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2018


The 2018 Annual Report is dedicated in memory of

Khaalgheich, Chaas Koogu Eesh, Chook ank and Khaaseiltseen

Ernest “Judge Walter Hillman Jr. August 5, 1936 - February 23, 2018

Juneau Delegate (2002-2018) & Judiciary Committee Chairman


Table of Contents Our Leadership

President’s Message....................................................... 4 Executive Council............................................................ 5 Delegates......................................................................... 6

Administration Reports

Tribal Operations............................................................. 8 Finance.......................................................................... 10

Tribal Court Report

Tribal Court.................................................................... 12

Tribal Enterprise Reports

Tlingit & Haida Cultural Immersion Park...................... 16 Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall............................................. 17 Sacred Grounds............................................................. 18 Sacred Shine Auto Detailing.......................................... 19 Smokehouse Catering................................................... 20 Tlingit Haida Tribal Business Corporation..................... 21

Division & Department Reports

477 Division................................................................... 24 477 Child Care............................................................... 26 477 Employment & Training......................................... 27 477 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families............ 29 477 Tribal Child Support Unit....................................... 31 477 Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation............................ 32 Business & Economic Development............................. 33 Cultural Heritage & Education...................................... 35 Head Start..................................................................... 39 Native Lands & Resources............................................. 41 Program Compliance..................................................... 43 Public Safety.................................................................. 44 Tribal Family & Youth Services...................................... 46 Tribal Transportation.................................................... 50

Statistics & Timeline

Statistics........................................................................ 52 Timeline......................................................................... 62

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Mission

Preserve our sovereignty, enhance our economic and cultural resources, and promote self-sufficiency and selfgovernance for our citizens.

Vision

Prosperous, healthy Tribe and tribal citizens who thrive culturally, spiritually and economically.


Our Leadership


President’s Message I am honored to present the 2018 Annual Report on behalf of Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Tlingit & Haida). This has been a significant year in strengthening the Tribe’s sovereignty and developing its social enterprises to economically diversify revenue streams while providing culturally-relevant services to our citizens.

Chalyee Éesh

Richard J. Peterson President

“Partnering to uphold our mantra of healthy tribes make healthy communities.”

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Our Tribal Court has seen tremendous growth in the past year and I’m excited to see the Tribe exercising its sovereignty and expanding its capacity to better serve our tribal citizens. We have hired a full time Court Administrator and Tribal Court Magistrate and are developing a Youth Healing to Wellness Court. We also continue to work closely with and offer technical assistance to Southeast tribes and communities in an effort to develop individual, inter-tribal and regional court systems in Southeast Alaska, and to provide tribal court services to our citizens in their communities. Working closely with the Tribal Court, the Tribal Child Support Unit has also seen significant success in the last year exceeding its annual benchmark goal of over $1 million in child support collections. This accomplishment helps to ensure that families have what they need to succeed and thrive. The Business & Economic Development department has worked very hard to expand the Tribe’s social enterprises — Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall, Sacred Shine Auto Detailing, Smokehouse Catering and Sacred Grounds Café. These social enterprises are already putting our citizens to work! No matter where our people reside, I am committed to ensuring the Tribe does its best to serve their needs. Oftentimes, client service funding is limited to our service area. We look forward to our new economic development ventures

generating unrestricted revenue so we will no longer be bound by funding agency restrictions. Other economic development venture projects are underway and I am very excited to see what 2019 brings in terms of economic sovereignty. Our communities, lands and tribal citizens thrive when our culture is our foundation. In line with this, we are pleased to announce that our Cultural Heritage & Education department is opening the doors to our first language immersion nest, Haa Yoo X’atángi Kúdi, in February 2019. This is a big step in bringing culturally-relevant programming to the Vocational Training and Resource Center. The center will be an instrument to bridge traditional knowledge with the present and provide a space for our citizens to embrace cultural values while preparing to compete and participate in modern society. Every day we are making great progress and I am honored to serve our Tlingit and Haida people and look forward to another year of working with our Executive Council and Administrative Team to accomplish the Tribe’s goals. Gunalchéesh/Háw’aa,

Richard J. Peterson President


Executive Council

Chalyee Éesh

Hook hatels Gudaawlaá Í’waan

Richard J. Peterson President

Yodean Armour 1st Vice President

Góos’k’

Ralph Wolfe 5th Vice President

Kashkaani

Ku.seen

Jacqueline L. Pata 2nd Vice President

Catherine N. Edwards 6th Vice President

Yaan Yaan Eesh Will Micklin 3rd Vice President

Sxaalgén

Stephanie Masterman Emerging Leader

Gu’usuwaa

Rob A. Sanderson Jr. 4th Vice President

“Enhancing governance through selfdetermination and tribal sovereignty in pursuit of the Tribes mission and vision.”

T’sa Xoo / Shaans Kadake Skil’ Quidaunce Edward K. Thomas President Emeritus

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Delegates

ALASKA Anchorage [9] Shirley M. Kendall Tasha J. Hotch Alvin C. Edenshaw Anthony R. James Marvin L. Adams Ronald C. Mallott Mary Moreno-Soots Lucretia A. Dennis Gilbert F. Stokes Angoon [2] Richard W. George Maxine L. Thompson Craig [2] Judy Helgesen Virginia L. Lawnicki Haines [2] James E. Hart Kevin L. Thompson Hoonah [3] Julie Jackson Frank G. Wright Robert Starbard

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Hydaburg [2] Sid C. Edenshaw Lisa M. Lang Juneau [27] William E. Martin Ben D. Coronell Gerald F. Bennett Sr. Douglas K. Chilton Selena A. Beierly Kenneth L. Southerland Sue Ann K. Lindoff Ella D. Bennett Michael L. Beasley James Jack Sr. Louise A. Kadinger Gloria A. Jack Royal T. Hill Gloria Sarabia Michael S. Corpuz Paul Marks II Jacqueline Pata Janice L. Hotch Andrea E. Cesar Leona M. Santiago Mike J. Hoyt Wm. (Ozzie) Sheakley Dionne Cadiente-Laiti

Juneau [Cont.] Wilbur G. Brown Jr. Gail M. Dabaluz Rhonda D. Butler Sandra Y. Cross Kake [3] Delbert Kadake Henrich Kadake Paul Aceveda Kasaan [1] Paula Peterson Ketchikan [7] Rob A. Sanderson Jr. Holly Burns-Churchill Thomas G. Skultka Jr. Helene R. Simpson Carrie L. James Roberta L. Hull Romay Edenshaw Klawock [3] Eva J. Rowan Yodean P. Armour Ruby M. Smith

Klukwan [1] VACANT Metlakatla [2] Deanna Nelson VACANT Pelican [1] VACANT Petersburg [2] Nathan C.S. Lopez MaryAnn Rainey Saxman [1] Candace R. Williams Sitka [6] Patricia Alexander Gerald Hope Louise Brady Paulette M. Moreno Rachel Moreno Harriet Beleal Wrangell [3] Luella Knapp Harry M. Churchill Susan G. Stevens

Yakutat [2] Cynthia L. Petersen Ralph Wolfe CALIFORNIA San Francisco [5] William (Will) Micklin Natalie L. Suan Donna Rae James John Jay Silva Donavin S. Hannon WASHINGTON Seattle [26] Michelle M. Demmert Janet L. (Jan) Peele Bear G. Alexander Cindy L. Williams Pederson Catherine N. Edwards LaVerne Wise Fred Lauth Sr. Joyce M. Alexander Marian K. Lauth Karen J. Elliott-Lauth Daphyne Albee Jessica S. Dominy Stephanie D. Rainwater Tate London

Seattle [Cont.] Jocelyn (Cher) Ketah Pamela Y. Dalton Stearns James W. (Jim) Price Sam M. Hanlon Jr. Kara E. Peele-Mayer Karen A. Nathan Carolyn S. Heersema Patricia Allen-Dick Cecilia E. Tavoliero Joey C. Ketah Morgan Howard Brandon R. Mayer

Delegates as documented in the 2018 Tribal Assembly credentials report.


Administration Reports


Tribal Operations The Tribal Operations department is responsible for ensuring the Tribe’s administrative and program operations remain consistent and within the framework of adopted budgets, strategic plans, applicable laws, regulations, and policies and procedures as established by Tlingit & Haida’s governing body, the State of Alaska and Congress. Tribal Operations provides administrative support to the President in all areas of tribal executive management such as policy development (fiscal, personnel and other operating policies), financing and business negotiations, and representation in tribal relations with government agencies, businesses and private entities.

Tuk’ Saek / Kadashan G. Ken Truitt Chief Operating Officer

Tribal Operations also provides direct oversight of the following departments: »» »» »» »»

Business & Economic Development Head Start Human Resources Information Technology

»» Native Lands & Resources »» Public Safety »» Tribal Transportation

2018 Highlights

Gee Shiex

Jodi Wise HR Manager

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Client Database Management System

Human Resources

The Tribe’s new Integrated Policy Database Management (IPDM) system utilizes the Tribal D™ TribeVue™ software for data tracking and reporting, training and support services so programs can focus more on comprehensive case management strategies.

The Human Resources (HR) department is responsible for maintaining and archiving employee personnel files, developing and maintaining the Personnel Manual, managing the HR Information System, conducting pre-employment background checks, recruiting for vacancies, screening applications and referring candidates to hiring managers.

ƒƒ Transitioned the following programs and departments over to TribeVue™: »» Child Care »» ICWA »» TANF »» Enrollment »» General Assistance »» Tribal Child Support »» Tribal Vocational »» Higher Education Rehabilitation

ƒƒ Implemented next phase of BambooHR, a cloud-based platform used to manage HR actions and information. »» Digital HR files were successfully transferred from the old Microsoft Access database and basic-use training was provided to all departments. ƒƒ Initiated Salary Survey and Classification Schedule rewrites. ƒƒ Audited Personnel Manual and identified new HR policies for inclusion in rewrite of the manual.


Tribal Operations Information Technology The Information Technology (IT) department maintains the Tribe’s computer and electronic office equipment used for administrative and program activities. The department is also responsible for the Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN) which allows all departments to communicate with each other more efficiently, including those employees located outside of Juneau. ƒƒ Completed a security audit of IT systems and began implementing best practices for IT security. ƒƒ Deployed a new network monitoring package that allows IT to monitor and respond to issues with switches and routers in real-time. ƒƒ Began updating and upgrading both LAN/WAN and Internet networks to provide better performance, speed and efficiency throughout the networks. ƒƒ Converted remaining physical servers into Hyper-V virtual servers for ease of management and maintenance.

Self-Governance / Compact Through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), Southeast Alaska tribes can authorize Tlingit & Haida to enter into a SelfGovernance Compact and Annual Funding Agreement (AFA) with the federal government to administer programs and services. Allocation of funding is calculated based on the Intertribal Distribution Worksheet which distributes tribal shares based on population for most programs with the exception of the Realty program which allocates funding based on the number of Native allotments in each Compact community.

ƒƒ Restablished a manager position that will oversee the SelfGovernance Compact effective January 1, 2019. ƒƒ Held negotiations on the 2018 AFA with Compact tribes, the Office of Self-Governance and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

2019 Goals ƒƒ Continue partnership with Tribal D™ to expand reporting functions and provide advanced training to programs. ƒƒ Develop a data warehouse to interface with the new system utilizing cleaned data from the old system; this will be a multi-year project. ƒƒ Complete work and testing on the Voting and Public Portal modules in TribeVue™ to ensure a successful launch in 2019. ƒƒ Complete and publish updated Personnel Manual, Salary Survey and Classification Schedule. ƒƒ Transfer all HR paper files to digital format in BambooHR. ƒƒ Increase use of BambooHR’s features by providing advanced training to employees. ƒƒ Implement IT Security & Risk Management Best Practices program and complete network upgrades to keep up with increasing external threats. ƒƒ Transition to Microsoft Office 365 Suite, a cloud-based software system. ƒƒ Replace aging Hyper-V host servers. ƒƒ Provide increased administrative support service to Compact tribes. ƒƒ Provide outreach to Tlingit & Haida Community Councils and offer support when requested.

Kooséxkw

Brian McHenry IT Manager 2018 Compact Tribes

»» Craig Tribal »» »» »» »» »»

Association (ICWA & Social Services) Chilkoot Indian Association Organized Village of Kasaan Klawock Cooperative Association Organized Village of Saxman Wrangell Cooperative Association

Note: Trust services are also provided to Ketchikan and Skagway.

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Finance The Finance department is responsible for recording the Tribe’s expenditures of approximately $29.1 million per year in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Tlingit & Haida employs a fund accounting system and operates on a fiscal year ending December 31. Working simultaneously with approximately 80 grant funds is complex due to different requirements, terms, reporting dates, statutory regulations and fiscal periods.

Ghals’int

Theresa Belton Chief Financial Officer

Other responsibilities of the department include: payroll, travel expense reporting, credit card transactions, accounts payable, sales and receivables, grant administration and reporting, financial reporting, oversight of the annual audit, and budget administration for each department and program. The Chief Financial Officer also serves as a trustee for the Tribe’s employee retirement plan and is a member of the Investment Committee which monitors the Trust Fund.

2018 Highlights Audit

Audit Committee Catherine Edwards (Chair) Sam Hanlon Jr. Jacqueline Pata Maxine Thompson Patricia Alexander Finance Committee James Jack Sr. (Chair) Marvin Adams Will Micklin Paula Peterson Helene Simpson Investment Committee Richard J. Peterson (Chair) Jacqueline Pata Will Micklin G. Ken Truitt Theresa Belton

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ƒƒ Completed annual audit without findings or reportable deficiencies. This is accomplished by adherence to federal regulations, enforcement of policies and procedures, and effective management of operations and internal controls.

Indirect Cost Proposal ƒƒ Prepared the 2019 Indirect Cost Proposal and concluded negotiations with the Interior Business Center with a favorable rate of 38.85%. In order to be effective with budget planning, a completed agreement is preferable before the start of the fiscal year.

Trust Fund The 2018 year-end balance of the Tribe’s Trust Fund was $20,075,599 which is a decrease of $1,916,701 for the year. The Trust Fund is managed by the Investment Committee. ƒƒ Transferred $477,517 to cover the 2017 indirect shortfall and tribal direct, and a $2M margin loan for activities related to the Tlingit Haida Tribal Business Corporation.

Other ƒƒ Implemented direct deposit with the State of Alaska to receive child support payments electronically instead of by check. This change has significantly reduced the turnaround time to issue funds due to custodial parents. ƒƒ Assisted with a 401(k) retirement amendment that changed the participation age from 21 to 18, reduced the eligibility for employee contributions from 90 days to 30, and re-enrolled participants who opted out of participation.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Prepare the 2020 Indirect Cost Proposal and conclude negotiations with the Interior Business Center on a favorable 2020 indirect cost rate. ƒƒ Continue to update tribal fiscal policies to make them current and easier to understand. ƒƒ Explore transitioning to new cloud-based accounting software that will reduce reliance on third party software to support processing and allow management access to realtime financial reporting through the cloud.


Tribal Court Report


Tribal Court The Tribal Court was established by Articles VII, XI of the Tribe’s Constitution as a separate branch of government to exercise the Tribe’s inherent sovereignty and provide a culturally-appropriate forum for tribal citizens to address their judicial needs. The Executive Council, Judiciary Committee and Tribal Court staff continue to work toward expanding and sustaining the Tribal Court’s judicial services. The Tribal Court is available for and has subject matter jurisdiction over:

Jaagal Aat

Michelle Demmert Chief Justice

»» Adoptions »» Child Custody »» Child Support

»» Child Welfare »» Divorce »» Domestic Violence

»» Guardianships »» Marriage »» Paternity

The Tribal Court’s judicial services are guided by the traditional values of respect, patience and the essential responsibility to safeguard the future of the Tribe by promoting healthy tribal families. The Tribal Court resolves matters by taking evidence and rendering both written and oral decisions. Each final decision of the trial court comes with the right of appeal to Tlingit & Haida’s Supreme Court which is composed of three elected Justices. Beyond dispute resolution and problem solving, the Tribal Court provides technical assistance to Alaska tribes in building tribal court capacity and is currently developing various alternatives for dispute resolution and restorative justice models that can be utilized by the Tribal Court in Juneau and shared with tribal courts throughout the state. The Tribal Court’s top priorities for 2018 were to develop an Alternative or Restorative Justice Court for adult tribal citizens to reduce incarceration rates; continue planning for the Youth Healing to Wellness Court; provide technical assistance and training to Southeast Alaska tribes on developing tribal justice systems; and secure funding to hire or contract for a Magistrate, Court Investigator, Guardian Ad Litem, Youth Healing to Wellness Court Coordinator and additional administrative staff.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Collaborated with the Office of the President, Chief Justice, Judges, and the Judiciary Committee to further strengthen relations with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to increase Tribal Court capacity and funding. ƒƒ Finalized strategic plan for the Youth Healing to Wellness Court and hired staff to begin implementation.

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ƒƒ Secured BIA special projects funding to hire a Court of Appeals Administrator, Indian Child Welfare Act Staff Attorney and a full-time Court Administrator; hold Tribal Court Round Table sessions; contract for Court Investigators; and complete other smaller projects. ƒƒ Reviewed and improved policies, procedures and forms to make the case flow process easier, accessible and understandable for all citizens.


Tribal Court ƒƒ Received a three-year grant to fund the Violence Against Native Women and Girls Initiative that will provide culturally acceptable access to support and advocacy services to ensure that all crime victims are not further traumatized by the legal and enforcement systems. ƒƒ Began working through the planning implementation outlined in the Court Assessment report funded by the BIA and held several meetings and work sessions with the Chief Justice, Associate Judges and key staff.

Djik Sook

Debra O’Gara Presiding Judge

2019 Goals ƒƒ Complete the strategic plan for and open an Adult Drug & Alcohol Court (Circle Sentencing or Civil Diversion) through partnership with state, municipal and tribal agencies to create a justice model that reduces recidivism and incarceration rates. ƒƒ Launch a Youth Healing to Wellness Court for tribal youth that have become involved in the criminal justice system. ƒƒ Continue to provide technical assistance to Southeast Alaska tribes and communities to develop individual, inter-tribal and regional court systems in Southeast Alaska, including an appeals court system. ƒƒ Continue to build tribal court capacity by strengthening current programs and services and researching ways to expand judicial services to include housing, elder abuse, conservatorship for youth and vulnerable adults, and probate.

“Excercising our inherent tribal sovereignty for the benefit, health and wellbeing of our tribal citizens.” 13


Tribal Enterprise Reports


Tlingit & Haida Cultural Immersion Park The Tlingit & Haida Cultural Immersion Park is a long-term commitment of the Tribe that will not only serve as a powerful instrument to promote cultural awareness and preservation, but will also create opportunities for our people and support workforce development and the local economy.

“A powerful instrument that will promote cultural awareness and preservation, and perpetuate our Southeast Alaska indigenous cultures.”

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The park will be a focal point in our community where residents and visitors can discover the richness of our cultures, ask questions and broaden their awareness that our culture is still very much alive.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Performed site clean-up with a summer crew to host several community events. ƒƒ Prepared site for the demolition of the structure formerly known as the Thane Ore House. ƒƒ Completed Phase I of the Tlingit & Haida Cultural Immersion Park project, which included permitting, demolition and post cleanup. »» The controlled burn was coordinated in partnership with the Capital City Fire & Rescue department and provided them with the opportunity to perform a live fire training.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Develop a comprehensive strategy to identify grants, private endowments and fundraising opportunities to secure funding to develop the Tlingit & Haida Cultural Immersion Park.


Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall The Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall is one of the Tribe’s social enterprises. It is located in the heart of downtown Juneau and offers event space for conferences, meetings, weddings and more. The Business & Economic Development department is actively working to make the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall the event venue of choice in Juneau.

2018 Highlights

2019 Goals

ƒƒ Shifted management of the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall under the Business & Economic Development department in the fall of 2018. ƒƒ Upgraded the sound system and audio visual equipment with top of the line products. ƒƒ Generated $171,266 in sales revenue.

ƒƒ Work with Juneau Chamber of Commerce to raise awareness of the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall and further develop partnership to host their weekly Chamber luncheons at the hall. ƒƒ Update lighting system to provide ambient lighting options (i.e., uplighting, spotlighting and projection lighting) to enhance events and transform the venue. ƒƒ Develop a cross-training program for all new hires that includes training on sound system, lighting and audio/visual equipment. ƒƒ Secure additional storage space to accommodate growing inventory of equipment and event supplies. ƒƒ Host community events that bring in talent to increase revenue and customer base.

“Offering a wide range of floor plan layouts to create a space custom tailored to make your next event a success.”

@JuneauEPHall • www.ephall.org • 907.463.7777 • ephall@ccthita-nsn.gov 17


Sacred Grounds Sacred Grounds Café is a tribally-owned coffee shop that opened in 2017. As one of the Tribe’s social enterprises, it proudly maintains a Native hire rate of nearly 100% and supports other Native-owned businesses and tribal artists. In addition to offering barista training, Sacred Grounds continues to partner with the Tribe’s 477 programs to provide employment opportunities to tribal citizens.

2018 Highlights

“Featuring a unique roasted coffee blend in partnership with triballyowned coffee roaster Skyaana Coffee Co.”

ƒƒ Shifted management of Sacred Grounds to the Business & Economic Development department in June 2018. ƒƒ Increased gross revenue from $47,497 in 2017 to $138,648 in 2018, with a net profit of $4,727. ƒƒ Recruited five youth from the summer Youth Employment Services (YES) program to work with Sacred Grounds staff and receive barista training. ƒƒ Secured lease with Sealaska to open a new Sacred Grounds Café on the ground floor of their headquarters in 2019. ƒƒ Mobilized two coffee carts to operate at various events around Juneau (i.e., Gold Medal, Celebration and Gold Rush Days). ƒƒ Hosted a community event to celebrate the one year anniversary of Sacred Grounds Café. ƒƒ Hosted three First Friday events in an effort to support our Certified Tribal Artists. ƒƒ Partnered with the Tribe’s Second Chance Reentry program to research ways to implement the Delancey Street model which includes for-profit businesses being run by returning citizens in Juneau.

@SacredGroundsAK • 18

2019 Goals ƒƒ Expand the Sacred Grounds brand to include two new locations in 2019, including a drive-thru. ƒƒ Develop inventory management system. ƒƒ Expand food service and menu options at all Sacred Grounds Café locations. ƒƒ Provide training and employment opportunities to tribal citizens participating in the Yak’éiyi Kustí Yinaadei Hít Reentry Transitional Housing program.

@SacredGroundsAK • 907.463.7770 • sacredgrounds@ccthita-nsn.gov


Sacred Shine Auto Detailing Tlingit & Haida’s Sacred Shine Auto Detailing (Sacred Shine) shop is a social enterprise that provides excellent customer service and a wide range of detailing options. With a mission and a vision to go above and beyond customer expectations, Sacred Shine consistently delivers a work of excellence by using the skills and knowledge that come with years of experience and by only using premium quality and environmentally-friendly products.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Established Sacred Shine and opened for business in late November 2018. »» Generated $4,018 in gross revenue by year-end. ƒƒ Launched Facebook page to promote Sacred Shine. ƒƒ Secured contract with Tribal Family & Youth Services department to provide auto detailing services for their fleet of vehicles.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Research growth opportunities for Sacred Shine. ƒƒ Increase net profit by 10%. ƒƒ Become a Government Services Administration (GSA) schedule vendor. ƒƒ Work with Ikonic Communications to develop a business marketing plan for Sacred Shine.

“Providing an array of auto detailing options to make your car shine.”

@SacredShineAK • 907.463.7775 • sacredshine@ccthita-nsn.gov 19


Smokehouse Catering Smokehouse Catering was established as a social enterprise to meet the internal food service needs of the Tribe. Since opening its doors in August, Smokehouse Catering has eliminated the need for contracting catering services by providing Sacred Grounds and the Tribe’s departments with direct food services.

2018 Highlights

“Meeting the internal food service needs of the Tribe with a mission to indigenize catering.”

ƒƒ Established Smokehouse Catering in August 2018. »» Catered over 100 events since opening. ƒƒ Upgraded Smokehouse Catering’s kitchen with new equipment, electrical circuits and plumbing system. ƒƒ Worked internally to provide catering services to Sacred Grounds Café, Tlingit & Haida Head Start, Office of the President, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Tribal Family & Youth Services (TFYS). ƒƒ Generated $162,637 in gross revenue with a net profit of $90,708. ƒƒ Partnered with REACH to provide work experience opportunities for clients with disabilities. ƒƒ Provided increased training and employment opportunities for tribal citizens. ƒƒ Hired an Executive Chef with a degree from Le Cordon Bleu culinary school.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Become an approved caterer with Centennial Hall. ƒƒ Secure large catering contracts from community partners. ƒƒ Partner with organizations such as Southeast Alaska Independent Living (SAIL) and REACH to provide employment opportunities to clients with disabilities. ƒƒ Work with Ikonic Communications to develop a business marketing plan. ƒƒ Indigenize and expand the catering menu. ƒƒ Secure catering contract with Juneau Chamber of Commerce for their weekly chamber luncheons.

@SmokehouseCateringAK • 907.463.7122 • smokehousecatering@ccthita-nsn.gov 20


Tlingit Haida Tribal Business Corporation The Tlingit Haida Tribal Business Corporation (THTBC) is a wholly-owned business enterprise of Tlingit & Haida that operates as a holding company for its subsidiaries. THTBC’s mission is to engage in business and economic development to improve the economic condition of the Tribe. Since the acquisition of KIRA in 2016, THTBC has been awarded over $500 million in contracts. We have secured several contracts as the Prime contractor, and have been awarded subcontracts as well. In addition to traditional base operation support services, KIRA has expanded into over a dozen new industries — logistics, IT outsourcing, cybersecurity, aircraft maintenance, fleet management, port operations, training and readiness, overseas contingency, emergency response and more. THTBC charters new subsidiaries as necessary to meet contract opportunities and now has multiple subsidiaries including several that are 8(a) certified and various HUBZone certified companies approved by the Small Business Administration (SBA). KIRA has established strategic partnerships with best in class companies – both large and small. THTBC's strategy of only competing in industries where the best value can be offered is working. All of the industries THTBC is working in are growing.

Tashee Du aani Kax Naalei Richard Rinehart Jr. Chief Executive Officer

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Awarded a $221 million United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Civil Engineering Base Maintenance Support contract under KIRA Facilities Services. ƒƒ Awarded a $19 million Port Operations Support Services contract for US Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. ƒƒ Awarded a $44 million Base Operation Support Services contract for Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Beaufort in South Carolina under T&H Services, LLC. ƒƒ Developed business opportunities through teaming agreements, set aside competitions, subcontracts and sole source awards in relationship with large, successful federal government contractors.

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Tlingit Haida Tribal Business Corporation 2019 Goals

“Engaging in business development to improve the economic condition of the Tribe.”

ƒƒ Invest in Salesforce and IT cloud upgrades to better manage and track growth. ƒƒ Upgrade and expand security clearances. ƒƒ Position subsidiaries for more sole source work. ƒƒ Minimize exposure to costs of capital expenditure and bonding through THTBC’s sound business strategy, which reduces financial risk and cost to acquire new contracts, and will allow THTBC to grow without additional investment capital requirements. ƒƒ Compete under teaming agreements for billions of dollars in contract opportunities. Based on past record of success, THTBC expects to participate in a significant percentage of awards from contracts over the next five years while maintaining and improving both profitability and performance quality ratings.

COMBINED FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS: DECEMBER 31, 2015-2018 PROFIT & LOSS

2015

2016

2017

2018

Sale

$665,875

$29,766,951

$57,705,600

$72,041,983*

Gross Profit

$267,872

$5,886,391

$11,525,638

$14,393,773

($191,300)

$647,992

$865,097

$1,593,748

Net Profit / EBITDA

*Number is unaudited and based on an approximation.

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Division & Department Reports


477 Division The 477 Division creates a single, coordinated system of collaborative services that focus on providing employment, training and related services to eligible Alaska Natives and/or American Indians within Tlingit & Haida’s service area. The following departments fall under the 477 Division: »» Child Care »» Employment & Training »» Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

Keegahn

William Martin Director

“Creating a single, coordinated system of services that focus on providing employment, training and related services.” 24

»» Tribal Child Support Unit »» Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

Tlingit & Haida was the first tribe in the nation to enter into a Public Law (P.L.) 102-477 Compact with the United States. Under the Compact, Tlingit & Haida integrates funds received from a number of different funding agencies which allows the Tribe the flexibility to focus funding as needed for the maximum benefit to clients. The 477 Division provides services through a consolidation of funds under P.L. 102-477: ƒƒ Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) »» Welfare Assistance – Employment Assistance and General Assistance »» Employability Assistance – Job Placement and Training (JPT) ƒƒ United States Department of Labor »» Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) ƒƒ United States Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS), Administration for Children & Families »» Native Employment Works (NEW) »» Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) »» Community Service Block Grant (CSBG) »» Child Care Development Fund (CCDF)

Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska 477 Division Toll Free: 800.344.1432 • Direct: 907.463.7332 • Fax 877.333.3449 www.ccthita-nsn.gov • facebook.com/ccthita

Building the Foundation for a Brighter Future!

477 DIVISION

Tlingit & Haida established a fully integrated P.L. 102-477 Plan that incorporates all employment and training related funding sources into a seamless client service system that eliminates duplication of services and links client services through collaboration and referral. 477 Division Folder.indd 1

12/12/2017 9:04:20 AM

The division’s purpose is to increase self-sufficiency among tribal citizens, empower unemployed & underemployed tribal citizens


477 Division and improve the quality and effectiveness of services through integration and collaboration.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Transitioned all 477 departments over to TribeVueTM. ƒƒ Coordinated and hosted a 477 Summit for the Tribe’s management team to review changes made under the Indian Employment, Training and Related Services Consolidation Act of 2017 (Public Law 115-93). ƒƒ Provided outreach on 477 Division services at the following events: »» Organized Village of Kake Annual Meeting, »» 477 Power Conference in Craig, Alaska, and »» Client Service Informational Fairs in Craig, Haines, Kasaan, Ketchikan, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Improve collaboration with Tlingit & Haida’s non-477 programs to improve delivery of services to clients. ƒƒ Secure advanced training for staff on TribeVueTM to ensure clients receive the services they are eligible for. ƒƒ Expand client access to distance learning programs to increase employment opportunities. ƒƒ Increase participation in the Fatherhood is Sacred® and Motherhood is SacredTM programs, which were established to strengthen communication and improve parent/child relationships through 12-week workshops with weekly sessions held throughout the year. ƒƒ Coordinate a focus group retreat to examine how best to realign services and look at funding sources that can be integrated into the Tribe’s 477 Plan.

“Increasing self-sufficiency, empowering the underemployed, and improving the quality and effectiveness of services for our tribal citizens.”

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477 Child Care The 477 Child Care department strives to increase the availability, affordability and quality of child care services to families who are working or in training and/or other related activities. The department supports before-school, after-school and cultural activities in addition to offering a quality improvement program for child care providers to help with health and safety equipment, business licenses, training and subcontracts for school and summer cultural programs.

Xut Xoo

Alice Bagoyo Manager

“Increasing availability of child care services to eligible tribal citizens in Southeast Alaska.”

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Child Care is funded by the Administration for Children and Families under a Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) block grant which is consolidated under P.L. 102-477.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Provided $1,279,375 in child care assistance to over 1,100 children in 15 Southeast Alaska communities. ƒƒ Provided child care subsidies to 235 families who were working, receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, court appointed guardians, and/or foster parents. ƒƒ Provided training and information on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Shaken Baby Syndrome to child care clients and providers in Juneau. ƒƒ Provided subcontracts for summer culture camps in seven Southeast Alaska communities: Angoon, Haines, Hoonah, Hydaburg, Juneau, Kake and Wrangell. ƒƒ Provided support to language immersion classrooms in Yakutat (Haa Yaakwdáat Lingít Yoo X’atángi Kúdi) and Juneau (Haa Yóo X̱ʼatángi Kúdi). ƒƒ Provided a grant to the Tlingit Culture, Language & Literacy (TCLL) program to provide healthy snacks to classrooms. ƒƒ Provided a subcontract to Organized Village of Kasaan to provide an after-school program and cultural activities. ƒƒ Assisted with the 477 Back to School Backpack Fair. ƒƒ Provided health and safety equipment to 30 homes.

ƒƒ Provided a one-time stipend to parents, providers, and foster parents to augment child care services ($160,186 was distributed). ƒƒ Supported the Fatherhood Is Sacred®, Motherhood Is Sacred™, Linking Generations by Strengthening Relationships® and wellness programs by providing participating parents with child care. ƒƒ Shared information and distributed literacy materials at Client Service Informational Fairs held in Craig, Haines, Kasaan, Ketchikan, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell. ƒƒ Provided financial support to the 477 Division to host holiday brunches and informational fairs.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Provide Child Development Associate (CDA) training to increase quality of care offered by child care providers. ƒƒ Increase awareness on all services offered by Child Care to boost daycare startups in Southeast Alaska. ƒƒ Travel to communities to monitor child care facilities to ensure providers are in compliance with health and safety standards.


477 Employment & Training The 477 Employment & Training (E&T) department provides a full range of educational, training and employment services to address the unemployment, under-employment and economic needs of Alaska Natives and American Indians residing in Southeast Alaska. The department administers the following programs: Burial Assistance, Employment Services, General Assistance, Job Placement (Work Experience and On-the-Job Training), Training Services and Youth Employment Services (YES). In 2018, E&T focused on providing Life Skills and Employability Skills training to 477 clients and youth participating in the summer YES program.

Saigee

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Coordinated and hosted the 477 Division’s two holiday brunches and informational fairs. ƒƒ Assisted the 477 Division in hosting its Back to School Backpack Fair in Juneau and traveled to outlying communities to help with the distribution of backpacks. ƒƒ Provided information on E&T services at Client Service Informational Fairs in Craig, Haines, Kasaan, Ketchikan, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell. ƒƒ Participated in the annual Juneau Homeless Connect event and distributed community resources, program applications, 120 sleeping bags, and care packages filled with winter gear and toiletries.

ƒƒ Distributed thermal tents to the homeless population in downtown Juneau.

Training Services & Job Placement The Training Services and Job Placement programs offer assistance with education, vocational training and employment opportunities to eligible applicants who lack specific training or certification to be considered for employment. Through these services, clients receive career assessment testing, educational and training assistance, job skills development, work experience and on-the-job training. ƒƒ Placed 16 Work Experience clients in general labor, clerical and barista positions. ƒƒ Provided service to 40 clients; 7 graduated and 6 secured employment. »» Fields of Study: Barista, Carpentry, CDL, Certified Nurse Aide (CNA), Cosmetology, Diesel Technician, Medical Assistant, Power Technician and Welding.

Grace Hawkins Manager

“Building the foundation for a brighter future through education, employment assistance and training.” 27


477 Employment & Training 2018 Highlights (Cont.)

“Discovering career pathways while developing employment skills and teaching selfsufficiency.”

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ƒƒ Referred clients to Southeast Regional Resource Center (SERRC) for GED testing, Juneau Job Center for basic office skills training, and online ALEXsys to apply for state, federal and local recruitments. ƒƒ Partnered with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) department to host a Power Conference and Job Fair in Juneau with over 200 participants, and a Power Conference in Craig, Alaska to provide participants with work readiness training, interviewing tips and resumé writing to increase their employability skills.

Youth Employment Services The YES program assists eligible tribal youth between the ages of 14-24 in obtaining summer employment. ƒƒ Coordinated a summer YES program with 31 youth participating in nine communities (Angoon, Hoonah, Juneau, Kake, Kasaan, Klawock, Klukwan, Petersburg and Sitka). ƒƒ Hosted a two-day camp for youth that focused on life and employability skills and cultural activities.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Increase partnerships with local, state and federal agencies to expand employment and training opportunities. ƒƒ Provide laptops to clients who enroll in distance education or college courses to increase higher education outcomes. ƒƒ Expand partnership with Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation and the State of Alaska Division of Vocational Rehabilitation to provide better outcomes for clients with disabilities.


477 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families The 477 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) department is funded by the State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). TANF services are designed to assist low-income families with dependent children to become self-sufficient by providing case management, monthly cash assistance, supportive services and other services to eligible families within Southeast Alaska (with the exception of Metlakatla). The department partners very closely with the Tribal Child Support Unit (TCSU) and Child Care departments to provide wrap-around services and align staff processes. There are four main purposes that guide TANF’s day-to-day activities: »» Provide assistance to needy families so that children may be cared for in their own homes or in the homes of relatives. »» End the dependence of needy parents on government benefits by promoting job preparation, work and marriage.

»» Prevent and reduce the incidence of out-of-wedlock pregnancies and establish annual numerical goals for preventing and reducing the incidence of these pregnancies. »» Encourage the formation and maintenance of twoparent families.

Káatdaa

Jesse Parr Manager August - December 2018

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Transitioned over to TribeVueTM to provide more efficient and effective case management and service delivery. ƒƒ Updated position descriptions for eligibility technician and case management staff. ƒƒ Partnered with the Employment & Training department to hold a Power Conference in Juneau and brought clients in from outlying Southeast Alaska communities to participate. ƒƒ Partnered with the Tribal Court and Tribal Family & Youth Services (TFYS) departments to create an expedited application process for “child only” TANF cases. ƒƒ Provided benefits and services to approximately 200 families per month.

Keegahn

William Martin Acting TANF Manager January - July 2018

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477 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families 2018 Highlights (Cont.)

“Helping families in need to achieve selfsufficiency while emphasizing work activities, education, responsibility and family stability.”

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ƒƒ Coordinated with 18 communities outside of Juneau to distribute over 2,000 backpacks and school supplies to children and youth for the 2018-2019 school year. ƒƒ Coordinated with TCSU to house a Child Support Specialist at the Juneau TANF office to answer questions, provide additional access to TCSU clients and better coordinate for family services. ƒƒ Partnered with the Navigators program to provide educational services, family planning, substance abuse prevention awareness and other services to at-risk youth.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Increase partnership with the Business & Economic Development department to help subsidize employment, increase work participation rates and create better outcomes for working families. ƒƒ Continue to partner with TFYS on high-risk families and reduce the number of children in state custody. ƒƒ Receive training as TribeVueTM is fully implemented. ƒƒ Increase coordination between local tribes and villages to ease the application process and better coordinate with the State of Alaska’s DHSS.


477 Tribal Child Support Unit The 477 Tribal Child Support Unit (TCSU) is a federally-funded child support program (Tribal IV-D) that works extensively with state and Tribal IV-D agencies. TCSU provides the following services: »» Paternity establishment »» Location of non-custodial parents »» Establishment of child support orders

»» Modification and enforcement of support orders »» Collection and distribution of child support payments »» Direct deposits

The program has two guiding principles that motivate its actions and activities: »» Child support should be a reliable source of income for families. TCSU will focus its efforts on the needs of children, and in doing so, empower parents to ensure children’s needs are met.

»» A cooperative approach will be used to establish and enforce support obligations. Both custodial and noncustodial parents will be treated fairly, kept informed and have their concerns addressed.

Keegahn

William Martin Acting TCSU Manager August - December 2018

TCSU strives to ensure that all tribal children receive the financial support they deserve from both parents and works to overcome obstacles and challenges in collecting child support.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Presented the teen outreach program “Think About It” to 192 high school students in eight classrooms in Juneau. ƒƒ Implemented an electronic funds transfer (EFT) process to receive child support funds electronically from Alaska Child Support Services Division (CSSD). This will ensure clients receive child support payments in a timely manner. ƒƒ Housed a Child Support Specialist at the Juneau TANF Office to answer questions, provide additional access to TCSU clients and better coordinate for family services. ƒƒ Increased the number of open cases from 1,291 in 2016 to 1,317 in 2018. ƒƒ Established paternity for nine children, excluded paternity of four alleged fathers and closed six cases through Tlingit & Haida’s Tribal Court.

ƒƒ Surpassed the benchmark goal of collecting over $1 million in child support payments for FY 2018. »» Distributed 77% of collections to families and reimbursed 23% to the Tribe for families that received financial support. »» Increased collections by 17.36% which exceeded TSCU’s fiscal performance goal of increasing collections by 15%.

Jessie Archibald TCSU Manager January - August 2018

2019 Goals ƒƒ Increase child support collections by 5%. ƒƒ Continue to increase the paternity establishment rate to above 50%. ƒƒ Update TCSU’s policies and procedures. ƒƒ Enter into an agreement with Alaska CSSD to provide IRS interceptions for TCSU cases. 31


477 Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation The 477 Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (TVR) department provides culturally relevant vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to eligible Alaska Natives and American Indians (AN/AI) who reside in Southeast Alaska. VR clients must have a physical/mental disability that is an impediment to employment. TVR assists clients in planning their path to gainful employment, including selfemployment or small business ownership.

Daax’tein

Teresa Sarabia Manager

“Providing services to eligible applicants with disabilities to assist them in obtaining and maintaining employment.” 32

TVR is funded through a discretionary grant from the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE), Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). The department empowers eligible applicants with disabilities to become self-sufficient and independent by providing guidance, referrals and counseling services. The application process includes assessments for career choices, determination for eligibility and individualized plans for employment. TVR continues its strong partnership with the State of Alaska, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) to ensure tribal citizens receive similar VR services.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Provided vocational rehabilitation services to 40 new clients; a total of 147 clients were served in 2018: »» Assisted 22 clients in maintaining and/or securing gainful employment. »» One client finished CDL Class A training and secured full-time employment. »» One client finished SEARHC Dental Assistant training. »» Two clients were hired with the State of Alaska. ƒƒ Completed third year of five-year grant cycle and met FY 2018 grant goals and objectives. ƒƒ Provided VR educational outreach to Angoon, Craig, Haines, Hoonah, Juneau, Kasaan, Kake, Klawock, Klukwan, Petersburg, Wrangell, Saxman, Skagway and Yakutat. Major events included: »» Power Conferences »» Client Services Informational Fairs »» Back to School Backpack Fair and distribution of backpacks in Southeast Alaska communities »» Juneau Homeless Connect

2019 Goals ƒƒ Provide services to 62 tribal citizens and successfully close 22 cases that result in tribal citizens securing and/or maintaining employment. ƒƒ Travel to Southeast Alaska communities to provide outreach to tribal citizens in need of VR services. ƒƒ Meet with community stakeholders to maximize support for VR clients to become self-sufficient locally and in Southeast Alaska communities.


Business & Economic Development At the heart of the Tlingit & Haida’s Business & Economic Development (BED) department is the fundamental understanding that economic development brings economic sovereignty, which from a tribal perspective, is true sovereignty. With a mission and vision to develop and promote sustainable business and economic opportunities for the Tribe, tribal business enterprises, tribal citizens and Southeast Alaska communities, the department is dedicated to creating tribal social enterprises that not only have a strong financial bottom line, but a social, cultural bottom line that reflects who we are as Native people. BED also focuses on supporting the Southeast Alaska Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS). Initiatives include transportation, housing, economic development, tourism, Economic Development Administration (EDA) training, creating jobs, supporting local businesses and promoting affordable housing. Implementing the strategies outlined in the Tribal CEDS will help make Southeast Alaska tribes a driving economic force both in the State of Alaska and beyond, while providing significant employment and training opportunities for tribal citizens. BED works internally with departments and programs such as Employment & Training, Head Start, Second Chance Reentry, Work Experience and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to create opportunities for tribal citizens. The department also works externally through strong, equitable government-to-government relationships with local, state and federal agencies to support commerce and workforce development, job creation and local economies.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Co-hosted the Strengthening Ties Community Gathering at the Thane property to breathe life into the site of the Tribe’s future cultural immersion park and celebrate Southeast Alaska’s cultures. ƒƒ Participated in Client Service Informational Fairs in Craig, Haines, Kasaan, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell. ƒƒ Secured over 20 sponsors for the third annual President’s Award Banquet & Language Fundraiser to support Southeast Alaska indigenous language programs. ƒƒ Attended the Tribal Transportation and Tourism meeting in Klawock, Alaska to begin preliminary planning for a dialogue with tribes and other Native entities to define objectives and goals for cultural tourism in the region.

ƒƒ Provided business start-up support to the Organized Village of Saxman, which included comprehensive business and barista training for their first tribally-owned business, Kooteeyaa Koffee House.

Keneggnarkayaaggaq Emily Edenshaw Director

“Supporting the economic development and selfsufficiency of Tlingit & Haida and its tribal citizens.” 33


Business & Economic Development 2018 Highlights (Cont.) ƒƒ Partnered with Southeast Alaska Independent Living (SAIL) to facilitate their annual staff retreat. ƒƒ Supported tribally-owned small businesses by hosting a Food Court during Celebration and partnering with Goldbelt, Inc. to host Alaska Native Markets in June and July 2018 with a total of 23 vendors. ƒƒ Certified 12 Tlingit and/or Haida artists under the Certified Tribal Artist program to identify and promote Native artists and their artwork’s authenticity. This brought the total number of certified tribal artists to 50. ƒƒ Hosted a well-attended Partnering with Tribes break-out session at the 2018 annual Southeast Conference. ƒƒ Partnered with the Juneau Public Market to host vendors at the Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Partner with the Child Care department to establish a tribally-owned daycare facility in Juneau. ƒƒ Deepen our relationship with statewide industries such as oil and gas, tourism and health care to advance the goals and priorities as outlined in the Tribal CEDS. ƒƒ Host a convening to advance cultural tourism in Southeast Alaska. ƒƒ Continue to support Compact tribes in business and economic development opportunities. ƒƒ Strengthen partnerships with internal departments to align goals to successfully implement the Tribe’s strategic plan.

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Cultural Heritage & Education The Cultural Heritage & Education department oversees the coordination of Tlingit & Haida’s cultural and educational activities in collaboration with other tribes and entities. The department reflects the principle that our communities, lands and tribal citizens thrive when our culture and education is our foundation. The department oversees the following programs and enterprise: »» Higher Education »» Johnson O’Malley (JOM) »» Language

»» Navigators »» Vocational Training & Resource Center

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Awarded a three-year grant from the Department of Education, Alaska Native Education Program in the amount of $1,654,825 to implement the Achieving Success by Respectfully Targeting Individual Developmental Ecology (ASTRIDE) project. This project will focus on increasing Adult Anchors (caring and connected adults), student achievement, graduation rates and integration of cultural standards in classrooms. ƒƒ Awarded a $66,000 Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) grant to complete a storage assessment and improve ongoing collection care of objects of cultural patrimony, sacred objects and funerary objects. Project activities will support the long-term stewardship of these objects by improving the storage, access, preservation and security of the collection through the purchase of museum quality storage units. ƒƒ Awarded a $10,000 IMLS Native American Basic Library grant to build upon Tlingit & Haida’s existing library collection and attend the 12th Annual International Conference of Indigenous Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

Higher Education

Aanshawatk’i Sarah Dybdahl Director

The Higher Education program provides assistance to eligible tribal citizens who are seeking post-secondary education. Assistance includes guidance, academic planning, scholarships (Alumni and College Student Assistance), and sharing of other financial aid resources. ƒƒ Provided $146,625 in College Student Assistance funding to 134 students. »» 68 were honor roll students, 10 graduated with Bachelor’s degrees, 5 graduated with Master’s degrees and 1 graduated with a Doctorate degree. ƒƒ Awarded $26,240 in Alumni scholarships to 65 students.

Laird Jones Manager January - July 2018

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Cultural Heritage & Education Congratulations Higher Education Graduates & Honor Roll Students!

Graduates

Honor Roll Students

Haines: Costin McQueen, BA Environmental Geoscience; and Justin Schneider, MS Aeronautics & Astronautics; Hydaburg: Janessa Chinana, MA Indigenous Governance; Juneau: Johanna Brown, BBA Accounting; Chloey Cavanaugh, BS Marketing & Communication; Michaela Demmert, BA Anthropology; Andrea Gordon, BS Kinesiology; Crystal Johnson, MA Management & Leadership; Tyler Tajon, BBA Marketing; Jessica Vigil, MA Social Welfare; and Kendra Wittwer, BA Art & Design; Kake: Jaafah Coppedge, BA Psychology; Kasaan: Taylor Crawford, BA Early Childhood Education; Wrangell: Britany Lindley, JD; Arthur Nelson, MA Marriage & Family Therapy; and Tasha Peterman, BS Nursing.

Craig: Lord Antwane and Margaret Dinon; Haines: Noah Borski, Dylan Comes Back Holy, Heidi Kattenhorn, Costin McQueen, Justin Schneider and Casey Smith; Hydaburg: Janessa Chinana and William Lauth Jr.; Juneau: Corissa Andrews, Andrea Biddle, Aquino Brinson, Johanna Brown, Kassandra Burke, Chloey Cavanaugh, Brandon Chappell, Harriet Chilton, Heather Clark, Michaela Demmert, Alicia Duncan, Antonia Fogg, Toriana Fogg, Andrea Gordon, Ryan Hartsock, Silas Hoyle, Roberta James, Ryan John, Crystal Johnson, C. Rosie Jones, Tatiana-Diamond King, Gabryel Kito, Austin Land, Breylan Martin, Shannon Mason, Jade Owens, Stacy Roberts, Avery Rowcroft, Jeryd Schauwecker, Cheyenne Siverly, Etienne Soboleff, Ruby Soboleff, Miranda St.Clair, Tyler Tajon, Marissa Truitt, Jessica Vigil, Katherine Waid, Malina Walkush, Alana Wheaton, Leilani Williams and Kendra Wittwer; Kasaan: Whitney Bremner, Taylor Crawford and Dillon Smith; Saxman: Veronica James; Wrangell: Alexandra Fennimore, Kenneth Hoyt, Kendall Kelley, Josephine Lewis, Britany Lindley, Arthur Nelson, Tasha Peterman, Megan Robinson, Mason Villarma and Ashley Wittwer.

Note: The 2018 Higher Education graduate list above only reflects those students who received College Student Assistance or Alumni Scholarship Assistance and provided notification of their graduation before the printing of the Annual Report.

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Cultural Heritage & Education 2018 Highlights (Cont.) Haa Yóo X̱ ʼatángi Kúdi (Lingít Language Immersion Nest) Haa Yóo X̱ʼatángi Kúdi is a community-based language learning project that focuses on improving language transmission between generations and within families. The program will open its doors to tribally-enrolled children ages three to five in 2019, immersing students in the Lingít language and ensuring families are provided the resources needed to be on the language journey with their children. Mission: Hél anák ̲ gaxt̲ oo.aat. X̲aat yáx ̲ yatee haa yoo xʼ̲ atángi, ka̲ a káx ̲ áwé Haa Yoo X̲ʼatángi Kúdi wududliyéx.̲ Aas jiséiyixʼ áwé woosh tudzixá̲ n haa ku̲ steeyí tóonáx.̲ Haa Aaní kanax ̲ chʼu tleix ̲ Haa Léelkʼu Hás sagaxt̲ oo.áax,̲ aag̲ aa woosh jín gaxt̲ oolsháat yeisú ka̲ a toowú latseen tín.

Johnson O’Malley (JOM)

Mission Translation: We are not going to walk away from it. Our language is like a tree root, and upon it Our Language Nest was built. In the shelter of a tree we love one another through Our Way of Life. On Our Land we will forever hear the voices of our grandparents, and then we will still be holding each other’s hands with strength of spirit.

Juneau JOM

ƒƒ Awarded a $1 million, three-year Native American Language Preservation and Maintenance-Esther Martinez Immersion grant through the Administration for Children and Families, Administration for Native Americans (ANA) to establish and operate the Haa Yóo X̱ʼatángi Kúdi.

The JOM program provides supplemental educational opportunities to Alaska Native and American Indian students and is guided by a local parent committee. The emphasis is on tutorial and cultural enrichment activities. ƒƒ Provided support to 128 Juneau School District students. ƒƒ Served as an adviser and mentored students in the Sources of Strength program aimed at improving Juneau-Douglas High School’s (JDHS) environment. ƒƒ Chaperoned students at the First Alaskans Institute’s 2018 Elders & Youth Conference. ƒƒ Provided two Academic Success classes at JDHS. ƒƒ Facilitated a Reconnecting Youth class for JDHS freshmen. The purpose was to improve attendance, increase academic success, decrease drug use, manage moods and offer support to one another. ƒƒ Tutored students throughout the school year and during summer school. ƒƒ Provided books for the Early Scholars program.

“Strengthening the Tribe’s nationhood through preserving our cultural heritage.”

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Cultural Heritage & Education Wrangell JOM ƒƒ Coordinated and hosted activities throughout the year (i.e., Elizabeth Peratrovich Day ceremony, Spook House, annual feast with kindergarten through second grade students, Lingít Christmas carols, and Lingít bingo at Christmas party and dinner). ƒƒ Participated in activities (i.e., dance performances and cultural interpretations) to raise funds to attend Celebration 2018. ƒƒ Participated in the First Alaskans Institute’s Elders & Youth Conference with three students and one Elder. ƒƒ Provided Stikine River cultural interpretation for Wrangell and Petersburg fourth grade student.

Navigators The Navigators program is a relationship-based prevention and early intervention program that serves Native youth ages 13-18. The program provides opportunities that help youth to navigate through adolescence focusing on cultural and community connectedness, learning life skills, and providing academic support and leadership opportunities. ƒƒ Hosted 47 weekly Compass Gatherings with an increased attendance of 18 participants. ƒƒ Hosted three Teen Speak communication workshops for parents, caregivers and service providers that focused on minimizing risky adolescent behavior. ƒƒ Provided funds and chaperoned five youth to attend the First Alaskans Institute’s Elders & Youth Conference. 38

ƒƒ Provided outreach in the communities of Hoonah, Hydaburg and Yakutat. ƒƒ Implemented bi-weekly study groups.

Vocational Training & Resource Center The Vocational Training & Resource Center (VTRC) is a tribal enterprise and State of Alaska post-secondary authorized institution that provides computer, distance education and vocational classes for career certification.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Provided CDL instruction to eight students; each attained their CDL license and secured entry level jobs. ƒƒ Enrolled 137 students in Computer classes; all attained their Certificate of Completion. ƒƒ Enrolled 35 tribal citizens in Penn Foster Career Academy. »» Eight completed the Penn Foster High School program.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Begin classroom instruction for up to 13 children ages three to five in Haa Yóo X’atángi Kúdi. ƒƒ Develop and implement educational opportunities in areas such as tribal management, childhood development and Alaska Native art. ƒƒ Seek funding to develop an online language library resource for Southeast Alaska’s indigenous languages. ƒƒ Expand and strengthen programming and outreach to Southeast Alaska communities. ƒƒ Develop repatriation and collection policies in line with traditional tribal values.


Head Start Tlingit & Haida Head Start serves 262 preschool-aged children (3-4 years old) in 10 communities throughout Southeast Alaska. »» Angoon (1 class) »» Craig (1 class) »» Hoonah (1 class)

»» Juneau (5 classes) »» Klawock (1 class) »» Petersburg (1 class)

»» Saxman (1 class) »» Sitka (2 classes) »» Wrangell (1 class)

»» Yakutat (1 class)

Head Start is a comprehensive preschool program that partners with families to foster healthy child development. In addition to preparing children to enter kindergarten, the program also coordinates health screenings in the areas of dental, health, mental health and nutrition, and monitors students’ development and parent involvement. Per Head Start Program Performance Standards, Head Start is administered in collaboration with the Tribe’s governing body (Executive Council) and the Policy Council which is mostly comprised of current Head Start parents. Each class operates with the input of their local parent committee. Head Start falls under the Office of Head Start’s (OHS) American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Region 10 and operates on an annual budget of $3,491,030. The program is funded with $2,789,673 in federal Head Start funds, $441,170 under the State of Alaska’s Department of Education and Early Development which is counted toward the Tribe’s non-federal match, and $260,187 by the Child Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) as a reimbursement for meals/snacks.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Achieved compliance under OHS’ new monitoring protocol, Focus Area One, which required interviews with the Tribe’s governing body, finance personnel and Head Start Policy Council. ƒƒ Increased enrollment numbers over last year by 2.16%. »» 57% of our total enrollment were income or categorically eligible and 43% of our total enrollment were considered over-income. »» 45% of total enrollment were three-year olds and 55% of total enrollment were four-year olds.

ƒƒ Improved Average Daily Attendance (ADA) by 5.22% over last year. Sitka Head Start morning class had the highest ADA over the entire school year with an average of 93%; highest ADA was reported during the month of September at 99%. ƒƒ Provided students with 25,313 breakfasts, 3,766 snacks and 25,143 lunches during the 2017-2018 school year.

Amber Frommherz Director

“Nurturing children to grow, participate in life with confidence and awareness, and use their strengths to reach their full potential.” 39


Head Start 2018 Highlights (Cont.)

Congratulations to Kayla Tripp who was awarded Early Childhood Educator of the Year 2018 by the Southeast Alaska Association for the Education of Young Children! 40

ƒƒ Completed the following health screenings on students: »» Dental (72%) »» Physical (82%) »» Hearing (71%) »» Vision (82%) ƒƒ Monitored and recorded developmental checkpoints through Teaching Strategies Gold (TSG) assessments conducted in the fall, winter and spring. Students improved their skills across all five domains (Social/ Emotional, Physical, Language, Cognitive, Literacy and Mathematics) with the greatest improvements in Literacy (+40% for 3 year olds and +37% for 4 year olds). Note: See statistical section of the annual report for more detailed information on Head Start’s developmental checkpoints, meal counts, enrollment and attendance.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Increase efficiency and effectiveness of our program leadership and operations. ƒƒ Extend service hours through supplemental OHS funds to increase classroom contact hours from 512 hours to 1,020 hours per school year for at least four classrooms. ƒƒ Finalize emergency preparedness plans in Head Start communities to ensure safe, healthy and children-friendly environments for our families. ƒƒ Strengthen our cultural foundation by expanding partnerships with fellow language immersion and wellness programs.


Native Lands & Resources The Native Lands and Resources (NLR) department manages and provides services that enhance and protect the land, environment and cultural artifacts. NLR consists of Realty, Forestry, Transboundary and Climate Change programs funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Compact; the Indian General Assistance Program (IGAP) and State Tribal Response Program (STRP) funded by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and the Cultural Resources program funded by the National Park Service (NPS). In 2018, the NLR department focused on water quality monitoring on transboundary rivers, harmful algae bloom studies, Southeast Regional Tribal Conservation District, Climate Change Adaptation Plan, Land into Trust, the Southeast Native Allotment Forest Management Plan, management of Native allotments and townsite lots, probate of restricted estates, and the repatriation of cultural artifacts. NLR successfully secured funding for transboundary mining, Southeast Conservation District, Southeast forest management, Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) historical sites, and the Native American Graves Protection & Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).

2018 Highlights Cultural Resources The Cultural Resources program repatriates objects of cultural patrimony, sacred objects, funerary objects and human remains in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 and the National Museum of the American Indian Act (NMAIA) of 1989. These acts allow federally recognized tribes to repatriate items from museums and federal agencies. ƒƒ Received a 100% mountain goat wool Chilkat blanket donated by the late Frances Lambert Allen which was welcomed home at the Strengthening Ties Community Gathering in June 2018. ƒƒ Participated in formal consultations with the Hood Museum of Art at the University of Maine in Orono, Maine and the Northwest Art Museum in Spokane, Washington for the return of ceremonial objects including objects of cultural patrimony and unassociated funerary objects.

ƒƒ Repatriated a song leader staff from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to the Teikhweidí clan and a hat from the National Museum of the American Indian that represents the clan’s ancestor Kaats’. ƒƒ Awarded a NAGPRA grant in the amount of $89,600 from the NPS for consultations with the Los Angeles County Museum in Los Angeles, California and the Milwaukee Public Museum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Environmental The Environmental program continues to develop environmental awareness, education, training and capacity building with Southeast Alaska tribes and communities.

Ghuneiteen

Desiree Duncan Manager

“Managing and providing services that enhance and protect land, environment, and cultural artifacts.”

ƒƒ Hosted a STRP training workshop in Juneau for Southeast Alaska tribes.

41


Native Lands & Resources 2018 Highlights (Cont.)

"Ensuring tribal rights through environmental and natural resource stewardship.”

ƒƒ Hosted the annual Southeast Environmental Conference in Juneau at the Vocational Training & Resource Center. »» Over 90 participants attended with representation from Southeast Alaska tribes, Southeast Native corporations and organizations, state agencies, federal agencies, and natural resource and environmental professionals. ƒƒ Collected a total of 26 water samples from Auke Bay and 14 from Point Louisa for the study of harmful algae blooms.

Realty and Forestry The Realty program provides professional land management to Native landowners who own trust/restricted properties. Individuals owning Native allotments receive services and consultation in forestland management through the Forestry program. ƒƒ Processed and/or approved 26 land conveyances, allotment adjudications and probate of estates for restricted property owners. ƒƒ Completed the Southeast Forest Management Plan fieldwork on Southeast Alaska Native allotments.

42

ƒƒ Assisted with fee-to-trust applications for property owned by Tlingit & Haida in the Juneau Indian Village. ƒƒ Completed fieldwork on 23 Sealaska ANCSA Section 14(h) (1) sites in the Prince of Wales Island area with funding received from BIA in the amount of $400,000.

Transboundary & Climate Change NLR works on raising tribal awareness on climate change issues and transboundary mining activities. ƒƒ Received BIA funding in the amount of $150,000 to begin water quality studies on the Chilkat River near Haines and Klukwan, Alaska. ƒƒ Conducted seven water quality samplings on the Stikine River, eight on the Taku River, and four on the Alsek River; this is the third year of sampling. ƒƒ Created a Climate Change Adaptation Plan and template for Southeast Alaska tribes to use to develop their own plans.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Complete the Southeast Native Allotment Forest Management Plan. ƒƒ Complete field work on 24 additional ANCSA Section 14(h)(1) sites. ƒƒ Execute and implement the Southeast Regional Tribal Conservation District. ƒƒ Begin water quality sampling on the Chilkat and Unuk rivers.


Program Compliance The Program Compliance department monitors and addresses client service programs for compliance, including handling program appeals or client complaints, and administers the Tribal Enrollment program which identifies and certifies tribal citizens. The department also provides technical assistance to Tlingit & Haida’s Community Councils and Southeast Alaska Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) tribes on enrollment and tribal elections.

2018 Highlights Tribal Enrollment

Audits/Complaints

The Tribal Enrollment program maintains Tlingit & Haida’s tribal citizen enrollment records and enrolls those persons of Tlingit and/or Haida descent into the Tribe. Services include certifying tribal enrollment and issuing tribal photo identification (ID) cards and certification letters for enrolled citizens.

A client who is not satisfied with the service he or she received from Tlingit & Haida staff may submit a written complaint. All complaints are taken seriously and are reviewed and responded to.

ƒƒ Held two Enrollment Committee meetings in Juneau. The committee approved 578 enrollment applications, completed 14 blood quantum corrections and approved 3 relinquishment requests. ƒƒ Provided outreach to tribal citizens in California and Washington to update addresses, issue tribal ID’s and provide enrollment applications. ƒƒ Coordinated community visits in partnership with IRA tribes in Craig, Haines, Kasaan, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell to provide information on Tlingit & Haida’s services, assist citizens in updating their tribal enrollment record and photograph citizens for new tribal ID cards. ƒƒ Worked with other Native organizations to address invalid tribal citizen mailing addresses. ƒƒ Started conversion of tribal enrollment data files from RiteTrack to TribeVueTM.

ƒƒ Addressed nine (9) formal complaints and three (3) appeals in 2018. Interviews were conducted with staff followed by meetings with supervisors and/or managers to resolve complaints.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Complete audit of tribal enrollment records to ensure all electronic and hard files match. ƒƒ Provide outreach to tribal citizens who are not registered to a voting community to increase voter activity in all communities. ƒƒ Assist all Tlingit & Haida Community Councils in updating tribal citizen data and provide tribal enrollment documents. ƒƒ Complete conversion of tribal enrollment data files from RiteTrack to TribeVueTM. ƒƒ Work with Tribal DTM to implement public portal and voting modules.

Ya Kon T’leix’ Valerie Hillman Manager

Enrollment Committee Ella Bennett (Chair) LaVerne Wise Patricia Alexander Judy Helgesen Stephanie Rainwater Frank Wright Jr.

43


Public Safety The Public Safety department consists of the Second Chance Reentry (Second Chance) and Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) programs. The Second Chance program focuses on efforts to reduce the high rate of recidivism in Southeast Alaska. The VPSO program trains and employs individuals residing in the village as first responders to public safety emergencies such as search and rescue, fire protection, emergency medical assistance, crime prevention and basic law enforcement.

2018 Highlights

Kíchgaaw Éesh Jason Wilson Manager

“Providing crucial services to ensure individuals have the tools to successfully reenter their communities.” 44

Second Chance The Second Chance program broadly supports efforts to reduce recidivism in Southeast Alaska. In 2018, the Second Chance program received funding under the Bureau of Justice Assistance through the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission to develop and implement a pilot program, Juneau Avert Chronic Shoplifting (JACS), in partnership with the City and Borough of Juneau (CBJ) and JAMHI Health & Wellness. ƒƒ Implemented a one-year JACS diversion pilot program to provide a non-incarceration response to habitual shoplifting. A key piece in the development of a new program is how to keep potential participants engaged through completion (several referrals were received, but only 30% completed the program). »» Although the program only graduated five participants, the data collected will be a valuable contribution to the Alaska Judicial Council in developing similar programs throughout the state. ƒƒ Developed the framework and garnered community support for Yak’éiyi Kustí Yinaadei Hít to aid citizens returning from incarceration with a supportive environment to ensure a successful reentry back into the community.

ƒƒ Received replication training from the Delancey Street Foundation to incorporate key aspects of the program into the Yak’éiyi Kustí Yinaadei Hít Reentry Transitional Housing program. The successful model uses employment, training and housing to produce an estimated 75-90% success rate in reentry.

Village Public Safety Officer The VPSO program provides rural Alaskan communities with needed public safety services at the local level. The VPSO program provides basic law enforcement and public safety services to participating communities. The presence of these officers has had a significant impact on improving the quality of life in the participating villages.


Public Safety The Public Safety department works closely with the local mayor and city council, as well as with the Alaska State Troopers, to administer the VPSO program in designated Southeast Alaska communities. The program is funded by the State of Alaska and was created to reduce the loss of life due to fires, drowning, lost person(s) and the lack of immediate emergency medical assistance in rural communities. Recruitment and retention continues to be a great challenge for the VPSO program. The following communities are supported by the State of Alaska with VPSO positions paid through Tlingit & Haida’s payroll system: »» »» »» »»

Angoon (1) Hydaburg (1) Kake (2) Thorne Bay (1)

»» Kasaan (1) »» Pelican (1) »» Saxman (1)

ƒƒ Filled two VPSO positions in Kake, Alaska. One of the positions was filled by a local Alaska Native who was born and raised in Kake. ƒƒ Secured Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) funding to purchase emergency response watercrafts for search and rescue operations for the communities served and to provide additional training. ƒƒ Secured funding to hire a VPSO Recruitment and Training Officer to be stationed in Anchorage with Alaska State Troopers and to fill all vacant VPSO positions. ƒƒ Reformatted quarterly VPSO Coordinator’s meeting to increase involvement from all parties and to put tribes in a more equitable position with the state.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Continue to work with the Alaska Judicial Council to analyze and interpret the data collected from the JACS program to help secure funding for a more effective diversion or reentry program. ƒƒ Develop sustainable reentry programming. ƒƒ Increase recruitment efforts to fill vacant VPSO positions. ƒƒ Assist communities in identifying grant funding for the upkeep of Public Safety buildings. ƒƒ Secure funding, partnerships and staffing for Yak’éiyi Kustí Yinaadei Hít. The Second Chance program plans to open this housing program in the summer of 2019. ƒƒ Monitor the 2019 Alaska Legislature session for potential threats to criminal justice reform and advocate for legislation that supports the reentry effort and resources to provide a wider safety net for tribal citizens returning from incarceration. ƒƒ Work with the State of Alaska on compacting Public Safety services.

“Providing basic law enforcement and public safety services in participating Southeast Alaska communities.”

45


Tribal Family & Youth Services The Tribal Family & Youth Services (TFYS) department administers the Child Welfare, Elderly Services and Wellness programs. TFYS also oversees field offices in Craig, Haines, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell. The department uses tribal values and strength-based practices to assist children, youth, elderly and families in achieving safety, stability and security. In 2018, the department administered 17 federal, state and tribal grants, and employed 20 onsite staff and 5 field staff.

2018 Highlights

Xaasteen

Francine Eddy Jones Director

“Providing culturally sensitive services to promote economic self-sufficiency and the social well-being of tribal citizens and tribal communities.” 46

ƒƒ Celebrated 18 years of a very strong partnership with Casey Family Programs, a private operating foundation. Through this partnership, staff received on-going training, technical support and opportunities for peer-to-peer learning exchanges with other tribes across the state and nation. ƒƒ Continued formal discussions with the State of Alaska regarding services currently provided by the Office of Children Services (OCS) that tribes and tribal organizations were interested in assuming responsibility of under the historic Alaska Tribal Child Welfare Compact. The TFYS Director served as one of three Tribal Lead Negotiators. ƒƒ Finalized the first Standard Services Funding Agreement with the State of Alaska to implement the first scope of work to conduct diligent relative searches for Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) cases. ƒƒ Fostered ongoing and new partnerships to ensure quality, culturally-based services and programs are available to tribal elders, children, youth and families. ƒƒ Hosted a Wellbriety Gathering: Celebrating Sobriety through Intertribal Song & Dance with 95 participants. ƒƒ Hosted 3rd Annual Honoring Our Volunteers celebration to acknowledge the hard work of 51 community volunteers; 23 were Elders who all support the work of TFYS. This is a 76% increase in volunteers from 2017!

ƒƒ Continued strong partnerships with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Child Care departments to increase culturally-based support groups that promote keeping families together and focus on sobriety, parenting and trauma for mutual clients. »» Women’s Group (30 participants), Wellbriety Support Group (50 participants), Fatherhood Is Sacred® (18 participants) and Inter-Tribal Culture Night (457 participants).

Child Welfare The Child Welfare team serves as tribal advocates at the intake, research, investigative, prevention/early intervention and intervention stages of tribal child welfare cases. ƒƒ Hired a caseworker under the Alaska Tribal Child Welfare Compact to conduct diligent relative and ICWA preference searches on tribal children who are in the custody of OCS. This helps to identify possible ICWA compliant placements for tribal children who need temporary out of home placement. ƒƒ Hosted a banquet to honor tribal partners who helped make the Alaska Tribal Child Welfare Compact a reality and have contributed many years to transforming tribal child welfare in Alaska.


Tribal Family & Youth Services ƒƒ Hosted a Tribal Child Welfare Convening (December 18-19) in Juneau, Alaska. Participants included representatives from the State of Alaska’s Department of Health & Social Services and the 18 Alaska tribes and tribal organizations that entered into the historic Alaska Tribal Child Welfare Compact in Anchorage, Alaska (October 2017). »» Participants had the opportunity to review progress, discuss benchmarks and goals moving forward in the process. ƒƒ Hosted two key ICWA-related events: »» Peer-to-peer with the Muscogee Creek Nation of Oklahoma. »» Reactivated the Tribal Advisory Review Commission and sent a delegation to ICWA training. ƒƒ Provided orientation to Alaska Office of Children Services and AWARE staff on programs and services. ƒƒ Co-hosted three gatherings on permanency placements that explored values and barriers to forever homes in Juneau, Sitka and Ketchikan, Alaska.

Elderly Services The Elderly Services program provides elder nutrition and caregiver support services, information and referral services, Elderly Emergency Assistance, and promotes wellness and health-related education. The program serves elders and caregivers in Douglas, Hydaburg and Juneau, Alaska. ƒƒ Continued partnership with the Juneau Tlingit & Haida Community Council for use of their building to expand the Litseeni K u.oo weekly exercise program which served 132 elders with 50 in regular attendance. ƒƒ Expanded exercise programming for elders to include Fall Prevention twice per week and Tai Chi once a week. ƒƒ Hosted the Annual Caregivers Workshop with 100 vendors and participants. The workshop provided a forum for elders and caregivers to learn new knowledge from resource centers, connect to local community service providers and network amongst themselves. ƒƒ Sponsored seven participants to attend the First Alaskans Institute’s Elders & Youth Conference in Anchorage, Alaska.

“Promoting health and wellness for tribal elders through health and social services.”

47


Tribal Family & Youth Services 2018 Highlights (Cont.)

“Supporting the health and wellbeing of tribal citizens by linking and empowering elders, youth and families.”

ƒƒ Provided 70 elders with Thanksgiving and Christmas food boxes to hold them up during the holiday season. ƒƒ Coordinated fun activities such as a whale watching tour, picnic at Eagle Beach, Halloween carnival, Alaska State Museum tour and a Valentine’s Day Dance with a guest appearance from Alaska’s former Governor Bill Walker and Lieutenant Governor Byron Mallott. ƒƒ Provided transportation to the General Election polls. ƒƒ Developed and implemented Two Generation programming in partnership with Juneau Indian Studies program that connected volunteer elders with youth in the Juneau school system. Elders had weekly opportunities to meet and share stories with youth. ƒƒ Participated in a peer-to-peer exchange with the Fairbanks Native Association’s Elder Services program to learn how to expand and improve elder services.

Wellness (Wooch.yax Haa Kusteeyi) The Wellness program (Wooch.yax Haa Kusteeyi - Balance is Our Way of Life) works to support the health and wellbeing of tribal citizens by linking and empowering elders, youth and families. It focuses on two components – Domestic Violence and Suicide Prevention. ƒƒ Renewed memorandum of agreements with AWARE, Inc., Women in Safe Homes (WISH) and Sitkans Against Family Violence (SAFV) shelters in Southeast Alaska.

48

ƒƒ Supported nine activities through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Native Connections grant: »» Boys Run (I Toowú Klatseen - Strengthen Your Spirit): The 10-week running program focused on building resiliency, pride in culture, and skills for healthy relationships for boys in grades 3-5. »» Latseen Adventure Club: The culturally-based outdoor leadership program for elementary youth that intertwined Tlingit cultural values and language into outdoor activities (i.e., running, hiking, ice skating). »» TCLL Family Engagement Art program: The culturallybased family program imparted healthy activities for families to share with their children (i.e., storytelling, Devil’s Club salve making, Native Youth Olympics). »» Haa Atxaayí Haa Kusteeyíx Sitee: The culturallybased family program helped participants learn how to traditionally harvest and process fireweed, goose tongue, beach asparagus and fish from a cultural specialist. Each session integrated traditional harvesting activities with literacy and storytelling.


Tribal Family & Youth Services »» Taxaa (Mosquito) Circuits and Legends Camp: The camp used the Cannibal Giant legend to integrate culture with the science behind electricity and visual art. Students experimented with electricity, created lighted illustrations of the legend and learned the Tlingit and English vocabulary of the story. »» Thunder Mountain Culture Club: The club was an open time for elders and teens to share food and stories. Elders shared how they would traditionally introduce themselves and asked teens to share their own traditional introductions. Elders often shared stories about their own experiences as teenagers, describing fishing and other traditional harvest activities. »» Floyd Dryden Tlingit Language and Culture Class: Middle school students interviewed elders about their lives, Tlingit culture and history. »» Two-Week Music Camp: The camp provided an opportunity for tribal youth to compose their first culturally-based music video, Ix̱six̱án, Ax̱ Ḵwáan, which was followed by the release of a second music video, Zibit, just four months later.

Field Staff The TFYS Field Staff provide a key role as community liaisons to share information on TFYS’ services as well as provide case management and resource referrals to tribal citizens. ƒƒ Filled all Field Staff positions in Craig, Haines, Kasaan, Klawock, Saxman and Wrangell, Alaska to provide case management services to tribal children and families in their respective communities and ICWA services for families who reside outside of Alaska. ƒƒ Participated in four key trainings: »» TribeVueTM phase I database, »» Structured Decision Making (SDM) tool in partnership with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) department, »» BIA Providers Conference, and »» Permanency Options for Tribal Children in State Custody with State of Alaska OCS staff in Juneau, Sitka and Ketchikan, Alaska.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Expand the Tribal Title IV-E Maintenance program which transfers State ICWA cases to Tribal Court. ƒƒ Research the Direct Title IV-E option. ƒƒ Continue to expand partnerships to provide culturallybased services and programs to elders, children, youth and families.

“Serving as a community liaison to ensure tribal citizens have access to the Tribe’s services.”

49


Tribal Transportation The Tribal Transportation department is organized to manage the day-to-day operations that the Tribe has contracted through the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) Tribal Transportation Program (TTP) for both Juneau and Saxman, Alaska.

Lgeik’l Eesh Will Ware Manager

“Collaborating with local agencies to improve, construct and maintain key transportation routes.” 50

The department was established in 2005 along with other federally recognized tribal transportation programs throughout the region. Tlingit & Haida began contracting directly with FHWA’s TTP (formerly the Indian Reservation Roads Program) in 2009. Beginning with FY 2013, funds were distributed to tribes annually on a statutory formula-driven basis under the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) legislation. Under new legislation, Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST ACT), the department is still operating under that same funding formula. Tribal shares of TTP funds can be used for planning, design, construction, maintenance and administration of the Transportation program. Annual TTP funding from FHWA was $778,263 for Juneau and $59,871 for Saxman. The Tribal Transportation Manager continues to provide representation on state and national transportation issues and currently serves on the Southeast Conference Alaska Marine Highway System (AMHS) Reform Project Steering Committee and Governor’s Tribal Advisory Subcommittee. He also participates on the National Congress of American Indians’ Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee and the Intertribal Transportation Association. The department continues to collaborate with local agencies to improve, construct and maintain transportation routes the Tribe has identified as important and necessary.

2018 Highlights ƒƒ Resurfaced Andrew Hope Building’s parking lot with gravel to prepare for paving. ƒƒ Created eight additional parking spaces around the Andrew Hope Building. ƒƒ Installed fencing to improve security on lots owned by the Tribe in the old Juneau Indian Village. ƒƒ Removed trees and outdoor deck and leveled surface with three inch minus rock topped with D1 aggregate at the Edward K. Thomas Building to increase parking and create usable space for Head Start to expand its playground area. ƒƒ Worked closely with the Southeast Alaska Native Veterans to finalize the design of their new Memorial Park to be located next to the Andrew Hope Building. ƒƒ Promoted road safety through radio ads.

ƒƒ Met with City and Borough of Juneau and Juneau School District officials on the Tribe’s Road Safety Audit grant for safe routes to schools.

2019 Goals ƒƒ Complete Riverside Drive Road Safety Audit. ƒƒ Begin construction of the Southeast Alaska Native Veterans Memorial Park. ƒƒ Resurface the following lots in the Willoughby District: »» Lots Eight (8) and Nine (9) of Block Three (3) and Block Five (5) & Lot Three (3) of Block Two (2). ƒƒ Resurface the unpaved portion of Edward K. Thomas Building’s parking lot. ƒƒ Reseal asphalt and complete general road maintenance on Saxman streets.


Statistics & Timeline


Statistics HISTORICAL TRUST FUND GRAPH

December 31, 2018 Ending Balance: $20,075,599 $25M $20M $15M $10M $5M $0

19

88

19

93

19

98

20

03

20

08

20

13

20

18

OPERATING EXPENSES BY PROGRAM PROGRAM TYPE Tribal Court Tribal Government General & Administration Client & Community Services Enterprises (not including THTBC) Total

52

AMOUNT $642,427 $904,343 $5,805,248 $21,135,592 $617,393 $29,105,003


Statistics NATIVE HIRE HEAD START ENROLLMENT & AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE (ADA)

Tribal Citizens Other Alaska Native / American Indian Non-Native Non-Identified

EMPLOYEES BY LOCATION

SEPT 2017 OCT 2017 NOV 2017 DEC 2017 JAN 2018 FEB 2018 MAR 2018 APR 2018 MAY 2018

ENROLLED 255 259 262 260 260 261 260 261 258

ADA (%) 89% 85% 82% 83% 86% 84% 81% 84% 85%

Head Start students are required to attend school 85% of the time that class is held. The table (above) shows student enrollment and their ADA by month during the 2017-2018 school year. Juneau Outside of Juneau (Field Staff)

53


Statistics HEAD START DEVELOPMENTAL CHECKPOINTS 3 YEAR OLDS 100% 90% 80% 70%

HEAD START DEVELOPMENTAL CHECKPOINTS 4 YEAR OLDS

60% 50% 40%

100%

30%

90%

20%

80%

10%

70%

0%

60% Social Emotional

Physical

Language Cognitive

Fall

Winter

Literacy Mathematics Spring

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

54

Social Emotional

Physical

Language Cognitive

Fall

Winter

Literacy Mathematics Spring


Statistics

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Total Child Support Cases Opened Divorce/Custody Petitions Domestic Violence Petitions Adoption Petitions Guardianship Petitions Child Welfare Petitions Hearings Held Marriage Licenses Issued

2008

TRIBAL COURT 2008-2018

167

155

131

111

82

71

85

91

109

106

106

1

193

125

136

173

Total Child Support 243 398 529 640 722 Cases at Year End Total Non-Child Support 1 Cases at End of Year Total Cases at Year End 243 398 529 640 723 Child Support % 100% 100% 100% 100% 99.9% Non-Child Support % .01%

17 4 4 3

31 14 3 8

28 15 4 9

27 18 5 19

162

213

204 1

45 7 6 10 2 258 2

33 14 5 26 2 342 3

793

878

969

19

75

131

812 98% 2%

953 92% 8%

356 3

1,078 1,184 1,290 201

270

367

1,100 1,279 1,454 1,657 88% 84% 81% 78 12% 16% 19% 22

55


Statistics Please note the number under “Served” in the following tables reflect the total number of individuals who received services through that program or department, not the number of times service was provided to an individual. Many clients receive services multiple times through a program. Acronyms: TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and VTRC (Vocational Training & Resource Center)

ANGOON PROGRAM NAME Alumni Scholarship Assistance

1

Child Care

75

Distance Education

2

Elderly Emergency Assistance

1

Employment & Training

1

Head Start

10

Second Chance Reentry

7*

TANF

24

Tribal Child Support Unit

32

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

1

Village Public Safety Officer

**

Youth Employment Services

5

VTRC

2

**Angoon VPSO Total Call Outs: 255 Non-Criminal (234) • Criminal (21)

56

DOUGLAS

SERVED

PROGRAM NAME

CRAIG PROGRAM NAME

SERVED

SERVED

Child Care

14

Distance Education

2 2

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

1

Realty/Forestry

Child Care

7

Second Chance Reentry

22*

Elderly Emergency Assistance

3

Tribal Child Support Unit

38

Employment & Training

1

Head Start

18

Indian Child Welfare Act

10

Realty/Forestry

16

TANF

4

Tribal Child Support Unit

31 *Individual(s) received services in Juneau– statistics note their community of origin.


Statistics HAINES PROGRAM NAME

HYDABURG SERVED

PROGRAM NAME

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

2

Child Care

80

College Student Assistance

4

Distance Education

2

Indian Child Welfare Act

14

Realty/Forestry

36

Second Chance Reentry

1*

TANF

3

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

Tribal Child Support Unit

18

Child Care

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

3

Elderly Emergency Assistance

2

Head Start

16

Second Chance Reentry

5*

TANF

15

Tribal Child Support Unit

42

VTRC

1

Youth Employment Services

2

HOONAH PROGRAM NAME

SERVED 2 128

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

2

Child Care

70

Elderly Services

27

Second Chance Reentry

1*

TANF

11

Tribal Child Support Unit

34

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

1

Village Public Safety Officer

**

**Hydaburg VPSO Total Call Outs: 294 Non-Criminal (244) • Criminal (50)

*Individual(s) received services in Juneau– statistics note their community of origin.

57


Statistics JUNEAU PROGRAM NAME

JUNEAU SERVED

PROGRAM NAME

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

36

Johnson O’Malley

128

Child Care

363

Language

35

College Student Assistance

119

Native Connections

149

Diligent Relative Searches

14***

Navigators

18

Distance Education

19

Preserving Native Families

42

Elderly Emergency Assistance

35

Realty/Forestry

100

Elderly Services

132

Second Chance Reentry

250*

Employment & Training

605

TANF

124

Family Support Groups

555

Tribal Child Support Unit

663

Foster Care

17

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

115

Head Start

90

VTRC

142

Indian Child Welfare Act

19

Youth Employment Services

15

***TFYS identified 232 relatives.

*Individual(s) received services in Juneau– statistics note their community of origin.

KAKE PROGRAM NAME

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance Child Care

100

TANF

12

Tribal Child Support Unit

21

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

1

Village Public Safety Officer

**

Youth Employment Services

2

**Kake VPSO Total Call Outs: 335 Non-Criminal (293) • Criminal (42)

58

2


Statistics KASAAN PROGRAM NAME

KLAWOCK SERVED

PROGRAM NAME

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

2

Child Care

11

College Student Assistance

2

Realty/Forestry

5

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

TANF

1

Tribal Child Support Unit

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

2

Child Care

2

Distance Education

1

3

Employment & Training

1

Child Care

33

Head Start

17

1

College Student Assistance

1

Realty/Forestry

14

Village Public Safety Officer

**

Distance Education

4

TANF

10

Youth Employment Services

1

Realty/Forestry

3

Tribal Child Support Unit

28

**Kasaan VPSO Total Call Outs: 139 Non-Criminal (127) • Criminal (12)

KETCHIKAN PROGRAM NAME

Second Chance Reentry

16*

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

4

TANF

72

VTRC

1

Tribal Child Support Unit

234

Youth Employment Services

1

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

KLUKWAN PROGRAM NAME Indian Child Welfare Act

SERVED 23

SERVED

7

*Individual(s) received services in Juneau– statistics note their community of origin.

METLAKATLA PROGRAM NAME

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

1

Tribal Child Support Unit

14

59


Statistics SAXMAN

PELICAN PROGRAM NAME Village Public Safety Officer

PROGRAM NAME

SERVED **

PETERSBURG

**Pelican VPSO Total Call Outs: 24 Non-Criminal (21) • Criminal (3)

PROGRAM NAME

SITKA PROGRAM NAME

60

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

5

Head Start

36

Second Chance Reentry

5*

TANF

26

Tribal Child Support Unit

139

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

7

Youth Employment Services

4

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

2

College Student Assistance

1

Head Start

19

Second Chance Reentry

1*

TANF

4

Tribal Child Support Unit

20

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

2

Youth Employment Services

1

*Individual(s) received services in Juneau– statistics note their community of origin.

SERVED

Child Care

4

College Student Assistance

1

Employment & Training

2

Head Start

20

Indian Child Welfare Act

5

Realty/Forestry

17

Tribal Child Support Unit

1

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

2

Village Public Safety Officer

**

**Saxman VPSO Total Call Outs: 237 Non-Criminal (209) • Criminal (28)


Statistics SKAGWAY PROGRAM NAME

WRANGELL SERVED

Child Care

24

Realty/Forestry

4

PROGRAM NAME

THORNE BAY PROGRAM NAME

SERVED

Village Public Safety Officer **Thorne Bay VPSO Total Call Outs: 240 Non-Criminal (204) • Criminal (36)

YAKUTAT PROGRAM NAME Alumni Scholarship Assistance

**

SERVED

OTHER

1

Child Care

105

Head Start

16

TANF

1

Tribal Child Support Unit

11

PROGRAM NAME

SERVED

SERVED

Alumni Scholarship Assistance

3

College Student Assistance

6

Distance Education

2

Elderly Emergency Assistance

2

Head Start

20

Indian Child Welfare Act

23

Johnson O’Malley

237

Realty/Forestry

7

Second Chance Reentry

1*

TANF

7

Child Care

19

Tribal Child Support Unit

22

College Student Assistance

1

Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation

4

Distance Education

3

VTRC

2

Elderly Emergency Assistance

4

Youth Employment Services

1

Indian Child Welfare Act

44

Tribal Child Support Unit

412

*Individual(s) received services in Juneau– statistics note their community of origin.

61


Timeline JANUARY Executive Council provided testimony at Alaska Board of Fisheries on the protection of the sac roe herring fishery.

MARCH Chief Justice Michelle Demmert appointed to Co-Chair National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Violence Against Women (VAW) Task Force.

MAY Tlingit & Haida Head Start school year ends with graduation ceremonies held for each class throughout Southeast Alaska. 62

FEBRUARY Elders’ Valentine’s Day Dance held with special guest appearances by former Alaska Governor Bill Walker and Lieutenant Governor Byron Mallott.

APRIL Entered into a Support Services Funding Agreement with State of Alaska’s Department of Health & Social Services, Office of Children’s Services to conduct diligent relative and Indian Child Welfare Act preference searches.

JUNE Enrollment Committee met to review and act on pending enrollment applications and requests for blood quantum corrections.


Timeline JULY Annual Back to School Backpack Fair held in Juneau, Alaska followed by backpack distributions throughout Southeast Alaska.

SEPTEMBER Executive Council met with Sitka Tribe of Alaska board members in Sitka, Alaska.

NOVEMBER Celebrating Our Ways of Life event hosted in recognition and celebration of Native American Heritage Month.

AUGUST Tribe formalized commitment with University of Alaska Southeast to expand communication, collaboration, and mutually beneficial partnerships through a Memorandum of Agreement.

OCTOBER Indigenous Peoples Day celebration held to highlight the resiliency of indigenous cultures and our tribal values.

DECEMBER Tribal Child Welfare Convening hosted with State representatives and 18 Alaska tribes and tribal organizations. 63


Central Council of Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska 9097 Glacier Highway • Juneau AK 99801 907.586.1432 • 1.800.344.1432 www.ccthita-nsn.gov • facebook.com/ccthita twitter.com/tlingithaida • instagram.com/tlingithaida

2018 Tlingit & Haida Annual Report  

2018 Tlingit & Haida Annual Report  

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