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Devil’s Lake State Park Official 2012

Visitor Guide

CAMPGROUND MAPS . ............. 56-57 ADMISSION INFORMATION ........... 58 EMERGENCY INFORMATION .......... 59 PARK/TRAIL MAP ....................... 60-61 Complete Index Located On Page 3

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

DEVIL’S LAKE STATE PARK • S5975 PARK ROAD • BARABOO, WI 53913 • (608) 356-8301 • www.WIPARKS.net WISCONSIN DEPT. OF NATURAL RESOURCES • PUB-PR-111 2012


2012 Calender of Events May 4

Downtown Baraboo Spring Wine Walk (Tickets on Sale April 4)

May 9 through October

Downtown Baraboo Farmers Market (Weds & Sat)

May 12

Downtown Baraboo Spring Fair on the Square

May 27 thru October

Downtown Baraboo Sunday Market

Thursdays June through August Concerts on the Square

July 28

Downtown Baraboo Circus Celebration

August 11

Summer Art Classic

September 21

Downtown Baraboo Brew Ha-Ha (Tickets on Sale August 21)

October 13

Downtown Baraboo Fall Fair on the Square

October 19-21 Fall Art Tour

November 16

Downtown Baraboo Fall Wine Walk

(Tickets on Sale October 16)

November 17

Downtown Baraboo Christmas Light Parade

Nov. 23- Dec. 31

Fun & Festive Events

See our website for more details!




Devil’s Lake State Park Official 2012

Visitor Guide

A Curious History .................................... 3 Healthy Forest........................................... 9 Is Devil’s Lake Your Special Place?........ 10 Nature Center . ....................................... 25 Get Outdoors! Wisconsin ...................... 25 Kids! ........................................................ 26 An Unusual Geology .............................. 29 Driving Tour and Map ........................... 30 Snakes ..................................................... 35 Badger’s and Wolves and Bears! ............ 37 Ice Age National Scientific Reserve ...... 38 Parfrey’s Glen.......................................... 39 Ancient Stories ....................................... 43 Ancient Mounds...................................... 44 Natural Bridge State Park...................... 45 Historical Devil’s Lake Map.................... 46 Depth Map............................................... 47 Wintertime.............................................. 49 Bat Condos.............................................. 50 Badger Army Ammunition Plant............ 54 101 Things to do...................................... 55 Concessions............................................. 62 SUMMER SCHEDULE......................... 13-23 GROUP CAMP MAP................................. 53 CAMPGROUND MAPS ..................... 56-57 ADMISSION INFORMATION ................ 58 EMERGENCY INFORMATION ............... 59 PARK/TRAIL MAP ............................. 60-61

Published By: Capital Newspapers Baraboo, WI General Manager: Matt Meyers Tourism Publications: Andrew Nussbaum

Advertising Director: Julie Brown Graphic Design: Nicholas Ahles Cover Photo by: M. Knapstein

Hikers about 1900

A Curious History Devil’s Lake State Park has hosted a wide range of improbable events and remarkable people. The Ringling Brothers, of circus fame, owned a summer home, icehouse, and garage with chauffer quarters on the lake’s shore. Circus elephants bathed in Devil’s Lake. An 85-foot tall lookout tower was built on the west bluff. Ulysses S. Grant visited Devil’s Lake. There was a race between an “oarsman” and a hiker. A man won $5 in a greased pole climbing contest by putting sandpaper on his arms and legs. Abraham Lincoln’s wife toured the park. Devil’s Lake had its own Post Office and train station. In the depths of winter, gung-ho adventurers have chopped holes in the lake ice to go swimming. There was a vineyard and winery at the south shore. A round hand-hewn tree house hosted meetings of the “Old Settlers Association.” A bluff-top resort failed when the manager died of typhus, and frightened people avoided the area like, well, the plague. Devil’s Lake has always been a place that has easily given rise to grandiose stories and rumors, sometimes making it difficult to sort fact from fiction. The first people at the lake probably date back more than 10,000 years; clear evidence shows prehistoric people using the shelter at what is now Natural Bridge State Park

and at the Durst rock shelter soon after the last ice age. Both are within a day’s walk of Devil’s Lake. The first irrefutable evidence of people at the lake points to a fascinating enigma: the mound builders of about 1000 years ago. They left effigy, linear, and conical mounds behind. To this day, the speculation of historians is widely dispersed among several theories about their long lost culture. Historic era Native Americans frequented the lake, but did not inhabit the valley on a long term basis. In 1832, John De La Ronde was the first non-Native American known to visit the lake. In 1849, naturalist and scientist, Increase Lapham commented “a large body of broken fragments have accumulated along the edge of the water rendering it very difficult to walk along shore: yet two of our party made a circuit of the lake, jumping from rock to rock as best they could.” European immigrants and settlers took note of the lake in the mid-1800’s. With the routing of a rail line through the lake valley, tourism began booming. The first of several hotels was built in 1866, and the railroad was completed in 1873. Transportation and accommodation went hand-inhand to provide adventurous visitors with a well-appointed glimpse into “Curious History” Continued on Page 4


 “Curious History” Continued from Page 3

the wilderness world. In some ways, travel to the park was more akin to a voyage than a vacation. After arriving via a steam train from Chicago or Minneapolis, visitors would alight with bags and trunks from behind the hissing sootspewing locomotives. Men wore hats, coats, button-collar shirts, and bow ties. Women wore long skirts and tall laceup shoes. Atop the south bluff

Children in the lake

The hotel era was an extravagant time at the park. Train passengers sometimes arrived by the thousands. Most stayed for the day, and then, exhausted, returned by train in the evening. But many remained for days or weeks. They checked in to a gabled wooden hotel with three tiers of balconies. Food was served in the dining room. In season, fresh fruits and vegetables from nearby orchards and gardens nourished diners. A vineyard was at hand near the lake. You could stay at the Kirkland Resort, the Cliff House, the Lake View Hotel,

or the Messenger Hotel and Resort. The hotels were all at the south shore except one – the Cliff House and its Annex. Amenities included a telegraph office, billiard room, barber shop, grocery and a bowling alley. Then, in the early 1900’s, Americans fell head-over-heels in love with the automobile. Lifestyles changed, recreation changed, travel changed, and it was just a matter of time until the Devil’s Lake hotels vanished. Amusements of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s are anachronistic from today’s view point. Ladies in ankle-length dresses played croquet on shaded lawns. Some attended a “band picnic” or listened to records on an Edison phonograph. You could take a whirl on the dance floor, attend a masquerade, enjoy a horsedrawn hay ride, or ice skate. There was a footrace between a democrat and a republican. A church service was held on the lakeshore with the pastor and choir on boats. “Curious History” Continued on Page 5

Hikers in 1919


“Curious History” Continued from Page 4

Some attended “an interesting exhibition of mind reading.” One enchanted evening was spent enacting the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet. Two side-wheel wood-burning steamers, the Capitola and the Minniwauken, took people on excursions around the lake. Even in those days, conflicting complaints arose about suitable uses of the park: the Capitola’s steam whistle could be heard in Baraboo – three miles away. You could visit a zoo with a bear, a deer, and a raccoon named Rastus. In the summer, there were sculling regattas on the water, and in the winter horses raced on the frozen lake. You could play golf in the park from 1922 to 1961. The boom of dynamite explosions echoed throughout the Devil’s Lake valley in the late 1800’s. Quarries operated within a stone’s throw of the lake, and another location about a half mile past the group camp area. Work camps sprang up, and trains hauled the shattered quartzite away. The last quarry in what is now the park operated

into the 1960’s. In the 1930’s the Civilian Conservation Corps used locally quarried quartzite stone to build the Rock Elm Shelter and the Park Headquarters.

 Quarry near northeast corner of the lake

From 1934 to 1941, about 200 young men worked on many projects that continue to benefit the park even to this day. They built trails in some of the most rugged places, removed invasive species, guided visitors onto the bluffs, built tables, signs, and benches, built a reservoir, relocated roads, patrolled the bluffs as fireguards, and built at least two stone buildings. During these same years, the boisterous big bands of the era performed regularly in the Chateau at the north end of the lake. Sound easily carries the length of the lake on a still night. Certainly the provocative sounds of the bands performing in the Chateau at the north end of the lake reached the ears of many a C.C.C. boy, conjuring up visions of dancing, drinking, and women. One speculates about imaginative schemes “Curious History” Continued on Page 7

Dual train tracks served the park

Assortment of boats




“Mini-Wauken”

Free Cultural Events! Beverages & Cookies!

Huge Selection of Books: Used, Rare, New

Cards, Journals & Sketchbooks

Proud anglers

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DL


“Curious History” Continued from Page 5

put into play by young men powerfully drawn to the vivacity of the Chateau! You can still attend a live big band concert and dance at the Chateau some Saturday nights in the summer. Devil’s Lake State Park was founded in 1911. In 1919, park attendance was recorded

at 100,000 for the year. In 1924, it had increased to 200,000. By 1952, attendance was over one million per year and has slowly risen to the current estimate of 1.3 – 1.7 million per year. Camping, similar to how we know it, began in the 20’s and 30’s at the northeast corner of the lake. Visitors set up campsites, which sometimes evolved into plankfloored summer shelters and

cabins. In the 1930’s Northern Lights Campground was laid out and put into use. In 1962 the golf course was converted into the Quartzite Campground. In 1984-5, the south shore camping was defunct and the Ice Age Campground was constructed. During the history of Devil’s Lake State Park, remarkable things have happened here. But throughout the decades,

most of the activities have remained surprisingly similar: hiking the bluffs, camping, taking pleasure in the vistas, picnicking with family and friends, enjoying the beach, fishing, and boating.



You and your family are tomorrow’s history! Enjoy the park!

The North Shore Chateau

Cliff House




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You Can Help Keep Our Forests Healthy!

A campfire is an important part of the camping experience for many people. But your campfire wood could be hiding insects or diseases that can kill Wisconsin’s trees. Gypsy moth, emerald ash borer, oak wilt, beech bark disease and others spread easily when hidden in firewood.

“It’s common to see campers bring firewood from home,” says Andrea Diss-Torrence, forest pest expert with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. “We have visitors from all over the state and across the country and we have no idea where all that firewood is coming from. Some of that wood might just be the source of our next big problem.”

• Leave firewood at home and Firewood isn’t the only way purchase aged firewood at these pests move around but is or nearby the park. With the most difficult to stop. The the increasing complexity DNR restricts the movement of and differences in firewood firewood onto all state-owned regulations, it’s the easiest way lands. Quarantines are in place to plan. for gypsy moth and emerald ash borer, and firewood may not • Wood from sources not be moved from a quarantined certified by the Wisconsin area to a non-quarantined area. Department of Agriculture may be confiscated and See www.dnr.wi.gov, keyword destroyed. For a list of certified “firewood” for details. All of firewood dealers, see www. eastern Wisconsin is quarantined emeraldashborer.wi.gov for gypsy moth and a dozen counties are quarantined for • Any firewood brought into the emerald ash borer. Violations are park must be cut in Wisconsin enforced with fines and jail time. AND within 25 miles of the park. Also, if it was cut or Campers, follow these simple stored in a quarantined area, it steps to help ensure the healthy is not allowed. future of our state parks and forests: •B  urn all firewood at your



campsite; don’t move it out of the park. • Cook over gas or charcoal instead of an open fire. Instead of an evening campfire, explore new night-time activities like star gazing or viewing wildlife by flashlight. Campfires remain an important part of the outdoor experience in Wisconsin, but we must all take a few precautions to keep our forests and campgrounds – and our city parks and yards – healthy. Ask a ranger, other park staff, or campground host about firewood rules, or visit www.dnr. wi.gov, and search “firewood.”

• PLEASE BE AWARE FIREWOOD RESTRICTIONS MAY CHANGE DURING THE SEASON •

South Shore “Cottage” Road


10

Is Devil’s Lake Your Special Place?

Was this Grandpa’s favorite spot in the whole wide world? Is there a significant someone in your life who dearly loves Devil’s Lake? Are there warm family memories that you’d like to commemorate? Does it make you smile when you first see the lake, bringing special memories or a wonderful person to mind? You can celebrate those memories, or honor that person with a lasting memorial. Request a personalized memorial brick or paver to be prominently placed in the most popular area in Devil’s Lake State Park. You decide what you want to say,

and we’ll do the rest. Your personalized memorial brick or paver will be positioned in front of the historic north shore Chateau, the hub of activity along the lakeshore. The memorial brick program is sponsored by the Friends of Devil’s Lake State Park, a non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization. All money raised by the memorial walkway goes to support Devil’s Lake State Park – nature programs, upkeep of vistas, facility maintenance, replacement of equipment – it helps keep the park running well, protects the park, keeps people safe, and serves visitors like you.

Ask for an information sheet at the Chateau or at the Devil’s Lake Visitor Center. You’ll get details about pricing, size, placement, and other choices.

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11 Please Join and Help the Park! Become a Member of

Friends of Devil’s Lake As a member of the Friends of Devil’s Lake State Park, you will receive a subscription to the “Devil’s Lake Advocate,” a quarterly newsletter that introduces you to the park personnel as well as informing you of upcoming events and activities in the park. Please check out the Friends of Devil’s Lake Website at www.devilslakefriends.org.

Members of the non-profit Friends of Devil’s Lake State Park want to ensure that the park remains an unspoiled jewel of nature by contributing their minds, a little muscle and their financial support. We help enhance and beautify the park by providing volunteer services for various environmental and beautification projects. We also sponsor a variety of educational and recreational activities for park visitors. An endowment fund has been established to ensure that, for years to come, the park will remain a beautiful and enjoyable park to visit.

Friends Programs and Projects As a Friends member you can assist our Naturalist at the Nature Center. Volunteers also assist at the Visitor’s Center, freeing the park rangers and staff to take care of more pressing matters. You can also get involved in park projects and improvements such as litter pick-up, habitat restorations and our ongoing efforts to control invasive species. Other projects that the Friends participate in include the Memorial Brick walkway program, firewood bundling and sales, candlelight hikes in the fall, the monthly music in the park programs and the annual Devil’s Challenge Triathlon.

Major Friends Projects • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

North Shore Bathhouse Restoration South Shore Building Restorations Renovation of Campground Toilets and Shower Buildings CCC Kiosk Martin Memorial Historical Display Ice Age Wayside Invasive Species Removal Lake Phosphorus Removal and Water Quality Improvements Music in the Park Programs Halloween Candlelight Hike Devil’s Challenge Triathlon New Teepee Tents Educational and Interpretive Displays Commemorative Brick Walkway

❑ Individual Membership (1 year) ❑ Individual 3-Year Membership

Individual memberships receive newsletter, decal

❑ ❑

Family Membership (1 year) Explorer (1 Year) Family 3-Year Membership

Family memberships receive newsletter, decal

Voyageur (1 Year)

Receive newsletter, decal, Sweatshirt (X, M, K, XL)

❑ ❑

Friends of Devil’s Lake State Park Membership Application

$20 $55 $30 $60

Receive newsletter, decal, T-shirt (X, M, K, XL)

Lake Water Quality Improvement As a Friends member you will be part of a major 15-year project with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to improve the water quality of the lake and the effort to control “swimmer’s itch.” The Friends group helped secure federal and state funding as well as providing additional funding and manpower, wherever possible, for this pioneering project to remove phosphorus from the lake beginning in 2002. By removing the phosphorus, we reduce the food source for the snails that cause “swimmer’s itch.” Results have exceeded expectations and the number of reported cases of “swimmer’s itch” has been drastically reduced.

$80 $120

Please don’t send any premiums

Name

Address

City

Use my entire gift to help preserve the park

State, Zip

Enclosed is my additional gift of $

Phone

to support (Check One)

❑ Current FODL Projects.

❑ The FODL Endowment Fund. Earnings are partially matched by state funds.

❑ I would like to set up an Electric Funds Transfer for this special gift. Please transfer $________ ($10/month minimum) from my checking account for________ months. (Please attach a voided check/deposit slip) Signature (EFT can be cancelled by contacting FODL) Date

Please make checks payable to and mail this form to:

Friends of Devil’s Lake P.O. Box 209 Baraboo, WI 53913-0209


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13

MAY 2012

Programs will meet at the Nature Center unless otherwise noted. Check at the Nature or Visitor Center for program additions and updates.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

1

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

2

3

FRIDAY

4

SATURDAY

5 7:00 – 8:30 am Spring Bird Hike South Shore Boat Landing Parking Lot 10:30 – 11:30 am Learn To Geocache

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

7:30 – 8:30 pm Frog Call Hike South Shore Boat Landing Parking Lo

13

20

14

15

21

22

16

23

17

24

18

19

6:30 – 7:30 pm Heron Rookery Walk Red Cedar Shelter South Shore

1:00 – 2:30 pm Healing Herbs

25

26

11:00 am – 12:00 pm Animal Feeding Day

2:00 – 3:00 pm Magnificent Mammals 7:30 – 8:30 pm Frog Call Hike Steinke Basin

27 10:30 am – 12:00 pm History Hike – South Shore Hotels Red Cedar Shelter 2:00 – 3:00 pm Snakes, Turtles, & Toads

28

Memorial Day

10:30 am – 12:30 pm Wildflower Walk – West Bluff

29

30

31


15

JUNE 2012

Programs will meet at the Nature Center unless otherwise noted. Check at the Nature or Visitor Center for program additions and updates.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1

SATURDAY

2 Free Fishing Weekend 11 am -12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Raccoons North Shore Beach

3

4

Free Fishing Weekend 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach

10 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Fish North Shore Beach

17 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Ponds North Shore Beach

24 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Raccoons North Shore Beach 6:00 – 8:00 pm Music in the Park Free Concert North Shore Beach

5

6

7

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day

8

9

11 am – 12 pm Fish Tales 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach

11 am -12 am Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10) 8:30 – 9:30 pm Become a Jr. Ranger Amphitheater

11

12

13

14

15

16

11 am – 12:30 pm Elephant Rock Hike

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day Nature Center

10:30 – 11:30 am House Hunting 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art

11 am – 12:30 pm Steinke Basin Hike Parking Lot 1:00 – 3:00 pm Go Back in Time – West Bluff 2:00 – 3:00 pm Owls

10:30 – 11:30 am Wolves, Foxes, Coyotes 2:00 – 3:00 pm Bird Hike - Grottos Trail South Shore 8:00 – 9:00 pm Bat Hike

11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 11 am – 12 pm Tracks! 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Frogs North Shore Beach 7:00 – 8:00 pm Stuck on the Rocks! Amphitheater

18

19

20

21

22

23

11:00 – 11:45 am Devil’s Lake - 100 Years & Counting

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 pm Magnificent Mammals

11 am – 12 pm Feathered Friends 1:00 – 2:00 pm Buggin’ Out!

11 am – 12 pm Nature Magnified 2:00 – 3:00 pm Tracks! 8:30 – 9:30 pm Firefly Hike

11 am – 12 pm House Hunting 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Frogs North Shore Beach 8:00 – 9:00 pm Loon Watch

10:30 – 11:30 am Nature Bingo 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach

25

26

27

28

29

30

11 am – 12 pm Fish Tales

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Journals

10:30 – 11:30 am Wolves, Foxes, Coyotes 1:00 – 2:00 pm Paper Making

10:30 – 11:30 am Nature Magnified 1:00 – 2:30 pm History Hike – South Shore Hotels Red Cedar Shelter 2:00– 3:00 pm Owls

11:00 – 1:00 East Bluff Hike Trail Head North Shore 1:00 – 2:00 pm Magnificent Mammals 8:00 – 9:00 pm Bat Hike

11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 11 am – 12 pm Tracks! 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Owls North Shore Beach 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10) 8:00 – 9:00 Meet a Turkey Vulture Amphitheater


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17

JULY 2012

Programs will meet at the Nature Center unless otherwise noted. Check at the Nature or Visitor Center for program additions and updates.

SUNDAY

1 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach

8 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Fish North Shore Beach

15 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Owls North Shore Beach

22 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Archery Day North Shore

29 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach 6:00 – 8:00 pm Music in the Park Free Concert North Shore Beach

MONDAY

2 10:30 – 11:30 am House Hunting 2:00 – 2:45 pm Devil’s Lake – 100 Years and Counting

TUESDAY

3

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

4

5

FRIDAY

6

SATURDAY

7

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day

11 am – 12 pm Snakes, Turtles, & Toads 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art 8:30 – 9:30 pm Full Moon Hike Steinke Basin

11 am – 12 pm Nature Art 1:00 – 2:30 pm History Hike – South Shore Hotels Red Cedar Shelter 8:30 – 9:30 pm Firefly Hike

11 am – 12 pm Feathered Friends 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Journals 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats! North Shore Beach

11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 11 am – 12 pm Magnificent Mammals 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Ponds North Shore Beach 8:30 – 9:30 pm Become a Jr. Ranger Amphitheater

10

11

12

13

14

11 am – 12 pm Wolves, Foxes, Coyotes

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 pm Owls

11 am – 12 pm Nature Bingo 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Art

11 am – 12 pm Nature Magnified 1:30 – 3:00 pm History Hike - Effigy Mounds 2:00 – 3:00 pm Tracks!

11 am – 12 pm Magnificent Mammals 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach 8:00 – 9:00 pm Bat Hike

11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 2:00 pm Paper Making 1:00 – 3:00 Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10)

16

17

18

19

20

21

11 am – 12 pm Snakes!

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Journals

11 am – 12 am Feathered Friends 1:00 – 3:00 pm History Hike – West Bluff

11 am – 12 pm Fish Tales 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Journals 8:30 – 9:30 pm Firefly Hike

11 am – 12 pm Tracks! 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art

11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 11 am – 12 pm Nature Bingo 1:00 – 3:00 pm Archery Day North Shore 7:00 – 8:00 pm Stuck on the Rocks! Amphitheater

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11 am – 12 pm Nature Magnified

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 - 3:00 pm Paper Making

11 am – 12 am Nature Bingo 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Journals

11:00 – 10:30 am Wolves, Foxes, Coyotes 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Raccoons North Shore Beach 2:00 – 3:00 pm Fish Tales

11 am – 12 pm Buggin’ Out 2:00 – 3:00 pm Magnificent Mammals 8:00 – 9:00 pm Bat Hike

11 am – 12:30 pm History Hike - Effigy Mounds 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Owls North Shore Beach 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10)

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10:am – 12 pm History Hike – West Bluff

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Bingo

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18 South Shore Picnic Area

(photo via RC plane by Kyle Goetzelman)

Try our Authentic Mexican Cuisine & Enjoy our Margaritas!

Receive 15% OFF your entire bill. One coupon per person. Not good with any other offer.

Los Nopales

Serving Serving Lunch Lunch && Dinner Dinner Daily Daily Specials Specials

506 W. Pine St., Baraboo

Mexican Restaurant 608-356-3566

Recycled Sally’s Maternity & Kids Consignment Quality New & Used Children’s Clothing, Shoes & Toys. Best Selection in the Area! 119 3rd Ave., Baraboo • 608-356-2212 • www.recycledsallys.com Open Mon-Fri 10am - 5pm, Sat 10am - 4pm, Sun 10 - 2

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YOUR FIRST DRINK Serving Breakfast and Lunch daily • Open 6am

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Now Serving OPEN 10am to 10pm Orange 701 Hwy 12 Julius 356-6313

We Deliver or Come In & Enjoy our Lunch Buffet Hwy. 12, West Baraboo • 356-9500 Dine In, Carry Out, Delivery


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Programs will meet at the Nature Center unless otherwise noted. Check at the Nature or Visitor Center for program additions and updates.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1 11 am – 12 pm Snakes, Turtles, & Toads 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art

5 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway

12 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Owls North Shore Beach

19 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats

26 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach 5:00 – 7:00 pm Music in the Park Free Concert & Ice Cream Social North Shore Beach

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AUGUST 2012 THURSDAY

2 11 am – 12 am Feathered Friends 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach

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FRIDAY

3 11 am – 12 pm Nature Magnified 2:00 – 3:00 pm Owls

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SATURDAY

4 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 7:00 – 8:00 pm Joy of Birds (Live Raptors) Amphitheater

11 10:30 – 11:30 am Magnificent Mammals 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Fish North Shore Beach 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10) 7:30 – 8:30 pm Wisconsin Wolves Northern Lights Amphitheatre

10:30 – 11:30 Wolves, Foxes, Coyotes

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 Nature Journals

11 pm – 12 pm Buggin’ Out Steinke Basin 1:00 – 1:45 Devil’s Lake – 100 Years & Counting

11 am – 12 pm Nature Bingo 1:00 – 2:00 pm Feathered Friends 1:00 – 2:30 pm History Hike – South Shore Hotels Red Cedar Shelter

11 am – 12 pm House Hunting 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach 2:00 – 3:00 pm Paper Making 7:00 – 8:00 pm Bat Hike

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11 am – 12 pm Fish Tales

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:30 pm History Hike - Effigy Mounds

10:30 – 11:30 am Nature Magnified 2:00 – 3:00 pm Magnificent Mammals

10:30 – 11:30 pm Nature Bingo 2:00 – 3:00 pm Snakes, Turtles, & Toads

11:00 – 11:45 am Devil’s Lake – 100 Years and Counting 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Raccoons North Shore Beach 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Art

10:00 -11:30 am Elephant Hunt Hike 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach 7:00 – 8:00 pm Wisconisn Bats Northern Lights Amphitheatre

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10:30 – 11:30 am House Hunting

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day 2:00 – 3:00 pm Feathered Friends

11 am – 12 pm Owls 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Bingo

11 am – 12 pm Wolves, Foxes, Coyotes 1:00 – 3:00 History Hike – West Bluff 1:00 – 2:00 pm Paper Making

11 am – 12 pm Buggin’ Out Steinke Basin 1:00 – 2:00 pm Nature Bingo 7:00 – 8:00 pm Bat Hike

11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Fish North Shore Beach 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Journals 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10) 7:30 – 8:30 pm Become a Jr. Ranger Amphitheater

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11 am – 12 pm Nature Magnified

12:30 – 1:30 pm Animal Feeding Day


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SWIMMER’S ITCH

Tell us yer favorite pizza the way you like it and we’ll put it on the buffet.

Seriously.

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1.00 Off any Full Buffet with purchase of soda

Limit 4 per coupon

Any 2 Large Pizza’s for

20.00

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Code DL01

Code DL02

Dine-In, Pick- up & Delivery

This is a der­matitis caused by the penetration of a microscopic fluke. It is neither dangerous nor con­tagious, but it can be uncomfortable. The site of the penetration is marked by a small red welt. The amount of discomfort varies with the individual. In some people the reac­tion is barely noticeable, whereas others have severe itching, swelling, and fever. The symptoms usually subside within a week. Swimmer’s itch organisms may be noted in the lake in early summer. If so, signs will be posted near the swim­ming areas to warn that the organ­isms are present. After the flukes have penetrated the skin, little can be done in the form of effective treatment. Some re­lief might be obtained through the use of a lotion with additives such as antihistamines and/or local anesthet­ics. If you go swimming during the “active” times of the summer, the best prevention is to rub briskly with a towel immediately after leaving the water. Showering may also help.

Baraboo Pizza Ranch, 1000 Log Lodge Ct. • Baraboo (Hwy 12)

448-2215

$10 OFF

55-MINUTE, 7-MILE TRAIN RIDE MANY HISTORICAL RAIL CARS ON DISPLAY

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: June 2 to Labor Day OPEN WEEKENDS: Just 12 Mi. from Devil’s Lake! May 5 to Oct. 21

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S3949 Cty. Bd (Business 12) Baraboo 2 Mi South Of Ho-chunk

Candles • Greenery • Prints • Books Jewelry • Pottery • Clothing

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Reg. Price Purchases of $30 or More Expires 9/5/2012

The

Barn

Restaurant

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Area’s largest deck looking out over the Baraboo Bluffs Open 7 days a week for Lunch and Dinner

Live Entertainment During Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday Brunch Call for Band Schedule Over 200 micro brews available

608-356-2161 S5566 Hwy 123 Baraboo Located less than 1 mi from Devils lake


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Programs will meet at the Nature Center unless otherwise noted. Check at the Nature or Visitor Center for program additions and updates.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

SEPTEMBER 2012 WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach 2:00 – 3:00 pm Nature Art

2 10:30 – 11:30 am Butterfly Walkway 1:00 – 3:00 Drop in on Owls North Shore Beach 7:30 – 10:30 pm Big Band Dance Chateau (Cost $10)

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3

Labor Day

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10:30 – 11:30 Nature Bingo 1:00 – 3:00 Drop in on Snakes North Shore Beach

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11:00 am – 12:30 pm History Hike - Effigy Mounds

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30 10:30 – 11:30 am Snakes of Devil’s Lake

15 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 History Hike – West Bluff

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Devil’s Challenge Triathlon 10:30 – 11:30 am Magnificent Mammals

10:30 – 11:15 am Devil’s Lake – 100 Years and Counting

8 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 2:00 Paper Making 1:00 – 3:00 Drop in on Bats North Shore Beach

22 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 2:00 Snakes, Turtles & Toads

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29 11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 3:00 pm Monarch Tagging Roznos Meadow Parking Lot Hwy 113


GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR WILD SIDE.

Devil’s Lake State Park, WI – Photo by Krzysztof Gorny

608-356-9218

880 Hwy 12, Baraboo, WI • Located in the Baraboo Mini Mall at the corner of Hwy. 12 and Cty. W

www.wildbar aboo.com


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Programs will meet at the Nature Center unless otherwise noted. Check at the Nature or Visitor Center for program additions and updates.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1

TUESDAY

2

OCTOBER 2012

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

3

4

FRIDAY

5

SATURDAY

6 10:00 – 12:00 West Bluff/Tumbled Rock Hike

7 11:00 am – 12:30 pm History Hike - Effigy Mounds

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11 am – 12 pm Animal Feeding Day 1:00 – 2:00 Snakes, Turtles & Toads

Columbus Day

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20 11:00 am – 12:30 pm Steinke Basin Hike Parking Lot

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27 1:00 – 2:00 pm Terrific Turtles 6:00 – 9:00 pm Friends Halloween Hike

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31 Halloween


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Photo By: D. Thomas from 2011 Photo Contest

Peking Buffet Biggest Chinese Buffet in Baraboo!

GREAT FOOD & Children’s Discount 30 Item Buffet Plus Dessert Bar! Full Service Buffet for Lunch & Dinner Check out our full salad bar & sample our new Entrees!

Delivery in Baraboo Area

1204 8th St, Baraboo, WI 53913

608-356-9909

Photo By: L. Chown from 2011 Photo Contest

THE MEAT MARKET BARABOO

356-5574

Quality Choice Meats 700 Lincoln Ave. www.themeatmarket.net Mon.-Tues., Thur.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 8-5; Closed Wed.

Would you like some Fresh, High Quality Meats from experienced and skilled butchers?

We've got you covered.

You Won't Even Need to Thaw!


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Activity Abounds at the Nature Center Looking for fun things to do while you visit Devil’s Lake? Come up to the Nature Center! There’s always something happening year-round. The Nature Center is located on the north shore entrance road. The center has lots of natural and human history displays, live animals, and even has a kid’s room, where kids can play – naturally!

Check it Out! There are also lots of things you can borrow and use at the park. The following items can be checked out any time the Nature Center is open. • Explorer Books and Backpacks The explorer books have nature activities, scavenger hunts, games, hikes, and crafts. Check out an explorer backpack containing magnifying lenses, bug boxes, pencils, crayons, and field guides to help your kids complete the activities in the books. • Take Smokey Camping Kids can take a cuddly, stuffed Smokey Bear camping for the night! Read “The True Story of Smokey Bear” and write in Smokey’s diary about all of the

Get Outdoors! Wisconsin

things Smokey did during his visit with you. • Forest Forever Backpacks Borrow a backpack filled with exploring tools, books, games, activity guides, and field guides that help kids (ages 10 to 14) learn about Wisconsin forests. • Fishing Poles Spend some time fishing on the lake. There is no charge for the equipment, and the poles can only be checked out for one day. The park does not provide bait or special lures. Kids 16 and older must have a current fishing license. • GPS Units Check out a GPS and head out to find some of the park’s several geocaches, waymarks, and earthcaches. Ask for our self-guided historical GPS tour (Centennial Tracks) at the Nature Center. GPS units can be checked out for one day, but if there is a large demand, the units can only be checked for 4 hours. • Snowshoes Come and snowshoe this winter at Devil’s Lake! The Nature Center has several pairs of snowshoes visitors can borrow for free. We have sizes for any More Green Time, Less Screen Time “Get Outdoors! Wisconsin” addresses the growing problem termed the “nature defect disorder.” Basically, kids aren’t spending a lot of time outside anymore. Studies show that kids today spend an average of 6.5 hours per day with television, computers and video games. In fact, a child is six times more likely to play a video game than to ride a bike. With that much time spent in front of a television or computer, childhood obesity rates for children ages 6-11 have risen four-fold since 1971. Obesity is not the only health problem kids face by the lack of time spent

age, including kids as young as 4 years old. Snowshoes must be used in the park and be returned that day. • Ice Fishing Poles This is something new we are offering in the winter of 2012. There is no charge for the equipment, but poles can only be checked out for one day. The park does not provide bait or special lures. Kids 16 and older must have a current fishing license.

Nature Programs Don’t forget to attend one of the many nature programs happening this year. There are lots of entertaining and familyfriendly programs to help you discover more about nature and the history of the park. Check out the drop-in programs happening on the north shore, near the Chateau. Drop in to learn about bats, owls, snakes, and more! To find out what’s happening, check out pages 1323 or go to the Nature or Visitor Centers to pick up a weekly program schedule.

Photo By: B. David from 2011 Photo Contest

Photo By: M. George from 2011 Photo Contest

Summer Hours: the Nature Center is open 9:00 am – 4:00 pm 7 days a week. Spring, fall, winter: hours vary and are posted at the Nature and Visitor Center. If you have any questions or want to find out what’s happening, give us a call at 608-356-8301 ext. 140 or email SusanA.Johansen@wisconsin.gov.

playing outdoors. Studies also show that the number of kids on prescription medication to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has increased 100-fold in less than 50 years. Prescriptions for antidepressants for children have doubled in five years. Nature is Good for Kids Even though statistics show how the lack of time outside can be detrimental for kids, these studies also show the benefits kids receive when they do spend time in the outdoors. For example, children who interact regularly with nature have better cognitive and creative skills and tend to show improved test

scores. Kids that spend time outside show a better ability to deal with the stress of their day-to-day life. Studies also show that regular experiences in nature may alleviate ADHD symptoms and reduce the need for medication. Get Outdoors! The Wisconisn State Park’s “Get Outdoors! Wisconsin” program is designed to provide places for nature-based recreation and exploration. The parks provide opportunities for unstructured nature-based play, outdoor recreation, and naturebased programs. Come check out a program this summer and Get Outdoors!


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Make tracks to the nearest contact station or nature center and get ready to discover some secrets! Ask for a Wisconsin Explorers book. Open the book and start exploring insects, birds, the moon, and all kinds of things! If you complete the requirements, you can earn a colorful patch. Booklets are available for three age groups (3-5, 6-8, and 9+). Get out there and start Discovering Secrets together!

A

beautiful course at the base of the Baraboo Bluffs just 2 miles from Devil’s Lake State Park.

401 East Mine St. (East off Hwy 123) Baraboo, WI 53913 www.baraboocountryclub.com

Call the Golf Shop for tee times and rates Golf Shop: (608) 356-8195 Four Seasons Restaurant: (608) 356-6141

APEX ADVENTURE ALLIANCE THE LOCAL EXPERTS IN ROCK CLIMBING

(608) 434-3360 GO ROCK CLIMBING TODAY!

All Instruction, Guides, Gear, and FUN provided.

• Trips Starting At $50 A Person- Full And Half Days Available (prices based on size of group) • Next Day Adventures Available • Discounts Available For Groups Of 10 Or More • Certified Guides • Single And Multi-Day Courses • 14 Years Of Guiding Safety With 100% Safety • All Ages Welcome

CALL TODAY! 608-434-3360 or look us up at

WWW.APEXADVENTUREALLIANCE.COM


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Facilities for the disabled Wisconsin State Parks are adding new facilities and upgrading some older facilities to accommodate people with disabilities. Devil’s Lake has many areas in the park that are accessible. Each area of the park has buildings that are accessi­ble to our park visitors who use wheelchairs.

Picnic Shelter Rentals Devil’s Lake State Park has five picnic shelters that are reservable and rented for family reunions, youth groups, company picnics, weddings and other events. Two shelters are enclosed and three are open-sided, with seating capacities from 40 to 100. All have water available nearby, and have a few electrical outlets. Rental prices range from $45 to $100 per day.

All camp­ground toilet buildings have spe­cial shower/toilet facilities avail­able to our visitors with disabili­ties. The paved pathways in the picnic areas along with the south shore sidewalk and boardwalk offer smooth and easy access for visitors with disabilities.

Shelter reservation applications are available by calling the park up to 11 months in advance.

The north end of Tumbled Rocks Trail, on the west side of the north shore picnic area, has 1,000 feet of paved trail that is accessible to hikers in wheelchairs or those who may have other mobility concerns, thanks to volunteer work by the Shelters are closed to rental use from November 1 to April 15. Telephone Pioneers of America. A wheelchair is available for mobility-impaired visitors to use while in the park. It can be checked out at the north shore visitor center. Our north shore and south shore visitor stations are both accessible to visitors us­ing wheelchairs. Please ask any of the park staff about our facilities and how we may better serve you.

Bands, DJ’s, amplified music, overnight use, and pets are not allowed. All vehicles must display valid stickers.

Information sheets about shelter rental and weddings are available from the north shore Visitor Center.

Got E-Mail? Would you like updates on programs and events happening at Devil’s Lake? Do you want information about trail conditions or the wildlife that’s been spotted? Then sign up for our e-mail updates. We’ll send periodic e-mails to alert you to the cool stuff happening at the park. Your e-mail will not be sold to any other organizations. If you would like to sign up, send an e-mail to: SusanA.Johansen@wisconsin.gov or sign up at the nature center. Devil’s Lake State Park Centennial 2011

PET RULES AT DEVIL’S LAKE • Pets must be leashed (8 feet or shorter) at all times and all places • Leashed pets may go on any hiking trails except Parfrey’s Glen • Pets may not go in buildings, playgrounds, beaches, or the main picnic areas • Pets may picnic with their owners near the north shore boat landing and east of the railroad tracks near the northeast corner of the lake • Pet owners must clean up after their pet • Pets may camp • Pets must be attended • Leashed pets may pass through picnic areas on the way to a trailhead if you remain on the paved walkways


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Tumbled Rocks Trail Photo By: D. Thomas from 2011 Photo Contest


An Unusual Geology Walking on quartzite stones sounds different. The shifting rock feels - somehow unique. When you walk on the loose scree (accumulation of rock debris at the base of a slope) around Devil’s Lake, your footfall scrunches with an almost musical clink and scrape of broken stoneware pottery. Underfoot, it doesn’t sound like a crushed limestone gravel driveway. The rock is older than you. It’s tougher than you. It’s shifting, but not yielding, not giving up even a single chip of its structural integrity. You will pass, but the rocks will remain long after you are gone Devil’s Lake quartzite is some of the hardest rock on earth. The quartzite rock began long ago as draining rivers brought quartz sand into shallow seas in this region. Over vast lengths of time, water circulating with silica, carbonate and iron oxide bonded the sand particles together into sedimentary sandstone. Then trillions of tons of pressure compressed the

sandstone into a metamorphic (changed) rock called quartzite. The seas left the area, and an uplift slowly formed what we call the Baraboo Hills into a canoe-shaped ellipse about 25 miles long and 5 miles wide. The middle of the “canoe” filled with softer sedimentary rock composed of sand and lime. Water draining from this oval plateau unhurriedly cut through the upturned edges of the Baraboo hills, forming what we now call the Devil’s Lake gorge and the lower narrows of the Baraboo River. Eventually, most of the softer sandstone and limestone eroded away, leaving a long oval depression surrounded by the Baraboo Hills. You may have driven through Lower Narrows State Natural Area coming into Baraboo on Highway 33 from the 90/94 Interstate.

earth, gravel, and rock called terminal moraines. (Visit the Nature Center, which sits atop one terminal moraine. Then go to Roznos Meadows on Highway 113 and look west to see the textbook view of the other terminal moraine, stretching across the valley in the distance). Finally the stage was set for the small footprint of a lake to be framed between the rugged quartzite bluffs. Devil’s Lake is an endorheic lake, having no natural drainage outlet. Its 360 acres are supplied solely by local drainage and springs. The maximum lake depth is usually 45 – 48 feet.

bottom of the boulder field.

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Geology may be old and dusty but it’s not dull!

Here are a few tidbits to whet your geological appetite for the area. The highest point in the park is neither on the East Bluff nor on the West Bluff, and few people ever stand there. It’s five miles east of the lake near the radio towers above the Sauk Point Trail. Take a walk in Parfrey’s Glen State Natural Area to find strange “pudding stone” – chunks of metamorphic rock embedded within sedimentary sandstone rock. In Steinke Basin find the reddish rhyolite boulder (north of the old windmill 500’ to the bluff tops frame) an oddity brought all Five hundred feet make a the way from Canada by the difference. In early and late Wisconsin glacier. Or stand in winter snowfalls, with the air an acre-sized deep kettle left by temperature near freezing, a collapsing glacial ice block. it’s not unusual for any snow Outside the park, drive a few accumulation at lake level to miles to Ableman’s Gorge State Glaciers did NOT be exceeded by 20% to 50% Natural Area near Rock Springs carve the valley on the bluff tops. The slanting and see the world renowned Van fields of boulders (talus slopes) Hise Rock, which made apparent Wisconsin’s renowned glaciers along the lake shores were one of the defining ideas of wielded their influence on the formed by freezing and thawing historical geology. Take a side Devil’s Lake story about 15,000 tirelessly loosening rocks until trip to the Natural Bridge State years ago. Walls of ice hundreds they shattered and tumbled. The Park and see the natural arch of feet thick bulldozed their signature formations of Balanced rock-shelter used by prehistoric way from a frozen northland, Rock and Devil’s Doorway were peoples 12,000 years ago. Find flattening and smoothing entire formed by this slow process. In Pewit’s Nest State Natural Area landforms along the way. The the summer, on the Grottoes Trail and imagine the one-of-a-kind inexorable sculpting snout of two visitors have long appreciated house that was once built above glacier lobes ground to a halt the cooled air sinking through the stream between the narrow at either end of the Devil’s Lake the talus boulders, flowing out rock walls of a ravine. Check valley, leaving dam-like piles of as natural air conditioning at the these out!

Photo By: D. Thomas from 2011 Photo Contest


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Driving Tour of Devil’s Lake State Park

17 miles - 1 to 2 hours Starts at the north shore of Devil’s Lake Driving Tour Map on pages 32-33 This driving tour includes excellent views of the lake, scenic vistas, an introduction to the land’s formation story, and a sampling of the park’s human history. Enjoy the drive!

Safety Rules

Do NOT read while you drive! Designate a nondriver to be the navigator and narrator. Do not stop in the roadway. When you stop, you MUST use a regular parking spot or designated vehicle pull-off area. There are no posted signs designating driving tour locations. Start at the lake’s north shore, near the headquarters or Visitor Center –

1. North shore picnic area – There are at least 10 ancient native mounds in the lake’s north shore area, dating back over 1000 years. You’ll find effigies of a lynx, panther, and bear, along with some linear and conical mounds. All were hand built without the use of metal digging tools. The true purposes of these mounds are lost to history, but are still open to speculation: ideas include burials, religion, artistry, worship, and rituals. Think about it - - - if you were living as a pre-historic person, would the lake be a good place to live? Drive across the railroad tracks and turn left, go out the north shore exit road.

2. North shore exit road – The stream alongside the railroad tracks and the exit road does not drain from the lake, but descends from the Steinke Basin plateau behind the East Bluff. In 2008, seven inches of rain fell in just a few hours. This little stream became a rampant torrent, destroying the railroad tracks. Think about it - - -in a contest of strength, what would win: a 185-ton train engine pulling a millionpound train… or a two-hour flood of this little creek? Turn left at the stop sign onto County Road DL. Go to the next stop sign, continue straight across. At the next stop sign, turn left onto South Shore Road. Head up the hill and stay on the paved road. Southbound behind the west bluff – watch for:

3. At the top of the hill

to your left, a half-mile walk would bring you out on top of the west bluff overlooking the lake. There, in 1894, Palisade Park was planned to be a resort for the “best class of people.”

4. A gravel road ahead (don’t take it) goes 2 miles and ends near the defunct Badger Army Ammunition Plant of 1942-1975. Along this dead end road are 3480 acres of the South Bluff State Natural Area within the state park. There are no trails in the area.

into the boat landing parking lot.

5. Messenger Creek – On the way down the winding hill, you passed the location of the tree house, cabin, and assembly hall of the Old Settlers’ Association of 1904. Farther along the lakeshore is the location of the Ringling Brothers vacation home. At one point there were 31 private cottages along the south shore. Think about it - - - should people of wealth, power, and privilege get to build houses in the most fabulous places, or should those places be set aside for all to visit? Turn right out of the boat landing parking lot, go about two hundred yards along the shore with the lake on your left. Park in one of several roadside pull-offs on your right.

6. South Shore – This

cut through the Baraboo Hills was made by an ancient river, slicing through the land over eons of time. The only water input into Devil’s Lake is the tiny Messenger Creek and springs. Devil’s Lake has no natural outlet and rests about 130 feet higher in elevation than the Baraboo River, three miles away. Devil’s Lake is a little less than 50 feet deep. In the lake you’ll find large & smallmouth & rock bass, yellow perch, crappie, walleye, northern pike, bluegill, and brown trout.

Think about it - - - this road wasn’t originally here. Think about it - - - why keep more than 3000 acres in Nor were the trails. Imagine a popular park without trails? walking around the lake… climbing over boulders and Stay on the paved road jumping from rock to rock. and curve left. Head down Would 3-½ miles be an easy the winding “Snake Hill.” At stroll? the bottom of the hill (watch for pedestrians) you’ll cross Messenger Creek; turn right

Continue ahead about ½-mile and turn left into

the main south shore picnic area. Continue to one of the parking lots and park in a place that gives a good view of the lake and the bluffs.

7. South shore picnic area - Several hotels existed on the shores of Devil’s Lake beginning in 1866 and ending about 1904. Most visitors arrived by steam train. There were vineyards, restaurants, gardens, bands, regattas, contests, plays, croquet games, dances, hayrides, ice skating, lake excursions footraces, …even masquerade balls. Think about it - - - imagine arriving via a smoke-belching steam train in 1877. You could stay a week in a lakeside hotel, tour the lake on a small paddlewheel boat, and trek the trails in a long dress. Or would you rather camp? Go back out of the south shore picnic area, and turn left at the stop sign onto South Lake Drive. Cross the railroad tracks, go another ½mile. Take the 2nd right turn into the C.C.C. area. Park in the back of the parking lot, near the bronze statue.

8. C.C.C. parking lot – From 1934 to 1941, during the Great Depression, the Civilian Conservation Corps operated a work camp for about 200 young men on this site. These men worked for the U.S. government and completed projects such as a reservoir, picnic tables, signs, removed invasive plants, and guided tourists. Much of their work still exists: the park headquarters, the Rock Elm Shelter, and much of the labor-intensive terraced trails and steps. The C.C.C. camp area is now the park’s group camp. North, across the road and up the very steep C.C.C.


trail, are some of the most popular rock climbing areas. Think about it - - Why would you live in a bunkhouse and dig dirt, carry rocks, pry boulders, put up buildings, sit on a bench to eat your chow, and sleep on a bunk at night for very little pay? Turn right out of the CCC parking lot and continue east. As you drive two miles, watch for:

9. A change from big rocks to a hill of smaller loose rock and gravel on your left - From 1922 to 1967, there was a rock quarry and buildings near here. The smaller loose rocks on your left are leavings from that quarry. You can still find foundations of the workers’ quarters in the woods, though the quarry itself is officially off limits now. To retrieve the valuable quartzite rock, railroad tracks were laid right to the quarry. Before this quarry, there was a quarry on the east shore of Devil’s Lake until 1919. 10. In 1-¼ miles, watch on your right for a small roadside pulloff – the Sandstone parking area. Roznos Meadow is the open area in this valley. Today, the meadow is kept open by periodic prescribed burning. On some summer nights, this vista is awash with the lights of thousands of fireflies. Hawks like to sit atop these few trees, watching the meadow for an easy lunch of mouse, vole, or rabbit. Continue driving east (the way you were going.) At the stop sign, turn right on Highway 113. Go about ¼ –mile, and turn right into the gravel parking lot by the Ice Age Trail sign.

11. Roznos Meadow parking lot – The 1000mile Ice Age Trail enters the

park near Parfrey’s Glen, loops around Devil’s Lake, and includes about 13 of the park’s 29 miles of trails. The valley you are in was not carved by a glacier, but a glacier was here. Look west (away from the road) and see what looks like a flat-topped earthen dam blocking the end of the valley. This is a textbook-perfect terminal moraine. Rock and dirt were pushed along by an advancing glacier, and then left in place at the end point of the glacier’s farthest advance. The C.C.C. parking lot and the Group Camp sit atop this moraine. Think about it - - - what would happen if there were two of these glacial “dams” a mile apart in the same valley? Turn right out of the parking lot, go 100 yards, and turn left on County Road DL. Go two miles and turn left into the Parfrey’s Glen parking lot.

12. Parfrey’s Glen – is the first Wisconsin State Natural Area, designated in 1952. It is a natural treasure, harboring rare plants, animals, and birds within the sandstone conglomerate walls of the narrow gorge. Many plants found here are most commonly found much farther north in Wisconsin, Michigan and even Canada. It’s a dynamic place, usually placid and quiet, but punctuated by flooding and intense erosion that continues to reshape the ravine. (If you choose, a walk into the glen will take at least an hour, and will cover 1-½ miles roundtrip on foot.) Think about it - - - why are many species of plants in Parfrey’s Glen the same as plants a few hundred miles north of here? Turn right out of the Parfrey’s Glen parking lot

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onto County Road DL. Go back two miles to the stop sign. Turn right on Highway 113 and head uphill. Drive 1½ miles…

13. uphill on Highway 113 –As you crest the hill, you’ll cross the Ice Age Trail. The highest elevation in the park is a mile east of here, about 600’ higher than the lake level. This eastern section of the park seems to have more sightings of wildlife: deer, coyotes, rattlesnakes, eagles, hawks, owls, and even a badger. Think about it - - - it seems wildlife is a bit more abundant out here. Why? Turn left on County Road DL (about ½ -mile after you crest the top of the long winding hill.) Go about 1/2mile and turn left into the Steinke Basin parking lot.

14. Steinke Basin – You’re in an extinct glacial lake bed, about 240 feet higher than Devil’s Lake’s elevation. You’ll find it to be a diverse area with meadow, pine trees, hardwood forest, a stream, and ponds. Beavers dammed the stream and flooded some low areas. Trees that couldn’t tolerate “wet feet” died, but the slow decay of trees has created food for woodpeckers – insects in the dead wood. This area was farmed for generations, and some land is still leased for hay production. Steinke Basin is the hub of the park’s crosscountry ski trails in the winter. To the north, across the road and in the woods, are some kettles – odd acre-sized round pits left after huge ice blocks from the retreating glacier melted. Also across the road to the north, behind the pine trees and north of the windmill frame, you might be able to find a large reddish rhyolite boulder, a geologic erratic all the way from

Michipicoten Island, Canada. Think about it - - - how did a single distinctive rhyolite boulder get here all the way from Canada?

Turn left out of the Steinke Basin parking lot onto County Road DL. Continue 1-½ miles all the way to the stop sign. (Do NOT turn left into the one-way exit road or into the Quartzite Campground) Turn left into the main north shore entrance of the park.

15. North Shore Entrance - If you’re lucky, you’ll get to drive this road on a sunny autumn day when you’re entering a brilliant tunnel of luminous yellow maple leaves. Winding downhill, along thelast of the entrance road, you’ll pass the completely overgrown location of the elegant Claude house, which overlooked the lake from 1857 to 1953. In the early 1900’s private cabins, wall-tents, and “claim-it-anduse-it” campsites proliferated around the northeast corner of the lake. Over the years, there have been waterslides, toboggan runs, horse races, train stations, big band dances, and even a zoo here in the park. Think about it - - -If Devil’s Lake was not protected as a state park, how might it look today? The driving tour finishes at the same north shore area where you started. Hopefully you enjoyed your jaunt around this remarkable area. If you want to explore more of the park, you’ll have to use some shoe leather. Find Balanced Rock, have lunch at the historic Chateau, explore the West Bluff, swim at the beach, rent a canoe or 101 other things to do at Devil’s Lake State Park.

Enjoy your visit!


123 Quartzite Campground

Park Boundary

DL

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Steinke Basin Loop 2.4 mi

West Bl uff Tra il – 1 . 4 mi West Bluff l – 1.0 mi

1 Park Headquarters Ea

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Devil’s Doorway Trail 0.1 mi

Balanced Rock Trail 0.4 mi

5 m Bur d aR

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Bo ardwalk

Upland Trail Loop 3.8 mi

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Devil's Lake

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Visitor Center North Shore

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Ice Age Campground

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Park Rd.

Nature Center

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Park Boundary

Northern Lights Campground

East B luff

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Old Lake Rd

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East Bluff Tra il

Potholes Trail – 0.3 mi Grottos Trail – 0.7 mi G r o u p Cam p Trail – 0.5 m i

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CCC Trail 0.3 mi

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Contact Station South Shore

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Group Camp Railroad

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Bluff

Driving Tour Map Written tour directions can be found on Pages 30-31


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Park Boundary Tower

Rd

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. 5 mi

Parfrey’s Glen Natural Area

113 Solum Ln

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Kentview Rd

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MILES 0

Trails and Roads Hiking Trail Hiking / Bicycling Trail Ice Age Trail Rescue Road Pet Picnic Area

E

Facilities Emergency 911 Phone Restroom Bike Trail Head Parking

$ Self-Pay Station South Shore Drive has changed over theNature past 100Center years. .5 1

and Ice Age National Scientific Reserve Unit

Shelter/ Restroom Bathhouse Concession & Boat Rental Boat Launch Amphitheater


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Snakes of Devil’s Lake • All snakes can swim

At Devil’s Lake One can find 11 species of snakes at Devil’s Lake State Park. They include: Fox Snake

“What do we do if we see a snake?” “Ewwwww! I won’t see a snake will I?” “Cool! Where can I go to see a rattlesnake?” “Do the rangers clear the trails of snakes?” “Hey Dad, look what I found!” “How many people have died from snakebites here?” “Will my children be safe in the campground?” Many people don’t think about snakes. They feel about snakes! There are emotional reactions that seem to be almost uncontainable. Common sense, science, knowledge, statistics, history, usefulness… none of that matters when it comes to snakes. It’s a gut reaction. You like ‘em, or you don’t.

• eastern hognose snake • North American racer • black ratsnake • western fox snake • eastern milk snake • eastern gartersnake • brown snake • northern red-bellied snake • northern water snake • smooth green snake • timber rattlesnake The most commonly spotted are the eastern gartersnake, northern red-bellied snake, northern watersnake, and western fox snake. The eastern gartersnake is a black snake with yellow stripes. It is typically 16” – 24” long. This snake will eat frogs, minnows, earthworms, mice, and insects.

The svelte red-bellied snake is not much bigger than a pencil, and is the smallest snake in Wisconsin. It eats slugs, earthworms, and beetle larvae.

Around the edges of the lake, a visitor is most likely to see the northern water snake. It eats frogs, crayfish, and minnows. The water snake is territorial and will readily defend its space. It can be mildly aggressive and will typically bite when picked up; it is not poisonous. Nothing clears a section of the beach like a swimming snake! The western fox snake is a fairly large snake, three to six feet in length. It’s a constrictor, suffocating its prey before eating it. It eats rodents, small rabbits, and eggs. The fox snake is often mistaken for a rattlesnake. Then threatened, the fox snake will shake the end of its tail in dry leaves, mimicking a rattlesnake’s rattle. Its best defense is emitting a vile musky stench when

Did you know? • Some snakes give birth to live young, while others lay eggs. • Without snakes, we might be overrun with rats and mice.

Northern Water Snake

it is disturbed. The fox snake is not poisonous. Rattlesnakes! There is one species of poisonous snake that lives in the park: the timber rattlesnake. If you see one, consider yourself extremely lucky. Look at it from a distance and enjoy your good fortune. A million-and-ahalf people visit the park every year, and only a few will see a rattlesnake. They’re shy and quiet, and will move away if someone approaches. It’s been over 30 years since a person was bitten by a rattlesnake at Devil’s Lake. A dog was bitten by a rattlesnake about 10 years ago. He lived, but his owners had an expensive vet bill. Since 1900, there has been only one death in Wisconsin from a rattlesnake bite. If you see a rattlesnake, you can report it to the naturalist. She’ll be interested to know where and when you saw it. And how do you know it was a rattlesnake? (it has rattles on it’s tail, the head is triangular and significantly larger than the neck). So. What do you do?

• Snakes feel clean, smooth, and cool to the touch.

If you see a snake, look. Then wonder, study, examine, ponder, enjoy, imagine. Be amazed. But do not disturb the snake or try to capture it. Your encounter doesn’t have to be scary.

• Snakes don’t blink because they don’t have eyelids • In order to grow, they shed their old skin • Snakes’ use their tongues to help them smell • The enzymes in a snakes stomach are almost as acidic as battery acid • Snakes don’t generate their own body heat, but get it from their surroundings

Timber Rattlesnake In The Park (photo by Gabriel Hesed)

Redbelly Snake


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Stop by the Visitor Center located at Hwy. 12/33/136. 600 W. Chestnut St. Vestibule with information kiosk open 24/7.

It’s Always a Great Day in Baraboo!


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Badgers and Wolves and Bears! Oh My!!

Some rumors are true! Black bears have been rarely, but reliably, sighted in the park about once a year since 2000. A single wolf was spotted and accurately identified just south of the park in 2009, and another not many miles from the park a few years earlier. The park naturalist saw a badger in 2007. So, implausible stories are not always rumors. But despite those reports and rumors of mountain lions, elk, bobcats, wolves, and bears - - - the living natural history at Devil’s Lake is usually a bit more mundane. For those coming from out of the region or from urban areas, the park contributes many treasured memories. In May and June, people have been kept awake by the incessant noisy cackling of the great blue heron rookery (community nursery) at the group camp. One elderly woman had never seen a deer fawn in the “wild.” Then along the entrance road in the spring she saw triplets! Birdwatchers

Badger

Wolves

today’s characteristic mammals of the park were unknown here early this century. Turkeys were re-introduced here in the 1980’s. Deer were scarce in the early 1900’s. Few anglers catch walleyes, but scuba divers report coming face-to-face with unafraid and lethargic record-size fish. Brown trout have been stocked here for decades; rainbow trout haven’t been stocked for many years. The usual Midwest creatures are common, but not always seen: raccoons, possums, fox, salamanders, and turtles. Bats reside in the park in great numbers, but you’ll only see them around dusk. The park had to evict hundreds of bats from the attic of the north shore Chateau in 2010. Staff provided transition housing and ultimately built a custom-made bat “condo” to host the beneficial creatures. There are four Wisconsin State Natural Areas within the park boundaries: South Bluff/ Devil’s Nose, Devil’s Lake Oak Forest, Parfrey’s Glen, and East Bluff. These are largely set aside because of the rare or unusual plant life found there. Watch for the jack-in-the-pulpit flowers in the spring. Oak, ash, hickory, maple, and white pine are the common trees of the forest. The

oldest tree in the park may be a 500 year old red cedar on the east bluff. In Parfrey’s Glen you can find scouring rush, yellow birch, mountain maple, red elder, clintonia, and clubmoss. Over 240 species of birds have been found in the park including the cerulean warbler, Acadian flycatcher, winter wren, Louisiana water-thrush, Canada warbler, and the black-and-white warbler. If you’re an insect expert, you might find a caddis fly or a rare diving beetle at Parfrey’s Glen. Turkey vultures are probably the iconic animal of the park. At certain times of the year, you can see hundreds soaring on the updrafts created by the bluffs. Bluff-top hikers can watch from above as the regal birds soar below the viewer. These birds migrate south in the fall, going as far as Honduras in Central America. The public perception of the “wilds” of Devil’s Lake State Park varies. Two families of hikers may be on the same trail, at the same time, seeing the same things. One family is having a pleasant stroll after lunch, and the other is having an awe-inspiring once-in-a-lifetime wilderness experience. It depends on your perspective!

come from all over to catch a glimpse of the rare Townsend’s solitaire high on the Balanced Rock Trail. Seasonally, migrant birds put in brief cameo appearances. People strolling along the south shore have been treated to a show of fishing ospreys diving into the water and rising with struggling fish in their talons. Sometimes in the spring and fall, loons’ evocative calls echo over the lake in the evening. One can watch the loons disappear underwater in pursuit of fish, and then rise up 50 feet away. Believe it or not, two of

Black Bear by: Emory Orlikowski


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Ice Age National Scientific Reserve

An order was published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1971, formally establishing an Ice Age National Scientific Reserve in Wis­consin. The purpose of this Re­serve is to protect and preserve our glacial heritage, which is most evi­dent and impressive in this state. The Reserve consists of nine units scattered over Wisconsin; they all contain representative fea­tures of continental glaciation. Some 40,000 acres are involved,

of which more than half are already in public ownership. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources will manage the Reserve, so that those units which are already State Parks, such as Devil’s Lake, or State Forests will retain their status. This is a cooperative venture of federal, state and local govern­ments. The Wisconsin DNR and the National Park Service are now working on plans and programs to realize the objective of this Re­serve.

For more information, see the folder on the Reserve, available at the Nature Center and all park of­fices.

Why is it called Devil’s Lake?

Balanced Rock

The original Native American name for the lake could have been translated as Spirit Lake, Holy Lake, Mystery Lake, or Sacred Lake. But the Winnebago name “Ta-wa-cun-chuk-dah” or “Da-wa-kah-char-gra” was translated in its most sensational form (for that era) as Devil’s Lake. In the mid-1800’s the railroad, hotel, and tourism entrepreneurs sought publicity for the destination, and competitive newspaper editors were eager to comply. Reporters produced superlative accounts of Devil’s Lake and reproduced legends (sometimes manufactured) to match. Before all the lurid one-upmanship, the earliest known map of the area in 1850 humbly referred to the lake as “Lake of the Hills.” Two years later, a geological survey called it “Devil’s Lake,” and ten years after that referred to it as “Spirit Lake.” By 1872, challengers to the name Devil’s Lake conceded defeat when the Green County Republican newspaper reported, “Had the lake been christened by any other name, it would not have attracted so many people…”

Aerial photo of Devil’s Lake by Jonathan Hesed, 2009


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An Imaginative Creation of Matchless Wonder - Parfrey’s Glen

Photo By: Michael Knapstein

Parfrey’s Glen is a gem. Recognized long ago as an extraordinary place, it was designated in 1952 as Wisconsin’s first official State Natural Area. Parfrey’s Glen is one of four Wisconsin State Natural Areas within Devil’s Lake State Park: Devil’s Lake Oak Forest, South Bluff/Devil’s Nose, and East Bluff. Set aside and protected, the glen (a Scottish word for a narrow, rocky ravine) holds many unique natural charms. In 1844, in the nearby town of Merrimac, a ferry across the Wisconsin River was begun, even before public roads served the area. Beginning in 1846, in or near the glen, a succession of sawmills for cutting lumber and gristmills for grinding grain were built and operated using Parfrey’s Glen Stream for power. Robert Parfrey owned the glen from 1865 to 1876. The earth and log dam for his millpond

was located at the lower end of the gorge. Water was carried from the impoundment to the mill via a long flume supported on trestles. Recreational visitors have enjoyed Parfrey’s Glen since at least the late 1800’s. In 1882, a rumor circulated about a large hotel to be built at the glen, but the hotel was never built. A few miles away, beginning in 1844, one could pay to cross the Wisconsin River on the Merrimac Ferry. A century and a half later, you can still cross the river on the Merrimac Ferry - - for free. In Parfrey’s Glen, you may experience an involuntary natural hush. That is appropriate because stealth is required if you desire a chance to glimpse a cerulean warbler or Acadian flycatcher. Observing other creatures may be easier at certain times of the year. Notable birds found in summer include the winter wren,

Louisiana water-thrush, blackand-white warbler, and Canada warbler. Small trout several inches long can sometimes be spotted in the pools and eddies of the winding stream. An expert eye might even spot a rare diving beetle or caddisfly. Some natural inhabitants require your close attention, perhaps dropping to your knees to carefully view a rare northern monkshood, or threatened round-stemmed false foxglove. Would you believe that something called a cliff goldenrod actually exists? It does here. The bamboo-like plant forming low thickets along the creek is scouringrush, a relative of ferns. Pioneers used it to scour pots and pans because of the silica in the stem. Contradictions may cause your body to pause as your mind ponders. On a hot summer day the temperature in the glen can be several degrees

cooler than at the trailhead a few hundred yards away. Then there’s the strange existence of quartzite pebbles and boulders (metamorphic rock) completely encased in layers of sandstone (sedimentary rock.) In ancient times, pieces of quartzite, up to about 1500 pounds, must have broken from nearby sea cliffs and been swept offshore, only to be assimilated into the deepening layers of ocean-floor sand. These layers vary, as shown by alternating layers of sandstone, and the “pudding stone” which is sandstone containing quartzite pieces.

Other observations may inspire you to take a silent step backwards to visually absorb the rising rock walls of the narrowing gorge, nearly one hundred feet deep. The small watercourse at your feet is one of very few year round streams descending “Parfrey’s Glen” Continued on Page 40


40 “Parfrey’s Glen” Continued from Page 39

from the Baraboo Hills. Moss, ferns and other shade-loving plants grow in damp footholds of the rock walls. This area is almost a micro-climate in the moist shade of the glen. It’s an anomaly, an enchanting eccentricity of nature. The lack of direct sunshine and the lingering moisture support plants that are seldom seen except hundreds of miles to the north – yellow birch, mountain maple, red elder, clintonia, and mountain clubmoss.

Parfrey’s Glen hikers

Parfrey’s Glen’s charms are not always peaceful. In the summer of 2008, the gorge was the scene of outrageous violence. There were no witnesses to the act, but on the scene the next day, rangers were shocked at the primal devastation. Boulders were flung about, wooden boardwalks and bridges were splintered and crushed, and the stream was completely rerouted for several hundred yards. Following seven inches of rain in a few hours, flash flooding roared through the glen. Interestingly, the casualties of the torrent were the man-made

additions: the trail, bridges, boardwalks, parking area, and gravel road. Parfrey’s Glen was closed for nearly a year. This event was a rare window to observe the phenomena by which the ravine was naturally formed. The glen will repair itself and plants are regrowing. However, repeat visitors who are very familiar with the heretofore ageless scenery say the creek pattern is very different in many places now. Parfrey’s Glen feels ageless and serene, yet is vibrantly dynamic as it continues to grow and change.

Because it is a Wisconsin State Natural Area, Rules are Different in Parfrey’s Glen • No carry in food or drink • Picnicking is allowed near the parking lot • Stay on the trail • No rock climbing, rappelling, or off-trail exploration • No picking any plants or collecting any objects • The area is closed from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. • No pets allowed

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Photos By: Michael Knapstein


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Photo By: D. Thomas - from 2011 photo contest

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Ancient Stories of Devil’s Lake The Story of Devils Lake

By Ulysses S. White, Winnebago Indian, of WI Rapids, WI

Photo By: S. Lipe - from 2011 photo contest

The stories of the natural history and the human history of Devil’s Lake go far back beyond our familiar modern history, before western settlement, before the European immigrants, back to the time of the Native Americans and to a time when stories were kept as oral traditions, passed carefully from generation to generation. Here are three Devil’s Lake stories from the Ho Chunk Nation. Stories courtesy of “Hocak Worak,” the newsletter of the Ho Chunk Nation, vol XXVI, issue 2, 2012. Thanks to Tracy Pecore.

Devils Lake Legend

Letter Written by Mitchell Red Cloud, Black River Falls, WI, to Mr. Walter Bubbert, Milwaukee, September 29, 1943 “According to Winnebago legends the lake was called “Day-waka-chunk-la”, meaning “The Sacred lake”. There are some very interesting myths regarding this beautiful body of water. One is of a man and a woman who were caught in a storm while crossing the lake. Sometime later the bodies were found near what is now Prairie Du Chien. So the Indians believed that there is an outlet from the lake to the Wisconsin River. I wondered at a time when I climbed the east bluffs last spring where the hole could be. “The Water Spirits” or “Wa-teexi” were, according to Winnebago belief, deities placed here on earth with supernatural powers of giving of endowing long life to the earth inhabitants and also had power in governing the weather and the days of the year. The creator of earth is “Mo-oo-la” and “Wakanda”. “Wa-kon-ja” is the “thunder bird”.

Water Spirit Legend

Another Indian legend of this lake, obtained from a former Winnebago Indian resident of the region, states that a quarrel arose between waterspirits or underground panters (Wa-kja-kee-ra) who inhabited its depths and the thunderbirds. The latter, flying above its surface hurled their great eggs (thunderbolts) into the waters and on the bluffs. The fight continued for days. The falling eggs tore down the trees and split off great pieces and masses of rock and the present tumbledown and cracked rocky surface of the surrounding bluffs stands as evidence of this great struggle. The thunderbirds were finally victorious and flew away to their homes in the North. No Indian dares approach the lake for a long time. The waterspirits were not all killed and some remain in the lake to this day.

The Winnebago formerly had their winter quarters on the north shore of Devils Lake, 3 miles south of Baraboo. In those days a young Winnebago went on a fast. Then fasting was the only thing they depended on. In fasting, the Indians put up a wigwam out where no one could bother the person who was fasting. As a general rule no one was allowed to visit it, excepting the old men, warriors and medicine men, or those who had experience in fasting and had been blessed by some spirit. These can advise him. He fasts in order that he may be blessed by certain spirits and become a warrior or medicine man among his people. Fasting months are December, January, February and March. In the summer time the Indians fast just as the corn is ripe. This particular young man and his people put up a wigwam on the south shore of the Lake, where the C. & N.W. Ry. Tracks now are. He was blessed by a water spirit. This spirit told the young Winnebago to come to the Lake, that the water spirit would there show himself to him on a certain day. He would tell him what medicine to use to heal general sickness, what war paint to use, etc. When the day came the young Winnebago came to the lake near the place where was fasting, on the southeast shore of the lake. The day was clear, nothing but blue sky above. At noon the water of the lake began to move and become wavy. Then the water spirit appeared and the waters became quiet. There was a small cloud moving towards them from the west. Just as soon as this cloud came above them a streak of lightning from the sky struck the water spirit and he was raised from the water; all of the water coming up with him like gum or syrup. From this the water spirit could not separate himself. A thunder bird did the striking, the thunderbird and the water spirit being enemies; they struggled for some time, pulling each other four times into and above the lake. The Thunder bird said to the young man, “My Brother, shoot this water spirit for me. He is getting me exhausted. He may take my life. I will bless you with everything I have control of above and on the earth.” (These Winnebago were a thunder clan.) The young Indian had a bow and arrows but he was confused because each of them wanted him to kill the other. The water spirit said, “Don’t shoot me. If you shoot me don’t ever come near any water on this earth. This Thunder bird should have blessed you long ago. He knows that you were fasting all winter.” The Thunder bird said, “Don’t mind him. He is not the only one who has water. I have water too.” But finally the young Winnebago shot the Thunder bird who was drawn down until he could be heard under the water. Then a great thunder storm came from the west and lightning struck all around the lake bluffs. The cliffs were all struck, and the rocks rolled down as we now see them. The young man received many blessings from the water spirit. This is the reason why the Winnebago call this lake by a name meaning holy lake or sacred lake. But the white people call it Devils Lake. -February 17, 1930


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Ancient Mounds at Devil’s Lake

Some mysteries are much more fun when they remain unsolved — Such are the mounds in Devil’s Lake State Park. You can let your imagination run wild speculating about their origin and purpose. Ideas are limited only by the depth and creativity of your mind’s eye - - from fanciful to ominous, elaborate to simple, trivial to sacred.

Historic and Prehistoric Dating back more than 10,000 years, the oldest authenticated prehistoric site for people in the Upper Midwest is a rock shelter located less than 20 miles from Devil’s Lake. The natural rock shelter at Natural Bridge State Park is a known site of early human inhabitation. In historic times the

Winnebago was the most important native tribe, but also represented were the Sauk and Fox (they had a village where the twin cities of Prairie du Sac and Sauk City are now located), the Kickapoo, and probably several other tribes.

Another group of Native Americans — we call them Effigy Mound Builders, were active in this region around one thousand years ago. They piled up earth to form three basic types of mounds: those in the form of various animals, the “true” effigy mounds; those which look like ridges, the linear type; and those which look like huge chocolate drops, the round or conical type. Consider the labor, organization, persistence, communication, and planning

required to achieve such construction. No backhoes, front-end loaders, or dump trucks; no steel shovels, axes, or picks; no wheelbarrows, no winter pac-boots or down parkas.

Ponder the Mystery No one, not even modern Native Americans, have any direct knowledge of the Mound Builders. We do know that they used some mounds for burials, as human skeletons are found in some of them, especially in the linear and conical types. Perhaps they also used the animal mounds for special festivities, holidays, rites, or services. But we’ll never know for sure — the answers are lost in the enigma of prehistory. Some animal mounds in the park are still in good shape;

they’re marked with plaques. One resembles a lynx - it’s located near the Nature Center; another looks like a bear - it’s near the north shore of the lake; and there’s a bird mound at the southeastern corner of the lake.

Be Respectful. Be Gentle. Please do not disturb the mounds in any way; don’t walk on them, lean against them, or picnic atop them. These sites were obviously significant to some ancient peoples, about whom we know almost nothing. Treat the mounds with respect as if you were in the cemetery of a relative. While you’re near the mysterious mounds, imagine the mysteries that you may be leaving behind for your descendents to puzzle over 1000 years from now.

E11329 Hwy 159 Baraboo 608-356-4877 www.wheelerscampground.com


Natural Bridge State Park

Natural Bridge is a small state park (530 acres) that merits a visit. Most people could easily spend 1-3 hours at the park; others could spend more time. It’s a little-visited area, and a great place for a walk in the woods. The main feature of the park is a natural bridge of sandstone with an opening 25 feet high by 35 feet wide. Its weathered formation was missed by the glaciers. People were living at this site from 10,000 to 12,000 years ago (on the basis of radiocarbon assay, geochronology and stratigraphy), when the Wisconsin Glacier was melting by Devil’s Lake. In the natural rock shelter under the sandstone arch is one of the oldest known sites for people in the Midwest.

amenities. Life would have been much different with furs instead of a parka, fire instead of an automatic furnace, rock walls on two sides instead of an insulated frame house, a small seasonal stream hundreds of yards away instead of running water, food that required capturing instead of pantry shelves and a refrigerator, and a cooking fire instead of an electric stove and microwave. People have been recreationally visiting the natural bridge for over a century, though a school picnic in the shade of the arch is a far cry from generations of year round survival in a harsh climate.

The earliest written reference to this bridge is in the Old Settlers’ Association of Sauk County Reports for 1874. Eleven years later, a Fourth of July celebration was held here, and by 1888 a local newspaper, the Sauk County News, was saying Natural Bridge is a good place of the bridge, “visited nearly to launch your imagination about every day.” And by 1897, when people from the Spring Green what it would be like to live in Wisconsin without modern High School visited the bridge,

they found it covered with carved names. “A wonderful and beautiful production” – that’s what the 1880 Sauk Co. History called the natural bridge. By the 1920’s the bridge was a favorite resort for picnic parties, and it was being visited by many tourists. In September 1930, there was a harvest celebration here – it consisted of food, games and dancing. Through the years there have been numerous organized parties at the bridge, especially on the Fourth of July, and students at the Denzer School had May Day picnics here. The native land cover is mainly oak woods, with open fields and patches of native prairie adding to the variety. A number of wildflowers bloom throughout the growing season, and bird watchers will be rewarded with sightings of such species as turkey vultures, pileated woodpeckers, and in winter, bald eagles.

in the Park Baraboo Hills Natural Bridge Nestled State

Natural Bridge State Park

Natural Bridge State Park

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Leland Denzer

In the winter, the park remains open for entry and use by foot, ski, and snowshoe. Nothing is plowed or cleared, and parking may not be available. Natural Bridge State Park is located in Sauk County, in the southwestern corner of the Baraboo Hills. Take U.S. Highway 12 south from Baraboo or west and north from Sauk City to County Highway C, then 10 miles west to the park. It is 18 miles from Devil’s Lake State Park. Denzer 2 miles

Indian Moccasin Nature Trail

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Devil’s Lake State Park 78

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of southern Wisconsin between the small communities of Denzer and Leland, Natural Bridge State Park has much to offer. The park was established in 1973, and includes a 60-acre scientific area. A self-guiding nature trail on the uses of plants by Native Americans winds through part of the scientific area. A hiking trail, two miles long, is located in the woods on the other side of the highway. This park is for day use only; there is no camping. There is a non-flush restroom building near the parking lot.

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Natural Bridge State Park is located in

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Park Boundary

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

Trail

from Baraboo or west and north from Sauk City to County Highway

Whitetail Hiking Trail

Leland 3/4 miles BG

2009

Highway Natural Bridge Overlook

C, then 10 miles west on

This publication is available upon request in alternate formats for visually impaired persons. Please contact Linda Netzer at (608) 266-0866 to request an alternate format.

Parking

this highway to the park.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources provides equal opportunity in its employment, programs, services and functions under an Affirmative Action Plan. If you have any questions, please write to: Equal Opportunity Office, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C. 20240

Pit Toilet


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9-Hole Golf Course

Historical Devil’s Lake

Club House

= Effigy Mound Claude House Bathhouses & Boathouses The “Annex” Cliff House

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Canfield Tree House & Old Settler’s Cabin

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Map Drawing by Don Stoffels, volunteer and friend of Devil’s Lake State Park

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Lakeview Hotel Ringling’s South Shore Lodge

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Devil’s Lake Depth Map = Park Building = Private Cottage = Effigy Mound = Boat Landing = Underwater/Underground

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DEVIL’S LAKE TRIVIA Water Area: 368.76 acres Under 3 Feet: 3% Over 20 Feet: 77% Max Depth: 47 feet Total Alkalinity: 23 ppm Volume: 11,210.71 acre feet Main Shoreline: 3.55 miles Lake Length: 1.3 miles Lake Width: About 0.5 miles

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Winter at Devil’s Lake State Park

It is 17˚ F below zero, there’s 21” of snow on the ground, it gets dark at 4:29 p.m.… and several campers are in their tents, in their sleeping bags… enjoying Devil’s Lake!

Brrrrr! Who in their right mind would come out in the winter?! An adventurous spirit trumps trouble-free comfort in some people. In the last 12 years at Devil’s Lake State Park, there has been only one weekend without someone camping in the park. Only ONE! Out of 600+ weekends. That includes the winters. What do they do?

Overnight campers brave the cold, snow, and dark in small numbers. Believe it or not, almost all of the winter campers are tent campers. During the daytime, there are things to do. Cross-country skiers come out

to bring their heart and lungs up to speed for the fitness benefits and the scenery. Snowshoers move more slowly on the deep snow, exploring the backcountry and lesser-used trails during their winter quests. Children bring their sleds, saucers, and snowboards for moments of glee, punctuated by longer trudges back up the sledding hill. People wait anxiously for the ice to come onto the lake so they can ice fish. By late January, there are usually a few ice shanties on the lake, and on a pleasant Saturday in February, dozens sit by ice holes expectantly watching their tip-ups. Other less common pursuits have included dog sledding, building igloos, ice skating (rarely suitable), and birdwatchers stalking the rare Townsend’s solitaire. Area law enforcement and emergency

Photo By: B Krippendorf - From 2011 photo contest

services personnel have come annually for years to practice their ice rescues and cold water diving techniques. The lake usually freezes over by late December and thaws by late March. Typically Devil’s Lake State Park receives about 44” of snow in a winter. In 20078, there was over 100” of snow. Mostly unseen and unheard, the natural land, animals, and plants are quietly going about their business - survival. The woods are quiet. But underneath is activity. The meadows are alive with voles under the snow, tunneling beneath the undersnow meadow grass, finding food. Just above the snow are foxes, and sometimes coyotes, listening intently and sniffing to find those voles for lunch. Pileated woodpeckers make their characteristic rectangular holes in standing dead trees, finding their nutrition in torpid insects. Great Horned owlets are already hatching in late winter. Raccoons, possums, and squirrels are not true

hibernators. Chipmunks, frogs, and turtles do hibernate. The signature bird of the summer visitor – the turkey vulture – migrates as far south as Honduras. The frozen lake settles into a languorous slumber, but it rouses sometimes, making groaning and creaking sounds as the ice adjusts like small scale tectonic plates. One early spring night brought the breathtaking music of “ice crystals singing” as shards of floating ice were blown into floating windrows along the north shore – tinkling like a thousand soprano wind chimes. Within an hour or two, the enchanting moment was gone as the warm breeze and water melted the ice away. So come and try it out. But remember, you must play by different rules in the winter. Deliberation, observation, and slowness reap subtle satisfactions. Patience, planning, and preparedness are rewarded.

Photo By: L Eisenhardt - From 2011 photo contest


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A Condo to Call Their Own

The big and little brown bats of Devil’s Lake have a new condo to call their own! For many years, these night-time creatures have lived in and around the Chateau. In 2010, in the interest and well-being of the bats, they were excluded from the Chateau’s attic and given 19 bat houses on the outside of the building to live in during the warm months. During the winter, these two bat species find a cave or abandoned mine to hibernate in.

What does the condo look like on the inside? The structure is not wide open, but has eight bundles of baffles so the bats can roost. This condo can house over 1000 bats. White-nosed Syndrome

Since 2006, bats all over the United States have been affected by a devastating disease, white-nosed syndrome (WNS). This disease affects hibernating bats and is named for the white fungus that appears on the bats’ muzzles and other body parts. WNS Surveys, done in the summer was first documented in New of 2010, showed that there York in the winter of 2006are over 900 bats roosting in 2007 and has rapidly spread those 19 houses. To give the across the eastern United bats a more suitable home, States and Canada. Bats with the Wisconsin Department of WNS show uncharacteristic Natural Resources and Devil’s behavior during the winter Lake State Park built the bats a such as waking up early, condo not far from the Chateau. flying outside in the day and

Visit the

Leopold Center and Leopold Shack & Farm

clustering around the entrances of the hibernacula. WNS has killed more than a million bats in the Northeast U.S. and Canada. WNS has not reached Wisconsin as of 2011. Why should we Care? Bats are some of the most important and beneficial animals in the world. In North America, bats are an important form of pest control. A single bat can eat over 1000 insects in one hour! Many bats, especially those in Wisconsin, feed on insects that are pests of agriculture and garden crops; not to mention they eat lots of mosquitoes! One little brown bat, a species most affected by WNS, will eat half its entire body weight in insects every night. That’s like a 150-pound teenager eating 300 quarterpounders! During the warm months of the year (mid-April through mid-October) a single little brown bat will eat 1 pound of insects. If we multiply that 1 pound by the 1 million bats that have died, there are over 694 tons of insects that are no longer being eaten. That’s equivalent to 6 female blue whales or 17 fully-loaded semi trucks. Bats are cool! Bats are a pretty important part of the natural ecosystem.

D how Aldo Leopold shaped conservation thinking and practices. May-October 2012: Open Monday-Saturday, 9am-5pm Visit our website for directions and a calendar of events! www.aldoleopold.org 608.355.0279

L about sustainability in our

green visitor center and the surrounding landscape.

E your own connection to the

natural world through tours, special events, workshops, and conferences. Present this ad for 1 free tour admission!

In Wisconsin, the seven species of bats found in the state are all insect eaters. At Devil’s Lake, they help reduce the number of mosquitoes, making it comfortable for visitors to enjoy the trails and beaches. There are several bat hikes happening throughout the summer; check for dates and times at the Nature Center. You can go anytime to watch the bats emerge for the evening. Head down to the north shore bat condo just before sunset and watch the hundreds of bats head out to eat insects.


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Devils Lake State Park Solum Lane Timber Sale Perhaps you are reading this magazine as you sit beside a crackling campfire. Do you ever stop to think about all of the ways you use wood and paper products every day? Where does all of that wood come from? Someplace far away? As you enjoy the beauty of the trees and the forest stands here at Devil’s Lake State Park, does it cross your mind that the trees growing around you could be the houses, furniture, and paper of tomorrow? Before you become concerned about the sunnier campgrounds and bluffs, consider that the DLSP property covers close to 10,000 acres, many of them forested. Sustainable forest management often involves cutting some, not all, of the trees in a given stand. By removing damaged, diseased, poorly formed and slow growing trees, the future forest is healthier and more vigorous. A 330-acre timber sale has been established by DNR forestry

personnel and is bounded by Solum Lane, Tower Road, and Hwy 113. The purpose of this harvest is to maintain a healthy and productive forest by reducing crowding. This thinning focuses on removing trees that are high risk, low vigor, poorly formed, and less desirable. The trees designated for harvest are marked with orange paint. A priority was to retain large, healthy oak and hickory trees which will continue to grow and provide a seed source for wildlife and future seedlings. These trees would also provide den and nesting opportunities for wildlife. Poorer quality or declining trees will be harvested allowing oak and maple seedlings and saplings in the understory to flourish. Another benefit of this timber sale is keeping aspen on the landscape. There are six aspen clear cut patches established within the harvest area that will

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A segment of the Ice Age Trail traverses a portion of the timber sale area. Along its corridor the marking and harvesting will address aesthetic and safety concerns. DNR forestry hopes to have this sale competitively bid this spring, and the harvest conducted within the next three years. The forest products harvested will include sawlogs and pulpwood. Harvest activity will be restricted to dry or frozen ground conditions to minimize soil impacts. It will also be restricted from April through July 15th as an oak wilt prevention measure.

A private contractor has been hired to work on invasive species control within 50 acres of the timber sale area. This work has been funded through a DNR Forestry grant. Devils Lake State Park Solum Lane Timber Sale (outlined in white) Aspen clearcuts (red), Ice Age Trail (yellow dashes) Mapped by Paul L. Kloppenburg 3/2/2012 Scale 1:7920

When When you’re you’re itching itching to to see see your your doctor doctor but it’s after office hours... but it’s after office hours...

Baraboo

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result in vigorous and dense aspen that will benefit many wildlife species.

Devil’s Head Resort & Convention Center

Devil’s Lake State Park

Merrimac

Bluffview

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From poison ivy and sunburn to minor sprains or the flu, we can see you quickly and conveniently in Urgent Care at Sauk Prairie Memorial Hospital!

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Prairie du Sac

Sauk Prairie Memorial Hospital & Clinics

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Sauk City

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URGENT CARE HOURS:

Monday - Friday, 5 - 10:30 pm Weekends and Holidays, 11 am - 10:30 pm 24-hour emergency care available

Accepting most commercial insurance plans and HMOs, including: Unity, Dean Care, The Alliance, Physicians Plus and BlueCross BlueShield.


Noah’s Ark, America’s Largest Waterpark: we don’t think there should be any limit to the thrills and excitement. That’s why we added even more for this season, with the new “Quadzilla” 4- lane waterslide dragway. That means, for the first time, Noah’s offers your family more than 50 exciting water slides, including “Black Anaconda”, America’s Most Thrilling Watercoaster, and “Time Warp”, the World’s Largest Bowl Ride. Younger kids will love the “Tadpole Bay” Kiddie Kingdom and Noah’s 4-D Dive-In Theater, featuring the swashbuckling adventure, “Pirates!”. It’s the most fun allowed by law — maybe even more!

Memorial Day Weekend – Labor Day Weekend

Order tickets online at Noahsarkwaterpark.com 608-254-6351


53

Photo By: J. Panka - from 2011 photo contest

Devil's Lake State Park

Legend

Outdoor Group Camp

Photo By: H. Kulakowski - from 2011 photo contest

Photo By: S. Heisler - from 2011 photo contest

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Maximum Campers per Site: Pit Toilets Site G1 — 60 1/2 mile to South Site Flush G2 — 20 Toilet/ Shore1/2 Picnic mileArea to South Site Shower G3 — Building 20 and Office G1 Shore Picnic Area Site G4 — 20 and Office G9 G1 G5 — 40 G1 Site Parking Site G6 — 20 G1 Site Trail G7 — 20 Site G8 —Flush 20 Toilet/ G7 Shower Building Toilet/ Site G9 — 20 Flush Flush Toilet/ Shower Build Shower Building Maximum Campers perResource Site: Department of Natural Flush Toilet/ G2 G8 Devil's Lake Shower Building Site G1 —State 60 Park G2 S5975 Park—Road Site G2 20 G2 Baraboo, 53913-9299 Site G3 WI — 20 G2 Site G4 — 20 Phone: Site G5608-356-8301 — 40 G3 Site G6 — 20 G3 Site G7 — G5 20 Site G8 — 20 G5 G5 G7 Site G9 — 20

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Badger Army Ammunition Plant becomes the Sauk Prairie Recreation Area The former Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) occupied 7,275 acres immediately to the south of Devil’s Lake State Park. The Badger plant was constructed in 1942 to provide ammunition propellant for World War II and was also operated during the Korean and Vietnam Wars. In 1997 the Army determined that the plant was no longer needed. In 2000, with the help of U.S. Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin, a locally driven reuse planning process was started. The Badger Reuse Committee (BRC) was convened in the summer of 2000 and concluded in early 2001. The BRC was a 21

member committee that included members from neighboring communities, local, state, and federal governments, and the Ho-Chunk Nation. The final report that the BRC compiled was dubbed “The Badger Reuse Plan.” This comprehensive plan outlined values and criteria to be taken into account when considering the future use of Badger. The plan also recommended the creation of an advisory board to help guide the future landowners. The Badger Intergovernmental Group was later convened and Badger Oversight Management Commission (BOMC) was established and is actively

meeting today.

Plan laid out, and receive input To date, lands have transferred from potential user groups, to the USDA (2106.72 acres), WI the BOMC, local units of DOT (61.21 acres), and WI DNR government, and the general (2170 acres). After the remaining public. Master plans establish the level and type of public acres have been reclaimed, use, and detail the resource they will be transferred. The management and facility projected date the Army is development on the property. expecting to totally vacate the The master plan is expected plant is 2014. to be completed in 2013. The Starting in early 2012 the plant is not officially open to DNR will be beginning the the public until the Army clears process of master planning for the lands of hazards and the the acreages that will come landowners deem it safe for use. under their control. This public Please check out the attached process will decide the future of links for more information. the lands under DNR ownership. http://dnr.wi.gov/master_planning/ The master planning process https://www.co.sauk.wi.us/planningandzoningpage/ will receive guidance from the badger-oversite-management-commission values that the Badger Reuse

After negotiations concluded, the following entities agreed on the division of lands at Badger. They include: Ho-Chunk Nation................................... 1553.04 acres US Department of Agriculture................ 2106.72 acres WI Department of Natural Resources..... 3387.41 acres WI Department of Transportation................ 61.21 acres Town of Sumpter.......................................... 3.59 acres Bluffview Sanitary District........................ 163.86 acres Total.............................................. 7275.24 acres

Badger Ordinance Works Entrance


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Painting by Victor Bakhtin

How the Sauk Prarie may have looked in pre settlement times

1942

1942

101 Things to do at Devil’s Lake State Park! ❏ lay on the beach ❏ bicycle to Baraboo ❏ bird watch ❏ bouldering ❏ build an igloo ❏ camp in the woods ❏ sing a campfire song ❏ walk by candlelight ❏ canoe ❏ catch a bug ❏ church service ❏ circumnavigate the lake ❏ climb a tree ❏ company picnic ❏ see Balanced Rock ❏ cook marshmallows ❏ concert in the park

❏ listen to a big band ❏ cross-country ski ❏ dance till you’re tired ❏ deer hunt ❏ do absolutely nothing ❏ draw some scenery ❏ earn a patch ❏ eat ice cream ❏ trail run ❏ find a historic spot ❏ have a family reunion ❏ feed a toad ❏ take a field trip ❏ identify a snake ❏ fish for the big one ❏ forget what day it is

❏ f ry a bluegill ❏ g aze at turkey vultures ❏ g eocach ❏ g rill the perfect burger ❏h  ike the bluffs ❏h  oneymoon ❏ t hrow horseshoes ❏ ice fish ❏ imagine ancient glaciers ❏ jog ❏ k ayak at sunrise ❏ lay in a meadow and look up at the sky ❏p  eer through a telescope ❏m  ake a friend ❏m  editate ❏m  ake friends with a ranger

❏ mountain bike ❏ take a nap ❏ explore the nature center ❏ notice an awesome world ❏ find your way by map & compass ❏ paddle a paddleboat ❏ paint a sunset ❏ pick up litter ❏ picnic with your family ❏ play a game ❏ play volleyball ❏ puzzle over effigy mounds ❏ pray ❏ race your big brother ❏ rappel down a cliff ❏ read a book

❏ regain wonder ❏ renew your vows ❏ rent a paddleboat ❏ rock climb ❏ roller skate ❏ row a boat ❏ glide in a sailboat ❏ build a sandcastle ❏ scuba dive ❏ send a postcard ❏ sing, sing, sing ❏ sit on a rock ❏ sled ❏ snorkel ❏ stealthily snowshoe ❏ stargaze ❏ sleep in a tepee ❏ stroll s-l-o-w-l-y ❏ sunbathe

❏ swim ❏ splash your sister ❏ take pictures ❏ toss a Frisbee ❏ track a muskrat ❏ try the triathlon ❏ turn off your cell phone ❏ volunteer ❏ walk your dog ❏ mosey, amble, saunter, sashay, or promenade ❏ wait for the train ❏ write that story ❏ get married ❏ windsurf ❏ snow camp ❏ pen a poem ❏ earn a Wisconsin Explorer patch


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Activities & Park Amenities

PICNIC SHELTERS: Two enclosed shelters & three open air shelters are available for rental at a cost of $45-$100 per day. Reservations accepted up to 11 months in advance. Call (608) 356-8301 for an application. SWIMMING: Beaches and bathhouses are lo­cated at both ends of the lake. Lifeguards are not provided. Please swim with a buddy.

FIREWOOD: Sold in the Ice Age Campground Store and Visitor Center during normal business hours.

FISHING: Devil’s Lake contains brown trout, walleye, northern pike, bass and panfish. A fishing license is required for anyone 16 or over. A trout stamp is required for trout fishing.

WASTE: Park rules require that you dispose of all waste only in the containers provided for that purpose in the pic­nic areas and campgrounds.

BOATING: Life preservers are required for all boats, including rubber rafts. There are boat launching ramps at both ends of the lake. Electric motors only!

LAUNDRY: There are no laundry facilities lo­cated in the park. Laundromats are available in Baraboo.

PICNIC FACILITIES: There are three major designated picnic grounds in the park with wa­ter, tables & grills. Two are located on the North Shore & one on the South Shore.

SHOWERS: Facilities are open seasonally in the campgrounds and in the Red Oak Shelter/Concession building on the south shore. To Baraboo

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Handicapped Site

P

Campground Host

B Bathhouse

Water

Boat Launch

Winter Water

Playground

Shower/Flush Toilet

Amphitheater

Winter Toilet Only

No Rollerblading

p D


57 320 322

308 305 304 301

326 327 329

328 330

331

332

*345e

342

Ice Age Store

371 370

W

369

355 358 360

425

364

363

427 362

357

428

422

Underpass

No Rollerblades Allowed

434

*

409

435

480

477 479

A5

507

475

453

514

508

511 509

472

471 469

456

512 510

474

476

515

513

505

504

452

454

521

503

478 506

482 484

451

523

517

483

A6

437e

522 520

525

502

481

401

524

518

501

404

402

526

534 535

406

403

529 528 532

412 410

408

527

530 531 533

405

433

432 Teepee 2

Waste Disposal/ Recycling Center

414 413

418 411

423 421 424 426

431

DL

Pit Toilet

Parking

417

420

429

361 359 Teepee 1

Shower/Flush Toilet

Campground Host

415

416 419

366 365

Handicapped Site

* Map Is Not To Scale

368

367

Water

Teepee

S

353

356

*

E

351

A4

341 339 340

388 390

354

335 343 338

372

373

386

389

Wooded Areas

e Electrical Sites

N

375 374

377

385

387

352

344

337

309 307 306 303 302

382 378

384

310

325

336

383 311

324

333 334

381 380 379 376

313

312

323

No Reservations for Sites #351-375, 345 & 437

Campground Map*

315

316 314

321

Ice Age Campground

Devil's Lake State Park

318 317

319

470

468 467

455

466 457 Northern Lights Campground

BIKING: Bicyclists must use caution and give hikers the right-of-way. Bicycles are allowed on the Upland Trail Loop and the connector trail between Steinke Basin and the North Shore Picnic Area. Trails open to bikers are so posted. A bike trail pass is not required to ride on these trails. ROCK CLIMBING: The park is not maintained for rock climbing. Loose rocks may be en­countered. Rock climbing at Devil’s Lake is at YOUR OWN RISK. SCUBA DIVING: All divers should remember to fol­low safe established diving practices. Always dive with a buddy. Diving flags are required.

463 464

459 461

465

462

DL

WINTER ACTIVITIES: There are 6 miles of cross country ski trails in the park; a map of the trails is available at the Visitor Center. The park does not rent skis. The lake freezes over for about three months each winter, and ice fishing is popular. The park staff does not monitor ice conditions. Be cautious of ice conditions at all times. Approximately 15 campsites are avail­able for winter camping. The hill near the nature center is popular for sledding. Snowshoers may travel anywhere except cross-country ski trails. Snowshoes are available for loan from the Nature Center. PETS: Dogs and other pets are allowed in many areas, including trails and campgrounds, as long as they are on a leash no longer than eight feet and under control

by their owner. They may not go in the main picnic areas, but may picnic in designated areas near the northeast corner of the lake. Pets are prohibited in the playgrounds, in buildings and on the beaches. Pet owners are responsible for picking up after their pets. Thank you for being a responsible pet owner. The two main picnic areas and Parfrey’s Glen are off limits to pets. Pet owners are responsible for picking up after their pets. Thank you for being a re­sponsible pet owner.

CAMPING FACILITIES

There are three separate individual site campgrounds located at the north end of the park. Together they pro­vide a total of 407 individual sites.

REGISTRATION

Campers using individual sites and group campsites must register at the Visitor Center in advance.


58 IN ORDER TO PROVIDE A SAFE, QUIET AND ENJOY­ABLE STATE PARK EXPERIENCE, HERE ARE A FEW THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW:

ADMISSION STICKERS: Motor vehicles parked inside the park boundary must have an admission sticker attached to the inside of the windshield on the driver’s side before parking. Resident Daily - $7.00

Resident Annual - $25.00

Non-Res. Daily - $10.00

Non-Res. Annual - $35.00

Senior Resident Daily - $3.00

Senior Resident Annual - $10.00 One Hour - $5.00

A second annual pass is available at half price. Inquire at the visitor center.

Park Hours:

Safety tips

Here are a few tips to help make a happy and accident-free vacation.

The park is open from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. daily. Only registered campers at or in route to their campsites are allowed in the park after 11:00 p.m.

While hiking, stay on the

Camping Rates:

trails shown on the park

The nightly rate is $15 for residents and $17 for non-residents. Electrical sites are an addi­tional $5 per night. In addition, there is an organized group tent camp­ground on the south end of the park.

map. When you wander

designated and signed

off these trails, you do so at your own risk!

CAMPING RESERVATIONS Reservations are available for all outdoor group, and family campsites by calling our toll-free number, 1-888-WI-PARKS (1-888-947-2757) or by visiting our website www. wiparks.net. This centralized reservation system provides “one-stop shopping” for any reservable site in the Wisconsin State Park System. Campers may make site-specific reservations up to 11 months in advance and will receive immediate confirmation. Please have your major credit card ready when you place your call. (Checks accepted upon request.) Reservations can no longer be made by calling or stopping at individual parks. The reservation fee is $10/site. Campers: For individual groups (non-family) no more than 6 individuals per campsite. Register at the office before you set up. Campers may not set up camp between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. Camping is allowed only in designated campsites in the campgrounds. Only two vehicles are allowed at each campsite at one time. Vehicles must be parked on the parking pad. Additional parking is available near each campground. Fires: Fires are permitted in fire rings and cooking grills only. Please do not leave any fire unattended.

Firewood: Firewood is available at the Ice Age Store & Visitor Center for a fee. No standing trees may be cut for firewood, even if dead. Tree limbs that have fallen to the ground may be collected for firewood. No chainsaws may be used. Noise: Noise restrictions are enforced for the benefit of all visitors. No radios, boomboxes, musical instruments, tape players or similar noise producing devices may be used in the campgrounds from 11:00 p.m. until 6:00 a.m. Personal headsets are recommended during this time. Campers

should also be quiet enough not to disturb their neighbors. Quiet hours in the campgrounds are strictly enforced.

In-line Skates: They are restricted in many areas of the park. Check with a Ranger or at the Visitor Center for more information.

From 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. noise producing devices such as radios and boomboxes should be used with consideration for other park visitors. No amplified music or sound systems are allowed in the park.

Plants and Flowers: All plants and flowers are protected at the park and may not be picked with the exception of edible fruits, nuts, berries and asparagus. Mushrooms may also be collected, but be cautious.

Traffic: All traffic laws, i n c l u d i n g o n e - w ay roads, are enforced.

Fishing, Boating and Pets: See the information elsewhere on pages 56-57.

Litter: Help keep the park clean for all to enjoy. Litterers will be fined.

If you have any questions about park rules, please ask a member of the park staff.

What may appear to be a “tame” animal may be ill or possibly rabid, and sick animals can bite! Leave it alone! Please report toofriendly or too-aggressive animals to the park personnel.

Never eat berries or plant parts unless you are certain of their identity. Staying on the hiking trails will lessen your chances of walking through poison ivy.

Always be careful with campfires, gas stoves and heaters.

Keep children away from the fire ring at all times and never leave your fire unattended.


59

EMERGENCY INFORMATION Stay Clear Of The Railroad Tracks!

ILLNESS OR INJURY

The Wisconsin & Southern Railroad which owns the railroad line that runs through Devil’s Lake State Park would like us to remind visitors to please stay off of the tracks. Trains pass through the park several times a day and the folks at Wisconsin & Southern would like your visit to Devil’s Lake to be a safe one.

POLICE:

Your attentiveness to this request is appreciated.

In case of any illness or injury, contact the park office for directions to hospitals or ambulance service. Doctors and hospital facilities are lo­cated in Baraboo, three miles north of the park via Highway 123 or 113.

Contact the Visitor Center or, if closed, an emergency phone is located on the outside of the Visitor Center to call directly to the Sauk County Sheriff’s Department:

EMERGENCY: 911 TELEPHONE NUMBERS

•Devil’s Lake State Park Visitor Center, 608-356-8301. •Sauk County Sheriff’s Department non-emergency, 608-356-4895.

There are emergency phones located at both the North Shore Visitor Center and the South Shore Contact Station

MESSAGES Photo By: Paul Swanson from WSRR

You may have emergency mes­sages sent to you at the park through the visitor center.

Don’t Spoil Your Visit to the Park

While the vast majority of visitors at Devil’s Lake State Park obey the laws, we would like to point out some of the most common violations encountered by our Rangers. No admission stickers on vehicles: ($162.20 fine)

All parked vehicles within the boundary of the state park must display a valid park sticker.

Pet violations: ($175.30 fine)

beds. Do not transport anyone under 16 years old in the back of a truck. Child safety restraints are also required for children under eight years old.

Noise violations: ($200.50 fine)

Noise violations are strictly enforced, especially at night in the campgrounds.

Alcohol: (Fine of $200.50 and up)

All pets must be on a leash at all times and are While alcohol is allowed in the park, you prohibited from certain areas of the park, including cannot drink if you’re under 21 years of age; beach and picnic areas. Please ask a staff member provide alcohol to someone under 21; transport an where your pet is allowed if you are unsure. You open intoxicant in your vehicle; or drive under the are also required to clean up after your pet. influence anywhere in the park.

Traffic violations: (Fine of $150.10 and up)

All roads and parking lots in the park are public highways and all traffic laws apply. Some common violations are speeding, driving the wrong way on one-way roads, and transporting children in truck

We ask that you please obey these laws to help keep Devil’s Lake a safe and enjoyable park for everyone.

Campground Hosts Here To Help You If you need help or would like information about the park or the local area, find one of our campground hosts in the campgrounds. QUARTZITE Site 60 NORTHERN LIGHTS Site 150 ICE AGE Sites 345 & 437


159

Old Lake Rd

60 123 Quartzite Campground Park Boundary

113

Park Boundary

Northern Lights Campground

Ice Age Campground

Park Rd.

Nature Center

Johnson Moraine Loop 2.8 mi

lu st B 1.3 mi

Tum

Devil’s Doorway Trail 0.1 mi East Bluff Tra il

m Bur d aR

$

CCC: A difficult, steep trail; stone steps on the south face of the East Bluff. Scenic views. [0.3 mi - estimated hiking time, 45 minutes]

Grottos: An easy, wide path along the bottom of the south end of the East Bluff, connecting the Balanced Rock, Potholes and CCC trails. [0.7 mi, estimated hiking time, 30 minutes]

CCC Trail 0.3 mi

Potholes Trail – 0.3 mi Grottos Trail – 0.7 mi

e East Bluff – South Fac

$ Group Camp

Contact Station South Shore East Bluff: A medium trail, asphalt with stone steps, winds between bluff edge and adjacent woods. Scenic views with drop-offs. Elephant Cave and Elephant Rock at the north end. [1.7 mi, estimated hiking time, 1.5 hours]

Upland Trail Loop 3.8 mi

o o ds Tr ail –

East B luff

East Bluff Woods Trail and Loop 3.4 mi

G r o u p Cam p Trail – 0.5 m i

Bo ardwalk

Steinke Basin Loop 2.4 mi

ff W

1.7 m i

Devil's Lake

il – uff Tra

b le dR ocks T ra i

Ea

s t Bl

Sout h Sh ore R d

Park Headquarters Ea

West Bl uff Tra il – 1 . 4 mi West Bluff l – 1.0 mi

$

Balanced Rock Trail 0.4 mi

Balanced Rock: A difficult, steep trail; stone steps on the south face of the east bluff. Spectacular Views, with Balanced Rock along the way. [0.4 mi - estimated hiking time, 45 minutes]

DL

$

Visitor Center North Shore

Railroad

South

Sauk Point: Part of the 1000 mile Wisconsin Ice Age Trail, this medium-difficult wooded, grassy trail runs between Parfrey’s Glen and Highway 113. Highlights include spectacular views to the south and the Wisconsin River. [4.5 mi - estimated hiking time, 3.5 hours]

Group Camp: An easy trail paralleling the South East Bluff Woods Trail & Shore Road between the Group Loop: An easy to medium Camp and the South Shore Johnson Moraine Loop: trail with two steep grades that Picnic area. Devils Doorway: An easy, is mostly woods. An easy trail with [0.5 mi, estimated hiking time, 20 minutes] level, asphalt trail along the [3.4 mi, estimated hiking time, 2.5 hours] variable grades, crosses Co. Upland: A medium trail, edge of the top of the East Bluff, Hwy. DL twice. Named for the East Bluff Woods: An grassy with variable views of Devils Lake with drop-offs. farmer who owned the land on easy/medium, gravel and grades, through fields, woods, A side trail to Devil’s Doorway. the north side of DL where a and brushy area. Scenic views Reached from the north via the East grassy trail, in woods, with a steep grade up the East Bluff from the top of the East Bluff at number of kettle ponds and Bluff Trail or from the south via the marshes are located. it’s south end. Balanced Rock, Potholes or CCC trail. from north to south. [0.1 mi - estimated hiking time, 15 minutes [1.3 mi, estimated hiking time, 1.25 hours] [3.8 mi - estimated hiking time, 2.75 hours] [2.8 mi - estimated hiking time, 1.5 hours]

Bluff Parfrey’s Glen Trail: An easy-medium trail with creek crossings. It passes through a deep gorge and ends at a small waterfall. [0.7 mi - estimated hiking time, 1 hour]

Tumbled Rocks: An easy trail, level and paved, winding through the quartzite boulders at the base of the West Bluff just above the lake. [1 mi - estimated hiking time, 45 minutes]

Potholes: A difficult, steep trail, with stone steps on the south face of the East Bluff. Scenic views. A series of rounded depressions (potholes) near the top. [0.3 mi - estimated hiking time, 30 minutes]

West Bluff: A medium trail, asphalt and stone steps; a steep climb on the south end, and a less steep but still enormous climb on the north end. Follows the bluff top; scenic views, drop-offs. [1.4 mi - estimated hiking time, 1.5 hours]

Steinke Basin Loop: An easy trail, grassy and fairly level through an extinct glacial lake bed. Several bridges. A variety of land cover. [2.4 mi - estimated hiking time 1.5 hours]

Ronzos Meadow: An easy to medium trail through a prairie with one steep climb to the top of the East Bluff through woods. [1.8 mi - estimated hiking time, 1.75 hours]

Please stay on marked trails and respect the rights of private landowners within the park boundaries.


61

Park Boundary Tower

Rd

Tower

Rd

Sauk Point Trail – 4

. 5 mi

Parfrey’s Glen Natural Area

113 Solum Ln

Parfrey’s Glen 0.7 mi

ndary Park Bou

South L ake Drive

Me

$

Roznos Meadow

N

ado wT rail – 1.8 mi

W

DL Marsh Rd

Roz no s

Devils Delight Rd

Kentview Rd

113

S

Devil’s Lake State Park H alweg Rd

MILES 0

Trails and Roads Hiking Trail Hiking / Bicycling Trail Ice Age Trail Rescue Road Pet Picnic Area Road .5

E

1

Facilities Emergency 911 Phone Restroom Bike Trail Head Parking

$ Self-Pay Station Nature Center

and Ice Age National Scientific Reserve Unit

Shelter/ Restroom Bathhouse Concession & Boat Rental Boat Launch Amphitheater


62

Devil’s Lake Concessions Welcomes You To The Park The North Shore Chateau, The Snack Stand, the South Shore Facility, and the Ice Age Convenience Store offer the following services and conveniences to make your stay at the park an enjoyable experience.

FRIDAY NIGHT FISH FRY

North Shore Chateau Starting June 8 Ending August 31 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Dance To The Big Bands

North Shore Chateau

•Cafe •Espresso Bar •Smoothie Bar •Dairy Bar •FREE Wi-Fi •Souvenier Shop (something for everyone) • Tap Beer & Wine by the Glass •Full Convenience Store groceries, ice, camping/beach supplies and toys, bait & fishing supplies, RENTALS (row boats, canoes, kayaks, and paddle boats), postal service, and more!

Snack Stand (featuring Ice Cream, Treats and More) Hours May Vary

Every 2nd &4th Saturday night June through August, & concluding Sunday night on Labor day weekend.

JUNE 9th & 30th JULY 14th & 28th AUGUST 11th & 25th SEPTEMBER 2nd Doors Open at 7:15

South Shore Facility Ice Age Campground

•Cafe •Smoothie Bar •Dairy Bar •Free Wi-Fi •Souvenier Shop (something for everyone) •Full Convenience Store groceries, beer & wine, ice,

cigarettes, camping/beach supplies and toys, bait & fishing supplies, RENTALS (row boats, canoes, kayaks, and paddle boats), and more!

OPEN 7 am - 10 pm DURING PEAK SEASON •Souvenir Shop (something for everyone) •FIREWOOD •Full Convenience Store groceries, beer & wine carryout, ice, cigarettes, camping/beach supplies and toys, and more!

Music from 7:30 - 10:30 This facility is available for your personal events also - call to reserve your date TODAY! May through September, for questions about concessions, boat rentals, and rental of the North Shore chateau, call:

608-356-3381

We are a nonprofit organization, with proceeds going toward park improvements.


es are created here! i r o m e m d The best childhoo • Heated Indoor Swimming Pool • Fishing Lake – No License Required • 18 Hole Adventure Mini-golf • Fox River Paddling Trips • Swimming Beach with Water Toys • Rentals: Canoe, Rowboat, Kayak, Paddleboat, • Theme Weekends & Activities • 5 Miles of Hiking Trails • Game Room • Restaurant & Snack Bar • Log Cabin Rentals • Craft & Convenience Store • Four Playgrounds • Outdoor Movies • Bark Park

FREE WI-FI

aurant in rest

W6445 Haynes Road, Pardeeville, WI 53954 E-Mail: itcinfo@indiantrailscampground.com www.indiantrailscampground.com • 608-429-3244

• BMX Course

Kids r Stay fo

FREE


TM

Smokey Hollow Campground

Just Minutes Away From Devil’s Lake State Park!

Baraboo Hills Campground

Merry Mac’s Campground

W9935 McGowan Rd • Lodi, WI 53555

E10545 Terrytown Rd. • Baraboo, WI 53913

E12995 Halweg Rd • Merrimac, WI 53561

(608) 635-4806

(608) 356-8505

(608) 493-2367

Whether you are looking for a weekend filled with activities or the quiet relaxation of a secluded campground, Smokey Hollow is the place for you and your family!

We invite you to make Baraboo Hills Campground your home away from home while you visit all the excitement of the Wisconsin Dells, natural beauty of Devil’s Lake State Park, or fun of the Circus World Museum.

Welcome to one of the BEST campgrounds in Wisconsin! Merry Mac’s Campground is a family friendly campground nestled between the South shore of Devil’s Lake and Lake Wisconsin.

www.smokeyhollowcampground.com

www.baraboohillscampground.com

www.merrymacscampground.com

www.campingforthefunofit.com

Devil's Lake State Park Official 2012 Visitor's Guide  

Devil's Lake State Park is located in Baraboo, WI. This is the Official Directory authorized by the WI Dept. of Natural Resources.

Devil's Lake State Park Official 2012 Visitor's Guide  

Devil's Lake State Park is located in Baraboo, WI. This is the Official Directory authorized by the WI Dept. of Natural Resources.

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