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DOCUMENT winter 2014


Document

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a Publication of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University

919-660-3663 | Fax: 919-681-7600 | docstudies@duke.edu | documentarystudies.duke.edu Director: Wesley C. Hogan Associate Director for Programs and Development: Lynn McKnight Publishing Director: Alexa Dilworth Art Director: Bonnie Campbell Communications Coordinator and Document Editor: Elizabeth Phillips Digital Arts and Publishing Intern: Tory Jeffay The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. CDS values documentary work that balances community goals with individual artistic expression. CDS promotes documentary work that cultivates progressive change by amplifying voices, advancing human dignity, engendering respect among individuals, breaking down barriers to understanding, and illuminating social injustices. CDS conducts its work for local, regional, national, and international audiences. All photographs appearing in Document® are copyright by the artist. | Document® is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

CONTENTS FEATURED 3 City Under One Roof 2013 Lange-Taylor Prizewinner Jen Kinney’s Project on Whittier, Alaska

AWARDS 6 Current and Upcoming Prizes and Prizewinning Book EXHIBITIONS 7 Tiksi Evgenia Arbugaeva’s Hometown Photographs from Siberia’s Arctic Coast Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene Photographs by 2012 First Book Prize in Photography Winner Gerard H. Gaskin ESSAY 8 A New Wilderness at the Maze 2013 Documentary Essay Prizewinner Rachel Andrews on Ireland’s Maze Prison FILM 10 2014 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival Thoughts from Director Deirdre Haj; Passes and Tickets; Year-Round Programming

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EDUCATION 11 Undergraduate Education News from Certificate in Documentary Studies Alumni and Recent John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Award Winners Continuing Education Student Work: Documentary Street Photography; New Spring 2014 Classes MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts Student Films at the New York Film Festival; 2013–14 Visiting Artists CDS INTERNS 14 Hannah Colton, Tory Jeffay, and Lisa McCarty OTHER NEWS 15 In Practice: Work by Duke Arts Faculty Gary Hawkins at the Movies Tom Rankin at the Library of Congress FRIENDS OF CDS 15

cover : Mother’s Day Ball, Manhattan, N.Y., 2001. Photograph by Gerard H. Gaskin, from Legendary (see pages 6 and 7). left to right: Continuing education student work from the Documentary Street Photography workshop. Photographs by

Bridgette Cyr, J. Rene Davenport, and Jennifer Greg.

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Winner of the 2013 Lange-Taylor Prize

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Jen Kinney: City Under One Roof

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he Center for Documentary Studies launched the Lange-Taylor Prize in 1990 to encourage collaboration between documentary writers and photographers in the tradition of the acclaimed photographer Dorothea Lange and the writer and social scientist Paul Taylor. Relaunched in 2013, the annual prize supports documentary artists—working alone or in teams—involved in ongoing fieldwork projects that rely on both words and images in their creation and presentation. The winner receives $10,000, a solo exhibition at the Center for Documentary Studies, and inclusion in the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Library. Jen Kinney, a 2012 graduate of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, won the 2013 prize for City Under One Roof, a project set in Whittier, Alaska. The members of the prize committee also awarded a “special recognition” to Bianca Giaever, a 2013 graduate of Middlebury College, for her innovative approach to using images and words to tell personal, philosophical stories. Her video Holy Cow Lisa, submitted as part of her proposal, can be seen on Vimeo. A selection of writing and photographs from Jen Kinney’s winning proposal appears below.

the matte - blue mountains out the airplane window were thin and flat like they’d been cut from paper. Cloaked and clouded, they haunted the gauzy horizon. That same night I saw my first glacier. Its face was a blue nearly painful to look at, raw and unashamed and naive as it was. At the airport Don hauled my bags into the back of his pickup truck. He and his wife, Margaret, owned the fish and chips restaurant that had provided me with a job and a reason to fly this far. When I stepped off the plane, I knew nothing about this town or this state, just the make and model of the car with which Don would pick me up. In my mind, Alaska was exceptionally quiet. As far as I imagined, nothing awaited me there.

The road from Anchorage to Whittier along the Turnagain Arm is belted to the feet of mountains, drawn thinly between land and sea. Captain Cook named this long inlet of water in warning after his expedition navigated the narrow passage to its mouth, and finding no outlet to open water, had no choice but to turn back. Gray rain sheeted down the cliffs into gray water. Don raced the minutes in tight, sure turns. Ten p.m. had come and gone, and we were in danger of arriving too late. If we arrived after 11:15, he told me, after the tunnel had closed, we wouldn’t be able to enter Whittier that night. Whittier is a winking crescent moon, curled into the shoulder of a mountain basin and cradled by the sea. The only route to cross the tight ring of peaks that surrounds it on three sides is a tunnel, two-anda-half miles long. Barring arrival by boat or small plane, it is the only throughway in or out of town. Every Alaskan who wasn’t born to this land has a story of her migration. I wonder how many thought they came seeking something, and how many knew that they had come to test how much could be left behind. Alaska draws the recluse, the restless, the solitary soul in need of greater communion with this great Earth. I’ve heard it said that if Alaska is where Americans— independent and uncompromising—go to make their escape, then Whittier is a cavern within that wilderness where Alaskans might go, to get further away. For the first fifty years of the tunnel’s existence, only trains could pass through its vault. In winter, they ran between Whittier and Portage only three days a week. One of those trains carried Babs to Whittier thirty-four years ago, with a broken shoulder and a broken jaw. She’d left a violent husband down in Seward, whose photograph she gave to the train crew. They kept an eye out for him, so even though he tried to hike the tunnel, though he’d call, spitting threats in the middle of the night, she knew that there wasn’t a train for another two days. Whittier was desolate, but it was safe.

Photographs by Jen Kinney from City Under One Roof, Whittier, Alaska, 2011–12

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These days, cars pass through the tunnel as well: in single file, into Whittier on the bottom of the hour, and out on the top. Metal gates on either end seal it at night. Like a camera of geologic proportions, the great yawning aperture opens and closes, its dispassionate shutter set to a generous supply of time. Don and I barely made the last opening that night. We sped into its mouth, and then, inside, slowed to a crawl. The passage, at twenty-five miles an hour, lasted a small eternity. Inside was dark, tall, and narrow. The walls are rock—rough, unpolished, uncovered—and they bear the full weight of the mountain behind them. I felt that I was traveling through the body of the earth. Finally the light at the end bloomed into an exit and came pouring down upon us. Walls of rain erased the mountains and buildings. The town was drowning in a viscous, clotted gray. Back on the other side of the tunnel, Whittier is notorious for weather like this. It’s always shittier in Whittier, they say with a smirk in other towns. Prisoners of Whittier, they condemn. Though the tunnel connects Whittier to the rest of Alaska, it’s come to represent all that separates and divides the town. At 10:45 p.m., when the tunnel closes for the night, one is acutely aware which side of Maynard Mountain one is stranded on. The City of Whittier is a world entire. The great myth of Alaska—harsh but rewarding, distant, lawless, primal, pristine—is alive here, unglorified and unique. From the entrance of the tunnel to the end of an unfinished road, Whittier is only three miles long—just barely longer than the tunnel itself. It can be mapped in fewer than fifteen streets. Hours here have a small town’s drawling density. It is not timeless, but time-heavy. Minutes stretch out like mountain ranges, beautiful and frightening and impossible to escape. Everyone’s got a tall tale to make them pass. I’ve been told that Whittier was named besttasting water in the country, two years running. I hear there’s a goldmine across the bay. It’s all true or it’s all false, and all of it matters: how anyone came to live in this unlikely land, how this city of no city came to be. Today Whittier’s designation as a city fits it like a garment for a vestigial organ. In 1959 Alaska became a state, prompting a swift consolidation of the state’s resources and manpower. Whittier was decommissioned as a military base. Shipments slowed, then stopped. A wartime population of 1,200—the highest this infrastructure ever held—quickly dwindled to 48. Photographs by Jen Kinney from City Under One Roof, Whittier, Alaska, 2011–12

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Of the fewer than roughly 200 people who live in Whittier year-round today, nearly ninety percent live in Begich Towers Incorporated, or the BTI. On the ground floor are a post office, laundromat, and corner store. The school is connected through a tunnel in the basement, beside the one-room church. Behind a door marked faintly, “Cabin Fever,” Babs runs a video-store and tanning bed, where she watches the news and chainsmokes long brown cigarettes. There is no thirteenth floor in the BTI because this is still America, as unrecognizable as it may be. Policemen live down the hall from marijuana dealers; bartender down the hall from missionary. When the wind blows in Whittier like it’s aching to kill, it is louder in those hallways than it is outside. When I could not sleep through the sun-soaked nights, I covered my window in the BTI with black garbage bags, poked a hole in the center, and turned my room into a camera. I lived with the shadowy projection of the parked cars, and the cannery, and the mountains and sea, shimmering, upside-down on my ceiling and walls. This city was, for me, a photographer’s dream. I worked at the restaurant ten-, eleven-hour days, and left at midnight with light still in the sky. The mountains lurked in every window. I couldn’t keep them out of the frame. I never tired of seeing that spectral nighttime sun caught on film, or of hearing the stories that drew people here from across the world, out of their disparate lives, and into this unexpected sanctuary we shared. In New York I also lived in enormous buildings, populated by hundreds of people, and I travelled vast distances via tunnels in the ground. New York is a gargantuan maze: a cacophony of choices, an excess of strangers, a highway of bright, sleepless ecstasy that can crash without notice into a bitter, stunted end. The maze has many entrances and exits, true and false. Time is always in short supply. Whittier, on the other hand, is a labyrinth. It is spiraled in on itself, geographically infinitesimal, a town with more hallways than streets, where every face has been worn familiar, and there’s only one way out. The labyrinth is not designed to confuse but to test. It is an endeavor of duration, one that rewards the patient and persevering. Time is thick enough to taste. New York speeds up, forgets itself. Whittier’s history, as lived through its infrastructure, is braided into the stories of all who live and pass through here, as though the buildings were characters themselves. To inhabit Whittier,


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People arrive for every reason, and stay for others they often couldn’t have dreamed. Sometimes the years just turn into decades. Sometimes, the choice is not theirs to make. There’s Mandy, who arrived in Whittier as I did, a summer waitress, met her husband and has taught at the school for eight years. There are the restless teenagers, born and raised here, who love Whittier in the summer when it fills with young workers, but who in the winter feel the tunnel close as though a noose around their necks. There is Gary, who for fifteen years worked at the manual weather station, requiring that he log the weather once an hour for eighteen hours a day, every day of the week. In those fifteen years he spent fewer than ten nights outside of Whittier. When I asked whether he would leave now that the station is automated, his eyes got wide. “That’d be a big step,” he said, “leaving Whittier.” There are those who can live by the ocean and those who fear its wrath; those who can live on a mountain and those who fear the thinness of its air. There are those who could live in the largest city on the bloated face of this teeming earth. What makes a place bearable or unbearable to its inhabitants are the stories they tell themselves: about safety, comfort, companionship; about resilience, faith, pride, fear. Stories are both a natural resource and a construction; the homes we live in and the wilderness they protect us from. Whittier’s is an architecture of boundaries: the sea and the mountains, perforated by the tunnel; the BTI, that city in a building. The spaces we inhabit shape and order our lives, and so as we construct, alter, and destroy them, we renovate the stories we tell ourselves, and we structure our lives with these stories. To live in Whittier is to live as though on an island. For some people the island provides all that could be desired or needed. For others, community turns eventually into claustrophobia, solitude into solitary confinement. From August to October the temporary residents, the half-Whitts, enact a slow diaspora—a people who arrived, as I did, for the promise of a job, and have lived with the promise of a tunnel ever since. I am still a stranger to this land, but I know this: as my plane circled Anchorage for a landing the night of my second arrival, I realized I would not recognize my

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one also inhabits the myth of Whittier and the two are endlessly intertwined.

Jen Kinney graduated with a BFA in photography and imaging from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in 2012. She has received grants from the Alaska Humanities Forum and NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and Fund for Emerging Artists, and her work has been exhibited at Aperture, NYU’s Gulf and Western and 412 Galleries, Columbia University’s Post Crypt Gallery, and Calumet Gallery. Kinney’s photography and writing have appeared in the magazines Mercer Street, Satellite, ISO, SAND, and Magazin XXX. She has also self-published a number of handbound books. To see Jen Kinney’s full submission, with photos and writing, visit: documentarystudies.duke.edu > awards > Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize > prizewinners

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For information about the 2014 Lange-Taylor Prize competition, see page 6.

birthplace from the air, but that every bend of the Turnagain all the way to Whittier is etched like a constellation on my mind. Two years ago I drove its blade-thin ribbon and learned the same lesson as did Captain Cook, two hundred years ago, on his search for an outlet to the sea. My departure would always necessitate return. Without always turning back, I would not be permitted to leave.

Photographs by Jen Kinney from City Under One Roof, Whittier, Alaska, 2011–12

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AWARDS Current and Upcoming Prizes CDS Documentary Essay Prize in Photography The CDS Documentary Essay Prize honors the best in documentary writing and photography in alternating years, with a focus on current or recently completed work from a long-term project. The 2014 CDS Documentary Essay Prize will be for documentary photography. The winner of the competition will receive $3,000 and have his or her work featured here in Document, as well as in a virtual gallery on the CDS website. Read an excerpt from this year’s prizewinning essay on pages 8–9. Submissions accepted from November to February Deadline: January 31, 2014

Lange-Taylor Prize The Lange-Taylor Prize supports documentary artists—individuals or teams—who are involved in extended, ongoing fieldwork projects that rely on and exploit the interplay of words and images in the creation and presentation of their work. Words can be taken in a broad sense: audio pieces, graphic novels, edited oral histories, creative narratives, and poetry are all welcomed. The winning individual or team receives $10,000, a solo exhibition at CDS, and inclusion in the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Library. Read an excerpt from the 2013 Lange-Taylor Prize–winning project on pages 3–5. Submissions accepted from February to May Deadline: May 7, 2014

John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Awards Now in its twenty-fourth year, the John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Awards, established in 1989 by the Center for Documentary Studies, are granted to undergraduates studying at Duke University, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State University, or the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to help them conduct sustained work on summer-long documentary fieldwork projects. Winners receive up to $2,000 and their projects are included in the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Library. Read about recent John Hope Franklin Award winners on page 12. Submissions accepted during the month of February 2014 Deadline: March 3, 2014

2014 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography JUDGE: Sandra S. Phillips, SFMOMA The Center for Documentary Studies and the Honickman Foundation’s First Book Prize in Photography honors work that is visually compelling, that bears witness, and that has integrity of purpose. The winning photographer receives a grant of $3,000, publication of a book of photography, and inclusion in a website devoted to presenting the work of the prizewinners. The biennial competition is open to North American photographers of any age who have never published a book-length work and who use their cameras for creative exploration, whether of places, people, or communities; of the natural or social world; of beauty at large or the lack of it; of objective or subjective realities. Submissions accepted from June to September 15, 2014 For more information about CDS awards and prizes: documentarystudies.duke.edu/awards

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Gerard H. Gaskin’s Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene Winner of the 2012 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography Selected by Prize Judge Deborah Willis Gerard H. Gaskin’s radiant color and black-and-white photographs take us inside the culture of house balls, from the quiet backstage to the shimmering energies of the runway to the electricity of the crowd. At these underground late-night pageants where gay and transgender men and women, mostly African American and Latino, come together to see and be seen, members of particular “houses”—the House of Blahnik, the House of Xtravaganza—“walk,” competing for trophies in categories based on costume, attitude, dance moves, and “realness.” 2012 CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography judge Deborah Willis chose Gaskin’s work to win the prestigious biennial prize, drawn to his images of an exuberant world of artistry and self-fashioning where people often marginalized for being who they are flaunt and celebrate their most vibrant, spectacular selves. The result is Gaskin’s new book, Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene, which includes ninety-two photos taken at ballroom events in New York, Philadelphia, Richmond, and Washington, D.C., and represents a collaboration between Gaskin, a camera-laden observer who has been attending balls for twenty years, and the house members who let him enter their intimate world. In addition to an introduction by Willis, Legendary includes an essay by Frank Roberts, “The Queer Undercommons.” An exhibit at CDS features selected images from the book; for more information, see page 7. Legendary is a copublication of Duke University Press and the Center for Documentary Studies and is now on sale in bookstores and through Duke University Press’s website:

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Tiksi: Photographs by Evgenia Arbugaeva Porch & University Galleries | Through January 11, 2014 “The uncanny light in every image is reason enough to see the show,” writes IndyWeek art critic Chris Vitiello about Russian photographer Evgenia Arbugaeva’s Tiksi exhibit. In 2013 Arbugaeva’s series depicting her hometown on Siberia’s Arctic Coast garnered her a Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund Grant, a spot on the annual Photo District News “30” list of new and emerging photographers to watch, and a Leica Oskar Barnack Award, the prestigious international photography prize. Arbugaeva and her family moved from Tiksi when she was eight years old, but she returned in her twenties to find out if the magical place she remembered actually existed. With her muse and guide Tanya, a thirteen-year-old resident of the remote port town, Arbugaeva explored the natural playground and shifting colors and moods of Tiksi and its environs—the aurora borealis, the flowering tundra, white-out blizzards, abandoned weather stations, and ghost graveyards—and rediscovered that place of childhood wonder. Arbugaeva was in residence at Duke this fall through a program administered by the university’s Center for International Studies in partnership with the Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund. As part of her residency, she gave an artist’s talk at CDS in November, met with Duke students and faculty, and connected with local and regional artists and arts patrons.

Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene Photographs by Gerard H. Gaskin Winner of the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography Juanita Kreps Gallery | Through February 22, 2014 This exhibit of extraordinary photographs—on the dazzling underground pageants known as house balls—features selections from a new book of the same name published by Duke University Press and the Center for Documentary Studies as part of the CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography. Renowned curator and photographer Deborah Willis chose Gerard Gaskin’s images out of two hundred entries for the biennial prize in 2012. For more information on Gaskin and his Legendary project, see page 6.

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“The balls were born in Harlem out of a need for black and Latino gays to have a safe space to express themselves. . . . Women and men become fluid, interchangeable points of departure and reference, disrupting the notion of a fixed and rigid gender and sexual self. My images try to show a more personal and intimate beauty, pride, dignity, courage, and grace that have been painfully challenged by mainstream society.” —Gerard H. Gaskin “Legendary allows us to bear witness to a group of people who are courageous enough to create their safe space. . . . In search of beauty, Gaskin’s photographs open our eyes to an extraordinary community of artists who are performing beauty.” —Deborah Willis

For more information on the Tiksi and Legendary exhibits, including slideshows and interviews with Evgenia Arbugaeva and Gerard Gaskin: documentarystudies.duke.edu/exhibits

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top right : Jline getting ready in a hotel bathroom, Washington D.C., 2005. Photograph by Gerard H. Gaskin. bottom left: Tanya runs around the tundra with a weather balloon at the polar meteorological station. bottom right: After school. Photographs from the Tiksi series by Evgenia Arbugaeva.

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RACHEL ANDREWS

A New Wilderness at the Maze

I saw where the IRA prisoner Bobby Sands died, in the corner of a hospital cell. I stood in the corridor and stared in, imagining. For a moment, some kind of feeling flickered, then went away. Now, all I remember is the blankness. That, and the cold of the colors, gray and green and yellow.

Winner of the 2013 CDS Documentary Essay Prize for Writing

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he CDS Documentary Essay prize honors the best in documentary writing and photography in alternating years—this year’s inaugural prize was in writing—with a focus on current or recently completed work from a long-term project. Irish writer Rachel Andrews was the winner of the 2013 competition for her essay “A New Wilderness at the Maze,” in which she explores the meaning of the demolition of Ireland’s Maze prison complex, near Belfast, the infamous maximum-security facility where paramilitary prisoners were incarcerated during the “Troubles” (1971–2000) and where ten Republican hunger strikers died in 1981. As the prizewinner, Andrews received $3,000 and will take part in CDS’s upcoming Documentary Writer Speaker Series. In addition, her essay will be placed in the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Library. The prize committee also awarded Honorable Mentions to Maggie Messitt and Leslie Starobin. A short excerpt from “A New Wilderness at the Maze” appears below; Rachel Andrews’s essay will be published in full on our website in early 2014.

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the first thing you notice is the rabbits. A tail disappearing behind a bush. A frantic scatter at the edge of your vision. Often, you see only the traces. Droppings to the side of the sports areas, or in the thick, damp moss that grows along by the barbed wire and the high walls. Along—you hear later—with the wildcats and the buzzards, even oyster catchers. And the flowers. The wild gorse and foxgloves and nettles. The ivy that trails the walls and fences still untouched by the demolition process. The pink rose bushes and the cherry trees, the copper beeches and the evergreens, growing now according to nature’s whim. You admire the confidence—the sheer entitlement—of the encroaching wildlife. This is the terrain of men, carved from rules and regime. It is a place of signs and warnings. “STOP, HOLD, LOCK.” Of pictures: guard dogs and prison officers. “CAUTION, we patrol the area.” It is a place of concrete and razor wire. It is not a place for the natural. It is not a place for the soft. I made my first visit to the Maze with the photographer Dara McGrath, and we came to the Maze on the bluster of a bright summer afternoon. The approach of the landscape, the watchtowers silent against the tumbling sky, suggested a story, or a memory. We had seen these towers before, framed in front of us on our television screens, in the days when Northern Ireland and all its troubles formed a blurry backdrop to our growing lives down south. Inside, we were certain, the buildings would speak. “Here died Bobby Sands.” “Here, the prisoners escaped.” “Here Billy Wright was shot.”

The Maze had a story to tell me alright, but it was not the story I had come to hear. It was a story of the brutal shape and structure of a building constructed cheap and fast as a solution to a problem. Of steel, shutting behind me in a doorway. A story, surely, of numbed, interrupted humanity, because no humanity could ever have been expected here. On a bitter Saturday in January, the occasion of my second visit to the Maze, I stood with my back to the entrance, looking at the security hut on my left and the bricked toilet hut on my right. Further ahead there was another hut, large and sickly green, where vehicles used to be assessed and inspected. After that, all I could see was waste ground. Mounds of ordered rubble, in their high, separate bundles, of wood and steel and concrete. Flattened, bent-over grass, the outline of a building still traced on top of it. A lone twig tree growing up and out of a crunching expanse of gravel and stones. Further again, there was the inside prison wall, half in pieces, cut short in its snaking journey around and through. It wasn’t hard to describe this place. Like a bomb site. In August 1971, the government introduced the internment—imprisonment without trial—of “suspected terrorists.” The first swoop took place four days later, and just over a month after that around 200 detainees were ferried by helicopter, in groups of ten, to a temporary prison at the old Long Kesh airfield. The Ulster Gliding Club had been given an abrupt few days to leave the site, and the prisoners were housed in the Nissen huts its members had seen under construction. At its peak, Long Kesh held over two thousand prisoners. The huts, grouped together in fours in compounds the inmates called cages, numbered eighty-eight. Here, they crammed the men in, forty to a hut. Shoved, one on top of the other, in bunk beds. The huts were not weatherproofed, in winter they were colder inside than out, freezing by day, freezing all night; in summer the prisoners stifled. Like for animals. I write it down. A concentration camp, for all the world. Like Long Kesh, the Maze was also supposed to be a temporary prison; work began on it while planning issues held up construction on a new prison site located elsewhere in County Antrim, but the other prison was never built, in its stead the Maze was hastily constructed, little planning, get it finished, just get it built. The Maze’s H-Blocks were built with enough reinforced concrete—on the walls, the floors, the ceilings—to withstand even the blast of a bomb. Each of the eight HBlocks was exactly the same, with four separate prison wings extending out from a central administrative area. Each wing contained twenty-four cells, and each cell measured eight foot by ten. I opened a cell door: inside the walls were cold blue, the floor gray. Pushed against a side wall was a narrow steel bed with a short, uncomfortablelooking mattress, the only furniture in the room. An identical single bed, minus the mattress, occupies the hospital cell where Bobby Sands died on hunger strike in 1981. In the years since the prison closed, visitors have steadily removed almost all of the bed’s springs; when I saw it, little but the frame remained.

From the 2008 series Deconstructing the Maze, a collaborative art project for which Rachel Andrews contributed writing. Photograph by Dara McGrath.

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Down in Halftown, I waited for Jackie McQuillan, who came out of bed ill and coughing with one of those chest infections that grab at your throat and heave you up double. Jackie lives at the heart of a tight little area of fifty-two small houses and, with his appetite for organization and negotiation, had become the spokesperson for the Halftown Residents’ Association. Out the back of the Hall Jackie set a ladder against a wall and I climbed it, rain slanting into my face. I looked over and across into the lonely mass of prison scrubland. The wall is the outer perimeter fence of the Maze. The Hall, where the community meets for line dancing and youth clubs and Weight Watchers, as good as bumps up against it. I stared into this dismantled place and wondered how it must have been to live alongside this dominant presence. It was a life not chosen by those who lived here. You

couldn’t ignore the Maze, so you took the jobs going there, in the mess, as a laborer, and reared your children with the wages. We went to the All Saints’ Church in Eglantine, a simple, calm structure that appears from behind a group of yew trees. We stood in the church and shivered, and I asked questions about the past. We chatted about the Marquess of Downshire, who owned Hillsborough Castle and Hillsborough Fort and the Maze lands and everything else you could see and whose family still brings the ashes of loved ones over from England. And in that little church with its Mothers’ Union banner and its RAF flag, I thought how it was a relief to talk about a history and culture that didn’t involve the Troubles, and how talking about that could make you forget for a while that people still hate each other, or hate what’s happened with the peace and carry around bitterness and helplessness inside of them. But Northern Ireland is a hurt place, tender. Too many victims. Too much loss. Too much. People say it. The damage is done.

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On the frozen, rigid mornings of wintertime, the little security hut to the left of the main entrance gate was the only warming-up place in the complex. The men moved in and out, smoke from their cigarettes suspended on the solid outside air, their security macs a whip and a bustle as they shifted back in their seats, turning towards screens or newspapers. Some of the men were re-recruited prison officers, out of retirement. They were older now, gray at the sides, rounded at the middle. They drank tea with milk, sometimes sugar. Their breakfast came wrapped in foil. They read the Belfast Telegraph, the Daily Express, the Sun. They leaned back, hands in their pockets or across their chests, and chatted about the weather. Their lives moved across the smaller details, where once they were crowded out by the bigger picture. That picture lay latent; ask the right questions and it came spilling out, in resentment and resignation. We sat, wind beating hard against the shutters, and listened to Campbell turn his way through half a lifetime as a prison officer in the complex. Campbell had thick, sandy-colored eyebrows and he spoke deep and broad, the rounded vowels flattened out. He talked about his first day as a prison officer, a twenty-five-year-old novice at Crumlin Road prison in Belfast. “I walked up to the Crumlin Road that day, didn’t know a thing about prisons, didn’t know if I was doing the right thing or not. The gate opened, urrrrrrrrr.” He talked and remembered and made it all seem ordinary and the way of it, and we were listening and smiling until he wandered into the time he was shot in the leg in the big breakout at the Maze in 1983. “It was a Sunday afternoon and I was working in H6 at the time. . . . My heart just, I thought it was going to pound out of my chest, and after a couple of minutes it went back to normal, and there was quite a few of us, ten, eleven, twelve fellas, and I could only see four or five prisoners and they were all pasty white, to me they were all scared, they were all pale, pale white, and I said, ‘You know, I think we could take these boys,’ and one of them turned to me and he says, ‘You’re a hero, you’re a dead hero,’ and he pointed the gun at me and he says, ‘Sit down and shut up,’ and I says, ‘Right.’ And then, ah, I don’t know how it happened, I don’t know who struck the first blow or what happened. . . .” Eight weeks after the shooting, he went back to work. I was waiting to hear about the fear, the nightmares, but there was none of that. He talked about having “all your same mates with you every day, you go out for a pint at lunchtime, you play cards at lunchtime. . . .” I thought I understood what he meant. Isn’t that what keeps us all coming back to the same?

I left the Maze on a winter afternoon and I have not seen it since. The months have passed, life has intervened. Still there is no denying it. The enormity of its presence. When I think back on it I see the sky above it as low and threatening and gray, even on the days when I am sure it was blue. I know I’m glad I saw it, in its dishevelled, unbowed state. I know it had its effect. If I hoped it would give me answers, or at least hint at some secrets, I was disappointed. But I took something else instead. I took its stubbornness and steely will beaten down into rocks and craters. I took the dismal light reflecting off its walls. I took the tiny, fragile traces of human beings. I took the small things and the big things, I took the details amidst the vastness, I took the silence, and later I took the noise. For more information about the upcoming Documentary Essay Prize competition, see page 6 and visit: documentarystudies.duke.edu/awards

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Rachel Andrews’s work has been published in such literary journals as The Dublin Review, where this essay was first published in a different form (Summer 2010), and in Irish Theatre Magazine, the Dublin Review of Books, and the Sunday Business Post. For six years, she worked as a journalist and theater critic with the Sunday Tribune, one of Ireland’s national Sunday newspapers, where she also wrote about architecture. She has also contributed pieces to RTE Radio in Ireland as well as BBC4. A recipient of several Arts Council of Ireland awards, Andrews is an MA in creative writing candidate at Bath Spa University in England and a lecturer in literature and journalism at University Cork College and Griffith College Cork.

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


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FILM Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

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he Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, a program of the Center for Documentary Studies, had a special year in 2013. Besides selling a record 35,600 tickets at the annual international event, Full Frame became an Academy Award–qualifying festival for short-form documentary, and the staff moved into a new home at the beautifully renovated Power Plant on the historic American Tobacco Campus in downtown Durham, complete with the new Full Frame Theater and Power Plant Gallery. 2014 will mark Full Frame’s seventeenth year dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema; in looking forward to another banner festival, we’re looking back to the following food for thought from Full Frame director Deirdre Haj, published in the 2013 program catalog:

Picture Arts and Sciences in February, said in his acceptance speech, “This shows that, finally, you all somehow consider us fellow filmmakers.” Here at Full Frame we always have, and always will. —Deirdre Haj, Full Frame Documentary Film Festival Director

Are there too many film festivals? None other than Robert Redford, the founder of Sundance himself, posited this idea in January, stating, “There’s a festival in every neighborhood.” I found myself perplexed by this notion. And I had to think, if that’s true, what a gift for communities—the opportunity to see independent films in a theater and engage in conversations with filmmakers and other audience members. . . . Maybe the question is, “What are film festivals for?” As Michael Moore stated at Full Frame 15, we don’t have enough documentaries on the big screen. Documentaries are distributed farther and wider than ever before thanks to digital formats. One can experience a film on a laptop or phone. However, we at Full Frame continue to honor the original documentary moving image in theatrical exhibition. Only then can hundreds of human beings experience a film simultaneously in the same room. This experience has a ritualistic, almost ancient, quality. Viewing a film together demands that we see one another, hear one another, look into each other’s eyes, when we discuss, debate, and question what we have seen. There is no substitute for that. While the documentary form is more popular than ever, these films make up a startlingly small part of the theatrical exhibition landscape. Documentary film festivals fill this gap in the most fundamental way. D.A. Pennebaker, the first documentarian to be honored with a lifetime achievement award by the Academy of Motion

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top : From the Full Frame screening of American Promise, April 2013. right: Full Frame swag at the 2013 festival. Photographs by Phil Daquila. opposite : Detail of a list of demands by the

Duke University student Afro-American Society in 1969, from an archival photo in Caitlin Johnson’s exhibit on a watershed event in the school’s history.

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Full Frame: April 3–6, 2014 Full Frame passes—there are four different types—go on sale February 5, 2014, and sell out quickly. Passholders enjoy special benefits at the jam-packed, four-day festival, including the opportunity to acquire tickets to individual screenings before they go on sale on March 27. Passes and tickets are purchased through the Duke University Box Office. The film schedule will be announced on March 13.

Year-Round Programming Full Frame showcases great documentary films year-round, not just during the annual springtime festival. The Full Frame Winter Series of free screenings at the Carolina Theatre is a much-anticipated annual event (2014 dates are January 23 and 30 and February 6). And festival staff have taken full advantage of the expanded programming opportunities afforded by the opening of the new Full Frame Theater. Two new film events have been a huge success, with consistent capacity crowds in the 100-seat theater for the Pop Docs series of free onenight-only screenings and the Third Fridays series of free monthly screenings, which will run from May through November in 2014.

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Student and Alumni Spotlight

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ne of the great privileges of working at the Center for Documentary Studies is supporting, and getting a front-row seat for, the wide array of work in the documentary arts created by students in our undergraduate and Continuing Education programs as well as the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program, which welcomed its first class in 2011 and was founded at Duke by CDS; the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies; and the Program in Arts of the Moving Image. In this issue’s education section, we’re featuring some of those present and former students and their work.

Undergraduate Certificate in Documentary Studies Alumni

Many undergraduates from across the arts and sciences take Documentary Studies classes at CDS; some choose to enroll in our Certificate in Documentary Studies program, a more structured sequence of courses culminating in a capstone seminar and documentary project. Among the certificate alumni with noteworthy news in 2013: The acclaimed Good Ol’ Freda, about the Beatles’ longtime secretary Freda Kelly, is the second documentary feature by Ryan White (’04). The film premiered at SXSW and screened at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival (among many other festivals) before its theatrical release in the fall. Ryan’s next documentary is the HBO film Perry v. Schwarzenegger, about California’s controversial Proposition 8 court case, for which he was awarded a grant from the Sundance Institute’s Documentary Fund. Among those working with him on that project as a field producer and cinematographer is Rebekah Fergusson (’07), who completed a successful Kickstarter campaign in the fall in support of her own documentary feature, The Pro Voice Project, a behindthe-scenes film about five women who speak publicly about their abortion experiences in spaces free from politics and moral judgment; the film is slated to wrap

in 2014. Ryan and Rebekah teamed up for the first time on the 2010 feature documentary Pelada, about pickup soccer around the world, a film festival favorite deemed “close to pitch perfect” by the New York Times. Gwendolyn Oxenham (’04) was another Pelada filmmaker. The former Duke soccer player went on to write a book about the experience, Finding the Game: Three Years, Twenty-Five Countries, and the Search for Pickup Soccer (2012, St. Martin’s Press), which was chosen as the first-year book for the 2013 Summer Reading Program at Meredith College in Raleigh, North Carolina, one of the largest independent private women’s colleges in the country. As the selected author, she visited Meredith in August to participate in programs with students and to give the Presidential Lecture to a full house in Jones Auditorium. In the fall, she and Ryan returned to the Duke campus for DEMAN Weekend, an annual part of the Duke Arts Festival that brings to campus alumni working in the fields of entertainment, media, and arts. The pair met with students and Ryan screened Good Ol’ Freda at CDS to a packed house of Duke students and alumni. Caitlin Johnson (’12) is another Certificate in Documentary Studies graduate who returned to campus this fall. Caitlin curated work she began as her capstone project into an exhibit of thirty photograph and text panels, along with an audio and video component. The Long Road to Integration: The 1969 Allen Building Takeover chronicled a watershed event in Duke’s history—the occupation of the university’s Central Records Office in the Allen Building by the student AfroAmerican Society in protest of the racial climate on campus. At an opening event in that same Allen Building, two participants in the takeover, along with Duke University President Richard Brodhead, gave remarks about the significance of the exhibit and the takeover’s remembrance on the fiftieth anniversary of the integration of Duke. To learn more about undergraduate education at CDS: documentarystudies.duke.edu/classes

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“I can’t speak about my documentary career without talking about the Center for Documentary Studies. The time I spent there and the people I met along the way have been a constant source of inspiration and support. CDS was a way of life; a place where time slowed down, art and ideas were at the forefront, and professors became mentors and friends.” —Rebekah Fergusson (’07)

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


mit in Dublin, Ireland, a three-day celebration of the most innovative and creative arguments and pieces coming out of undergraduate research globally. And Jacob Tobia (’14) used his 2013 John Hope Franklin Award to continue his human rights advocacy work in South Africa, where he had previously interned at the Sonke Gender Justice Network in Cape Town (in addition to having been a Human Rights Intern at the United Nations Foundation). He collected the histories of LGBT-identified South Africans across racial and class boundaries, investigating the limits of legal equality and hoping to better understand how difference impacts the LGBT community. Prior to returning to South Africa, Jacob, already a Benjamin N. Duke Scholar, learned he’d been selected for a Truman Scholarship, offered to sixty-two students nationwide, which includes $30,000 for graduate school and priority admission. Scholars are selected based on their demonstrated leadership, scholarship, and commitment to public service and advocacy.

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To learn more about all CDS Awards, see page 6 and visit:

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Continuing Education Student Work: Documentary Street Photography

Recent John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Award Winners For the past twenty-four years, CDS’s John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Awards have supported undergraduates from Triangle-area schools with up to $2,000 to pursue summer-long documentary fieldwork projects. Here’s 2013 news from three students who won John Hope Franklin Awards in the last two years: Following a successful Kickstarter campaign in the summer, David Mayer (’14) returned to Germany to continue work on a documentary film project originally funded by his 2012 John Hope Franklin Award, a personal and intimate retelling of his grandfather’s Holocaust story as a parallel to his own comfortable suburban upbringing, based in part on the journal that Paul Mayer began on January 1, 1945, at the age of twenty. David has visited his grandfather’s childhood home, labor camp, and eventual escape route; has interviewed family members, friends, and other Holocaust survivors; and has investigated the plight of the Mischlinge—the so-called “half-Jews” like his grandfather—a subject of particular interest. “What would it have been like to have had one Jewish parent and one Christian parent, one parent who the Nazis would seek to kill and one parent who is a part of the Nazis’ ‘superior race’?,” he wonders. David expects to complete his project by spring 2014 with assistance from CDS and Duke’s Kenan Institute for Ethics. Another award recipient (and Certificate in Documentary Studies graduate), Alice Kim (’13), also traveled overseas in 2012 to begin fieldwork for what would become her capstone certificate project. She went on to win a prestigious 2013 Undergraduate Award in the international category for Visual Arts for that project, In Search of Roots, which integrates audio, black-and-white film photography, digital photography, and text to examine the trajectory of her Korean-Japanese-American immigrant grandmother’s life. She received her award in November at the UA Global Sum-

The Center for Documentary Studies hosted renowned photographer Harvey Stein in the fall for a repeat performance of his popular three-day Documentary Street Photography workshop, first offered through our Continuing Education program in  2012. Again, Stein explained his approach, describing a set of very specific aesthetic and interpersonal methods for capturing glowing, revealing portraits of complete strangers. This year’s eleven students then spent the weekend taking their own photographs at the annual NC Pride Festival for extensive workshopping and critique.  For a slideshow of selected images: cdsporch.org/archives/20271

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Spring 2014: New Classes In addition to the many established classes in our Continuing Education program’s Spring 2014 lineup, we’re excited about these brand-new offerings: Audio: Sonic ID Workshop; Strategies for First-Person Audio Storytelling Photography: The Elements of Effective Photographs; Peripatetic Photography Video: The Home Movie Movie Special Topics: Acting Out Black History Online: Finding Funding; Making Maps that Tell Stories: An Introduction to Documentary Mapmaking

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“I had always known that I liked documentation, record-keeping, storytelling, but I hadn’t really found a way to do that for myself, and really, I hadn’t even considered that I wanted or needed to find a way. CDS allowed me to find a way to create a direction for myself.” —Alice Kim (’13)

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MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts

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Student Films Screen at Prestigious Festival

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For the second year in a row, the MFA|EDA program made an impressive showing at the New York Film Festival. Work by alums Marika Borgeson (’13), Lisa McCarty (’13), and Talena Sanders (’13), and by current student Erin Espelie (’14), was selected and screened as part of the festival’s Views from the Avant-Garde section, an annual celebration of the best and boldest experimental film and video from around the world. (Duke film faculty members Shambhavi Kaul and Josh Gibson as well as 2013–14 MFA Visiting Artist Deborah Stratman also showed work at Views, which is curated by another 2013–14 MFA Visiting Artist, Mark McElhatten.) Views from the Avant-Garde is perhaps the most important and prestigious venue for artist-made moving-image work in the United States. Along with the Toronto International Film Festival’s Wavelengths section and the British Film Institute’s London Film Festival Experimenta section, it is one of the three agenda-setters for the coming year in artists’ film and digital moving image pieces. “It is extremely unusual for the festival to show works of MFA candidates,” said Duke film instructor David Gatten last year. “In the seventeen-year history of Views there have been only a handful of students shown.”

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MFA Visiting Artists The MFA|EDA continues to draw stellar talent to Duke University via its Visiting Artist program. The 2013-14 lineup as of this publication: Evgenia Arbugaeva is a freelance photographer who travels extensively, mainly focusing on exploration of the northern regions of her Russian homeland. (See page 7 for information on her acclaimed Tiksi series.) Jim Dow is a photographer and professor of photography at Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. His book American Studies was published in 2011 by CDS Books of the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books. Cheryl Dunn is a documentary filmmaker and photographer whose latest feature, Everybody Street, is about legendary street photographers who have used New York City as a major subject. Jack Loeffler is an aural historian, writer, radio producer, and sound collage artist. He has produced or otherwise recorded, written, and narrated over fifty soundtracks for documentary films, videos, and museum exhibitions. Dana Miller is Permanent Collection Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, working on acquisitions, loans, and conservation projects, as well as curating exhibitions drawn from the museum’s collection. Mark McElhatten is a film curator and cofounder of Views from the Avant-Garde at the New York Film Festival. He has curated programs for the Whitney Museum of American Art and the National Gallery of Art, among other institutions. Shahia Sikander is best known for her experimentation with the formal constructs of Indo-Persian miniature painting in a variety of formats and mediums, including video, animation, mural, and collaboration with other artists. Deborah Stratman is a Chicago-based artist and filmmaker interested in landscapes and systems. A Fulbright and Guggenheim fellow, she works in multiple mediums, including sculpture, photography, drawing, and audio. Yvonne Welborn is an associate professor of journalism and media studies at Bennett College for Women and creator of the Sisters in Cinema archive of African American women’s media production. As a Humanities Writ Large Visiting Faculty Fellow at Duke, she will be a year-long resource for MFA students. Marco Williams is a documentary filmmaker and professor of film production at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. His award-winning films include Two Towns of Jasper and In Search of Our Fathers.

top : Cemetery of old ships. Photograph by Evgenia Arbugaeva from the Tiksi series. left, top to bottom: Stills from Liahona by Talena Sanders,

The Starry Messenger by Marika Borgeson, and True-Life Adventure III by Erin Espelie. opposite left: Jacob Tobia prepares to run across the Brooklyn Bridge in five-inch heels for his 2012 campaign to benefit the Ali Forney Center for homeless LGBT youth. Photograph by Christy Kim. opposite right: At the NC Pride Festival. Photograph by J. Rene Davenport.

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


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CDS Interns

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his is the fourth year that CDS has benefited from the exceptional talent of three nine-month interns, who in turn gain broad experience in the documentary field, with particular focus on exhibitions, digital arts and publishing, and web design. Our interns for the 2013-14 academic year: Hannah Colton is a writer and recent student of storytelling fascinated by relationships between human communities and the natural resources that sustain them. A 2013 Duke graduate, Hannah earned her BA in public policy and environmental science with a concentration in food system studies. After graduating, she headed to the Southwest for a few months to sing country music and lead kids on outdoor education treks. At CDS Hannah assists web production director Christopher Sims with the creation and management of content for the CDS web-sphere. In the fall she created a video about The Long Road to Integration: The 1969 Allen Building Takeover, Certificate in Documentary Studies graduate Caitlin Johnson’s exhibit on the Duke campus (see page 11 for more information on the exhibit).

Tory Jeffay comes to Durham from the south of Japan, where she spent a year shooting a documentary about the seventy-year presence of the American military on the island of Okinawa. She received her BA in film studies from Yale, where she produced a film about the women of scrapbooking. At CDS she glides on her office chair between the offices of publishing and awards director Alexa Dilworth and communications coordinator Liz Phillips. In the fall Tory created two videos—one on MFA|EDA student Kristin Bedford’s exhibit on the Duke campus, Be Still: A Storefront Church in Durham, and one on CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photop, left to right: Lisa McCarty, Tory Jeffay, and Hannah Colton. Photograph by Christopher Sims. bottom : Oriel Window, Lacock

Abbey. From a series by Lisa McCarty, exhibited at Fotoweek DC, of her pilgrimage to William Henry Fox Talbot’s home. opposite top : Veiled Conversations. From an interactive mixed-media piece by Pedro Lasch, part of the In Practice exhibit (see page 15). opposite bottom : Gary Hawkins captures Gary Hawkins in Toronto, 2013.

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tography winner Gerard H. Gaskin and his project (see pages 6–7 for more information on Gaskin’s book and exhibit, Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene). Lisa McCarty is a photographer and recent graduate from Duke’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Admirer of both William Henry Fox Talbot and Robert Walser, Lisa devotes her time to fixing shadows, making cameras by hand, and taking long walks through Durham. Lisa assists exhibitions director Courtney ReidEaton with exhibition planning and installation, as well as the transfer of materials to Duke’s Archive of Documentary Arts. In the fall, her film Every Filter in Final Cut Pro screened at the 2013 New York Film Festival (see page 13) and a solo show of her photographs was shown at Fotoweek DC. Lisa will be teaching a new CDS Continuing Education class in spring 2014, Peripatetic Photography. Hannah Colton’s video on The Long Road to Integration: cdsporch.org/archives/20644

y Tory Jeffay’s videos on Be Still and Legendary: cdsporch.org/archives/20647 and y cdsporch.org/archives/20631, respectively For more information on Lisa McCarty’s work: lisamccarty.com

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In Practice: Work by Duke Arts Faculty

An exhibit on view this fall at the new Power Plant Gallery—a joint initiative of the Center for Documentary Studies and the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program—included works in a wide range of media— photography, film and video, printmaking, new media—by seventeen Duke faculty members and instructors from three arts units at the university: CDS, the Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies, and the Program in Arts of the Moving Image. In Practice: Work by Duke Arts Faculty demonstrated the remarkably interdisciplinary nature of the arts at Duke, as well as the dynamic and diverse energy of the regional arts scene. CDS– affiliated artists included Bill Bamberger, Alex Harris, Tom Rankin, MJ Sharp, and Christopher Sims. For a full list of In Practice artists: cdsporch.org/archives/19979

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Gary Hawkins at the Movies When Gary Hawkins isn’t teaching, he’s writing fiction, and it seems to be paying off. The longtime CDS film instructor and award-winning filmmaker wrote the screenplay for Joe, adapted from the late Larry Brown novel, and the film premiered in the fall at the Venice and Toronto International Film Festivals to strong reviews. Directed by David Gordon Green and starring Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan, The New Yorker called Joe Green’s best film to date, and critics agree that the title character is one

of Cage’s best performances in thirty-five years. In an interview with Vanity Fair, Cage says the script resonated with him immediately. “I took a year off from work,” he says, “and I was just trying to find a hundred-point script. By ‘hundred-point script’ I mean a script that would allow me to find the truth of the character without having to act too much.” Tye Sheridan won the Marcello Mastroianni Prize in Venice for his performance, and the Guardian UK picked Hawkins as a wildcard to win an Academy Award. Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions acquired Joe for the film’s theatrical release in the U.S.

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OTHER NEWS

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Tom Rankin at the Library of Congress Tom Rankin, editor of One Place, the acclaimed book of photographs and selected prose by self-taught artist Paul Kwilecki, gave the Botkin Lecture at the Library of Congress in October. The Benjamin A. Botkin Folklife Lecture Series presents the best of current research and practice in folklore, folklife, and closely related fields. Each lecture is recorded for permanent deposit in the Archive of Folk Culture, accessible to researchers. Rankin is the director of Duke’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program and the former director at CDS. One Place: Paul Kwilecki and Four Decades of Photographs from Decatur County, Georgia was published in 2013 by the Center for Documentary Studies in partnership with the University of North Carolina Press. documentarystudies.duke.edu/books

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JOIN FRIENDS OF CDS You can support the programs and projects of the Center for Documentary Studies—a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization affiliated with Duke University—by making a contribution through Friends of CDS. Two Ways To Give: You may make a secure

online donation at documentarystudies.duke. edu/donate or you may send a check payable to “Center for Documentary Studies” to Friends of CDS, 1317 W. Pettigrew Street, Durham, NC 27705. For More Information: Contact Lynn McKnight, Associate Director for Programs and Development, Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University: 919-660-3663 or docstudies@duke.edu.

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