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WELCOME TO OCTAVIA PAVILION. INSPIRATION // OCTAVIA HILL DESIGN PROCESS SITE CONTEXT THE DESIGN TECHNICAL DRAWINGS CONSTRUCTION PROCESS ASSEMBLY RISK ASSESSMENT


A celebration of the life and legacy of Octavia Hill (1838-1912), co-founder of the National Trust, a hundred years after her death. The centenary of Octavia Hill’s death has featured in the media. She once more has public consciousness.

Octavia Hill was born in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire in 1838, the eighth daughter of James Hill, a prosperous corn merchant and former banker. Seen as the founder of modern social work, she was a woman ahead of her time. An artist and a radical, she was a pioneer. she fought to save the recreational open spaces that were being devoured by theexpanding metropolis.

her ideals must remain . her legacy must live on

Octavia Pavilion prolongs her stay in the memories of Dunham Massey’s visitors. It is designed around her words.

it frames ‘the quiet influence of nature’ as she saw it; it shows the ‘need of air’ and ‘of things growing’ she knew to be so important Her National Trust is now one of the country’s largest charities and landowners, one hundred years on, her ideas and ambitions must not be forgotten.

INSPIRATION.

whilst celebrating octavia hill’s legacy, we wanted to also take ideas from the previous formal layouts of the gardens. we wanted our pavilion design to link back to the history of the site on which it sits it will persuade curious minds to return.

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Secretive and Beautiful, the site manages to hide amongst the planting on the path to the orangery

measuring only 3.16m wide and 2.88m deep, the site could be seen as a small and unsuitable location for our paivilion design to be built, however there is a secret. the beautiful, hidden view of the canal running behind. we wanted to introduce a stunning piece of minimal architecture, used to create an intriguing introduction to an arresting experience. An unmissable event, to encourage the discovery of a sublime natural scene that may otherwise have been missed.

Members will find some unexpected new treasures. – HRH Prince of Wales, President of the National Trust

SITE CONTEXT A

SITE

LOCATED ON THE MAP OF DUNHAM MASSEY, WE CAN SEE THAT THE SITE SITS ON THE PATH LEADING TO THE ORANGERY, MAKING IT A PROMINENT LOCATION FOR OUR DESIGN. WITH LOW-LYING BEDDING COVERING THE IMMEDIATE EDGES AND LARGER BUSHES OUTLINING THE SURROUNDING AREAS CAUSE THE VIEW TO THE CANAL TO BE OBSCURED. WE AIM TO MAKE A FEATURE OF WHAT WOULD OTHERWISE BE A FORGOTTEN LOCATION.

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a frame around one of Dunham Massey’s least noticeable but most beautiful views.

We began by analysing the site and designing within the set measurements, outlining three objctives:

1// LEAD VISITORS TO THE VIEW OF THE PATH BEHIND THE SITE 2// SPAN THE PAVILION OVER THE EXISITING PATHWAY 3// MAKE HISTORICAL LINKS TO THE SITE by keeping these objectives thorughout our design, we were able to develop our ideas to create a pavillion which is focused and fits beautifully into it’s site and surroundings. From the initial sketches 1 and 2, it is possible to see we used the ‘focusing of the view’ as a starting point. Our design was a timber clad structure that zig-zagged towards a window, which perfectly framed the view beyond

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DESIGN PROCESS. 3

2 Looking at drawing 3, we then simplified the design to a square shaped, open air canopy with an opening for the view. In sketch 4 this design was extruded further into the site, forming a tunnel-like shape. We continued to draw up different concepts until we managed to to design a pavilion that took the best features from each design. The main structural point we wanted to replicate in the final idea, was the ‘frame’ - we wanted to ensure that there was an opportunity to utilise the site’s location and focus on the views that are currently left hidden.

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THE DESIGN

capturing attention and imagination without screaming for either


Octavia Pavilion is simple. it is angular. it is minimal. it is modern. it is sleek. Our design is formed by two large walls and a roofing structure, spanning the path to the Orangery. The first panel is an almost site-long wall along the path, behind which curious minds discover a second, smaller wall.

It does not distract from the beauty of the site, instead it focuses the attention of visitors onto an otherwise easily missed view. by only using two materals; plywood and pine timber, we are able to create an effortless, yet rewarding design that sits proudly across the path. The linear roof timbers link back to the formal plans of the gardens in years gone by and give dunham massey a pavilion that reflects the rich heritage, in a beautiful and modern way.

the pavilion will sit on the site with it’s smaller wall facing the canal, Visitors will be able to walk past the first large wall, not knowing the beauty they will be sure to find. The wallpaper peepholes will frame the view of the canal, allowing uniquely shaped aspects of the water and beyond. .


It is a frame. It brings focus. It is attractive to look at, and invites visitors to look at other, more naturally attractive scenes... We have designed the pavilion in such a way that it sits on a very small footprint. Anchored to the ground with metapost poles, two for each board, the pavilion will tread lightly on the ground on which it is placed.

The pavilion evokes all the characteristics of a shelter, without imposing on its’ surroundings, allowing visitors to emerse themselves in the heritage of the site.

‘Focus on the value of time, place and beauty.’ – Tristram Hunt on the relevance of Octavia Hill today


A PATTERN. TAKEN FROM THE HOUSE. LASER-CUT INTO PANELS CASTING SHADOWS AND FRAMING VIEWS. to try and form a strong connection between the history of Dunham Massey and our design , we wanted to add a personal touch to our design we have represented this in the form of cut-out panels, shaped from wallpaper found in the Dunham Massey Hall (seen below).

Falling down the wall, like the shadows of the roof struts, that tie our pavilion together, These peepholes will beautifully frame the canal and its banks as they lie behind the site.

The way we have designed the ‘peepholes’ is such that they run down the wall, allowing visitors of any height to capture a view through the patterns.

Visitors will catch glimpses of the view beyond from many different angles, all framed by unique shapes.


TECHNICAL DRAWINGS.

1: 20 PLAN DRAWING


1: 20 SOUTH-EAST ELEVATION 1: 20 EAST ELEVATION


EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC DRAWING (NO SCALE)


KIT OF PARTS.


CONSTRUCTION MANUAL.


ASSEMBLY GUIDE


RISK ASSESSMENT


Octavia Pavilion  

Octavia Pavilion Design Scheme