riders fall in love with the look of a horse, only to find he or she has a personality, movement or even a vice the rider is not equipped to handle. “It’s much too common to see the wrong horse and rider match,” says trainer Michelle DeCanditis, an occupational therapist and hippotherapy clinical specialist in Albuquerque. “People seem to fall in love with an idea, a fantasy, or a fairy tale and lose objectivity.” Too often, she says, a person can leap into horse ownership or into buying a particular horse, only to end up “overhorsed and under-equipped.” “I see it every day,” says Christina Savitsky, a rancher, guide and owner of Buckaroo Balance, a practice of integrating balance & breath into riding. Sometimes a mismatch comes from an abundance of caution, notes trainer Scott Thomson who teaches natural horsemanship with classical influences in Silver City. He identifies a couple of trends that he says frequently lead to a Photo by Cecilia Kayano. 8

horse and rider “divorce.” “People will buy a kids horse because they figure that’s really safe,” he says. “They go and see four kids hanging off this horse and they think this will be a great horse for someone who is older and wants to get into riding. But then you have a 250-pound man, with a 50-pound saddle, and he puts a leg on the horse and suddenly the horse wakes up and you have a personality you didn’t see before.” Another thing Thomson says he sees too frequently is an older rider who buys a gaited horse because he or she has heard all the hype about how smooth they are and how you don’t need to be much of a rider on a gaited horse. What they haven’t heard is how fast a gaited horse can be. “So they are calling me up trying to find some kind of a bit to slow this horse,” Scott says. “That can lead to divorce.” So how to address a mismatch, however it happens? Trainers say prevention is the best cure.

Getting the right horse to start with

“First and foremost,” Michelle says, “purchase the horse YOU can ride. Not the one your trainer can ride, not the one the seller can ride, not the one your friend can ride; the one YOU can ride.” And ask the horse in a tryout to do more than just walk, she advises. “The walk often tells us very little. I know all too many stories of the horse being ridden around bareback with a halter and lead rope (by the seller). We don’t get a true sense of a horse until a demand is presented. Does the horse lope off willingly? Or is it balky and resistant?”

HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

Make a list and stick to it

Before you get in the market for a horse, Michelle says you should make a list of what you want and need from a horse, and bring a friend or trainer who will help you keep focused. Consider what the horse you’re looking at was bred to do and whether or not you can support that with your physical, energetic, attention, and financial resources. Whatever happens while you are shopping, “Stick to the list,” Michelle says. Christina uses a little math to teach potential horse owners how to find the right horse. “Take the emotion out of the equation, “ she advises. “Make a list of one or two items that are non-negotiable, maybe having a registered horse or having a gelding or maybe it has to be a roan because that’s what you always imagined seeing when you look out your kitchen window. My must-haves might be gelding, soundness and over 15 hands. If these three boxes aren’t checked, I’m not even considering the horse. “ Then she suggests making a list of five other qualities and scoring the horse on it on a scale of 1 to 20. Maybe you want a horse that’s very calm, or one that has trail or cow experience. Whatever quality makes it on to the checklist, assess each potential acquisition against the list. The closer a horse scores to 100 on your list, the better. “This tool allows me to reflect back to clients the weight they’re putting into their decision as opposed to saying ‘Oh but he’s roan and he’s in a muddy little stall and I have to take him home!’ No one wants pity! Especially not horses!!”


trainers say an ounce of prevention is worth a bale of cure BY PEGGY CONGER www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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Choosing the right horse to begin with is the best way to reduce chances that you will have to move a horse along. If you can, visit the horse multiple times, and observe it in different situations to get to know its personality. (Photo of Michelle DeCanditis by Cecilia Kayano.) Here’s a question horse people often hesitate to ask: When is it time to move a horse down the road? As horse lovers, many of us tend to view a horse as a beloved pet. And the idea of having to make the hard-eyed decision that your horse isn’t in the right situation -- for whatever reason -- can feel like a betrayal of the animal and your own ideals. On the other hand, sometimes a horse isn’t working out, and will never work out. We’ve all seen riders with too much horse, whether that’s an inexperienced rider with a green horse (where the old adage, "green on green makes black and blue” comes from) or a rider who has fallen in love with a horse well beyond their riding abilities. Sometimes you acquire a horse that isn’t right for your interests. A horse who’s spent its prior

life in stalls and arenas might not make it as a trail horse, even though you have the best intentions. A horse who’s spent years moseying along on Sunday rides might not have the ability to become a barrel or dressage horse. Some riders fall in love with the look of a horse, only to find he or she has a personality, movement or even a vice the rider is not equipped to handle. “It’s much too common to see the wrong horse and rider match,” says trainer Michelle DeCanditis, an occupational therapist and hippotherapy clinical specialist in Albuquerque. “People seem to fall in love with an idea, a fantasy, or a fairy tale and lose objectivity.”

Too often, she says, a person can leap into horse ownership or into buying a particular horse, only to end up “overhorsed and under-equipped.” 10 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

“I see it every day,” says Christina Savitsky, a rancher, guide and owner of Buckaroo Balance, a practice of integrating balance and breath into riding. Sometimes a mismatch comes from an abundance of caution, notes trainer Scott Thomson who teaches natural horsemanship with classical influences in Silver City. He identifies a couple of trends that he says frequently lead to a horse and rider “divorce.” “People will buy a kids horse because they figure that’s really safe,” he says. “They go and see four kids hanging off this horse and they think this will be a great horse for someone who is older and wants to get into riding. But then you have a 250-pound man, with a 50-pound saddle, and he puts a leg on the horse and


suddenly the horse wakes up and you have a personality you didn’t see before.” Another thing Scott says he sees too frequently is an older rider who buys a gaited horse because he or she has heard all the hype about how smooth they are and how you don’t need to be much of a rider on a gaited horse. What they haven’t heard is how fast a gaited horse can be. “So they are calling me up trying to find some kind of a bit to slow this horse,” Scott says. “That can lead to divorce.” So how to address a mismatch, however it happens? Trainers say prevention is the best cure.

Get the right horse to start with

“First and foremost,” Michelle says, “purchase the horse YOU can ride. Not the one your trainer can ride, not the one the seller can ride, not the one your friend can ride; the one YOU can ride.” And ask the horse in a tryout to do more than just walk, she advises. “The walk often tells us very little. I know all too many stories of the horse being ridden around bareback with a halter and lead rope (by the seller.) We don’t get a true sense of a horse until a demand is presented. Does the horse lope off willingly? Or is it balky and resistant?”

Make a list and stick to it

Before you get in the market for a horse, Michelle says you should make a list of what you want and need from a horse, and bring a friend or trainer who will help you keep focused. Consider what the horse you’re looking at was bred to do and whether or not you can support that with your physical, energetic, attention, and financial resources. Whatever happens while you are shopping, “Stick to the list,” Michelle says. Christina uses a little math to teach potential horse owners how to find the right horse. “Take the emotion out of the equation," she advises. “Make a list of one or two items that are non-negotiable, maybe having a registered horse or having a gelding or maybe it has to be a roan because that’s what you always imagined seeing when you look out your kitchen window. My must-haves might be gelding, soundness and over 15 hands. If

To find a horse that more likely will be your "forever friend" make a list of two non-negotiable qualities, then add five more desirables. While shopping consider only horses that score high on your list. (Photo courtesy Christina Savitsky.) these three boxes aren’t checked, I’m not even considering the horse. “

a different horse who happened to be pastured with the original one.

Then she suggests making a list of five other qualities and scoring the horse on it on a scale of 1 to 20. Maybe you want a horse that’s very calm, or one that has trail or cow experience. Whatever quality makes it on to the checklist, assess each potential acquisition against the list. The closer a horse scores to 100 on your list, the better.

“Hanging out in the pasture will tell you a lot about a horse’s personality,” Kendra says. The horse she eventually took “just stayed with me and attached to me” every time Kendra was in the pen, she says. That horse’s loving personality translated into being great with kids, a must for any equine in Kendra’s operation.

“This tool allows me to reflect back to clients the weight they’re putting into their decision as opposed to saying ‘Oh but he’s roan and he’s in a muddy little stall and I have to take him home!’ No one wants pity! Especially not horses!” Christina says.

Getting to know your potential partner

Kendra Loring, owner of Enchanted Equine Adventures which offers therapeutic riding, riding lessons and horsemanship education in Albuquerque’s South Valley, says taking time to get to know a horse can help you get one that’s right for you. She recalls working with NM Horse Rescue at Walkin N Circles Ranch in Stanley as a volunteer trainer. She got interested in adopting a particular horse for her business but wasn’t in a hurry. Over five months, she worked with that horse -- and then ended up adopting

Have a long-term plan

Needing to move a horse along isn’t always about a buying mistake. Horses age, riders lose interest, kids go off to school or they outgrow their first horse. Horses can become idled for lots of reasons, and it’s up to their owners to make the right choices when that happens. “The saddest thing for me is when you have a 20-something horse who is probably dealing with some amount of arthritis and special needs, meaning he really isn’t good for trotting for an hour, but he will safely and carefully carry a child one or two days a week on a walking trail ride,” Christina says. “You often find comments and negative judgments attached to the sale of an elderly horse who has outlived his usefulness for his current owner. That doesn’t mean that he is not absolutely perfect for someone else. Why should you have to keep that horse in your barn and feed him with no job when he could be in someone else’s barn

www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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3. The horse can’t do what you want to do. Not every horse is right for every task. Kendra says a teenage rider she knew got a thoroughbred for barrel competition. As it turned out, the horse hated barrel work. The rider replaced her with a quarter horse bred for the short bursts of speed and endurance that barrels require.

When considering a horse to buy, expose it to scary objects, and ride at different, faster gaits. (Photo courtesy Scott Thomson.) getting loved on and taken for a walking trail ride once in a blue moon?” That’s where having a plan comes in, says Kendra. Plenty of horse owners plan for their animals’ future in the event of their own untimely death. But what about a career/retirement plan for your horse? “It’s a big responsibility to take on an animal with a 30-year life span,” Kendra points out. “If you’re buying a horse for a kid, for example, that kid will eventually go away.” She suggests getting connected to the horse community -- through horse professionals, horse sports groups, 4-H, Pony Club or other organizations. Having those ties can help you plan for what’s next for a horse and give you a network of resources to draw on when it's time. Maybe your kid’s show pony could become a school horse. Maybe your friend’s trainer knows somebody who is looking for a horse like yours. Maybe a trail riding company needs a well-broke horse like the one your daughter no longer rides. The wider you spread the net, the more likely you can find the right situation for a good horse. Scott says he tries to get people to focus on the future before they buy. “If I have a 70-year-old looking at a four-year-old horse, I say, ‘What are you going to do with this horse in five years if you stop riding? Maybe you should be looking at a 15- or 18-year-old horse instead.’”

Avoid guilt

Christina says it’s an unfortunate fact that people tend to operate out of guilt when

faced with the situation of having to make tough decisions about a horse’s future. “We need to decipher how many external factors are affecting our decision making when it comes to horses/livestock,” she says. “There are social expectations that horses should be viewed as pets and part of your family therefore there is a negative stigma around finding a new home for a horse. I think people often have the wrong horse because they feel committed to that horse.” When you do have to move a horse along, “Make a confident decision and stand by it,” she advises. “There are always going to be naysayers. That doesn’t mean that we should be working out of fear when we make the decision to find a different/ better home for an equine.”

Five signs you have a horse that’s wrong for you

Because re-homing a horse is an emotional decision, you may not be seeing the clear signs that Rio isn't the guy for you. Here are five: 1. You avoid riding him. Trainer Michele DeCanditis says there are lots of tells: You avoid riding, or, when you are in the saddle or around the horse, you feel frightened or worried over the way it moves or assume guarded postures such as a crouching fetal position or braced extremities. 2. You ride but it’s not fun. Sure, gritting your teeth on occasion is something most riders can relate to, but if you don’t enjoy your horse time overall, trainers say that’s a big clue something is off.

12 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

4. You started out with big plans but now your horse is idle in the pasture. “I am not a fan of horses on welfare,” Christina says. “If you have a horse that you are paying board on or paying feed and cleaning up after, when you choose to use that horse for a trail ride or another job, that horse is expected to perform to your expectations. Otherwise there’s no reason for you to be dumping money into his belly so he can poop it out.” 5. You feel you have to bribe the horse. “One of the signs I look for is if they have a 4,000-pound bag of treats in the barn,” Scott Thomson says. “You shouldn’t have to bribe the horse.”

How to Plan Ahead

When you buy a horse, he may live another 20 or more years. Plan ahead for his welfare, especially when you know you will not be his last stop. • Invest in training. A well-trained horse will always have a better future than one who has stood around doing nothing for years. • Keep the horse ridden and get him or her lots of experience. A horse that loads well, can show, ride trail, go horse camping, is good with kids, has done cow work, etc., will generate more interest if you need to re-home him. • Build a good horse network. Reach out to friends, riding groups, horse organizations, volunteer groups, social media groups and horse professionals to create a network of resources you can count on. Not only will it enrich your horse's life, you’ll have lots of help if you need to find Flash a new home.

n Peggy Conger is the Associate Editor of Horse Around New Mexico magazine. She enjoys trail riding and can be reached at P_Conger@yahoo.com


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Why auditing a clinic can be just as effective as participating

14 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com


ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY EVALYN BEMIS

www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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Watching from the stands has more benefits than just being less expensive. You can watch multiple horses/ riders, and clearly see how they improve during the day.

Ask before writing the check

First ask yourself why you want to shell out big bucks to ride with the clinician. Do you feel his/her tutelage can provide a level of instruction or insight not available with your regular trainer? Are you considering trying an equestrian discipline that no one else teaches in your area? Are you seeking to challenge yourself or your horse with a multi-day immersion that might be good preparation for competition or a step up in level?

well-known clinician is coming to a barn near you to give a clinic and your friends are all signing up to ride in it. Should you jump on the hay wagon with them? Here are some tips to help you decide if you should join, audit or save your money. 16 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

Any or all of these might be reason enough to write that check. But also ask these questions: Will there be a group of riders at approximately the same level of skill as yours? Are you and your horse fit enough to ride in several sessions over multiple days? If the answers are no, then consider auditing.

Why auditing is a great option

By watching, rather than riding, you can learn quite a lot, especially if the format of the clinic makes it practical


TOP PHOTO: Maddy Skrak took “notes” during the clinic then employed what she learned by riding in one of the sessions. (Make sure you get permission to photograph or record video from the clinician.) BOTTOM PHOTO: Here Maddy shows beautiful form and concentration in this gymnastic exercise.

to observe and ask questions. Ask the clinician if asking questions during the clinic is encouraged. Some only want questions from auditors during the breaks. Sometimes those watching get as much or more than riders, especially if the clinician makes a point of speaking to the audience. Sitting in the stands gives you a bird’s eye view of what is going on with several horses. It allows you to concentrate on what the clinician is saying, and not have to deal with correcting your horse, or being distracted by others’ fidgety horses. Another enticement is that auditing costs a fraction of the participation costs. (Think $40 instead of $400.)

Time to test the waters

Auditing will allow you to learn whether this clinician is someone whose style of teaching suits you. Just because someone has achieved status in the horse world doesn’t mean they can impart that wisdom or skill to others. And if you aren’t prepared to ride at the level of instruction, you will risk embarrassing yourself, hurting your horse, and slowing down the pace for the rest of the riders, not to mention wasting your money.

Example of the perfect audit situation

At a recent 3-day clinic with jumper Richard Spooner at Hipico Santa Fe, there were four sessions per day, limited to six riders per group. All sessions were held in the indoor arena, with a sound system making it possible to hear every word. www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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Richard was generous in his praise of the riders, but also clear on the issues that each rider faced and how to make corrections. Observing from the stands, it was easy to see that Richard’s system of exercises improved the horses and riders, and also gave them tools to continue the training at home. There was a lot to take away, even without actually riding in the clinic. So consider auditing as an affordable way to up your horsemanship skills. Remember to ask questions, listen well, and take notes, photos and video (if allowed.) And, if you find the information useful in improving your skill set, be sure to let the people who organized the clinic know so they will invite the trainer or similar trainers in the future. The next time the clinician comes to town, you may want to sign up as a rider.

n

Evalyn Bemis is a photojournalist and lifelong equestrian. View her photos online by searching Evalyn Bemis Photography.

Straight from the humans mouth The following riders and auditors shared their thoughts on the value of the clinic, which shows that researching a clinic to find a suitable one, then attending as an auditor or participant will improve your horsemanship skills. Even though this was specifically a clinic for jumpers, these points can translate to any form of training. Chenoa McElvain: You want to teach the horse to fight for you, to figure out how to get over the jump even if you get there wrong. Don’t always try to fix the distances for the horse, let him figure it out for himself through the use of gymnastic exercises.

Vivian Keller: What I have enjoyed the most is how much good horsemanship Richard has applied to this clinic, really checking out how the horse thinks and what we do with that information. I have gained a lot of new tools to improve my riding.

Olga Ashioni: The best part of the clinic for me was learning how to bend the horse in the direction of travel, first on the flat, then over the jumps, without worrying about positioning the head high or low. I felt my horse improving each day.

Berkley Chesen: It was so good to be reminded to keep my head and upper body back over the jumps. I know this, but Richard really emphasized this in a helpful way. He gave me lots of little corrections that I can take home and work on every day, on my own.

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your need to keep your pet’s remains close by, or scatter them at a meaningful place. We offer a wide selection of urns, and can engrave them with words of comfort. Albuquerque Pet Memorial Service is owned by Kelly and Dave Gifford. Pictured here is Kelly’s father David Leahy riding Ani, the couples’ beloved Icelandic Horse.

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www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

19


Wisdom and Wonder of the Walk I

have a particular love of walking with a horse. As a child, I spent hours riding my angel-pony, Lily, on our family farm land back east. Bareback and with a halter, I would lay makeshift lead rope reins down on her neck to let her find our way back home after we were done exploring. I’d lean back on her white rump, swinging my legs with the rhythm of her steps, looking up at the tree tops with sunlight filtering through. She’d rock and sway me, straying far from the path we had originally taken into the woods, picking her way carefully through the forest and thickets, over streams, faithfully and safely bringing us back home once more.

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The rolling, four-beat walk is considered by many to be the optimal gait for schooling, the foundation upon which all other movements develop. Unless you and/or your horse are fairly talented, the trot can involve the horse pulling itself along versus pushing from the hindquarters. And while it’s a thrill when it goes well, the canter can often be a bit much for both horse and human — too challenging to stay balanced and calm, particularly on the trail. While sometimes there is a great advantage to getting a horse’s feet busy, helping an antsy horse learn to slow down can help re-wire prey and flight tendencies, and I believe may help teach them about self-regulating their own energy at times.

Walking is for every breed and discipline

Gaited horses: The true, four-beat walk is extremely important for gaited breeds, helping to strengthen their hocks (a common site for injury or weakness due to gaited conformation), developing a quality base for behavior and strength (thus improving the easy gaits), and making it more comfortable to ride with non-gaited breeds.

ARTICLE BY LYNN CLIFFORD, MA,LMHC PHOTO BY TONY STROMBERG As an adult, I continue to enjoy the walk for the meditative quality it fosters. As my horse walks, I pay attention to my breathing, the rhythm and sounds of the horse, the sensation of being carried and supported, and take it as an opportunity to go through my pre-ride checklist for myself and my horse. I consider it the foundation before any other work or training commences.

Benefits for the horse

Of course, the walk is excellent for warming up and cooling down, and it is also incredibly rehabilitative without the sometimes jarring, staccato trot or canter gaits. When was the last time your horse had an injury and your vet told you to go out and trot and canter him? The walk lets the horse heal and start over again.

Dressage training: Schooling for a genuinely great walk is one surefire way to improve your dressage test scores. The walk is judged on every test from beginner to Grand Prix. Depending on the level, you’ll need the working walk, free walk, extended walk, turn on the haunches (pirouette) at the walk, etc. Circles, turns, lateral movements -- all of these come much more easily at trot and canter when they are perfected at the walk first. Hunter/jumper: Legendary coach George Morris touts the importance of developing the walk, in order to create impulsion, break up resistance in the horse, encourage the croup to drop and the shoulders to raise and develop roundness. These are the basics upon which good form over the jumps and quality movement on the flat depend. Trail and competitive trail: Show me a horse that runs up and down hills on the

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Walking is good practice for every breed and equine discipline. It helps the horse's joints stay strong and, when done properly, will build muscles and good form throughout his body. (Photo by Evalyn Bemis.)

trail, and I’ll see a horse that lacks true partnership with his rider; an unbalanced mount with a weak hind end is one that is more prone to injury over the long haul. Not only is the ability to maintain a walk on the trail “come hell or high water” an excellent training and strengthening tool -- it might save your skin when it comes to unexpected situations or obstacles. Endurance horses: Endurance is not about running your horse as fast as possible for as long as possible. Many, many hours and miles must be spent “legging up” and developing the strength and control necessary for your horse to endure -- and enjoy! -- the long trots and brief canters of an endurance ride.

Benefits for the rider

Therapeutic riding programs exist for a reason; the physical benefits (not to mention mental and emotional benefits) are extraordinary for ALL riders! Riding at the walk — a seemingly simple but

profound gait — opens the hips, releases the low back and simulates a human walking without the compression of the legs and associated joints among other benefits. The walk is also a place to naturally learn better balance and how to stabilize our core, things that decline with accidents and age if we’re not careful. As with horses, learning to slow down helps riders to rewire our own flight tendencies in this harried, high-tech world. The walk can help teach us how to self-regulate our energy, release serotonin, soothe adrenals and stabilize cortisol/stress hormone levels. Who wouldn’t want that?

Importance of saddle fit

On a practical note, keep in mind the comfort and fit of your saddle, for both you and your horse. In order for your horse to really benefit from the walk, the saddle must fit. And for you to be able to enjoy the walking work, you need the kind of seat on your saddle that

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encourages you to sink in and relax. If your saddle fits both you and your horse really well but the actual seat is stiff or hard, consider investing in a “seat saver." Relatively inexpensive, these come in all shapes, sizes and materials to complement your tack and add comfort for you

Four steps to get the most out of walking

Here are a few points to remember as you start walking with more awareness. 1. Just go for a walk! Your time with your horse does not always have to be mounted. Try walking with your horse on the ground, letting the horse set the pace. See if you can match your footfalls to hers. Try a walking meditation in nature: Focus on your own steps -- heel first, ball of your foot, pushing off from the toes. You can play around with your intentions -- expect your horse to follow your lead for a while, then go ahead and follow your horse’s lead too.


2. Consider sitting “in” your horse rather than “on” your horse: Try this at the halt first. Feel what it feels like to truly let go, allowing your horse to carry you. Can you be a centaur? 3. Let your horse choose the pace and direction, simply follow with your seat, feeling the nuanced quality of your horse’s particular walk. It’s permissible to move your hands if you feel you must. Anything goes except changing the gait or stopping completely.

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4. At the walk, pay close attention. Notice which portion of the movement is dominant. Do you feel more right/left, front/back, up/down? Which portion of the movement is restricted? This awareness will translate beautifully to an innate, body-centric understanding of your horse’s stride, making it easy to time your aids for more advanced work later on. I am so grateful for the hours and miles I spent walking with Lily, my wonder pony. While I also liked to gallop around, many of my favorite memories are of sauntering through the fields and forests feeling utterly safe, free and supported—a sensation I recognize now on certain days and times because our time together helped me create a memory in my body.

n

Lynn Clifford is a third generation professional equestrian and licensed therapist. She specializes in holistic horsemanship and classical dressage for all disciplines and is the founder of The Inner Equestrian: Life Coaching & Counseling for Equestrians seeking more freedom and connection with their horse and in their lives. Contact LynnClifford.com, lynn@lynnclifford.com or 505-231-5353.

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24 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com


Goose Downs Farm

Goose Downs Farm 64 Goose Downs Road Galisteo, NM 87540 (505) 690-9948 MJRatGDF@aol.com 25 www.horsearoundnm.comwww.goosedownsfarm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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BE READY TO RIDE

N

ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY ROELIFF ANNON

ow that we have survived an actual winter, we may look back and realize we haven’t done as much with our horses as we do in a warmer version of winter.

But that’s okay. This situation presents a great opportunity to learn how our horse reacts when coming back from having some time off, or a period of limited exercise.

1

When horses don’t move much, several As stewards of our horses’ mental and things happen: They lose muscle tone, physical well-being, it is incumbent on joint, tendon and ligament health are us to be aware of the risks to ourselves compromised, and they are going to have (falling off a frisky horse) and for our pent up energy. Their nature will cause horses (pulling a muscle, straining a them to want to run around, buck, play, tendon or otherwise injuring themselves) etc. This is what all normal healthy when coming back from a period of horses do. But when you consider the inactivity. impact of a layoff, the potential for trouble should not be underestimated. 26 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

The initial connection

I am a firm proponent of giving a horse as much turnout as possible. If your horse can be turned out for even a half hour before you start working him, that will be helpful. Remember that the instant you and your horse are aware of each other, the “training” begins. These


These photos show a warm-up exercise to get your horse to pay attention to you, and to be in a relaxed state before you mount.

1.

If you have a sturdy platform, gently lead your horse onto it, one step at a time.

2. Notice if your horse is relaxed and not rushing. It means he is using self control.

2


3. Your goal is to have your horse look like this -- calm yet responsive. This can best be achieved with ground work that enables you to control your horse's feet. When you are connected to your horse in this way, it makes for a much more predictable and safer ride.

initial steps are a simple and effective way to “connect” up with your horse. • Be aware when approaching, haltering and leading your horse. Watch him carefully. Does he turn his head away when you halter him, push past you, put his hip on you? Does he react by bracing or pulling or pushing

on you with his shoulder? These are all indications some work is in order before you ride. • Watch what happens when you turn him out. Does he pull away and run off ? Or stay with you while you walk away first? The former encourages

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3 Five tips to get you started Here are five tips that will help you and your horse get in tune, even after a long layoff. 1. After the horse is saddled but before you mount, ask him to step back exactly three steps, come forward five steps, yield both front and hindquarters from each side, in a calm, responsive fashion. Ask him to move around you in a circle, nice and round. As soon as you ask, your horse should respond.

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2. Be insistent about good behavior. When mounting your horse, he should stand and wait for you to get both feet in the stirrups. If your horse cannot stand for you, do not mount. 3. Do step 2 until he allows you to sit calmly in the saddle for a few seconds. Then YOU ask him to move off. When you ask your horse walk, he should move out calmly. 4. Remember you will need to re-condition a horse that has been laid off. Make your first few rides easy and undemanding, slowly working up to more strenuous outings. 5. If you are unsure, seek professional advice, and maybe even have a trainer work your horse for a month or so before the riding season.

n Roeliff Annon is a native New Mexican blessed to have been exposed to Ray Hunt as a young man. He and his wife have a ranch in central New Mexico where they run cattle and horses. He enjoys exploring the horse human dynamic and helping horses navigate their journey through the humans world. Contact raranch@mac.com

Albuquerque Bob Powell 505.261.8059 Dr. Diana DeBlanc, DVM 505.804.1846 Horsemen’s 8812 2nd St NW 505.792.8225 Academy Pet Hospital 6000 Academy NE 505.822.0255 Dan’s Boots and Saddles 6903 4th St. NW 505.345.2220 Isleta Feed and Livestock 4607 Isleta Blvd SW 505 307 3859 Aztec/Durango Dennis Brazeal 505.508.8054 Aztec Feed and Supply 216 S Main Ave 505.334.8911

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Belen Old Mill Farm & Ranch 19763 NM-314 505.865.5432 Old Mill Farm & Ranch Riverside 2353 NM-47 505.864.4766 Corrales Meddleton Equine Clinic, Inc 6165 Corrales Rd 505.344.2680 Edgewood Jim Morris 505.350.5615 Old Mill Farm & Ranch 1912 Rte 66 505.286.4115 Los Lunas, NM Carol Newbill 505.565.2120 Santa Fe/Las Vegas Andrea Pabel-Deane 505.690.8426 Taos Nicole Trousdale 303.903.2721

www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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30 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com


TLC FOR YOUR HORSE

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Cameron Veterinary Clinic, in Eldorado, Santa Fe, offers two veterinarians and five clinic staff who are all devoted to providing the best care to your beloved horse or pet.

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Welcome to one of Albuquerque's finest Equestrian Estates! Located on over Two Luxuriant Acres and nestled next to the Bosque for instant access for riding, bicycling or walking .You'll think you died and went to Heaven! Five stalls a 2217sqft Barn attached outdoor runs & four more runs and large arena. All areas have automatic water. Pipe fencing over the entire property. Covered trailer parking area. A gorgeous northern NM home boasts soaring ceilings, hardwood floors, Architecturally intriguing windows and skylights, French doors, 2 way fireplaces and 3BR’s with ensuites downstairs with 2BRs+All Purpose Room Upstairs. All this is nestled in a Green Oasis with a Lovely Outdoor Living Area.

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HORSE SERVICES DIRECTORY

Listed here are horse-related services provided by the March/April 2019 issue advertisers. They are experts in their fields. Many of the business owners are also horse owners and enthusiasts. They are the reason Horse Around New Mexico magazine exists and why the magazine is growing. If you enjoy this free publication, please show your support by supporting our advertisers. BARNS/CORRALS Ironhorse Pipe & Steel, page 19

KIDS Starrynight Guest Ranch, page 13

RESCUE/ADOPTION Four Corners Equine Rescue, page 24

BOARDING Dancing Bear Ranch, page 35

NATURAL PRODUCTS Pharm-Aloe, Erin Bales, page 23 Pharm-Aloe, distributors, page 29

SADDLES John McKenna Saddlery, page 13

BOOKS Margret Henkels Conformation Balancing, page 35 CLASSES Ginger Gaffney, Inspired Writing With Horses, page 19 EVENTS Tucumcari Rawhide Days, page 30 FEED Standlee Premium Western Forage, page 2 GUEST RANCH FOR SALE Flying W, Oklahoma, page 6

MASSAGE & BODYWORK Masterson Method, Karen Evans, page 35 ORGANIZED RIDES Navajo Lake CTR, page 37 Competitive Trail Rides, page 37

SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS Back Country Horsemen, page 24 SPECIALTY SERVICES Albuquerque Pet Memorial Service, page 18

TRAINING Heart of the Horses Sanctuary, page 30 Katrin Silva, page 24 Lynn Clifford, The Ride of Your Life, page 23 Susan Smith, page 38 TRAINING FACILITY/CLINICS Goose Downs Farms, page 25 Terra Nova Training Center, page 7 VEHICLE/TRAILERS Hal Burns Truck & Equipment, page 13 Sandia Trailer Sales and Service, page 40

TACK AND FEED STORES Horse Shelter Resale Store, page 37 Horsemen’s, page 35 VETERINARIAN Miller’s Feed, page 38 Cameron Veterinary Clinic, Paul’s Veterinary Supply, page 31 page 28 Western Trails, page 19 Taos Tack and Pet Supply, page 39 Village Mercantile, page 3 www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

REAL ESTATE Ann Taylor, page 31 Linda Vista Stables for Lease, page 38 Marie-Claire Turner, page 37

31


GROUND TRAINING

BRUSH UP Just 30 minutes a day with your horse can yield amazing progress! ARTICLE BY SUZANNE DE LAURENTIS AND ALLEN POGUE PHOTOS BY KATE AUSTIN

T

oday lots of horse folks are searching for cutting-edge training technology or the newest recipe for success. The good news is that new animal behavioral science studies show the horse to be capable of more than ever thought possible. Miniature horses are even being used as service companions and horses use their empathetic abilities in human counseling and therapeutic programs. This is encouraging and exciting progress: The horse is being recognized

for his brainpower, not just his horsepower. Many animal behavioral experts advocate slowing horse training down and using fewer repetitions for better results. An emphasis on fewer repetitions and clearer communication can put a horse at the head of the proverbial class. This method can be used to help your horse get in sync with you, after a layoff or when he is not paying attention.

Setting the stage for success

To try out this 30-minutes-a-day training

32 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

approach, make a list of several skills or tricks you would most like your horse to learn. Choose one skill per week and break each skill down into around 10 steps. Your training plan should be so simple to understand that a five-year-old child could understand it. Teach your horse one or two of those steps every day and in a month, you will be pleasantly surprised at your success. Here’s a sample of nine basic ground skills that horses can easily learn. All the horse needs to know to begin is how to lead. The only equipment you need is a halter and working length line (1520 feet) and a guider whip or other nice flexible whip of about 48 inches. Some Basic Ground Skills 1. Forward movement is perhaps the most important ground skill you can


4. Yield the shoulders and yield the hindquarters. A horse should easily let you direct or control each part of his body long before he is saddle trained. This will translate into easier steering and better balance when you are on his back and progress into beautiful mounted moves such as the turn on the haunches and turn on the forehand. 5. Yield the face. If a horse is taught to accept and then yield to light pressure with a halter and then later a bit or other headgear, he will be more willing and lighter to handle when he is started in mounted work.

Teaching your horse to ground tie is easier when you give him a specific place to stand (like the mat) and control him from a long line. teach a horse. He should move forward speed, change speed or gaits on cue and willingly on a line with a cue and improve general body balance. should not change speeds or stop until 3. Change of direction. This teaches a asked. A horse that is generous in his horse to use each eye separately to view forward movement is usually easier to you through the changes of direction. train than one that is sluggish. Let your He will also see you with both eyes as horse know from the very beginning he follows through the change. In other that when you ask him to move, he is words, he learns to work as directed expected to do so. from either side. This also helps him 2. Transitions or changes of gait. This to gain confidence in your position and helps a horse to tune into your body verbal cues. language while learning to maintain his

6. Turn-backs on the half circle. This is a great exercise to help a horse learn to shift his weight and balance onto his hind quarters and to engage his hocks as he makes a turn-back. Try lunging the horse in a half circle at the trot, asking him to halt as he comes to the fence. After a pause of a couple seconds, cue the horse to turn toward you and complete a half circle in the opposite direction, also halting when he approaches the fence again. 7. Whoa. You may notice the “whoa” was not at the top of our list. We began the process as we incorporated it in the turn-back exercise above. It will be easier to teach a horse to stop after he has gained confidence in taking direction with his forward movement and turns. WHOA means stop and do it NOW. “Easy” or “slow” can be used to ask for reduced speed but “whoa is whoa!”

HOW TO TEACH CISCO TO STOP, STAND, COME Whoa We teach most skills on the ground long before mounted training begins. A great way to instill the “whoa” is in ground driving gear (surcingle and 22' long driving lines.) Give the verbal cue of “whoa,” gently give the driving lines a squeeze by closing your fingers. When the horse halts, gently release your fingers but keep the horse in the halt until you give him the next cue. If he doesn’t halt, plant your hips and feet to resist his pressure until he yields.

Another method is to lunge the horse in half circles in a round pen and give the verbal cue “whoa” each time the horse must stop at the physical barrier of the wall. Verbal cues are easily transferable to mounted work at a later date. Ground Tie This rope method (photo above) enables me to remind my mare to “stay” even at a distance. The rope is fastened to the halter and run through a ring on the belly band of the surcingle. If she moves, I can give her a gentle touch to ask her to stay. Great training from a distance!

Come When Called Begin by repeating the horse’s name each and every time you are near him and keep other chatter to a minimum. Put him loose in the round pen and shake or rattle a handful of feed in a bucket as you say his name. Don’t move toward him but wait for him to come to you. Repeat this until he comes eagerly to you each time. As his response becomes a habit, switch from the tiny bit of feed in a bucket to just a small horse treat. Over time, you can try a good scratch or stroking instead of a food treat.

www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

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8. Ground tie. A horse learns to stand where he is placed and to stay with the lead dropped. We like to use a mat or other marker to help the horse to better understand to stay on position. 9. Come when called. We teach our horses to recognize and respond to their names. A dog may come running eagerly at the sound of his name and, although horses don’t respond exactly in the same manner, they can still be taught to be called by name even from a pasture group.

Helpful hints

Giving clear and consistent cues is actually like giving instructions in

pantomime. Spending 30 minutes every day with your horse will sharpen your skills as a teacher. Physical cues indicate a touch with either hand or a guider whip, proximity cues mean where your body is in relation to the horse’s body and verbal cues are the delivery of one or two very distinct words. A reasonably intelligent horse will begin to understand your request with about three repetitions. Too many repetitions can decrease his responsiveness. At times when a horse seems unable or unwilling to understand, consider giving him some time to think and try again when he is in a different frame of mind. He may simply need a little time out or a walkabout.

Suzanne De Laurentis and Allen Pogue recently relocated their business, Imagine a Horse, to Pie Town, NM, from Texas. Best known as Master Trick trainers, their methods were developed by blending modern and classical horsemanship into a fun and comprehensive training method designed to increase the intelligence, adaptability and predictability of today’s companion horse. Contact imgineahorse.com or 512-736-3208.

n

BEST "DON'T MISS" HORSE EVENTS March 2 • April 13 Orientations & Tours The Horse Shelter www.thehorseshelter.org Los Cerrillos....See ad page 37 March 1-8 • April 5-12 Positive Reinforcement Intensive Workshops ~ Shawna Karrasch www.terranovatrainingcenter.com Terra Nova Training Center Santa Fe....See ad page 7 March 9-10 • April 6-7 Eventing X Games www.goosedownsfarm.com Goose Downs Farm Galisteo....See ad page 25 March 9 • April 20 Barn Tours/Volunteer Orientation Four Corners Equine Rescue www.fourcornersequinerescue.org Aztec....See ad page 24 March 15 • April 5 • May 4 Starting Off on the Right Foot Erica Hess & Joost Lammers info@heartofthehorses.com Heart of the Horses Sanctuary Santa Fe....See ad page 30

March 22-23 How to Buy a Horse Lynn Clifford 505-231-5353 lynn@lynnclifford.com Arrowhead Ranch Santa Fe....See ad page 23 March 23 Pony Bones Study Group with Susan Smith www.susansmithsantafe.com Arrowhead Ranch Santa Fe....See ad page 38 March 23 • April 27 • May 25 Conformation Balancing~ Get Started Workshop Margret Henkels 505-501-2290 ConformationBalancing.com Rancho Mariposa Lamy....See ad page 35 April 6 Bodywork in the Saddle Equine Ortho-Bionomy - for horse and rider with Susan Smith www.susansmithsantafe.com Santa Fe....See ad page 38 April 13 Inspired Writing with Horses Ginger Gaffney, trainer/author ggaffney@newmexico.com http://www.gingergaffney.com Turtle Ranch Abiquiu....See ad page 19

April 27-28 NATRC Caballo Canyon kbingham630@msn.com www.natrc3.org Near Aztec....See ad page 37 May 3-4 Tucumcari Rawhide Days www.tucumcarirawhidedays.com Tucumcari....See ad page 30 May 3-5 • September 13-15 Positive Reinforcement Training for Equines ~ Shawna Karrasch www.terranovatrainingcenter.com Terra Nova Training Center Santa Fe....See ad page 7 May 10-12 NATRC Navajo Lake-45th Annual cathycumberworth@yahoo.com www.NATRC3.org Near Aztec....See ad page 37 May 11 Ground Schooling Demonstration: Ground Manners, Work in Hand, Round Pen & Longing Lynn Clifford 505-231-5353 lynn@lynnclifford.com Arrowhead Ranch Santa Fe....See ad page 23

May 11-12 Working Equitation: Obstacles with Trainer Ginger Gaffney ggaffney@newmexico.com Turtle Ranch Abiquiu....See ad page 19 May 24-25 The Inner Equestrian Mini-Clinic for the Ride of Your Life Lynn Clifford 505-231-5353 lynn@lynnclifford.com Arrowhead Ranch Santa Fe....See ad page 23 June 1-2 Conformation, Compensation or Both? with Susan Smith www.susansmithsantafe.com Santa Fe....See ad page 38 July 20-21 NATRC Chicken Creek cathycumberworth@yahoo.com www.NATRC3.org Mancos, CO....See ad page 37 Sept 21-22, 2019 NATRC Chokecherry Canyon tsmith@sjrmc.net www.NATRC3.org Farmington....See ad page 37

IMAGINE YOUR AD IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF HORSE AROUND NEW MEXICO. FIND OUT MORE AT HORSEAROUNDNM.COM OR CALL 505-570-7377. 34 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com


IS YOUR HORSE

IS IN YOUR HANDS

IS YOUR HORSE

100%

ABILITY

Conformation Balancing is deceptively simple. With patient, conscientious placement of your hands on specific areas of the horse’s body, you can bring about profound change in his physical and mental well-being. The secret? The internet-like web of fascia beneath the skin. Fascia is the connective tissue that “holds everything together”—it wraps around, attaches, and stabilizes muscles and internal organs, communicating with all parts, while providing structure and organization. But here’s the thing: Fascia also is a reservoir for emotional trauma and tension. This means that when you help a horse find a physical release in a “stuck” area of strain or stiffness, you invite psychological healing, as well.

This is a book that goes beyond the anatomical importance of the connective tissue system in horses.... It addresses the holistic need of the horse to be understood and respected. It gives insight into the way fascial tension affects the behavior and performance of horses and how relief for the fascial system provides horses with much more than alleviation of pain. This book should be in the library of all horse owners.

www.horseandriderbooks.com

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with Joseph Freeman. Her method of Conformation Balancing developed through years of work with horses experiencing elusive athletic limits. An avid rider, Henkels includes a rider’s perspective in her bodywork techniques. Her riding experiences have taken her to Ireland with the Willie Leahy Connemara and Coast tours, and at home, she explores dressage, trail rides, and has foxhunted. Henkels continually researches conformation in relation to her unique approach in order $29.95 USD ISBN 978-1-57076-791-3 to offer new tools for looking at the horse’s 52995 appearance to find athletic imbalances.

margret henkels

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MADALYN WARD, DVM

Following a Bachelor’s degree in journalism, Margret Henkels was a reporter and sales associate in the newsprint industry, while her visual skills were honed in the art business in Santa Fe, New Mexico. A deep passion for horses, good health, and learning to find her own 100-percent fitness drew Henkels into equine bodywork. She is certified in Matrix Energetics, a Quantum Energy work developed by Dr. Richard Bartlett, and Equine Natural Movement (Heller Work for horses)

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Resolve Painful Limitations in the Equine Body with Conformation Balancing and Fascia Fitness

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Conformation Balancing puts the power in your hands with this book & DVD v Give your horse a gift that v Learn about how the miracle brings him happiness and fitness, every season!

of fascia, the body’s internet, affects your horse.

BOOK AND DVD AVAILABLE AT:

Trafalgar Square Books’ Website -HorseAndRiderBooks.com or Amazon.com

ConformationBalancing.com

Masterson Method Integrated Equine Performance Bodywork • Release Tension • Reduce Restriction • Restore Range of Motion

CHICKS Yep, they’re coming! (not just for horses)

Release Accumulated Tension in Key Junctions of the Horse's Body that Most Affect Performance, Health, and Well-Being

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Karen Evans, Certified Practitioner

Buy 2 Sessions, Get 1 FREE* horseplaynm@gmail.com (505) 501-3633 *Introductory Offer

www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

35


HORSE HEALTH

Have a Year-Round Health Plan for Your Horse BY ANDY CAMERON, DVM

e are fortunate to live in a climate that lends itself to yearround riding. But as we gear up for a more active spring, summer and fall of trail rides, shows, rodeos and other horse-related activities, consider this handy list of things you should schedule to help keep your horse healthy all year. • Spring vaccinations. Horses, even those that stay home on the farm or ranch, should be vaccinated annually for those infectious agents that can find their way to horses: insect transmitted viruses like eastern and western (and depending on your location) Venezuelan equine encephalitis, West Nile virus, tetanus (which is everywhere in a horse’s environment), and rabies (which is harbored by the wildlife populations that can easily wander onto the property.) Horses that will be traveling and in close contact with other horses at events should also be vaccinated for equine influenza and equine rhinopneumonitis (aka equine herpes virus, EHV.)

To keep your equine in top health, jot down the health/vet care dates on your 2019 calendar. It's much easier to stay on top of health care yearround, than hurrying to get a test or medical procedure. Coggins tests. This blood test must be run annually on your horse for any interstate travel and may be required by local shows, rodeos, events or organized trail rides that you join. If you’re not already on a yearly schedule to get this done, consider doing it every spring when your vet is out for your horse’s check up and vaccinations. The test results takes 1-3 days to get back from the lab, so planning ahead is a must. There’s no such thing as an “emergency” Coggins test. • Health certificates. Requirements may vary by state or event, so be sure to check your destination’s rules. In general, health certificates for travel are good for 30 days from the date that the veterinarian sees your horse. • Deworming. Together with your veterinarian, you should come up with an annual parasite control plan, whether it be twice a year testing for worms, or scheduled routine dewormings or some combination of the two. • Hoof care. Work with your farrier to come up with the optimal regular hoof care plan for your horse throughout the year. Many farriers like to schedule you out ahead for a few cycles, generally every 6-8 weeks. • Dental work. Though the need for dental work varies a lot from horse to horse, an annual dental exam should be included in your horse health plan. This is commonly done in the spring by your veterinarian. • Fall vaccines. For horses that will continue traveling and co-mingling with others, you should consider having the equine influenza and equine rhinopneumonitis vaccines boosted six months after their spring vaccines.

Dr. Andy Cameron owns Cameron Vet Clinic in Santa Fe and treats all livestock and small animal species. He owns three horses, is a member of Mounted Search and Rescue and enjoys wilderness packing. Contact him at 505-466-1540. 36 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com

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821 W. San Mateo Rd, Santa Fe • (505) 954-1375 store@thehorseshelter.org • thehorseshelter.org NORTH AMERICAN TRAIL RIDE CONFERENCE (NATRC)

FREE MEMBERSHIPS FOR FIRST-TIME MEMBERS

WHAT CTR IS: A distance competition over a measured trail and completed within a window of time. It is a family sport open to all equines. It promotes education by evaluation of both horse & rider by qualified judges. For ride details, visit natrc3.org or contact Donna Dandy at klubadandy@myedl.com EXPERIENCE: The Challenge - A Deepening Partnership with Your HorseCamaraderie - Confidence - Exhilaration - Awesome Scenery

2019 RIDE DATES April 27-28, Caballo Canyon, Aztec, NM May 11-12 Navajo Lake, Navajo Lake State Park, NM June 8-9, General Albert P. Clark Memorial, Colorado Spring, CO Air Force Academy July 20-21, Chicken Creek Region 3 Benefit Ride, Mancos, CO August 3-4, Wingle Ride, CO August 17-18, Music Meadows, Westcliffe, CO September 7-8, Colorado Trail, Buffalo Creek, CO September 21-22, Chokecherry, Farmington, NM October 12-13, Rabbit Valley location TBD

TO JOIN OR FIND OUT MORE: www.natrc.org / natrc@natrc.org 303-688-1677

www.horsearoundnm.com | Mar/Apr 2019 | HORSE AROUND

37


LINDA VISTA STABLES

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IDEAL FOR TRAINERS, PERSONAL HORSES, BOARDING BUSINESS

Located in Galisteo, NM. 35 acres, barn, large turn out, side arena, pasture, pipe rail pens, covered stalls, office, tack and feed room. CALL 505-466-8930.

EQUINE BODY BALANCE™ Equine Body Balance is informed by Equine Ortho-Bionomy®: a non-force bodywork approach – addresses acute and chronic injury patterns, structural, visceral, circulation, fluids, soft tissue, that may manifest in lameness, illness and behavioral patterns. MOUNTED BODY BALANCE™ The application of Equine Body Balance techniques for the horse coupled with Ortho-Bionomy for the human, mounted or unmounted sessions. Focus on deriving the best possible outcome for horse and rider by working with inherent strengths. ORTHO-BIONOMY® Non-force bodywork for the human, based on Osteopathy, that addresses all body systems: acute and chronic injury patterns, structural, visceral, fluids, soft tissue, circulation – with focus on self-correction. CLASSES – Equine Body Balance – Equine Ortho-Bionomy® for horses and riders, Ortho-Bionomy® Professional certifications: Registered Instructor & Advanced Practitioner – Ortho-Bionomy® & Equine Ortho-Bionomy®, Practitioner – Equine Positional Release (EPR)®. Member ABMP; Society of OrthoBionomy International; Independent Liberty Trainers Network. Located in Santa Fe. info@susansmithsantafe.com www.susansmithsantafe.com 505-501-2478 38 HORSE AROUND | Mar/Apr 2019 | www.horsearoundnm.com


Profile for Cecilia Kayano

HORSE AROUND NEW MEXICO, MARCH APRIL 2019  

Tips from trainers on groundwork and getting your horse ready for spring rides. Special feature on choosing a lifetime horse, and what to do...

HORSE AROUND NEW MEXICO, MARCH APRIL 2019  

Tips from trainers on groundwork and getting your horse ready for spring rides. Special feature on choosing a lifetime horse, and what to do...