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Where U.S. Students Rank Globally: The United States Ranks: n 17th In Reading Literacy n 21st In Science n 26th In Math

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation 2014

17

TH

In Reading Literacy

21

ST

In Science

26

Based on 2013 International PISA results

TH

In Math


Parent Resource Grades 3 – 5

The Center for Development and Learning One Galleria Blvd. Suite 903 Metairie, LA 70001 (504) 840-9786


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Center for Development and Learning


Introduction This guide provides an overview of what your child will learn by the end of kindergarten, grade 1 and grade 2 in English Language Arts (ELA). The guide focuses on key skills that will build a strong basis for success in other subjects. The skills are based on the Common Core State Standards, which are being used by more than 44 states. These K–12 standards were created from the highest state standards from across the country. If your child is meeting the expectations outlined in these standards, he or she will be well prepared for the next grade.

Why are common academic standards important?

Until now, every state had its own standards and different goals for student learning. Common academic standards are important because they help make sure that, no matter where you live, you will know exactly what your child should be learning at each grade level. Of course, high standards are not the only thing needed for children’s success, but they provide an important first step — a clear, consistent roadmap for learning. They also help your child develop real-world critical This Guide Includes: thinking* skills needed for college and the workforce.

How can I help my child?

You should use this guide for two main reasons: (1) as a tool to help your child at home, and (2) as a resource to help build a relationship with your child’s teacher. Talk to you child’s teacher regularly about how he or she is doing so you can work together to address any issues. Parents are children’s first teachers. At home, you can play a big part in setting high expectations and supporting your child in meeting them.

n An overview of some of the key things your child should be learning in English/literacy from 3rd through 5th grade. n Ideas to help your child learn at home n Topics of discussion for talking to your child’s teacher about his or her academic progress

*See pg. 45 for definition

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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About CDL Founded in 1992, the Louisiana Children’s Research Center for Development and Learning, d/b/a Center for Development and Learning (CDL), is a results-driven Louisiana-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. CDL specializes in the development and dissemination of leadingedge scientific research, knowledge, and best practices that improve teaching and increase student learning. CDL’s work is focused on closing the achievement gap by increasing teacher effectiveness. CDL has special expertise in the areas of learning differences, evidence-based teaching strategies, and building the capacity of teachers.We advance public education reform by providing educators with professional learning that is specific and relevant to the needs of students and teachers. With an on-the-ground, in-the-trenches approach, we tackle real-time issues such as ways to remediate struggling readers, differentiate instruction for diverse learners, and build and sustain collective capacity.

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Center for Development and Learning


Table of Contents Common Questions about Common Core. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Overview of ELA Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 What your Child Should be Learning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Reading Progressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Book Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Writing Progressions.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Writing Samples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Speaking & Listening Progressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 How to Support your Child. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Glossary* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 * Definitions of words with an asterick beside them are contained in the Glossary.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Common Questions about Common Core Q: A:

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What are the Common Core State Standards? The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are learning goals that will ensure Louisiana’s students are prepared for college and career success. Common Core is not a curriculum. Teachers still decide how to get kids to the goal.

Why do we need the Common Core? Louisiana is 3rd from the bottom in education compared to the rest of the country. Common Core will help give From Failing to Fantastic: all Louisiana students a high Winning the Education quality education so they can be Game successful in today’s economy.

Who developed the CCSS? State governors and education experts working together with teachers and parents across the country developed the CCSS. Many school officials from Louisiana were involved.

Center for Development and Learning

In football, the goal is to get a touchdown; it’s up to the coach to choose plays that will get the ball in the end zone. If we want our students to be successful, Common Core sets the goal; it’s up to the teacher to choose plays to help kids win.


Why Now? n Student mobility, military families n Too many different standards across states n Global competition n Today’s jobs require different skills

Q: A:

Q: A:

Is Louisiana required to use the CCSS by the federal government? No. The federal government did not force Louisiana to use Common Core State Standards. Louisiana, along with 44 other states, voluntarily chose to use Common Core State Standards.

When will the CCSS go into effect? Louisiana voluntarily adopted the Common Core July 1st, 2010. You may have already heard your child’s school mention “Common Core” or “new standards.” You may have even noticed that your child’s homework and tests are getting harder.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Q: A:

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How will the CCSS affect student grades and school performance scores (SPS)? Some are concerned that school test scores and letter grades will drop because of Common Core. A drop in scores is expected at first because previous standards were not accurate indicators of college and career-readiness. State Superintendent John White has made changes to school and teacher evaluations that will give students and schools time to adjust.

How does the Common Core affect me as a parent? As a parent, you may notice your child’s classwork and homework becoming harder. You may also see a slight drop in grades. While it may be uncomfortable and scary, this is normal because schoolwork and tests are more challenging. Keep in mind that now our kids are getting the high quality education they deserve, but weren’t getting before.

Compared to other states in the country, Louisiana ranks 3rd from the bottom in Reading. Only Mississippi and Washington D.C. are lower than Louisiana.

– NAEP, 2013

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Center for Development and Learning


Q: A:

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Will students still take the LEAP test? Starting in the 2014-2015 school year, 3rd through 8th grade students will take the PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers). This test will replace the LEAP and iLEAP. High school students will continue to take Endof-Course tests in English language arts and math.

The PARCC for all grades will be administered online. Therefore, it is critical that students are comfortable typing and using a computer and mouse.

What does the Common Core look like in the classroom? The Common Core standards are not a curriculum. Schools and teachers will continue to make decisions about how to teach their students and meet their needs.

What are the benefits of the CCSS? CCSS will help ensure that all students, no matter where they live, are prepared for success in college and the workforce. The CCSS makes sure that your child will receive the same level of education if you decide to move to another city or state. The CCSS will help our children learn more real-world knowledge and think more critically so that Louisianians will be able to compete successfully in the 21st century, allowing our economy to remain strong. CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Overview of ELA Standards The skills developed in language arts are used in every day life, making them very important. The language arts include reading, writing, spelling, learning vocabulary, listening, speaking, handwriting, grammar, and storytelling. Your children will use their language arts skills in all subject areas, such as social studies and science, to understand information and organize, develop, and express their ideas clearly and creatively. A person who can speak well, relate well to others through language, and listen well to what others are saying will have higher chances of success in school and life. The Common Core State Standards for ELA describe skills that students need to have in the following areas:

ELA Standards

Reading

Writing

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Center for Development and Learning


Having strong oral and written language skills provides a foundation for further learning and future job success. Third grade is a turning point for children. Learning to read fluently will serve as a foundation for the reading demands in later grades. Building vocabulary in order to read challenging text and increasing their ability to explain what a book says is fundamental in 4th grade. When writing and reading, 5th graders will be able to understand relationships between words (company and companion) and recognize that words have literal and nonliteral meanings (a piece of cake). They will also begin to build knowledge about subjects through research projects and analyzing materials. CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Third Grade By the end of the school year your child should be: Writing short essays about related topics using facts and details.

Comparing key points and details from two books on the same topic.

Writing in complete sentences, including simple, compound, and complex.

Writing stories that present a situation, have clear sequences of events, and describe the actions, thoughts, and feelings of characters.

Making logical connections between sentences and paragraphs in stories (first, second, third; cause and effect).

Reading closely to find main ideas and supporting details in a story.

Using correct punctuation, capitalization and grammar, including subject-verb agreement and correct use of quotations and apostrophes.

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Center for Development and Learning


Spelling correctly and using dictionaries (print or electronic) to find meanings of words.

Conducting short research projects using print and electronic resources.

Reading stories and poems aloud easily, without pausing to figure out what each word means.

Talk to the teacher about how your child is doing in school. Ask questions like: 1. “Is my child on track?” Distinguishing the literal and nonliteral meanings of words, such as “something’s fishy,” “cold shoulder,” and “it’s raining cats and dogs.”

2. “Are there areas where my child is struggling?”

Asking and answering questions that build on what others have said during class discussions.

4. “What are some resources to help my child learn outside the classroom?”

3. “In what area is my child doing well?”

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Fourth grade By the end of the school year your child should be: Describing the basic elements of stories — such as characters, events, and settings — by using specific details in the text.

Explaining how the author uses facts, details, and evidence to support specific points.

Comparing ideas, characters, events, and settings in stories among several books and from different cultures.

Conducting short research projects on different aspects of a topic using evidence from books and the Internet.

Relating commonly used words to other words with similar meanings (synonyms) and to their opposites (antonyms).

Summarizing and responding to others in discussions, including comparing and contrasting ideas and explaining how speakers support their points.

Word

Synonym

ask

interrogate rebut accurate

invalid

noisy

boisterous

tranquil

kind

generous

miserly

correct funny

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Center for Development and Learning

hilarious

Antonym

somber


Become a partner with your child’s teacher Technology can be a good way to build regular communication with your child’s teacher. Some teachers may respond to email and text faster and more often.

Making presentations on a topic or telling a story with facts and details.

Using prepositional phrases, and correctly using frequently confused words.

Writing summaries or opinions about topics supported by a set of well-organized facts, details, and examples.

Writing book reports with introductions, summaries, and clear details and descriptions using information from the book to support opinions.

Recognizing and correcting fragment and run-on sentences.

to too two there their they’re

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Fifth grade By the end of the school year your child should be: Summarizing the key details of stories, poems, and nonfiction articles, including their main ideas or themes.

Point of View

Plot Setting

Mood

Making judgements about evidence that supports the author’s argument to change the reader’s point of view.

th eme?

C h a r ac t e r

Keep Performance Positive

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n Discuss with your child their performance

n Talk about tests with your child and be

in schools and what they are learning positive and encouraging

Center for Development and Learning


Producing writing on the computer.

Combining information from several print and digital sources to answer questions and solve problems. 3

Writing stories, real or imaginary, that unfold naturally and developing the plot with dialogue, description, and effective pacing of the action.

Writing opinions that offer reasoned arguments and provide facts and examples that are logically grouped to support the writer’s point of view.

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5

4 E

T

R S

F

7

6 Y

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F

9

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Reporting on a topic or presenting an opinion with his or her own words, a logical sequence of ideas, sufficient facts and details, and formal English when appropriate.

Expanding, combining, and reducing sentences to improve meaning, interest, and style of writing.

Coming to classroom discussions prepared, and fully participating by: contributing accurate, relevant information; elaborating on the remarks of others; synthesizing ideas.

Building knowledge of academic words, particularly those that show relationships or a contrast in ideas, such as “on the other hand,” “similarly,” and “therefore.”

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Center for Development and Learning


Reading Reading is as important as getting enough to eat or a having a place to sleep. Highly literate students are more likely to graduate from high school and attend college. Thus, being able to read well will allow all children to have an opportunity to live healthy, productive lives. The reading standards focus on two main things: (1) the difficulty of what students read and (2) how well they read. Students will read more non-fiction and informational text in earlier grades, and have deep and detailed discussions about what they read. For example, instead of only naming parts of a story, such as characters, plot, and setting, students will compare different stories using their understanding of these elements. This section provides an overview of how the reading standards progress from the beginning to the end of the year and from one grade to the next. There are also examples of books that you can read with your child.

Reading is the foundation for all other subjects n All subjects require reading skills. For example,

students must be able to read their textbooks to learn Science and Social Studies.

n Even if a child is really good in math, he or she must

still be able to read the directions or word problems on the test.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Progressions

Third Grade In addition to previous grade level skills, students will:

Reading Literature

n Determine the central message, lesson, or moral using key details in the text. n Describe story characters and explain how their actions affect the order of events. n Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including literal and nonliteral meanings. n Know parts of stories, dramas, and poems using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza. n Form own point of view outside that of the author or characters. n Explain how pictures and words in a text relate. n Compare and contrast themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author.

Ask questions that can help your child understand what it means to think critically. This can also be a way of helping with homework. Some questions are:

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Center for Development and Learning


Fourth Grade In addition to grade three level skills, students will: n Use details and examples in text to support answers and explanations. n Describe character, setting, or event in depth by using specific details. n Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose by referring to elements of each.

Fifth Grade In addition to grade four level skills, students will: n Use exact quotes from a text to support explanations and inferences. n Determine theme from details in a text, including how characters respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic.

n Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are told.

n Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events, using details in the text.

n Compare and contrast similar themes, topics, and patterns of events among different texts.

n Determine the meaning of figurative language, such as metaphors and similes. n Describe how a narrator’s point of view influences how events are described. n Analyze how images and multimedia affect the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text.

n How do you know that’s true or correct? n Why do you think that? n Can both of these things be true? n Can you make a drawing that shows what you mean? n If you were the reader, would you be convinced?

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Progressions

Third Grade In addition to previous grade level skills, students will:

Reading for Information

n Determine the main idea using key details to support. n Describe the relationship between a series events, ideas, concepts, or procedures using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect n Use text features and search tools, such as key words, sidebars, and links, to locate information. n Describe the connection between sentences and paragraphs in a text. n Compare and contrast the most important points and details in two texts on the same topic.

Urge your child to use reasoning and support to defend his or her opinion. If he wants a new pair of shoes, have him research different types of shoes and explain reasons why he should have those specific shoes, supported by facts and details. |#|

Center for Development and Learning


Fourth Grade In addition to grade three level skills, students will: n Use details and examples in text to support answers and explanations. n Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in terms of what happened and why using specific information in the text. n Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic. n Interpret information presented visually, such as charts, graphs, diagrams, timelines, animations, etc., to understand text. n Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support specific points in a text. n Combine information from two texts on the same topic to write or speak about the topic.

Fifth Grade In addition to grade four level skills, students will: n Use exact quotes from a text to support explanations and inferences. n Determine two or more main ideas of a text using key details to support. n Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts. n Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, identifying similarities and differences among points of view. n Gather information from multiple print or digital sources to answer a question quickly or solve a problem more easily. n Combine information from several texts on the same topic to write or speak about the topic.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Third Grade Books Nonfiction Vote! By: Eileen Christelow Using a town’s mayoral election as a model, this introduction to voting covers every step in the process, from the start of the campaign to the voting booth. There’s even a recount! The fun cast of characters will keep all future voters intrigued. Common Core Alignment: Determine the meaning of general academic and domainspecific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

Fiction Charlotte’s Web By: E. B. White Considered a classic of children’s literature, this novel tells the story of a pig named Wilbur and his friendship with a barn spider named Charlotte. Common Core Alignment: Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. |#|

Center for Development and Learning


Tips As your child reads books and works on homework or projects, talk about how someone might use what he’s learning in real life. In Charlotte’s Web, for example, you can discuss how spiders spin webs, the value of friendship, different ways to communicate, life and death, and many more.

Poetry Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening By: Robert Frost This picture book version of the classic poem gives Frost’s masterpiece a seasonal feeling. Common Core Alignment: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Fourth Grade Books Nonfiction Now & Ben By: Gene Barretta This fascinating book tells the story of Benjamin Franklin’s many inventions that have helped create our modern world from a comical and engaging perspective. Common Core Alignment: Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text (chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution).

Fiction The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark By: Carmen Agra Deedy King Christian X of Denmark bravely stands against the Nazis by wearing a gold Star of David, which symbolizes the loyalty and fearless spirit of the king and his people. The result is a powerful and dignified story of heroic justice. Common Core Alignment: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. |#|

Center for Development and Learning


Tips Talk about the news together. Pick one story in the news, read or listen to it together, and discuss with your child what it means.

Poetry Poetry for Young People: Carl Sandburg By: Frances Schoonmaker Bolin This volume contains more than 30 poems from the poet who has been called “the voice of America.” It includes a biographical sketch of the poet, footnotes providing definitions of difficult words, and a title index. Common Core Alignment: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Fifth Grade Books Nonfiction Worst of Friends By: Suzanne Tripp Jurmain John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were good friends with very different personalities. Their differing views on how to run the newly created United States turned them into the worst of friends. Full of history and humor, this is the story of two of America’s most well-known presidents and how they learned to put their political differences aside for the sake of friendship.

Common Core Alignment:

Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Fiction M.C. Higgins, the Great By: Virginia Hamilton This is a coming-of-age novel covering 3 eventful days in the life of teenager Mayo Cornelius Higgins. The book highlights the customs of the hill people, including their traditions of song and superstition. At its core is the reconciliation M.C. must make between tradition and change.

Common Core Alignment:

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. |#|

Center for Development and Learning


Tips Discuss your family stories and history. Encourage your child to interview relatives and tell family tales in various forms, such as stories, poems, plays, etc.

Poetry Poetry for Young People: Emily Dickinson By: Frances Schoonmaker Bolin A collection of Dickinson’s best-loved poems. It includes a biographical sketch of the poet, footnotes providing definitions of difficult words, and a title index. Common Core Alignment: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Writing Writing is one of the main ways people communicate. It is used in school, all types of work, and everyday activities. While writing is an important part of our daily lives, it can be difficult to learn and master. Many students have trouble organizing their thoughts and writing clearly, which can cause frustration. Encouraging children to develop strong writing skills early and become better writers may make writing easier and more enjoyable for them. This section gives an overview of how writing standards progress from one grade to the next. There are also writing samples showing what students need to be able to do at each grade level.

Progressions

Third Grade n Write opinion, narrative, and information essays. n Introduce a topic or state an opinion, and expand on it with facts, reasons, and details. n Use words and phrases to link ideas (also, because, for instance) n Use words and phrases to show change in time or event. n Provide a concluding statement or section. n Improve writing by planning, revising, and editing with help from peers and adults. n Use technology to write and collaborate with others (includes typing skills). n Use information from experiences or from print and digital sources. Take brief notes and categorize information.

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Center for Development and Learning


Example of Transitional Words and Phrases To Clarify Clearly Of course Specifically Usually

Obviously Surely After all

To Link or Show Agreement Also And As for For example For instance Moreover Regarding Too

Like Similarly In addition Comparatively Coupled with with regard to In comparison Not only... but also

To Show Cause/Effect Thus Because Consequently Therefore

Provided that As a result of If...then So that

To Show Opposition or Contradiction Yet In contrast Although Whereas Despite However Regardless

Fourth Grade In addition to grade three level skills, students will: n Group related information in paragraphs and sections; include headings, graphics, and multimedia to help with understanding. n Use linking words and phrases to connect ideas within categories (such as, for example, in addition). n Use subject-specific vocabulary. n Produce clear and organized writing. n Fluently type at least one page using the computer. n Gather evidence from text to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Besides While Unlike Different from On the other hand On the contrary

To Conclude In brief Finally All in All To sum up

In summary In conclusion As can be seen

To Show Sequence or Change in Time/Setting Before After Until Since Then Lasly Once Next During Earlier Formerly

First, second... Meanwhile Eventually By the time Until now Instantly Presently As soon as To begin with All of a sudden At the same time

Fifth Grade In addition to grade four level skills, students will: n Expand on a topic or opinion with logically ordered reasons, facts, details, definitions, and quotations. n Use words and phrases to link ideas across categories (in contrast, in comparison). n Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to show sequence. n Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue and description, to develop stories. n Use sensory words and phrases to communicate experiences. n Fluently type at least two pages. n Conduct short research projects listing many sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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on Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

Third Grade

student sample: Grade 3, Informative/explanatory

This informative report is a process piece that was produced in class.

What’s Great about This Essay: n Introduces a topic n Uses headings to organize and group related information together |#|

Center for Development and Learning

n Develops the topic with facts and details n Provides a conclusion


Writing Sample

mmon Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

mmon Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

mmon Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

annotation The writer of this piece annotation

n The Uses linkinga topic. words to n Shows a growing • introduces writer of this piece o ideas I chose horses because I like to ride them. . understanding . . Horses are so beautiful connect within ofand fun to ride. • introduces a topic. • creates an organizational structure (using headers) that groups related information together. categories of information o I chose horses because I like to ride them. . English . . Horses aregrammar so beautiful and fun to ride. o Horsebecause Families; Markings; Breedsaand Color Coats; Horses from Different Countries (I • likecreates Morgans they have annotation an organizational structure (using headers) that groups related information together. • develops the topic with facts and details. beautifulo reddish-brown coat) Breeds Horse Families; Markings; and Color Coats; Horses from Different Countries The writer of this piece o Hocaidos are from Japan, Sumbas are from Indonesia, and Pintos are from America. • develops the topic with facts and details. • introduces a topic. o A horse can walk, trot, canter, and gallop. o IHocaidos are from Japan, Sumbas from and areand from America. Resource Guide 3–5 o chose horses because I like to rideare them. . CCSS . Indonesia, . HorsesParent are so Pintos beautiful fun to ride. o They [horses] live about 12 to 14 years. o an A horse can walk, structure trot, canter, and headers) gallop. that groups related information together. • creates organizational (using

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Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

Fourth grade student sample: Grade 4, narrative

This narrative was produced for an on-demand assessment. Students were asked to respond to the following prompt: “One morning you wake up and find a strange pair of shoes next to your bed. The shoes are glowing. In several paragraphs, write a story telling what happens.” Glowing Shoes

One quiet, Tuesday morning, I woke up to a pair of bright, dazzling shoes, lying right in front of my bedroom door. The shoes were a nice shade of violet and smelled like catnip. I found that out because my cats, Tigger and Max, were rubbing on my legs, which tickled. When I started out the door, I noticed that Tigger and Max were following me to school. Other cats joined in as well. They didn’t even stop when we reached Main Street! “Don’t you guys have somewhere to be?” I quizzed the cats. “Meeeeeooooow!” the crowd of cats replied. As I walked on, I observed many more cats joining the stalking crowd. I moved more swiftly. The crowd of cats’ walk turned into a prance. I sped up. I felt like a rollercoaster zooming past the crowded line that was waiting for their turn as I darted down the sidewalk with dashing cats on my tail. When I reached the school building . . . SLAM! WHACK! “Meeyow!” The door closed and every single cat flew and hit the door. Whew! Glad that’s over! I thought. I walked upstairs and took my seat in the classroom. “Mrs. Miller! Something smells like catnip! Could you open the windows so the smell will go away? Pleeeeaase?” Zane whined. “Oh, sure! We could all use some fresh air right now during class!” Mrs. Miller thoughtfully responded. “Nooooooo!” I screamed. When the teacher opened the windows, the cats pounced into the building. “It’s a cat attack!” Meisha screamed Everyone scrambled on top of their desks. Well, everyone except Cade, who was absolutely obsessed with cats. “Awww! Look at all the fuzzy kitties! They’re sooo cute! Mrs. Miller, can I pet them?” Cade asked, adorably. “Why not! Pet whichever one you want!” she answered. “Thanks! Okay, kitties, which one of you wants to be petted by Cade Dahlin?” he asked the cats. None of them answered. They were all staring at me. “Uh, hi?” I stammered. Rrriiiiinng! The recess bell rang. Everyone, including Mrs. Miller, darted out the door. Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

Out at recess, Lissa and I played on the swings. “Hey! Look over there!” Lissa shouted. Formed as an ocean wave, the cats ran toward me. Luckily, Zane’s cat, Buddy, was prancing along with the aroma of catnip surrounding his fur. He ran up to me and rubbed on my legs. The shoes fell off. Why didn’t I think of this before? I notioned. “Hey Cade! Catch!” Cade grabbed the shoes and slipped them on. The cats changed directions and headed for Cade. “I’m in heaven!” he shrieked.

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Center for Development and Learning


Writing Sample

What’s Great about This Essay: n Opens the essay by presenting the situation, narrator, and characters

n Organizes a sequence of events in a natural progression

n Uses dialogue and description show experiences and events

n Uses mary types of transitional words and phrases to show the sequence of events

(“Awww! Look at all the fuzzy kitties!...Mrs. Miller, can I pet them?” Cade asked, adorably.) (I felt like a rollercoaster zooming past the crowded line that was waiting for their turn…)

n Uses concrete details and descriptions to develop the topic

(The shoes were a nice shade of violet and smelled like catnip)

(When I started out the door…As I walked on…When I reached the school building)

n Provides a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events

(The narrator earlier describes Cade as being obsessed with cats. The conclusion of the story makes sense because Cade would likely be happy to wear shoes that attract cats to him.)

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Fifth grade

dardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and teChniCal SubjeCtS

Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and

What’s Great about This Essay:

(We opened the door and the sparkling sun blinded our eyes. It was over. All over. Finally)

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Center for Development and Learning

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n Provides a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events

n Organizes a sequence of events in a natural progression and uses a variety of transitional words and phrases to show the sequence of events appendix C |

n Title catches the reader’s attention

(Trevor went first…It was my turn… When Taryn had her turn…)


Writing Sample

ndardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial CommonStudieS, Core State SCienCe, StandardS and teChniCal for engliSh SubjeCtS language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and te

Common Core State StandardS for engliSh language artS & literaCy in hiStory/SoCial StudieS, SCienCe, and te

student sample: Grade 5, narrative

This narrative was produced in class, and the writer likely received feedback from her teacher

annotation The writer of this piece •

orients the reader by establishing a situation and introducing the narrator.

o We were in the darkness filled, mountain-top cold, waiting room. We were pr the shots of our lives. •

organizes an event sequence that unfolds naturally and uses a variety of transitiona phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.

uses narrative techniques to develop experiences and events or show the responses characters to situations.

o Trevor went first. . . . It was my turn. . . . When Taryn had her turn . . .

o Humor through exaggeration: Before the shot was even touching him he was howling. When it did hit him he was yelling loud enough to deafen you.

o Reporting a character’s thoughts: I was paralyzed with fear, I was death-defye scared.

o Pacing: It touched, entered my flesh, and fufilled it’s job. I started with a whim BOOM! full blast cry. •

uses concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and eve precisely.

o We were in the darkness filled, mountain-top cold, waiting room. We were pr the shots of our lives.

o There were also doors. Three doors, which were also brown and also faded. O way in. Not the way out unfortunately.

o The rest of the room was filled with families. Including my family of five. My fi self, my three year old bother, and my one year old sister.

provides a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events (emphas closure by the use of sentence fragments).

demonstrates good command of the conventions of standard written english (with errors that do not interfere materially with the underlying message).

n Uses sensory words and imagery to set the tone and convey experiences

o We opened the door and the sparkling sun blinded our eyes. It was over. All o

(We were in the darkness filled, mountain-top cold, waiting room.) 34

(Exaggeration: I was paralyzed with fear) (Pacing: It touched, entered my flesh, and fulfilled its job)

appendix C |

n Uses a various narrative techniques to develop experiences and events

n Opens the essay by establishing the situation and narrator CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Speaking & Listening Speaking is another major way people communicate. How well children can speak in school affects their ability to participate in class discussions and present in front of the class. If children are good listeners, they will be able to learn from their teachers and classmates more easily. Children need many opportunities to both speak and listen in order to gain the language skills to be able to read and write. The more children talk at home, the more this skill will transfer to school. This section gives an overview of how speaking and listening standards progress from one grade to the next.

Progressions

Third Grade In addition to previous grade level skills, students will:

n Be able to have various collaborative discussions, including one-on-one, groups, and teacher-led. n Prepare for discussions by reading and studying material. n Follow rules for discussion, such as respect and speaking one at a time. n Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker. n Tell a story or speak about a topic using facts and descriptive details. n Speak clearly and in complete sentences, and use details when explaining something.

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Center for Development and Learning


Tips Improvement takes time, which can be frustrating for kids. However, children learn most easily when there’s encouragement and support. These tips can help ease frustration while positively supporting your child: n Focus on one area of improvement at a time. n Celebrate your child’s progress even when it seems small! n Talk openly about your child’s strengths as well as her challenges. n Explain that every person has areas that are easier to do and areas where she has to work harder.

n Also share with your child your own strengths and challenges, and discuss how you work on improving yourself.

Fourth Grade In addition to grade three level skills, students will:

n Ask and answer specific questions to clarify or follow up on information from a speaker. n Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. n Summarize parts of what a speaker says or reads. n Identify reasons and evidence provided by a speaker to support specific points. n Determine when to use formal and informal speaking.

Fifth Grade In addition to grade four level skills, students will:

n Explain key ideas and form conclusions based on discussions. n Summarize points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence. n Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using facts, details, visuals, and multimedia to support and enhance main ideas or themes. n Adapt speech to various situations using formal English when appropriate.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Special Education Because all children deserve a high quality education, there are no separate or different standards for children with special needs. However, the CCSS require that students with disabilities be provided a range of supports. Children with special needs should receive accommodations, modifications, assistive technology, and other supports for classroom learning and any tests associated with CCSS, all of which can be specified in an IEP (Individualized Educational Plan) or 504 Plan.

Some questions to ask include: n What learning goal does each standard address? n What does my child need to have in place to access the standards being taught? n What strategies, special teaching, technology, or other accommodations will be provided to make sure my child is able to learn? n Who should I go to for help?

Knowing what your child is supposed to be learning in each grade can make it easier for you to ask questions about meeting academic goals and what kind of extra help your child might need. An IEP may have both learning and nonacademic goals, such as behavioral goals or goals with how your child expresses his/her feelings. Only the learning goals need to be based on the Common Core gradelevel standard.

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Center for Development and Learning


For more information: Accessibility Features and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities in PARCC Assessments - A Parent’s Guide http://www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/files/Parent%20PARCC%20 Brochure%20for%20Students%20with%20Disabilities.pdf

Application to Students with Disabilities

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/application-to-students-withdisabilities.pdf

FAQs on Universal Design for Learning and the Common Core from the National Center on Universal Design for Learning http://www.udlcenter.org/advocacy/faq_guides/common_core

Louisiana Department of Education: Students with Disabilities

https://www.louisianabelieves.com/academics/students-with-disabilities

National Center for Learning Disabilities

http://www.ncld.org/learning-disability-resources

PARCC Accessibility Features and Accommodations Manual

http://www.parcconline.org/parcc-accessibility-features-andaccommodations-manual

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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How to support your child For too long, there has been a gap in what students need to know and do in order to be successful in college and the workplace. Building on the strength of Louisiana’s standards, the ELA Common Core Standards (CCSS) are meant to be: clearer, more rigorous, and based on what research shows will prepare your child for college and career. In order to change what and how our students are learning, ELA CCSS focuses on 6 main changes, also known as “shifts.” This section provides a closer look at the shifts, what they mean for your child, and what you can do to help.

Shift 1

Balance Informational & Literary Texts

Students Must… n Read a balance of non-fiction* and fiction* texts, increasing the amount of non-fiction* as grade level increases.

Parents Can… n Read non-fiction* books with and to your child (see pages 23-27 for suggestions). n Read more informational texts like newspapers, magazines or online articles. n While reading ask questions like, “What is this book about?” “What point is the author trying to make?” “How does this relate to…?” or “What information from the book tells you that?” |#|

Center for Development and Learning


The recommended balance of fiction to non-fiction books students should read is: elementary level - 50/50; middle level - 45/50; high school level - 30/70.

Shift 2

6-12, Literacy in All Content Areas

Students Must… n Learn how to read books for different subject areas, and write using evidence* or proof from texts. n Use primary and secondary sources* to understand a topic.

Parents Can… n Give your child different types of books, especially on topics in which they are interested – from sports heroes to animals. n Have your child read at least 15 minutes daily. n Have your child write a story, draw a picture, give a presentation, or create a project based on what he/ she read. CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Shift 3

Text Complexity

Students Must… n Read and “unpack”* more complex texts* at each grade level.

Parents Can… n Have children retell stories, including key details. n Have conversations about characters, lessons, and central themes and ideas. n Ask questions like, “What do you think the author is up to?” “What mood does reading this book put you in?” or “Would you write this book differently if you were the author?”

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Center for Development and Learning


What do complex texts look like? n n n n n n

More words Longer sentences and paragraphs Various sentence types Challenging words More serious or real-life topics Complicated ideas

Shift 4

Text-based Answers

Students Must… n Use evidence* from the text* to answer questions, make judgments, and support arguments, beliefs, and opinions.

Parents Can… n Encourage your child to provide evidence* or support in everyday discussions. n Ask questions like, “Why do you think that?” or “What information in the text* helped you come to that conclusion?”

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Shift 5

Writing from Sources

Students Must… n Write using evidence* from multiple sources to inform or make an argument about a single topic. n Analyze* and synthesize* ideas, events and facts across many texts* to form an opinion or conclusion.

Parents Can… n Encourage your child to write in a daily journal. n Write “books” together, using evidence* and details to tell stories about everyday activities such as family activities, events, holidays or special occasions. n Have your child choose an article from a newspaper, magazine or website and write a story about it. n Have older kids write a report on a topic using information from many different sources (newspaper, Internet, personal experience, asking/interviewing others, books, etc.)

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Center for Development and Learning


Shift 6

Academic Vocabulary

Students Must… n Build vocabulary across various subjects and focus on words students will read and use most frequently.

Parents Can… n Read and talk often to young children. n Start a family vocabulary box or jar. Have everyone write down new words they discover, add them to the box, and use the words in conversation. n Pick a “word of the day” starting with a different letter. Have your child write the word and look for other things beginning with the same letter. n Play rhyming and word games. n Have older kids read more complex books, highlight words they don’t know, and find definitions for those words. n Relate new words to words children already know. For example, if a child knows what it means to be mad, that may help her learn the word “frustrated”.

CCSS Parent Resource Guide 3–5

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Glossary Align – making sure information being taught reflects what students should know in each subject area and at each grade level. Analyze – to break something complex into parts or ideas; to look at details; to identify key factors or evidence in a text to support an opinion or thought. Compare – looking at two or more people, things, events, etc. in order to see what is alike or what they have in common. Complex sentence – A complex sentence has one independent clause (can stand alone) and at least one dependent clause (cannot stand alone). For example - Juan and Maria went to the movies after they finished studying. “Juan and Maria went to the movies” = independent clause, “after they finished studying” = dependent clause. Complex text – text that requires deeper thinking; may include longer and more complicated words and sentences, multiple meanings and points of view, and challenging topics. Compound sentence – two or more simple sentences joined by conjunction (and, but, or). For example - Kate likes to eat fruit, and Michael likes to eat candy. “Kate likes to eat fruit” = simple sentence, “Michael likes to eat candy” = simple sentence. Contrast – looking at two or more people, things, events, etc. in order to see what is different. Critical thinking – ability to use information solve problems; thinking outside the box; consider other points of view; to figure something out; making reasonable judgments or arguments; learning how to think rather than what to think. Dialogue – a conversation between two or more people; an exchange of ideas or opinions on a particular topic. Evidence – proof; facts or information used to prove or disprove something. Fiction – based on the imagination; a make-believe story that is not real. Firsthand – from the first or original source Literal – exact meaning of a word or phrase. Moral – a lesson or principle contained in or taught by a fable, story or an event.

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Narrative – story or account of events or experiences, either true or fictitious; a book, article, poetry, or other writing that contains such a story.

Center for Development and Learning


Narrator – a person or character that tells the story. Non-literal – using figures of speech; when words or phrases are used in a way other than their exact or usual meanings. Non-fiction – based on factual events or true information. Paraphrase – to reword or explain information in one’s own words. Poetry – spoken or written language that uses repetition, rhyme, or verse. Primary source – original information or information created by someone with a firsthand account (personal experience) of an event or topic. Examples include: speeches, letters, interviews, autobiographies, poetry, novels, and articles reporting NEW research or findings. Progression – continuous standards, knowledge, and skills students need to show from the beginning of the school year to the end and from one grade level to the next. Prose – the ordinary form of spoken or written language, rather than rhythmic structure, as in poetry or verse. Rigorous – challenging; learning information faster and at earlier ages. For example, your child may learn in 2nd grade what you learned in 4th grade. Secondary source – information based on interpretation or research of primary sources, rather than personal experience. Examples include: textbooks, magazine articles, encyclopedias, and commentaries. Secondhand – from an indirect source or from others; not directly known or experienced. Sequence – when one thing follows another; a continuous or connected series of things, actions, procedures, events, patterns, etc. Sensory words – words that give a clear picture of what’s being described; usually related to the five senses of sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch (i.e. bright, whispering, bitter, rotten, mushy). Simple sentence – includes the most basic elements of sentence: a subject and a verb. For example - The boy jumped high. “boy” = subject, “jumped” = verb. Source – anything or place from which information comes or is obtained; a book, statement, person, etc., supplying information. See Primary source and Secondary source. Synthesize – using information to form one’s own thoughts, ideas, and opinions about a topic or book. Temporal – related to or expressing time; showing sequence or order of steps. Text – any written information used to support an opinion or claim. Examples include: books, magazines, articles, websites, newspapers, etc. Unpack – to break down, figure out, analyze, or Parent understand complex CCSS Resource Guidetext. 3–5

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References “Common Core State Standards for ELA & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.” Accessed March 18, 2014 at http://www.corestandards. org/wp-content/uploads/ELA_Standards.pdf. EngageNY. “Common Core State Standards: Shifts for Students and Parents.” Accessed March 18, 2014 at http://www.engageny.org/sites/default/files/resource/ attachments/shifts-for-students-and-parents.pdf. Louisiana Department of Education. Accessed March 18, 2014 at http://www.louisianabelieves.com. National PTA. “Parents’ guide to Student Success.” Accessed March 18, 2014 at http://www.pta.org/parents/content. Scholastic. “Common Core for Teachers: Booklists.” Accessed March 18, 2014 at http://commoncore.scholastic.com/teachers/books/non-fiction cfm?ItemNumber=2583. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation: Education and Workforce. Accessed March 21, 2014 at http://www.businessforcore.org/. California Department of Education. (may 15, 2014) Common Core Resources for Special Education http://www.cde.ca.gov/SP/se/cc/. accessed May 23, 2014.

This resource contains excerpts and summaries. See the Common Core State Standards for ELA & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects for the official set of standards. http://www.corestandards.org/wp-content/ uploads/ELA_Standards.pdf See CCSS for ELA Appendix B for a complete list of book examples. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf See CCSS for ELA Appendix C for more writing samples. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_C.pdf

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CCSS Parent Resource Booklet Grades 3-5