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Early Childhood Development Mini-Plenary Sessions and Workshops The Case for Investing in the Early Years Mini-Plenary Monday, July 23 1:30 – 3:00

Dr. Perri Klass, National Medical Director, Reach Out and Read, and Director, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University Oleta Garrett Fitzgerald, Director, CDF Southern Regional Office and Project Lead, Supporting Partnerships to Assure Ready Kids (SPARK), a W.K. Kellogg Foundation funded initiative The Hon. Holly J. Mitchell, Member, 47th District, California State Assembly, and Chair, Budget Sub-Committee on Health and Human Services Judith Van Ginkel, Ph.D., President, Every Child Succeeds and Professor of Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Hon. Eric Griego, New Mexico State Senator, 14th District Sheena Wright, President & CEO, Abyssinian Development Corporation Some of our nation’s most respected economists agree that support for early childhood development is a sound investment policy and yields higher graduation rates, earnings and tax revenues while reducing future involvement in the criminal justice system. Through creative partnerships and innovative community development models, pediatricians, parents, early care providers, educators, government agencies and businesses are breaking down silos and coming together to provide our youngest children with the nurturing home environments, quality early care, early reading skills and other supports they need during the years of greatest brain development, and to help ensure that America’s children enter kindergarten prepared to succeed. Advocates will hear about the crucial importance of early childhood development and how to make the most effective case to expand investments in young children’s lives particularly in the face of deep proposed budget cuts to core safety net programs serving children and families.

Closing the Achievement Gap through Quality Summer and Afterschool Enrichment Programs Mini-Plenary Tuesday, July 24 10:45 – 12:15

What Somebody Else Learned in Kindergarten: CDF’s National Campaign for Full-Day K Tuesday, July 24 10:45 – 12:15

Ron Fairchild, CEO, Smarter Learning Group - Hampstead, Md. Dwayne Crompton, Kansas City Freedom School Initiative Lauren Gilbert, Vice President of Programs, Bell Foundation Mary Nell McPherson, Executive Director, Freedom Schools Partners Emily Raine, Manager, Massachusetts Expanded Learning Time Initiative Expanding out-of-school-time learning has the potential to significantly reduce the achievement gap between White and Black children. During the summer months, poor children often lack access to essential resources that support their academic performance and healthy development and experience well‐documented setbacks in academic skills, which contribute to growth in the achievement gap. High quality afterschool programs improve children’s personal, social and academic skills, yet 15 million school-aged children are on their own after school—including one million K-5th grade students. This session will discuss strategies to improve access to affordable, quality summer and afterschool programs for all children. Cathy Grace, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Development, Children’s Defense Fund Kristie Kauerz, Ed.D., Research Scientist and Program Director for PreK-3rd Education, University of Washington John D. Stanford, Ph.D., Chief Operating Officer, Columbus City Schools Did you know in some states parents are paying tuition for their children to attend full-day kindergarten in public schools? Some children in kindergarten receive two-and-a-half hours of daily instruction, while others receive five or more. Only 10 states currently require by statute fullday kindergarten as part of the K-12 educational system and other states are rolling back kindergarten programs due to budget cuts. Even though 44 states have committed to implementing the K-12 Common Core Standards, in many of them kindergarten is a broken step, with children getting off to a very different start depending on whether and how they are making the transition from PreK to first grade. Join CDF’s national campaign for Full-Day K and learn why this grade is so pivotal.

25 E Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001

p (202) 628-8787

f (202) 662-3510

www.childrensdefense.org


PreK to Third Grade Reform: An Approach to Early Care and Education that Delivers Results Tuesday, July 24 4:30 – 6:00

Cathy Grace, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Development, Children’s Defense Fund Janine G. Bacquie, Director, Division of Early Childhood Programs and Services, Montgomery County Public Schools Kristie Kauerz, Ed.D., Research Scientist and Program Director for PreK-3rd Education, University of Washington Sharon Ritchie, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Providing high quality PreK programs for four-year-olds followed by a full day of kindergarten and the deliberate alignment of standards, curriculum, assessment, leadership and teacher professional development from PreK through third grade is showing promising results in closing the achievement gap. This session will explore two examples of schools and school districts in various stages of the PreK to Third Grade Initiative and how it is paying off.

Lessons Learned from Head Start and Early Head Start: Innovations that Inform Early Childhood Care and Practice

Cathy Grace, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Development, Children’s Defense Fund Amanda Bryans, Director, Education and Comprehensive Services Division, Office of Head Start, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Catherine McCarty, Vice President for Clayton Educare, Clayton Early Learning Sarah Sexton, Director, Center for the Advanced Study of Excellence Family, Infant and Preschool Program

Monday, July 23 1:30 – 3:00

Head Start and Early Head Start served more than 1 million low-income children and families in 2010. New Head Start standards will strengthen the program and accountability for services provided. Participants will learn about the best of Head Start and how local communities can partner and benefit from this unique American contribution to the early childhood field.

Focusing on the Needs of Black Male Infants and Toddlers: Building the Foundation for School Success

Cathy Grace, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Development, Children’s Defense Fund Lauren Hogan, Director of Public Policy, National Black Child Development Institute Iheoma U. Iruka, Ph.D., Investigator, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Rashanda Perryman, former Senior Policy Associate, Early Childhood Development, Children’s Defense Fund

Wednesday, July 25 1:30 – 3:00

Black boys fare worse than their peers throughout their life course in education, social and economic domains. It doesn’t have to be this way. Infant and toddler early care providers can take steps early in life to close the pervasive gaps and make sure Black boys get off to a strong start. Panelists will discuss how intentional programming built around the specific needs of infant and toddler Black boys could have a positive impact on later life outcomes.

Embracing Children Birth to Three: Comprehensive Services through State and Community Level Planning

Cathy Grace, Ed.D., Director of Early Childhood Development, Children’s Defense Fund Darneshia Bell, Arkansas Community Coordinator, Safe Babies Court Team Project, Zero to Three Cindy Oser, Senior Policy Analyst, Zero to Three

Monday, July 23 3:30 – 5:00

A growing body of research has documented the crucial importance of early brain development in setting the foundation for a child’s future. Infants’ and toddlers’ physical, social-emotional, and cognitive development happen simultaneously, and meeting the needs of this population must occur across developmental domains. This session will provide an overview of the interconnectedness between early childhood programs, health and mental health care in the lives of infants and toddlers with a special focus on the needs of the most vulnerable young children—those in the child welfare system.

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Early Childhood Development