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CENTER FOR DOCUMENTARY STUDIES AT DUKE UNIVERSITY

winter 2011 Jazz Loft Project Exhibit Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Full Frame Documentary Film Festival April 14–17, 2011 Nancy Kalow Visual Storytelling: The Camcorder Documentary The Parchman Hour Songs and Stories of the ’61 Freedom Riders New Internship Program 2010–2011 Publishing and Exhibitions Interns Continuing Education Fall 2010 Graduates

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books EVENTS AWARDS more


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a Publication of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University

919-660-3663 | Fax: 919-681-7600 | E-mail: docstudies@duke.edu | documentarystudies.duke.edu CDS Director: Tom Rankin CDS Associate Director for Programs & Communications: Lynn McKnight Editors: Lauren Hart and Alexa Dilworth Designer: Bonnie Campbell Publishing Intern: Maggie Smith The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. CDS values documentary work that balances community goals with individual artistic expression. CDS promotes documentary work that cultivates progressive change by amplifying voices, advancing human dignity, engendering respect among individuals, breaking down barriers to understanding, and illuminating social injustices. CDS conducts its work for local, regional, national, and international audiences. All photographs appearing in Document® are copyright by the artist. Document® is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

COVER, top to bottom: 1) Ronnie Free (drums), Freddie Redd (piano), Bill Takas (bass). Photograph by W. Eugene Smith, courtesy of the W. Eugene Smith Archive, Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona and © The Heirs of W. Eugene Smith. 2) Marietta Bray in The Parchman Hour at UNC’s Kenan Theatre, December 2010. Photograph by Chris Fowler. 3) Stanley Crouch, writer, Manhattan, 2003. Photograph by Lourdes Delgado. 4) Opening night, Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, 2010. Photograph by Rachael Fiorentino.

contents

winter 2011

EXHIBITIONS 3 Jazz Loft Project Exhibit Travels to the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University

Advanced Documentary Photography: Vision and Craft

Sparkle & Twang: An American Musical Odyssey Photographs by Marty Stuart

Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts

Jazz in New York: A Community of Visions Photographs by Lourdes Delgado

OTHER NEWS 10 Second Annual Daylight/CDS Photo Awards

Durham Civil Rights Heritage Project Our Pictures and Stories

CDS Books: Recent and Forthcoming Publications

FILM 5 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival April 14–17, 2011

FRIENDS OF CDS 11

PEOPLE 5 Nancy Kalow Visual Storytelling: The Camcorder Documentary CDS Interns Brenda Hornsby Heindl and Maggie Smith EDUCATION 7 Undergraduate Education Highlights The Parchman Hour: Songs and Stories of the ’61 Freedom Riders Coming Home: Stories of Homelessness and Finding Home Again New Course: Documentary and Policy Continuing Education Highlights Fall 2010 Continuing Education Graduates

Visit on the CDS Porch, our news blog, at cdsporch.org

Digging In: An Audio Retreat with Big Shed

CDS on iTunes

CALENDAR 12


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The Jazz Loft Project Exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art Winner of the 2010 Innovative Use of Archives Award from the Awards Committee for the Archivists Round Table of New York (ART) and the 2010 Deems Taylor Multimedia Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University presents The Jazz Loft Project: W. Eugene Smith in New York City, 1957–1965, an exhibition of photographs and recordings of an extraordinary chapter in American jazz history and the climate in which it occurred. In the late 1950s, W. Eugene Smith lived and worked in a New York City loft building with an amazing list of visitors—jazz musicians, filmmakers, writers, and artists. In photographs and audio recordings Smith documented an era, and rare moments with Thelonious Monk, Zoot Sims, Norman Mailer, Salvador Dali, and others, presented here in photographs, video, and audio. The exhibition is on view February 3–July 10, 2011. The Jazz Loft Project is the first-ever public presentation of Smith’s vintage prints and audio recordings. The project also includes oral history interviews with hundreds of participants in the original loft scene. A book authored by project director Sam Stephenson and published by Alfred A. Knopf accompanies this exhibition, as does an ambitious public radio series produced by WNYC and the Center for Documentary Studies, where the decade-long Jazz Loft Project is based. The exhibition—curated by Sam Stephenson and Courtney Reid-Eaton, exhibitions director at the Center for Documentary Studies, with Jazz Loft Project research associate Dan Partridge and program coordinator Lauren Hart—includes more than 200 images and several hours of audio. After the exhibit closes at the Nasher Museum of Art, it will travel to the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, California, and the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona.

Related Events February 2, 7:30–9:30 p.m. Exhibition Opening Reception Nasher Museum of Art February 3, 6 p.m. First Thursday: Gallery Talk by Sam Stephenson Nasher Museum of Art February 10, 7 p.m. Jazz Then and Now: A Conversation Between Branford Marsalis and Sam Stephenson Hayti Heritage Center, Durham, NC March 31, 7 p.m. Lecture: Photography archivist and historian William Johnson on W. Eugene Smith Nasher Museum of Art June 2, 6 p.m. First Thursday: Gallery Talk by Courtney Reid-Eaton Nasher Museum of Art

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ABOVE: Tape boxes from the collection of W. Eugene Smith. Courtesy of the W. Eugene Smith Archive, Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona and © The Heirs of W. Eugene Smith. OPPOSITE: Cell phone photograph, Amsterdam. Photograph by Tom Rankin.

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


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Jazz in New York: A Community of Visions Photographs by Lourdes Delgado February 3–July 9, 2011 | Kreps Gallery

Close-Up A Sample of W. Eugene Smith’s Audio Recordings from Radio and Television, 1957–1965 Sources and broadcast dates are listed if known. Tristan and Isolde by Richard Wagner, read by Claire Bloom Tribute to Frank Lloyd Wright upon his death, WNYC radio, 1959 Mr. Magoo cartoons News coverage of John F. Kennedy’s election, 1960, and his assassination and funeral, 1963 Strange Interlude and The Iceman Cometh by Eugene O’Neill Newscasts of Martin Luther King Jr. in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963, and in Selma, Alabama, 1965 News stories on the Cuban Missile Crisis, with discussions ranging from Cold War politics to steel and concrete bomb shelters for the backyard The poetry of James Weldon Johnson and Langston Hughes, read by Sidney Poitier Dorothy Parker speaking on Jack Kerouac and the Beats The Negro and the American Promise, hosted by Dr. Kenneth Clark, with James Baldwin, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr., WNET-TV, 1963 World Series, Game 1, from Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, 1960 First match, Sonny Liston versus Cassius Clay, 1964 A radio documentary called Poverty and the American Space Program Dialogues by Plato Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee Gertrude Stein on WBAI radio, 1963

On View

In Jazz in New York, Spanish photographer Lourdes Delgado documents in spectacular detail the lives and personalities of contemporary New York jazz musicians. Exploring jazz from a social, economic, and cultural viewpoint, Delgado photographs the artists in their homes not only to capture the spaces they inhabit but also to present an alternative representation of professional jazz musicians. The show celebrates this vibrant community and features such musicians as Kenny Barron, David Sanborn, Jeff Ballard, Stanley Crouch, Robert Glasper, Butch Morris, Christian McBride, and Ingrid Jensen. Presented in collaboration with the Jazz Loft Project exhibition at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University

y cds.aas.duke.edu/exhibits/nowonview.html Durham Civil Rights Heritage Project Our Pictures and Stories December 2, 2010–January 31, 2011 Lyndhurst and Bridges Porches

The history of Durham, North Carolina, is rich, and no aspect richer than that of its African American community. From the neighborhood that was Hayti and the businesses on Parrish Street’s ”Black Wall Street” to the Durham blues, from the first African American female Episcopal priest to the founders of the first black-owned insurance company in the United States, Durham has many stories to tell. The Durham Civil Rights Heritage Project focuses on one chapter of that history—stories about the Civil Rights Movement accompanied by oral histories. During the course of three collection days, sixteen stories were recorded and nearly 125 photographs were collected from both private individuals and professional photographers. The exhibit includes eleven six-foot fabric banners featuring photographs, quotes from interviews with local people, and text to depict part of the history of the Civil Rights Movement in Durham.

in the CDS Galleries

Sparkle & Twang: An American Musical Odyssey Photographs by Marty Stuart January 31–March 31, 2011 Porch and University Galleries Country music icon Marty Stuart has photographed some of the most famous stars in American music, including several of the greatest performers on the country, bluegrass, rockabilly, and Southern gospel scenes. In Sparkle & Twang, Stuart shares his journey in music and the beloved musicians he encountered along the way. This uniquely American collection includes photographs of such legends as Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, Bill Monroe, Dolly Parton, the Staple Singers, and Porter Wagoner. Presented in collaboration with Duke Performances: Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives Thursday, March 3, 2011, 8 p.m., Reynolds Industries Theater, Duke’s West Campus

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Visit on the CDS Porch, our news blog, cdsporch.org

ABOVE: Johnny Cash and Ray Charles, Columbia recording studios, Nashville, 1981. Photograph by Marty Stuart. TOP LEFT: Ronnie Free. Photograph by W. Eugene Smith, courtesy of the W. Eugene Smith Archive, Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona and © The Heirs of W. Eugene Smith. OPPOSITE, top: The Carolina Theatre, Durham, North Carolina. Courtesy of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. OPPOSITE, bottom: Courtesy of Nancy Kalow.


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Full Frame Documentary Film Festival April 14–17, 2011

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he Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is an annual international event dedicated to the theatrical exhibition of nonfiction cinema. Each spring Full Frame welcomes filmmakers and film lovers from around the world to historic downtown Durham, North Carolina, for a four-day, morning-to-midnight array of over 100 films as well as discussions, panels, and southern hospitality. Set within a four-block radius, the intimate festival landscape fosters community and conversation between filmmakers, film professionals, and the public. In 2010 Full Frame celebrated many accomplishments: the festival sponsored a popular outdoor summer film series at the American Tobacco Campus in Durham; three Full Frame award-winning films were short listed for Academy Awards; the festival was named one of the “Top 50 Film Festivals in the World” by indieWire; and director of programming Sadie Tillery was named one of the “Most Powerful People in Documentary” by Tom Roston’s POV blog. The 2011 festival will take place April 14–17. Archivist, writer, lecturer, and filmmaker Rick Prelinger will curate a series around archival footage for this year’s thematic program. The 2011 Career Award will be presented to Ricki Stern and Annie Sundberg, who will screen the U.S. Premiere of their most recent film, Burma Soldier. Passes are on sale through the Full Frame website. Pass holders enjoy special benefits at the jam-packed four-day event, including the opportunity to buy tickets to their preferred screenings before the general public. Schedules and film descriptions will be online and in print on March 24.

PEOPLE

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The festival is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies and receives support from corporate sponsors, private foundations, and individual donors whose generosity provides the foundation that makes the event possible. The Presenting Sponsor of the festival is Duke University.

Nancy Kalow on Visual Storytelling: The Camcorder Documentary Nancy Kalow is a folklorist and filmmaker who has taught at the Center for Documentary Studies since 2000. She attended Harvard University (A.B.), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (M.A.), and was a Rockefeller Fellow at UNC’s University Center for International Studies. She has documented southern traditional music and material culture, Primitive Baptist preaching and visionary narratives in eastern North Carolina, and the music and religious folklife of the Mexican community in central North Carolina. Her video documentary Sadobabies was a winner of a Gold Hugo at the Chicago Film Festival and the Special Jury Trophy at the San Francisco Film Festival. In addition to teaching, she is working on a documentary project about “dead media” and maintains a blog called Documentary Starts Here. She has been co-chair of the Selection Committee of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival since 2003. In 2011 CDS Books will publish her e-book Visual Storytelling: The Camcorder Documentary, which will be available on the CDS website. The following is from an interview with Nancy Kalow conducted by Lauren Hart of CDS. LH: What is it like serving on the Full Frame Festival’s Selection Committee? NK: The film festival started in Durham in 1998, and in 1999 I joined the Selection Committee, which is a diverse volunteer group overseen by the Full Frame programming department. There are twenty of us carefully watching and vociferously advocating for all the terrific films that come in to Full Frame, and it is painful that there isn’t room during the festival to show many more films. Actually, the e-book is a sometimes-opinionated distillation of all that watching! LH: I love your approach to filmmaking in Visual Storytelling: The Camcorder Documentary because it dispels the notion

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


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that one needs expensive equipment and extensive training in order to make a film. In the book you say that you are “passionate about the democratization of documentary filmmaking.” Can you talk about what this means and how documentary filmmaking can be a useful skill for people with assorted backgrounds and with different levels of technical experience? NK: In the mid-2000s, a student was the first to do the Visual Storytelling assignments on a cell phone, pretty much shocking me and everyone in the class into understanding the egalitarian potential when anyone who wants to make a documentary has access to a great story and some basics on how to make inexpensive equipment work for them. Many CDS students go on to film school, big-budget projects, and professional work in filmmaking, which is very exciting. But when you’re just getting started, the idea, the story, and the characters may need to be documented now, before a lot of production money can be raised. Lowbudget documentaries don’t have to look low-budget, and the e-book explains how to do it. LH: What projects are you currently working on? NK: Low-budget, one-man-crew doc shorts are especially fun to make, and they’re even more meaningful when they can be shared at a film festival or by putting video up on the web. My ongoing “Dead Media” project is on a website, for example, documenting old audio recording machines from the mid-twentieth century with view-camera photography and a camcorder video. My blog, Documentary Starts Here, considers hundreds of films, including rarities such as The Tourist by Robb Moss, Seraphita’s Diary by Frederick Wiseman, and Robert Drew’s Yanki No, shot by D.A. Pennebaker, Albert Maysles, and Richard Leacock. More web projects are in the works. LH: Can you describe your educational background and explain how you came to documentary work and to teaching filmmaking? NK: Folklore graduate study at UNC–Chapel Hill provided a rigorous grounding in fieldwork and theory, as well as an ethical approach to rendering the stories and traditions of a community. The professors there, such as Dan Patterson, Trudier Harris, and Jim Peacock, have much in common with the faculty at CDS. In the early camcorder

era of the late 1980s, they encouraged the use of video to document cultural expression and folklife, including material culture, music, religion, and narrative. Two of my undergraduate teachers, David Riesman and John Stilgoe, were big influences on exploring the interdisciplinary breadth of documentary work. In 2000, CDS’s Education and Curriculum Director, Charlie Thompson, asked me to teach Visual Storytelling, a camcorder video “one-man-crew” course. It was a chance to put into practice the key elements in low-budget documentary filmmaking with a series of weekly assignments, such as shooting a process, an interview, or a performance. Continuing Education students bring their own ideas, experience, and access to the class. No one has ever needed a suggestion on what to document. Student films are revelatory for everyone involved: the filmmaker has an “I can do this!” moment; the people in the documentary are enthusiastic about collaborating; classmates learn what works and what doesn’t work. The new e-book is a lively and compact version of the Visual Storytelling class based on many years of teaching and a “tried and true” methodology. Nancy Kalow’s Dead Media Project ibiblio.org/deadmedia_dictation

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Documentary Starts Here Blog Documentarystartshere.blogspot.com

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CDS Interns Brenda Hornsby Heindl and Maggie Smith The 2010–2011 academic year is the inaugural term of the CDS internship program for recent college graduates. CDS interns gain broad experience in the documentary field, with particular focus on exhibiting, publishing, and producing a range of materials related to the documentary arts. Brenda Hornsby Heindl is the exhibitions intern, and Maggie Smith is the publishing intern. Brenda Hornsby Heindl earned a B.A. in 2008 from Berea College in Berea, Kentucky, where she studied history and German, and trained as a production potter in the Ceramics Apprenticeship Program. She received her M.A. from the University of Delaware in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture in 2010. She has recently begun her own pottery studio, Liberty Stoneware, and continues to lecture, research, and write articles related to material culture. Through her varied passions for oral history, traditional music, photography, research, and teaching with objects and exhibitions, Brenda was drawn to CDS. As the exhibitions intern, she has been assisting with exhibitions installations, openings, text panel creation, and research. Maggie Smith earned a degree in comparative religion at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. After graduating she taught a photography workshop in Chiang Mai, Thailand, at a nonprofit school for Burmese refugees and migrant workers and worked for the Center for Photography at Woodstock as an arts administration intern. In addition to her position as the CDS publishing intern, she is a contributor to Daylight Magazine’s blog Daylight Daily, where she writes about community photography projects. At CDS she is exploring her interests in documentary photography and independent publishing and is enjoying the opportunity to hone her photography and audio documentary skills.

ABOVE, top to bottom: Publishing intern Maggie Smith. Exhibitions intern Brenda Hornsby Heindl (right) works with Exhibitions Director Courtney ReidEaton (left). Photographs by Lauren Hart. OPPOSITE, top: The Parchman Hour at UNC’s Kenan Theatre, December 2010. Photograph by Chris Fowler. OPPOSITE, bottom: Toni Bullock, residential manager of Dove House, a Housing for New Hope program. Photograph by Daniella Choi.

Visit on the CDS Porch, our news blog, at cdsporch.org


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Undergraduate Education Highlights

Undergraduate Documentary Studies courses allow students to connect their educational experiences and creative expression to broader community life through documentary fieldwork projects, while they also examine theoretical and practical issues related to this work through readings, screenings, and classroom discussion. Taught by CDS staff, faculty members, and adjunct instructors, these courses provide community-based experiences using the mediums of photography, film and video, audio, and narrative writing.

The Parchman Hour: Songs and Stories of the ’61 Freedom Riders In 1961, a group of mostly young people came together from across the United States—leaving families, college campuses, and jobs—to board buses headed for the Deep South. Their plan was simple, innocuous in fact. Integrated teams would embark on interstate trips and simply ignore the signs designed to segregate them by race. These acts of nonviolent direct action landed many of the riders in jail. Some were beaten and hospitalized. Some were sent to the infamous Parchman Penitentiary in Mississippi. On the eve of the fiftieth anniversary of these Freedom Rides, actor and playwright Mike Wiley (Dar He: The Story of Emmett Till and the theatrical adaptation of the bestselling Blood Done Sign My Name) made his directorial debut with his latest production, The Parchman Hour. Presented in the style of old-time variety shows, this moving production explores three of the tensest months of 1961. The Parchman Hour brings to the stage powerful oral histories and conversations from the Freedom Rides’ most iconic protagonists and antagonists alike. The Parchman Hour, the result of Wiley’s two-semester residency at Duke and UNC, involved students from both campuses as well as members of the broader com-

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munity. Wiley, the 2010 Visiting Joint Chair Professor in Documentary Studies and American Studies at Duke and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, taught classes in documentary theater, which engaged students in researching, writing, and performing the play. The Parchman Hour premiered in December 2010 at UNC’s Kenan Theatre and will travel in 2011.

y http://www.mikewileyproductions.com/ Coming Home: Stories of Homelessness and Finding Home Again

In fall 2010, ten Duke undergraduates participated in a service-learning course titled Documentary Engagement, taught by Alex Harris and Liisa Ogburn and supported by the Hart Leadership Program at the Sanford School of Public Policy and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. Each week, in addition to traditional in-classroom participation and assignments, students were required to visit and get to know individuals associated with the Durham-based organization Housing for New Hope in order to more directly understand the complex roots of homelessness.

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


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Continuing Education Highlights Certificate in Documentary Arts Graduates Fall 2010

Housing for New Hope (HNH) has been working for almost twenty years to prevent and end homelessness in Durham County and Orange County, North Carolina. The organization provides a continuum of care for the most needy through outreach and crisis assistance, transitional housing, and permanent housing. In order to help HNH tell the stories of their participants and programs, Duke students were required to spend more than twenty hours over the course of the semester at one HNH site, building relationships and capturing stories. Each student took hundreds of photographs and captured many hours of audio. As a final project, each student produced a six- to eight-minute audio slideshow rendering the story of one person they met through HNH. Collectively, the ten stories illustrate the complex factors contributing to homelessness today, as well as reveal the programs and support that enable people in crisis to move toward lives marked by increased levels of stability, dignity, hope, and independence. All media collected over the course of the semester will be given to Housing for New Hope for use in print materials and on the web.

Throughout the year the Center for Documentary Studies offers a wide range of short courses, institutes, and workshops for adults who are interested in learning to do their own documentary work. These courses, most of which are taught on nights and weekends by working professionals, are designed to help students of all ages and backgrounds gain the skills they need to explore doing documentary work on their own terms. The cornerstone of the CDS continuing education program is the Certificate in Documentary Arts. The certificate program establishes a process for engaging and empowering already motivated people to do the work they care about, and for examining the representational and ethical issues related to this work. Over the past eleven years, students in the certificate program have produced photography, film and video, audio, multimedia, and writing projects on a diverse range of topics. These projects often move out into the world to larger audiences in the form of exhibits, installations, websites, and other creative artworks. Four students completed projects in the fall’s Final Seminar in Documentary Studies, a capstone course that all certificate students take in order to successfully complete their documentaries, and presented their work to the public in December.

The Students and Their Projects

To view the photographs and listen to the stories:

y http://housingfornewhope.wordpress.com/ New Course! Spring 2011 Documentary and Policy | Karen Price

This course examines documentaries as catalysts for change in local, state, and federal laws and regulations, with special attention to relationships between film and organizations with political influence. Using case studies of documentary films (essay-style, journalistic, information-driven films; narrative, story-driven films; propaganda; art films; and hybrids of all of the above), students will look at how documentaries have altered public sentiment and political outcomes. This course also explores the question of how a film achieves influence: for example, with a high-profile theatrical and/or television release, by utilization as an educational tool, or by “going viral” to become part of a public conversation. Karen Price is a North Carolina–raised filmmaker based in Los Angeles. She directed the documentary Living by Instinct: Animals and Their Rescuers, which was broadcast on PBS and won several national awards. She has directed, produced, and written for documentaries and shows appearing nationally and internationally on Discovery Health Channel, the Travel Channel, Animal Planet, and Lifetime. Her latest documentary is a fulllength feature following seven Democratic congressional candidates during the 2006 midterm election. Previously she worked on Capitol Hill, serving as press aide to a U.S. senator and congressman.

Visit on the CDS Porch, our news blog, at cdsporch.org

Alan Julich | Getting Out and Getting On [Video] Getting Out and Getting On follows LeJhoyn Holland after his release from the state prison in Hillsborough, North Carolina, through his integration back into society after serving twenty-five years for first-degree murder. The documentary shows the vital role Holland’s interfaith volunteer support team plays in his reentry. Alan Julich was born and raised in Memphis and is proud to be a southerner. Since leaving advertising in 2005 to pursue independent video production, he has produced long-form family memoirs, weddings, and other commercial work; a biographical video; and a political video. Lisa Sorg | That Rockin’ Motion [Video] That Rockin’ Motion is the story of a toy and its inventor— how one man’s idea sparked the world’s imagination. The filmmaker’s great-great uncle, William Baltz, invented the Wonder Horse, which became one of the most popular children’s toys of the twentieth century. Lisa Sorg is an award-winning journalist and the editor of the Independent Weekly.


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Brian Stabler | Of2Minds: The Creative Bipolar Life [Video] This short film offers a glimpse into the lives of two creative people: one a dancer, the other a writer, both diagnosed with bipolar disorder. One elects to undergo treatment; the other does not. The film traces the outcomes of their decisions and explores the ways in which individuals manage this disorder outside the bounds of traditional medicine. Brian Stabler came to Chapel Hill in 1967 from the University of Durham, England, on a one-year fellowship to study film and television. Instead, he earned a doctorate in psychology and joined the faculty of the UNC School of Medicine. Forty-three years later, he is fulfilling a long delayed passion by getting a certificate at the Center for Documentary Studies. Enrique Vega | The Elusive Creator: An Artist’s Quest to Understand the Mysteries of Creation [Video] What is the source of creation? Does it come from the individual artist or by connecting with something outside oneself? In this short version of The Elusive Creator, Vega gives viewers a glimpse into the world of what motivates artists. He’s currently seeking additional funding to complete an expanded version for a film series on why we create. Enrique Vega has been a visual artist for most of his life and a professional artist/blacksmith for the last twentyfive years. Three years ago, he lost his passion for the metal arts and started to rekindle his love for the visual arts through documentary filmmaking.

New Courses! Advanced Documentary Photography: Vision and Craft | Alex Harris May 5–8, 2011 This four-day workshop is intended for students who have created a relatively large body of photographs and now want to learn more about how to edit and present those photographs to publishers, galleries, curators, and the general public. Harris will work with students one-onone and in group critiques to help them find their most personal and powerful images and then sequence those pictures in the most effective way. The second half of the workshop is devoted to beginning to build a printed portfolio by learning digital workflow, advanced Photoshop techniques, and inkjet printing. Students will take key representative images from their edited body of work and learn to adjust them effectively in Photoshop, as well as to make a series of consistently rendered inkjet prints. Harris will share his own work as well as the work of other accomplished documentary photographers. There will

Alex Harris is a founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and of DoubleTake magazine. He has taught documentary photography and writing at Duke since 1975. Among his books are River of Traps, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction in 1991, and The Idea of Cuba (2007). His photographs are in the collections of numerous museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Harris is collaborating with the sociobiologist E.O. Wilson on a book set in Mobile, Alabama, that focuses on the role of place in the life of the individual and in the broader society. He is also photographing housing and living conditions across North Carolina for a book that will connect his contemporary photographs and observations with images he produced on the same theme in the early 1970s.

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also be an evening presentation by a special guest photographer followed by a reception.

Digging In: An Audio Retreat with Big Shed | Shea Shackelford, Jesse Dukes, and Jennifer Deer July 24–29, 2011 This five-day creative retreat is designed to bring together audio producers (other media producers are welcome, too) in a lightly structured environment to work on individual projects. Whether it’s a story you’re trying to finish, a proposal you’re trying to write, or maybe you just need space and community to think about your creative trajectory—Shea Shackelford, Jennifer Deer, and Jesse Dukes (also known as Big Shed) will make sure you have an intensely relaxing, invigoratingly supportive time to dig deep and get some serious (or not so serious—it’s up to you) work done. Course fee includes all lunches during the week (and homemade ice cream on the porch). Big Shed is an audio and media production shop run by Shea Shackelford, Jennifer Deer, and Jesse Dukes. Big Shed produces multimedia content for the web and public radio. Their work has aired nationally on such programs as All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Studio 360, and Weekend America. Register now for spring CDS Continuing Education courses and workshops:

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duke

Duke University will launch its first MFA program in Fall 2011. The Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts (MFAEDA) is a terminal degree offered jointly by the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, the Center for Documentary Studies, and the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image.

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ABOVE: Audience members watch a video by Enrique Vega at the CDS Continuing Studies Certificate in Documentary Studies graduation, December 2010. Photograph by Maggie Smith. OPPOSITE, right: Graduating students Brian Stabler, Enrique Vega, Alan Julich, and Lisa Sorg with instructor Randolph Benson. Photograph by Maggie Smith. OPPOSITE, left: Richard Lee Dodgins, a Housing for New Hope participant, with his dog, Kaiser. Photograph by Eddie Wu.

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


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OTHER NEWS Second Annual Daylight/CDS Photo Awards Competition Judges: Anthony Bannon, Darren Ching, Stacey Clarkson, Whitney Johnson, Joel Sternfeld, Sasha Wolf, with Taj Forer and Michael Itkoff, editors, Daylight Magazine, and Alexa Dilworth, publishing director, and Courtney Reid-Eaton, exhibitions director, Center for Documentary Studies

Reality Radio: Telling True Stories in Sound Edited by John Biewen, coedited by Alexa Dilworth With a foreword by Rick Moody

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In recognition of a mutual interest in documentary and fine art photography, Daylight Magazine and the Center for Documentary Studies started an international competition in spring 2010, the Daylight/CDS Photo Awards, to honor and promote talented and committed photographers, both emerging and established, in two prize categories, the Project Prize and the Work-in-Process Prize. Full guidelines will be posted on the Daylight Magazine and CDS websites March 1, 2011. Submissions Accepted: March 1 to May 1, 2011

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y http://cds.aas.duke.edu/daylightcds To see last year’s winners: y http://www.cdsporch.org/archives/2913 CDS Books: Recent and Forthcoming Publications

Telling True Stories in Sound John Biewen, editor / Alexa Dilworth, coeditor

The Jazz Loft Project and Reality Radio in the News The Jazz Loft Project: Photographs and Tapes of W. Eugene Smith from 821 Sixth Avenue, 1957–1965 | By Sam Stephenson

Now in its 2nd printing! Essays by Jad Abumrad, Jay Allison, damali ayo, John Biewen, Emily Botein, Chris Brookes, Scott Carrier, Katie Davis, Sherre DeLys, Lena Eckert-Erdheim, Ira Glass, Alan Hall, Natalie Kestecher, The Kitchen Sisters, Maria Martin, Karen Michel, Rick Moody, Joe Richman, Dmae Roberts, Stephen Smith, and Sandy Tolan

“A powerful and illuminating anthology about our most powerful and intimate medium. Reality Radio is a must-read for anyone who feels called to make documentary work or whose imagination and heart are stirred by the sounds of nonfiction storytelling on the radio. A wonderful book!” —Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps and Sound Portraits Productions “Reality Radio is a fabulous book I wish I could have read when I started at NPR in 1974. It would have shaved 10 to 15 years off the learning curve in discovering how to make great radio.” —Bob Edwards, host of The Bob Edwards Show on Sirius XM Radio “The Jazz Loft Project is a riveting work of social archaeology, and extraordinary testament to artists whose music caught all the tumult and excitement of a fast-changing America.” —The Guardian, May 12, 2010 “The most chaotic and soulful gift book this year. . . an elegiac stew of sight and sound, and a singularly weird, vital and thrumming American document.”—The New York Times, Best Coffee Table Books of the Year, November 15, 2009 Published by Alfred A. Knopf and CDS Books at the Center for Documentary Studies 288 pages / $40.00 hardcover / ISBN 978-0-307-26709-2

Available at bookstores or by ordering from Alfred A. Knopf

For more information about the Jazz Loft Project and to learn about upcoming events: jazzloftproject.org

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Visit on the CDS Porch, our news blog, at cdsporch.org

In the series Documentary Arts and Culture Published by the University of North Carolina Press and CDS Books at the Center for Documentary Studies 196 pages / $22.95 paperback / ISBN 978-0-8078-7102-7

Available at bookstores or by ordering from the University of North Carolina Press

To learn more about Reality Radio: realityradiobook.org

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11

CDS on iTunes

American Studies: Photographs by Jim Dow

Short audio documentaries from undergraduate students in the Fall 2010 Introduction to Audio Documentary course and Spring 2010 Short Audio Documentary course with John Biewen are available on CDS iTunesU. As part of a collaboration between the Center for Documentary Studies and Duke Magazine, students in John Biewen’s undergraduate class The Short Audio Documentary have produced audio features to complement the stories featured in the magazine.

OCUMEN

With an introduction by Ian Frazier

In American Studies, Jim Dow documents places and things crafted and occupied by ordinary people for practical purposes that share inventiveness and resilience, that mix the makeshift with the carefully considered. For Dow, landscape is fashioned by those who leave their mark both in and out of doors; on signs and billboards, in barbershops, office buildings, libraries, pool halls, private clubs, courthouses, and motels. The photographs depict how Americans create environments for utility but with transforming aesthetic power—spaces that celebrate lives and deities, memorialize the past, and sometimes make money.

“What I love about Jim Dow’s pictures is that they’re not kidding. . . . In wordless ways America continually describes its vision to us, dropping broad hints about what its citizens are expected to be. With these photographs Dow catches the hints latent in dozens of American settings. . . . And when I say his pictures aren’t kidding, I mean they avoid the danger that exists in recording such hints and signs . . . no superiority, no wry chuckles from a more refined altitude. Aspects of his photographs are funny, maybe even hilarious, but that’s only noted in passing. He’s more interested in what the American vision is, or was, and in the scary open-endedness of our identity.” —Ian Frazier, author, from his introduction

“‘Some objects are more alive than most humans,’ the Czech filmmaker Jan Švankmajer once told me. He was looking at a 300-year-old cabinet when he said it, but he could have been looking at Jim Dow’s new book American Studies, a work of the greatest love, patience, and mastery. . . . The fierce affection Jim Dow evokes for time and place awakens in us the realization that we have perhaps loved this wild world and its wonders less than we should. In these photographs, objects and places, some of them now past, are intensely alive.” —Emmet Gowin, photographer and professor emeritus, Princeton University Published by powerHouse Books and CDS Books at the Center for Documentary Studies 136 pages / 115 full-color and black-and-white photographs / $49.95 hardcover / ISBN 978-1-57687-565-0

document

Forthcoming from CDS Books

Listen to the pieces:

y http://www.dukemagazine.duke.edu/documentingduke/ Connecting with the Center for Documentary Studies Document Also Available Online cds.aas.duke.edu/about/document.html

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y Follow us @CDSduke y facebook.com/CDS.Duke y vimeo.com/CDS.Duke

Twitter Facebook Vimeo

To receive CDS’s e-mails with the latest news and events, click the link under Get Involved on our home page. documentarystudies.duke.edu

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Social media icons by Ben Weaver

JOIN FRIENDS OF CDS The best way to get involved at the Center for Documentary Studies is to support the documentary arts. This is easy to do, by making a contribution through Friends of CDS. Through their contributions, Friends of CDS help to support the Center for Documentary Studies, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization affiliated with Duke University. Because the founders of the Center for Documentary Studies envisioned an organization that would bridge campus and community life, CDS was established as neither an academic department nor a traditional university educational center. Rather, CDS functions as an independent not-for-profit organization, with its own budget and fundraising goals. Two Ways To Give: You may make a secure on-line donation at http://cds.aas.duke.edu/ donate OR you may send a check payable to “Center for Documentary Studies” at Friends of CDS,
1317 W. Pettigrew Street,
Durham, NC 27705 For More Information: Contact Lynn McKnight, Associate Director for Programs and Communications, Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University:
919-660-3663 or
docstudies@duke.edu

Available spring 2011 at bookstores or by ordering from powerHouse Books

y powerhousebooks.com/site/?p=1218

Find out more about CDS at documentarystudies.duke.edu


January 31 Sparkle and Twang: An American Musical Odyssey An exhibition of Marty Stuart’s photographs in the Porch and University Galleries, through March 31 Center for Documentary Studies

February 2, 7:30 p.m. The Jazz Loft Project: W. Eugene Smith in New York City, 1957-1965 Public opening for a traveling exhibition of the Jazz Loft Project at CDS, through July 10 Nasher Museum of Art

February 3, 6 p.m. Gallery Talk by Sam Stephenson

Curator, author, and project director, in conjunction with The Jazz Loft Project: W. Eugene Smith in New York City, 19571965 Nasher Museum of Art

February 3 Jazz in New York: A Community of Visions

An exhibition of photographs by Lourdes Delgado presented in conjunction with The Jazz Loft Project at the Nasher Museum of Art, through July 10 Center for Documentary Studies

February 9, 7 p.m. The Tillman Story

Part of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival Winter Series American Tobacco Campus, Durham, NC

February 10, 7 p.m. Jazz Then and Now

A conversation between Branford Marsalis and Sam Stephenson, Jazz Loft Project director Hayti Heritage Center, Durham, NC

February 11, 7 p.m. Woodpecker

Southern Circuit film screening with director Alex Karpovsky Center for Documentary Studies

February 15, 7 p.m. Restrepo

Ethics Film Series screening with director Tim Hetherington Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, West Campus

February 25, 7 p.m. Anytown U.S.A.: Smithfield

A screening of student work from a CDS continuing education class Richard White Auditorium, East Campus

March 2, 7 p.m. Gallery Talk by Marty Stuart

In conjunction with a CDS exhibition of his photographs, Sparkle and Twang: An American Musical Odyssey Center for Documentary Studies

March 3, 8 p.m. Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives

A Duke Performances event in conjunction with an exhibition of Marty Stuart’s photographs at CDS Reynolds Industries Theater, West Campus

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

Durham, North Carolina Permit Number 60

All events are on the Duke University campus unless otherwise noted. Please check the CDS calendar on the web for updates to this events listing

PAID

DOCUMENT a Publication of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University | Winter 2011

Calendar

WINTER 2011

y http://cds.aas.duke.edu/events/index.html

March 3 – 6 Show + Tell

April 5, 7 p.m. Lars and the Real Girl

Center for Documentary Studies

Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, West Campus

March 9, 7 p.m. Waiting for Superman

April 8, 7 p.m. Scrappers

Multimedia boot camp from Big Shed, an audio and media production shop

Ethics Film Series screening

Part of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival Winter Series

Southern Circuit film screening with directors Brian Ashby and Ben Kolak

American Tobacco Campus, Durham, NC

Center for Documentary Studies

March 11, 7 p.m. Southern Stories

April 14 – 17 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

Southern Circuit film screening with directors Paul Harrill and Ashley Maynor Center for Documentary Studies

March 15, 7 p.m. Monica and David

Ethics Film Series screening Griffith Film Theater, Bryan Center, West Campus

March 17– 20 Listening Institute

Audio/radio producers from the U.S. and abroad share their work Center for Documentary Studies

March 21, 7 p.m. Alabama Getaway

A reading and book signing by Allen Tullos Center for Documentary Studies

March 31, 7 p.m. A Conversation with William Johnson

Perspectives on photographer W. Eugene Smith, in conjunction with The Jazz Loft Project exhibition Nasher Museum of Art

Screenings of more than 100 films with directors, discussions, panels, and parties Carolina Theatre and other venues, downtown Durham, NC

April 28, 7 p.m. Gallery Talk by Lourdes Delgado

In conjunction with a CDS exhibition of her photographs, Jazz in New York: A Community of Visions Center for Documentary Studies

May 5 – 8 Advanced Documentary Photography: Vision and Craft

An intensive workshop with Alex Harris Center for Documentary Studies

Document Winter 2011  

Document is a quarterly publication that features some of the best documentary work supported and produced by the Center for Documentary Stu...

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