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A mind-altering, myth-shattering exposé about diet and exercise myths. Nutrition expert and health activist Christine Cronau tells us why reducing dietary fat actually makes us fat, sick and even depressed!

WHY BUTTER AND REAL FATS

Discover the story behind the biggest scam of the 21st century. The Fat Revolution is a fascinating and controversial disclosure, debunking ‘conventional wisdom’ about what constitutes a healthy lifestyle and diet. This book is an invaluable look into what makes us fat and the real cause of heart disease.

ACTUALLY MAKE US

slim. . .

Christine Cronau

As seen in Who Vogue Grazia Body & Soul Wellbeing Women’s Health & fitness and more

Health / Weight Loss

And why the vilification of fat was the biggest health blunder in history

Foreword by Paul J. Rosch, MD, Professor of Medicine NYMC

Christine Cronau


What people are saying about The Fat Revolution This well-researched book will revolutionise the way we look at food and health. Thanks Christine, for bringing some common sense to the table. Bill Statham, Bestselling Author, The Chemical Maze I really enjoyed this book. Christine has done a great job condensing the mass of literature about our (bad) dietary advice and explaining where it came from and how we got things so terribly wrong. Beautifully written and illustrated, it is highly readable even when tackling the more complex nutritional issues. Christine’s positive energy comes across in her writing and what a role model she is for the wisdom she shares with us. If you want to understand how we made two thirds of our fellow humans fat and sick— this is one of the best places to start! Zoe Harcombe B.A., M.A. (Cantab), Bestselling Author, The Obesity Epidemic: What caused it? How can we stop it? Christine Cronau has done a bang-up job of explaining what’s wrong with the anti-fat hysteria that has driven dietary recommendations for the past 40 years. After reading this easy-to-grasp book on nutrition science, you’ll understand why low-fat diets are worse than useless: in addition to being tasteless, low-fat diets can make you fat and sick. Tom Naughton, Health Writer and Comedian, writer and director of Fat Head: You’ve been fed a load of bologna! To understand what you eat when it comes to fats, you have to understand what the human body requires, how it functions. If you are putting things in that are harder to break down, harder to digest, the result is weight gain and obesity. The majority of people do not know how to eat properly, from your highest corporate high-roller to your general mum and dad. The world has been saturated with advertising from big companies, but it does not mean they are looking after the welfare of the human race. Be very cautious what diet you follow. Be very careful that you are not guided by the diet world, because it is very dangerous, especially if you have underlying conditions. The Fat Revolution is an important book that will change the way you think about food, fat and health. Clint Robinson, Five-time Olympic Champion Christine reminds us that fats don’t actually make us fat—it’s the insulin our body produces in response to consuming sugars and refined carbohydrates that creates most of the problem. Chelsea Hunter, Co-editor Wellbeing Magazine Christine is living proof that what we eat is reflected in the way we look. Nadine Fisher, Tweed Daily News Christine’s uncommon good sense about the health benefits of fat deserves a wide audience. Read, eat, digest, and enjoy! Sarah J Buckley, M.D., Bestselling Author, Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering: A Doctor’s Guide to Natural Childbirth and Gentle Early Parenting Choices The Fat Revolution challenges many ingrained assumptions about health and more importantly gives readers positive and practical advice to improve their quality of life. Peter Holsman, M.D., N.D, General Practitioner and Naturopath

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In 2006, a landmark study on cardiovascular disease and high saturated fats failed to prove that a diet high in fat contributed to an increase in heart attack or stroke. This study was published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association. Despite this, and many other studies meticulously referenced in this book, doctors and nutritionists continue to perpetuate the myth that saturated fat is the cause of all our modern day health woes. Those practitioners willing to let go of dogma based on unsound theory will quickly see that the cause lies elsewhere, that the refined carbohydrate, high-sugar, low-fat diet is contributing to our lifestyle diseases and making a generation of ‘low-fat junkies’ more obese than ever. Christine has done her research well and presents undeniable evidence which debunks the fat myth and provides a pathway to robust health and wellbeing for her readers. Dr Karen Coates, M.D., MB BS Dip Obs RACOG, Nutritional Practitioner, and Bestselling Author, Embracing the Warrior: An Essential Guide for Women Saturated fat is the type of fat that dominates in animal food such as eggs, cream, meat and cheese and it is also abundant in palm oil and coconut oil. Today, too much saturated fat is considered as dangerous to our arteries as are the greasy food leftovers destined for the sewer of our kitchen sink, but where is the evidence? The truth is that there is none. The truth is that the warnings against saturated fat are based upon data which has been manipulated. Uffe Ravnskov, MD, PhD Once again, Christine has written an excellent factual health manual that is contemporary and accurate. She dispels the myths surrounding fat and cholesterol usage that have erroneously circulated within society for the past 40 years. Her book serves to highlight how both our food chain and food choices have been gravely influenced by organizations more interested in marketing a product or a drug that serves no purpose to overall human health. Using compelling scientific research together with a good understanding of the evolution of diet and the human race, Christine has successfully brought to light the importance of eating healthy fats in the diet as part of a health, wellness, anti-aging and longevity programme. Kim Balson N.D. (Hons), Naturopath, Hormone Consultant, Bestselling Author, Woman to Woman: Managing Your Hormones safely and Naturally It is refreshing to read Christine’s sound and unbiased assessment of fat and how it has been unfairly demonised for decades. Christine presents many insightful examples and writes in an easy-to-understand way. Christine does not shy away from the arguments, brick walls and the well entrenched beliefs about health, diet and well being. Instead, she rationally and logically highlights the faulty premise of many of these assertions and carefully counteracts them. This is an exciting time for us all where we are observing first-hand the creation of a paradigm shift. Christine needs to be congratulated in her role in speaking out—her quote from Winston Churchill, about not running away from the truth, is particularly apt. Sarah Spencer-Matthews, PhD  A compelling and compulsory read for everyone interested in real health and real food! Beautifully written, thoroughly researched and myth busting! Christine has a natural gift for discerning and articulating evidence. Not just a companion to her first book, but a comprehensive and holistic investigation into what really makes us healthy and how to apply changes in our life. Thanks to Christine, we can all welcome genuine health and decant taste back into our lives. Carolyn Summers, R.N., Registered Nurse, mother of two.

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There is no one perfect way to eat, however there most certainly are foods that reduce the health of all and many of these have a cloud of misconception covering their shady reality. Christine dispels the myths and confusion with clear facts, presented in an easyto-read language. She has done the research for you and has no hidden agenda. No matter how hard science may try, Mother Nature still comes up trumps. Julie Phillips B.A.R.M, Dip Shiatsu & Oriental Medicine, Cert. Whole Food Medicine, Kinesiology, Dynamic Healing, Training Cert IV, et al At last, someone has recognised that the demons in our diet are not cholesterol and animal fats, but processed vegetable fats, grains and sugars and the large corporations that benefit from the diet industry. Christine Cronau has pulled together a vast body of scientific evidence to back up her particular take on this issue as well as providing some compelling anecdotal evidence and great ideas for revolutionising our diet and lifestyle. Julia Bruce, Book Editor Christine’s book makes so much sense and it’s such a natural way to eat. It’s a great health program and also a good way to lose that bit of extra weight without having to really do anything! No more calorie or points calculations, you can eat practically anything you want, how amazing is that?!! Even my doctor has commented on how much better I look, not just with the six kilo weight loss, but my skin is glowing and fresh. If you’ve tried every diet there is and always felt ‘starved’, then read this book; it may well change your life. Linda Mitchell de Barrios, mother of two I would like to thank you for this book. I am SO friggin’ sick of starving myself and ending up brain dead just to try and lose a few pounds. Laura Hartmann, Consultant. We will be recommending The Fat Revolution to all our family and friends. We believe this book is an ideal starting point for people that may be blissfully unaware of how unhealthy their current lifestyle really is. It gives good quality information that is written in a way that laypersons can understand, but at the same time, it points the reader in the right direction if they do wish to further explore the evidence presented. The evidence is so compelling and logical that it would be difficult for people NOT to join the revolution!! Well done Christine, you’ve nailed it!! Kirby, Aircraft Technician, father of two I have just finished reading The Fat Revolution and I LOVE it! There is so much information and all possible questions have been answered. I can’t wait to start my nutrition units this semester with your book under my arm! Jo Atkinson, Mother of three, Health Science (Nutritional Medicine) student, Endeavour College of Natural Health Extremely well written! Excellent correlation of thoroughly researched data, simply put and very easy-to-read and understand. I know so many of my clients who will want to buy this book; I will be highly recommending it to everyone! Terri Batsakis, Certified Master Trainer Christine’s Fat Revolution is simply amazing! I read the entire book in one sitting, as I just couldn’t take myself away! It is so well argued and articulated so that anyone can understand it! In my opinion, this book has the potential to change, or at least strongly rock the boat, of the mainstream medical and health industries, which have a lot to answer for. I urge anyone who wants to dramatically improve their health and life, struggling with weight, or who is just sick of dieting to read this book. Honest to God, it is one of the greatest gifts you will give yourself (and hopefully someone else).  Lisa Drake, Political Science and Education student (University of Melbourne)

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The Fat Revolution is something you should read if you care about your health. Christine makes losing weight and staying healthy sound enjoyable! In the book, Christine quotes scientific studies to back up her theories, but it is written in a way that everyone can understand. She made me excited about changing my lifestyle, knowing I won’t feel like I’m missing out. She also makes catering for children sound simple— without the processed rubbish. The Fat Revolution is a fantastic follow-on from Great health is a piece of cake. As Christine advocates: we all need to go back to basics! Lauren Veldman, Personal Assistant The Fat Revolution is a fantastic read; it goes into the science of what and why we should be eating fat and Christine uses herself as an example of great health. She is the perfect example of why eating fat does not make you fat. She explains the reasons why so many people in today’s society are not only overweight but also unhealthy. Sarah Zammit, mother of two I absolutely loved reading The Fat Revolution and I praise Christine for sharing her knowledge and educating mothers (like myself) on the benefits of healthy fats for children. I cried reading the chapter on Healthy Children as I used to think I was doing the ‘right’ thing by limiting all fats and giving cereals with skim milk, sandwiches and pasta (carbohydrates) to my children as their main source of nutrients. I must admit, when they refused their meat and vegetables but devoured their pasta, I would think ‘well at least they have carbohydrates for energy to grow’. I wouldn’t have known the importance of healthy fats in my family’s diet had I not read Christine’s book and I am so grateful that she has shared her knowledge and helped make a difference. I now  provide healthy natural food to my children and avoid packaged snacks (especially those that have a tick printed on the box) and other processed carbohydrates. As Oprah once said ‘When you know better, you do better’ and that quote certainly applies to me after reading this book. Now I know the truth about healthy fats, I can provide my family and myself with a far healthier diet. Thanks Christine. Kim Beveridge, Mum of three and Franchise Owner I have always taken great pleasure in cooking good food. However, it wasn’t until I came across Christine’s books that I came to understand how different foods affect my health and body. I now  look at  fat in an entirely different way. I get such great satisfaction from the food I’m eating, and no longer feel deprived of sugar and grains. I have no need to snack between meals, because the high quality fat and grass-fed, organic protein keeps me full for much longer. I believe I couldn’t be making any better decisions about my health. If only someone had told me years ago to get off the low-fat bandwagon—at least I have the right information now, thanks to Christine! Mardi Ramsay, Mother of two I’m just blown away by the myths being blown apart by Christine’s findings. She has explained it so clearly, succinctly and powerfully that I just raved to my husband and family about the fat fallacy and the dangers of sugar and cholesterol-lowering medication. I’m so excited about the positive benefits of Christine’s Fat Revolution that I have thrown out the margarine and will be replacing it with butter as of tomorrow! Christine, thank you for giving me the facts, for blowing apart the myths and for giving me hope for a healthier, happier future for me and my family! I will be urging everyone to get it and join the revolution! Melpomene Selemidis, teacher, writer, fitness leader, and mother

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The Fat Revolution WHY BUTTER AND REAL FATS ACTUALLY MAKE US

slim. . .

And why the vilification of fat was the biggest health blunder in history

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Disclaimer All the information contained within this publication are of the nature of general comment only, and are not in any way recommended as individual advice. The intent is to offer a variety of information to provide a wider range of choices now and in the future, recognising that we all have widely diverse circumstances and viewpoints. Should any reader choose to make use of the information contained herein, this is their decision, and the author and publishers do not assume any responsibilities whatsoever under any conditions or circumstances. It is recommended that the reader obtain their own independent advice.

FIRST EDITION 2012 Š Purple lotus Publishing All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission from the publisher. National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication entry: Cronau, Christine. The Fat Revolution: Why butter and real fats actually make us slim 1st ed. Includes index. ISBN 9780980878745 (hbk.) 1. Health 2. Weight loss. 3. Nutrition 613.25 Published by Purple Lotus Publishing Moggill, Qld, 4070 Email: purplelotuspublishing@iinet.net.au For further information about orders: Email: purplelotuspublishing@iinet.net.au Proofreading by Julia Bruce Layout and typesetting by Siobhan Skipworth [shesasheep.com] Cover design by Ingrid Arna Cover photography by Chris Johnston, Arjoh Photography Printed and bound by McPhersons Printing [www.mcphersonsprinting.com.au]

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Contents

Dedication Foreword by Paul J. Rosch, MD, FACP Foreword by Dr Graham Lyttle, DO, ND, MSc, DC et al. Introduction The Fat Revolution The Demonisation of Fat and Cholesterol Chapter 1

Diet and fat: the biggest health blunder in history How experts keep a dead hypothesis alive Chapter 3 But what about her cholesterol? Chapter 4 The real culprits behind heart disease Chapter 5 Premature ageing—why we are getting older faster Chapter 2

Our Natural Diet Our natural diet: Did we evolve to eat plants or meat? Chapter 7 Clint Robinson—an inspiring story Chapter 8 Butter and coconut oil—super foods Chapter 9 Have your cake and eat it Chapter 10 Healthy children Chapter 6

Weight loss

Chapter 11 What made us fat Chapter 12 Exercise is unnecessary for weight loss Chapter 13 Easy weight loss—the real story

More myths exposed Chapter 14 Eleven more myths shattered

Conclusion

Common questions Last words References and Credits Index

viii ix x 1 2 7 8 13 20 29 40 44 45 57 61 68 72 79 80 90 99 110 111 123 124 128 129 147

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Dedication I dedicate this book to my family, who inspire me daily; my beautiful husband Randall and my gorgeous children Zac and Anna. I dedicate this book also to all my readers, who continually inspire me with their stories of their lifechanging triumphs with their health, wellbeing and their weight. And, for their ongoing dedication to spreading the message further, to their loved ones and anyone else they know. And to the scientists, doctors, naturopaths and other healers who have dared to be different; to speak the truth, despite the sheer force behind conventional thinking. And to the medical professionals who, when presented the evidence for the first time, have the courage and the open-mindedness to change their thinking.

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Foreword by Paul J. Rosch, MD, FACP President, The American Institute of Stress Clinical Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry, New York Medical College Honorary Vice President, International Stress Management Association Advising someone to eat more fat to lose weight and prevent heart disease might sound pretty preposterous. Everyone knows that a gram of fat has nine calories, over twice as much as a gram of protein or carbohydrate, and that the more calories you consume, the more pounds you will pile on. Yet, the fact is that eating more fat and less carbohydrate is the best way to shed extra weight. This was vividly demonstrated by William Banting over 150 years ago in his Letter on Corpulence Addressed to the Public. His experience has been corroborated over the past few decades in Pennington’s DuPont or ‘Holiday’ Diet, Taller’s Calories Don’t Count, Stillman’s The Doctor’s Quick Weight Loss Diet, Tarnower’s The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet, Atkins’ Diet Revolution, Agatstson’s South Beach Diet and other variations. The Atkins diet was on the New York Times best seller list for four years, and so many million copies were sold preaching the opposite of what the government was promoting, that he was forced to defend his views in Congressional hearings and attempts were made to revoke his license. Similarly, the theory that eating saturated fat and cholesterol rich foods like butter and eggs raises blood lipids, which then precipitate out into the lining of coronary arteries where they accumulate and eventually restrict or completely block blood flow to vital heart muscle seems to make sense, since it is easy to visualize. However, none of this is true, and the fallacious fatty food ® high cholesterol pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis has been accurately described by one eminent authority as ‘The greatest scam in the history of medicine.’ But if it is so erroneous, how did it start and why has it persisted? As Christine points out, it began with Nicolai Anitschkov’s studies over 100 years ago, showing that force-feeding rabbits cholesterol produced atherosclerotic lesions. However, rabbits are herbivores, and these results could not be reproduced in carnivorous animals or humans. The fatty food hypothesis got a big boost from Ancel Keys famous Seven Country Study in the middle of the last century, which allegedly proved a straight-line relationship between cholesterol consumption and deaths from coronary heart disease. The problem with this is that Keys had data from 21 countries and had cherry-picked only seven that supported his theory. Had he included all the countries, no such correlation would have been shown, and had he selected seven others, he would have arrived at the opposite conclusion. More recently, the World Health Organization’s MONICA (Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease), an enormous epidemiologic study of more than seven million men and women from 21 countries who were followed for ten years, found that all the countries in the top eight for fat consumption had lower death rates from heart disease than all the eight countries that ate the least fat. The French consumed three times the amount of saturated fat compared to Azerbaijan but had one-eighth the rate of heart disease. You may wonder why, if despite the above and additional damning evidence, the fatty food hypothesis has persisted. The answer is very simple, ‘Follow the Money’. The cholesterol cartel of manufacturers of low-fat foods, lipid lowering drugs and testing equipment want to preserve their billions of dollars in profits. And their stranglehold on regulatory bodies, legislators, academia, prestigious medical journals, organizations, physicians and the media, who have been the recipients of their largesse, is so powerful, that things are not likely to change. It is difficult to get contrary views published, and any opponents quickly find their funding is cut off or are viciously persecuted. Although there are other books dealing with various aspects of this topic, this meaty book not only provides a concise summary of the problem targeted to a lay audience, but also offers valuable advice on dietary and other recommendations that can reduce your risk for heart disease. Dr Paul J. Rosch

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Foreword by Dr Graham Lyttle, DO, ND, MSc, DC et al. Back in the 1960’s, the NSW Egg Board promoted the slogan—‘eat an extra egg a day’ and continued right up until the cholesterol scare campaign, driven mainly by the Heart Foundation’s reaction, and their idea that ‘fat produces fat’. It wasn’t long before the media joined in and the old poor innocent egg yolk was found guilty, without fair trial, of producing plaque (arthrosclerosis), so the old chook egg got the chop through no fault of its own. Butter, cream and even coconut oil were next, all looked on with suspicion; big chemical companies were very quick to fill the gap with artificial plastic-like table and cooking margarines, which in themselves were far worse than the natural substances they were replacing. My father is 101 and has eaten every bit of fat he can lay his hands on all his life. As kids we joined him in ‘bread-n-dripping’ with pepper and salt, often with bubble and squeak (left over vegetables fried in butter). Dad’s cholesterol is ‘normal to high’, he has not lost his mind, in fact, he as sharp as two tacks and still licks up every bit of cream and fat off his lamb roast as well as consuming large doses of antioxidants and mineral foods (barley greens). Unfortunately, my 90-year-old mother took ‘doctors advice’ with all their drugs, including cholesterol-lowering drugs, and she now suffers with severe dementia and many other major health conditions. I have been in a health practice for over 40 years, my cholesterol is also very good and in ‘normal range’; how is that possible when I eat three to four eggs every day, lots of quality olive oil and sesame oil, and have coconut cream in my black coffee? I regularly advise people to avoid the pitfalls of cholesterol-lowering drugs, protect their bodies from fat-reducing diets, maintain good exercise and deep breathing, keep their body alkaline and liver in a very healthy state. I also advise them to ask their doctor for tests to check these key important markers of chronic heart disease:

1. High homocystine levels 2. Coenzyme Q10 stores (which statins and drugs help to deplete) 3. Elevated levels of platelet-activating-factor and thromboxane A2 4. High levels of Free Radicals in the bloodstream that attack artery walls 5. Total cholesterol and HDL/LDL ratio, not just lowering ‘bad’ LDL. 6. Lp(a) a plaque forming lipid that attaches itself to oxidized phospholipids. Christine’s book is well over due; the public needs every bit of help they can get to assist them to break free from this big fat cholesterol lie. I encourage readers to enjoy this book, to find quality advice from a good experienced health care provider or medical doctor who has bravely rejected the pharmaceutical industry’s cholesterollowering drug propaganda. Request the above blood tests, eat wisely, reduce obesity and protect the most important thing you don’t ever wish to lose—your mind, your brain, nerves and heart— they all need good fats! Dr Graham Lyttle, Naturopath, Osteopath, DO, ND, MSc, DC, FIMCA, MANPA, CAcp. MIBPA. PhD (cand)

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Introduction

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The Fat Revolution Why a revolution? Why put my time and energy into this movement? Because the MAJORITY of women (and many men) struggle with weight, when there is a simple solution. When I know it isn’t difficult. When I know we are being fattened like cattle. How do they fatten cows? With fatty foods? No! With grain. We have the wrong information and it means we are always fighting a losing battle. Because people diagnosed with heart disease often receive exactly the WRONG advice. Our loved ones are dying because of misinformation. Isn’t that worth an investigation? Because we are suffering from man-made disease, chronic illnesses that are completely preventable. In Australia, one in two will get cancer, one in four currently has diabetes, and someone dies from heart disease every ten minutes. Not to mention all the other man-made ailments cropping up, such as sports injuries (from connective tissue breakdown), chronic fatigue and autoimmune diseases just to name a few. Is current dietary advice effective? Despite medical advances, the incidence of disease is growing at an alarming rate. The medical profession is brilliant at handling trauma, but their health advice isn’t working. Because children’s natural brilliance is being dimmed. Even ten years ago, a much smaller percentage of children suffered from learning disabilities, behaviour issues, and other problems. Today, en masse, children struggle with gross motor skill, focus and energy. And, I’m just going to say it; their IQ is a fraction of what it should be. And, we now have the first generation expected to die before their parents. That means, five to ten years before we die, we have to watch our children die? Our looks are changing too! Our natural human blueprint is beautiful (we are all meant to be attractive). Because of major changes in western nutrition, our faces are changing. For example, large foreheads, eyes too close together, under bites, over bites, crooked teeth (yes, because of nutritional deficiencies), lopsided ears, and more. Adelle Davis, a nutrition writer, recognised this problem back in the 50s, and it isn’t getting any better. Our children should be a picture of health. Many don’t look well and have dark circles under their eyes, but the answer is simple. What’s the problem? The problem is that we are misinformed about the most fundamental of issues—what we eat. In many cases, it’s simply a matter of mistaken consensus. We’ve all been told fat makes us fat. We’ve all been told that fat causes heart disease and stroke. What if this theory was never based on fact, but has been accepted because it’s the consensus of the majority? What if, like the award winning science journalist Gary Taubes says, ‘it has all been a big fat lie’? And, what if saturated fat has been replaced with substances that do make us sick—and fat!

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Why this book? Many people are under the mistaken impression that authors sometimes push a particular idea just so they can sell a book. Unfortunately, authors rarely make money from books. So, why do we do it? In many cases, because we have something very important to share. In this case, because of my own life experience, and the ten years of research that followed, I feel obligated to share what I’ve learned so others can benefit. There are some very important, little known facts about diet, fat, exercise, heart-disease and other diseases that people need to know. There is something seriously wrong with what we are currently doing. Thirty years ago, the public was asked to reduce fat intake from 40 per cent to 30 per cent. We were also advised to swap saturated fats for margarine and polyunsaturated vegetable oils. Statistics now show that we have reduced our fat consumption to 30 per cent, and butter consumption has steadily been going down since the 1920s. Intake of vegetable oils has steadily risen. So, why then, is heart disease such an issue? Why is type II diabetes more prevalent? Why are the rates of obesity sky-rocketing? Modern disease has reached crisis point; we will shortly be completely overwhelmed with the aftermath of what I call the biggest health blunder in the 21st century. Conventional medicine would like us to believe that it is because we don’t eat enough vegetables, we don’t move enough, we smoke too much, and we drink too much. Actually, they would like to tell us that it is our fault. But, the answer is much simpler than that, and it isn’t our fault at all.

Are you worried about your high cholesterol? Do you avoid butter, cheese and cream because you are afraid of dying from a heart attack? Do you take a cholesterol lowering drug? If so, you are a victim of the cholesterol campaign, the greatest medical scandal in modern times. Even worse, you may suffer from bad memory, muscle weakness, pain in your legs, sexual impotency or cancer, not because you are getting old, but because of the harmful effects from your cholesterol treatment. Uffe Ravnskov, MD, PhD, Ignore the Awkward!

I had the good fortune to become financially independent through my investments a few years ago, so I have the luxury of being able to spread my message without financial benefit. For the reader, this means I have no ulterior motive, which is rare in the health industry; I can provide uncensored information.

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INTRODUCTION

When health recommendations come from organisations that receive money, are sponsored, or receive licence fees from big business, then I believe we need to seriously question those recommendations. Unfortunately, most of our health mandates come from exactly these types of organisations. The current conventional dietary guidelines benefit any number of large corporations. The facts in this book benefit no one, except maybe our farmers who are currently grossly underpaid. I have said, and I will continue to say, if anyone has any evidence to prove my claims to be wrong, please feel free to come forward and present it. I would love to look at it. So far, nobody has come forward and there is a very good reason for that. There simply isn’t any credible evidence supporting the majority of current ‘health’ and dietary recommendations. The statement that ‘everyone knows saturated fat causes heart disease’ is not evidence. Anyone trying to defend this theory needs to supply facts from a full, publicly available scientific study that has not been conducted by a food company or other interested party. There simply is no such study. When ‘studies’ have been funded by anyone benefiting from the result, they aren’t credible. The true scientific, clinical trials show time and time again that fat is not the demon it has been made out to be, that saturated fat does not cause heart disease, and that it is actually essential for good health. A few government establishments (in the U.S.) have attempted for years to prove that saturated fat is the unequivocal cause of heart disease by evaluating all the available studies and they have failed. However, that message never gets to the public. When they fail, they don’t inform us they were wrong; they just sweep the results under the rug, and pretend it never happened. Some researchers try to explain away their results because they don’t fit the accepted theory, even though the results are clear. However, many researchers have accepted the obvious results. Researchers conducting the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study concluded, ‘With our results added to the pool of evidence from large-scale prospective cohort studies on dietary fat, disease and mortality, traditional dietary guidelines concerning fat intake are thus generally not strongly supported.’ And Michael Oliver, Director of the Wynn Institute for Metabolic Research, strongly recommended that national and international advisory bodies take recent findings into consideration, and said, ‘Not to do so may be ethically unacceptable.’ But these recommendations have been ignored by the majority of conventional health organisations. I believe that our health today is in such a state, and the evidence supporting the information in this book is so strong, that every health professional with the opposing view should at least investigate and consider the possibility. I do believe, however, that the tide is turning, and soon, those supporting the old, outdated information will realise the mistake. There is now so much evidence to the contrary, and more and more credible people are speaking out. The currently accepted theories have already started to fall and, with enough time, it will become astonishingly clear that it was all a fallacy.

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Here are some juicy facts before we get started: ◆◆

You can eat as much fat as you want, and never gain weight (I am not kidding).

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You can eat as much saturated fat as you want and never gain weight (again, not kidding).

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Saturated fat consumption does not cause heart disease. In fact, many studies show it actually protects us from heart disease. Saturated fat consumption does not affect our blood cholesterol levels. High levels of cholesterol do not put us at high risk for heart disease; in fact, more than half the people with heart disease don’t have high cholesterol. In addition, low cholesterol is linked to depression, cancer, and serious illness. Cholesterol is essential for healthy cell function, brain function, and many other vital processes.

It may seem impossible, but these are simple facts. When I first discovered this, I was very sceptical; in fact, I rejected it completely. But, the more I researched, I found the evidence undeniable. Saturated fat is a healthy and natural part of our diet. At age 41, people often ask me to share my secrets for looking so youthful. Eating fat is one of them. When we remove fat from our diet, we get fat, we get sick, and we age much faster than we should. Not only do we need the fat in our diet to keep us healthy, when we reduce fat, we increase the foods that are making us fat and sick. And, we don’t have to exercise hard to burn it off. I love exercise, but when it comes to weight loss, it is completely unnecessary! For those who think you have to work hard to get results, think again. It is about the food we eat, not how much we do. When we constantly fatten ourselves, no matter how much exercise we do, the result is the same. Weight loss is simple and easy with the right diet. In addition to exposing fat and cholesterol myths, I will also shatter a long list of other diet and exercise myths. Our current dietary and exercise recommendations are a lot of hard work. Find out why we can stop listening. Find out why it is actually in our best interest to stop listening. We can enjoy our bacon and eggs again; we can eat butter, and lots of it. We can savour our food without worrying about how much we are eating, how many calories it has, or how long we have to exercise to work it off. There are a lot of inconvenient truths out there, but this one is convenient. . .and a whole lot of fun!

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INTRODUCTION

In addition to coconut oil and other fats, I eat over 100 g of butter every day

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The Demonisation of Fat and Cholesterol

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Part 1 : The Demonisation of Fat and Cholesterol

Chapter

1

Diet and fat: the biggest health blunder in history As Tom Naughton says in the brilliant documentary, Fat head—You’ve been fed a load of bologna, ‘If you could pack all of human history into one year, we’ve only been farming and eating grains since about yesterday, which is when we became shorter and fatter. We only started consuming processed vegetable oils about ten minutes ago, which is when heart disease became our number one killer, so after examining all this human history, the ‘experts’ came to the obvious conclusion. We need to eat a lot more [grains and processed vegetable oils]. And so they convinced us that human health depends on foods that we didn’t eat for more than 99 per cent of our entire human existence.’

How did this happen? Where did the idea come from that would consequently turn our diet completely upside down? The idea was lipid hypothesis, also known as the cholesterol hypothesis or the diet-heart hypothesis, and it only came into play in the 1950s, so it is a very new idea. What few people know is that we ate plenty of fat back in the 1800s, and prior to that, for the entire history of humanity. Fat and protein were staple foods, which provided energy and long-lasting sustenance. In fact, many indigenous communities would never kill a lean animal, unless it was a difficult period like a drought; it was considered a waste. Even in the wild, large carnivorous The idea that a little extra animals eat the fatty parts and the organ meats of their cholesterol in the blood prey and leave the lean muscle meat for the scavengers. should result in a deadly And heart disease was practically non-existent. When disease seemed to me did it raise its ugly head? The first documented case just as silly as to claim that of heart disease was in 1926, described by Dr James yellow fingers cause lung Herrick in the United States. In addition, the World Health cancer, or that burning Organisation statistics on death rates (1900 to now) houses are set on fire by didn’t even include any heart-disease deaths until 1948. the fire brigade. I didn’t That doesn’t mean they didn’t exist, but heart disease pay much attention to certainly wasn’t on the radar at that point. Evidence the Framingham report, suggests that heart disease started cropping up in the because I thought that early 1900s, and was well and truly on the rise by the such foolish ideas would 1920s and 30s. What changed between the late 1800s soon be disproved by and the 1900s? Sugar consumption doubled between more intelligent scientists. 1890 and 1920. And, the first soft-drink and confectionery Sadly, I was wrong. Uffe companies were formed in the early 1920s. Coincidence? Ravnskov, MD, PhD, I think not. Diabetes was also non-existent in the 1800s, Ignore the Awkward! but Diabetes deaths in the U.S. increased more than four times between 1900 and 1920. 8

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Part 1 : The Demonisation of Fat and Cholesterol

In addition, many people eating low-fat diets have cholesterol levels that are sky-high. And more than half of those who suffer heart attacks have low or normal cholesterol levels. How do the ‘experts’ explain away these anomalies? With ridiculous statements like this:

Why has this man, with no risk factors for heart disease, had a heart attack? — Because he is genetically susceptible. — By what evidence can you support your statement that he is genetically susceptible? Oh, don’t you see that he has had a heart attack, although he has no risk factors? So he must be genetically susceptible. Dr Malcolm Kendrick, The Great Cholesterol Con

We ask the butcher not to trim the fat off our meat

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Part 2 : Our Natural Diet

Miranda Kerr takes 4 tsp coconut oil daily

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Unlike polyunsaturated oils, the short- and medium-chain fatty acids (found in butter and coconut oil), are sent directly to our liver and used immediately for energy. One study described medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil as ‘weight loss agents’. Medium-chain fatty acids: 1. Are used for instant energy, and not stored in fat cells (like long chain fatty acids). Because of the way they are metabolised, they produce ketones, which give us an immediate energy boost. 2. Enhance fat burning (thermogenesis). People consuming coconut oil burn fat at a higher rate. 3. Enhance metabolism (burn more fuel). 4. Suppress appetite. Consuming coconut oil eliminates food cravings, because of increased feelings of satiety. In studies where subjects are fed exactly the same amount of fat, the group fed the medium-chain fatty acids lost significantly more weight. Studies also show that when two groups are fed a regular diet (not designed for weight loss), the ones consuming medium-chain fatty acids lose weight, while weight in the other groups remains unchanged. Studies comparing diets including three types of fat intake (low-fat, monounsaturated oils, and coconut oil) showed a 60 per cent reduction in fat storage for the groups consuming coconut oil. The low-fat group and the monounsaturated group both stored more fat. When people start taking coconut oil in large doses, some have an adverse reaction; they might get diarrhoea and feel extremely full. This problem can be alleviated by starting out with a smaller dose and then building up. Coconut oil can be taken on the spoon, but it can also be mixed into food so it is more palatable.

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Part 3 : Weight Loss

Chapter

11

What made us fat There is a very simple reason why so many people struggle with their weight. It can be quite annoying that we have all been led down the garden path for so long, believing that only the genetically ‘blessed’ could have the perfect weight, or that we need to eat like birds. Actually, that is a bad analogy. My native baby birds eat like pigs; they are absolutely insatiable, so even birds eat plenty. We don’t need to under-eat or eat boring, tasteless, flavourless foods (without fat) to achieve a great body weight. Hate dieting? You can say goodbye to dieting forever. You can eat as much as you want—and look the way you want. I never go hungry, and I eat plenty—as much as I feel like. I never, ever skimp or think about whether I am eating too much. Never. Is there a trick? Do you need to sign up to a plan? Is it going to be hard work? Maybe you have to exercise six hours a day like they do on popular weight-loss shows? No trick! And what if I told you that you don’t need to exercise at all to lose weight? OK, there must be a trick somewhere, right? No, it is simple once we take away the foods that fatten us. You can eat all the saturated fat you want and not exercise? Are you getting excited yet? Here is a little history of why it is not how much we are eating or how much we are doing; the culprit behind excess fat is something else.

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When did we start getting fat? Like I mentioned previously, our food changed between the late 1800s and the early 1900s, which coincided with the birth of soda and confectionery companies and processed vegetable oil. At the same time, diabetes, heart disease and other afflictions started their dramatic increase, along with obesity. In the early 1930s, after her arrival in America, Hilde Bruch, a German paediatrician, said ‘I was startled by the large number of fat children, really fat ones, not only in clinics, but on the street and subways, and in schools.’ Now in case you are tempted to think these kids were eating too much, Hilde’s observation was made in the middle of the great depression. In fact, there is a strong link between the poor, malnutrition and obesity. How could that be? It is not the volume of food making us fat, but the type of food changing the way our body metabolises and stores fat. The foods most readily available to the poor are cheap: white flour, sugar, margarine and cheap vegetable oils; all foods that didn’t exist for the majority of human history. Eggs and meats are expensive. A great example is the Pima people in the late 1800s, which had previously been one of the most affluent Native American tribes in the U.S., but became extremely poor after settlers moved in, diverted the river and over-hunted. The Pima became reliant on government rations, which consisted of large portions of processed flour and sugar. They were hard workers, were under-nourished, under-fed, and yet still fat. Not just fat—obese. Their traditional foods had been replaced by refined, Western foods. Examples of malnutrition coupled with obesity are widespread, from the early 1900s until now, including many hard working poor (most doing hard labour), from all over the world. The experts recognised this important link back in the 1970s, and often referred to obesity as a form of malnutrition. In fact, those observations are still continuing today. Benjamin Caballero, head of the Center for Human Nutrition at Johns Hopkins University, described a visit to a clinic in Brazil where he was shocked to see obese mothers in the clinic with small, undernourished children. This is why I keep saying that even though our children might look well fed, they are actually malnourished. They aren’t getting the food they need; their food might make them fat, but doesn’t nourish their cells.

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Part 3 : Weight Loss

Why reduced-calorie, low-fat diets don’t work If we have a strong link between obesity and under-eating, why does conventional wisdom tell us to reduce our caloric intake? Especially with all the research that shows it doesn’t work. Studies continue to show that when women under-eat they do lose a small percentage of weight; however, they actually lose muscle and gain fat. Even though they think they have lost a few pounds, they have, in actual fact, gained fat. And, the weight normally returns as soon as they stop dieting (more fat). If we starve enough, we will eventually waste away; we lose fat and muscle. But, is that an acceptable way to go through the world? Continually starving, hoping to lose a few pounds? And, if our body starves, it goes into preservation mode. It stores everything it can, and as soon as the ‘starvation’ is over, it quickly breathes a sigh of relief, and stores everything else it can to get ready for the next time. This is why we have a billion-dollar weight loss industry; we keep coming back for more because we don’t have a solution.

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Conclusion

Last words I hope that by now, you are less concerned with your fat intake, and actually inspired to increase it without worrying about your waistline or your health. It can be frustrating that we have been led astray for so long and that so many of the health choices we thought were right were actually detrimental, but it is never too late to make a change. Our bodies heal once we give them a chance, and children especially bounce back very quickly once we give them the right fuel. I am continually inspired by the many success stories, comments, praise and thanks that I receive from my readers, and I can only hope that I continue to create positive changes with your health, weight and lifestyle. Your success and health is what motivates me to continue my work. Together I believe we can make powerful changes to the health industry and revolutionise the way we think about fat, food and wellness. My best wishes to you all.

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Permissions The author thankfully acknowledges permission to print excerpts from the following books and movies: The Great Cholesterol Con: The Truth about What Really Causes Heart Disease and How to Avoid It, by Malcolm Kendrick. Copyright © 2007. Reprinted by permission of John Blake Publishing. Fat and Cholesterol are GOOD for You!, by Uffe Ravnskov, M.D., PhD. Copyright © 2009. Reprinted by permission of Dr Uffe Ravnskov. Fat Head: You’ve been fed a load of bologna!, by Tom Naughton. Copyright ©2010. Reprinted by permission of Tom Naughton. Ignore the Awkward!, by Uffe Ravnskov, MD, Phd. Copyright © 2010. Reprinted by permission of Dr Uffe Ravnskov. Science for Smart People, by Tom Naughton. Copyright ©2010. Reprinted by permission of Tom Naughton. Suicide by Sugar: A Startling Look at Our #1 National Addiction, by Nancy Appleton and G. N. Jacobs. Copyright © 2009. Reprinted by permission of Square One Publishers. The author thankfully acknowledges permission to print excerpts from the following articles: Health Freedom News. Reprinted by permission of the National Health Federation. ‘Lies. Damned Lies, and Medical Science’, The Atlantic. Reprinted by permission of Author David H. Freedman, Contributor of The Atlantic, Scientific American, The N.Y. Times, Discover, and Inc. ‘What if there was a cure for Alzheimer’s disease and no one knew?’ Reprinted by permission of Author Mary Newport, M.D., coconutketones.com

Illustration credits Portrait shots of Christine Cronau © Chris Johnston, Arjoh Photography Fitness shots of Christine Cronau © James Pitman, Photoevents Miranda Kerr © Rex Features/Tim Carrafa Anonomous actress © Rex Features/Heining Anonomous nutritionist © Rex Features/ITV Young African boys © iStockphoto.com/ManoAfrica Nigella Lawson © iStockphoto.com/EdStock Toddler © iStockphoto.com/LaArtist Young girl with crooked teeth ©Palmer Kane LLC Crooked teeth © Elena Stepanova Stevia © Dario Sabljak Honey © Subbotina Anna Young woman on a diet © Doreen Salcher Clint Robinson, Olympic win © Newspix/Phil Hillyard

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Index acute thrombosis · 37 Adelle Davis · 2, 47 ADHD · 73 –74 adrenal glands · 37, 91–92 agave syrup · 35, 70 ageing · 29, 35, 40–42, 118, 121 agriculture · 47, 49–50, 120 alcohol · 125 allergies · 52, 72, 85, 121 dairy · 121 aluminium · 117 Alzheimer’s · 18, 64–65, 117 anaemia · 71, 121 Ancel Keys · 9–11, 13, 15, 17, 20 animal fat · 2–6, 8–34, 36–39, 40–75, 77, 99–100, 111–112 antioxidants · 61, 69 arteries · 11, 13, 23, 32, 36–37, 61, 111 artificial sweeteners · 71 asthma · 56, 72 atherosclerosis · 13, 37–38, 64 athletes · 38, 57–59, 90, 92, 95 endurance · 92 enhanced performance · 64 autism · 64 autoimmune disease · 2, 116, 121 biotin · 69 bloating · 54, 70–71, 83, 92, 113, 121 blood pressure · 25, 27, 35–36, 38, 117 bone loss · 34–35, 51, 117, 121 bone strength · 46, 56, 61, 95–96, 121 bowel cancer · 112–113 brain development · 20, 29, 72–73 brain function · 56, 64, 71–73, 104, 117 bran · 53, 112 bread · 36, 46, 52–55, 59, 65, 73, 75, 83–85, 89, 112–113 breast cancer · 116 breathing · 37–38, 91–92, 96, 98 brown rice syrup · 69 butter · 3, 5–6, 8, 10, 17, 23, 29, 31–36, 43, 55–56, 59, 61–67, 72, 75, 83, 88, 99, 101, 114–115, 124–125 calcium · 35, 56, 61, 75, 114, 116, 121 calories · 70–71, 85, 90, 95, 100 cancer · –3, 5, 10–12, 14–15, 19, 29, 34–35, 46, 60–61, 71, 112–113, 116, 120 bowel · 112–113 skin · 118–120 candida · 63, 106, 106 canola oil · 30–31, 111 carbohydrates · 14, 26, 40, 43, 46, 48, 56, 64–65, 70, 83–84, 88, 95, 99–104, 115, 125 are they essential? · 104, 114 centenarians · 50 cereal · 36, 39, 48, 73, 83, 88, 112–113, 120

children ADHD · 73–74 brain · 20, 29, 72–73 energy · 7, 72 failure to thrive · 116 focus · 2, 72–73 healthy birthday parties · 77 IQ · 2, 73 learning · 2, 29, 34–35, 72–73, 121 life-span · 2, 39, 45, 72 meal ideas · 75 puberty · 116 sugar · 72–75 transitioning to healthy food · 74–78 vegetables · 75 chips · 32, 75–77, 111 cholecystokinin (CCK) · 83, 86 cholesterol · 3, 5, 10–28, 33–37, 46, 50, 61–64, 122 dangers of low cholesterol · 26 Friedewald formula · 22–23 HDL, 25–27, 36, 38 Iranian formula · 23 large and fluffy · 26 LDL · 22, 25–27, 38 oxidised · 37, 122 parameters · 21–22 small and dense · 26 tests · 21–27 drugs · 3, 11, 14, 19, 21–22 triglycerides · 22, 26, 36 cholesterol hypothesis · 8–16 cholesterol-lowering drugs · 3, 11, 14, 19, 21–22 chronic fatigue · 2, 53–54, 58, 85, 91, 95, 121 recovery · 58–59 Clint Robinson · 57–60 coconut oil · 12, 17, 23, 29, 31–32, 43, 49, 55–56, 61–67, 72, 75, 83–84, 99 digestion · 62 fat burner · 65 gall bladder · 62 immune system · 63 neurological disorders · 64 thyroid · 63 viruses · 63 weight loss · 65–67 coconut sugar · 70 coffee · 101, 102, 106 collagen · 35, 40–42 constipation · 35, 107–108, 112, 121 fibre—friend or foe · 112–113 magnesium · 107, 113, 116 cortisol · 37–38, 65, 92–93 depression · 5, 20, 26, 37, 91, 117–118, 121 dextrose · 71 diabetes · 2–3, 8, 18, 29, 35–36, 81, 104, 120 diets · 81–83, 95

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Conclusion

dietary guidelines · 4, 114, 120 diet-heart hypothesis · 8–16 digestion · 29,53–54 endocrine function · 116 epilepsy · 64 Epstein Barr virus · 58 Ethiopians · 46 excercise adrenal glands · 90–93 benefits · 95 best forms · 96 bone strength · 96 cardiovascular · 93–94 martial arts · 96 muscle mass · 96 muscle recovery · 96 personal trainers · 96 stretching · 98 weight-bearing · 96 weight loss · 90–94 Fat · 2–6, 8–34, 36–39, 40–75, 77, 99–109, 111–119, 121–122 bone health · 56 brain development · 56 burning for energy · 102–105 calories · 95 detoxification · 56 fullness hormones · 56, 83, 85–86, 95 hormones · 20, 56 how much? · 56 immune system · 56, 61–63 liver health · 56 lung health · 56 monounsaturated · 30, 36, 65–67, 111–112 polyunsaturated · 3, 10, 31, 36, 65–67 fat soluble vitamins · 61, 114 fibre · 112–113 flatulence · 113 insoluble · 112–113 soluble · 113 flatulence · 113 food allergies · 52, 72, 85, 121 food labels deciphering · 126 food myths · 111–122 formaldehyde · 69 free radicals · 29, 31–33, 40, 61, 69, 77 fructose · 34–37, 49, 51–52, 68–71, 85–86, 95, 117 agave syrup · 70 fruit · 49, 59, 84, 86 how much? · 100 fruit · 49, 59, 75, 84, 86 when to eat · 59, 101 fullness hormones · 56, 83, 85–86, 95 gall bladder · 62 gas · 113 ghrelin · 86 glucose · 34–35, 38, 51–52, 55, 64, 71, 84, 86–88, 102–104, 115 does the brain need it? · 64, 104

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glycaemic index · 70 glycogen · 84, 102–104, 106 grain · 8, 40, 42, 48, 49–50, 52–55, 62–63, 84–85, 102–103,112–121 cancer, 112–113 processed, 15 toxicity, 53 whole, 53, 120 gut flora · 35, 52, 107, 112–113 heart disease · 2–5, 8–12, 14–18, 21, 24–39, 46, 49–50, 60–61, 64, 81, 120 high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) · 36 high-carbohydrate diet · 26, 38, 40, 43, 48–56, 59, 64, 83–84, 99, 104, 115 homogenisation · 121 honey · 68–69 hormones · 16, 20, 35, 56, 91, 118 hunterer-gatherers · 45–50, 104, 120 hydrogenation · 32–33 hypertension · 35, 46, 117 hypothyroidism · 116 immune system · 20, 26, 29, 34–35, 56, 61–63, 69, 72, 118 incontinence · 118 insulin · 49, 52, 71, 84, 86, 101, 104, 106 intolerances dairy · 121 Inuit · 45–46, 56, 104, 112–114 iodine · 61, 75, 114 IQ · 2, 73 iron · 48, 75, 114, 116, 121 isomalt · 70 Japanese · 49–50 stroke · 50 jaw shape · 46–47 ketoacidosis · 104 Ketogenic diet · 102–105 ketones · 67, 103–104 ketosis · 102–105 is it dangerous? · 104 kidney disease · 18, 35, 71, 117 Kitavans · 49–50 lactitol · 70 lard · 50, 75, 111 learning disorders · 35, 73–74 lecithin · 61, 75, 114 legumes toxicity · 54 leptin · 86 lipid hypothesis · 8–16 Liver health · 29, 34–35, 46, 56 longevity · 2, 39, 45, 72, 50 low-carb diet · 22–26, 45, 48–57, 64–65, 88, 100, 103, 109 constipation · 113 low-fat diet · 10–12, 17–18, 24–25, 42, 50, 53–56, 67, 82–83, 121, 126 low-fat milk added milk solids · 37, 122 Lustig · 85, 109

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macrobiotic diet · 41–42 magnesium · 107, 113, 116 malabsorption · 52–53, 70 malnutrition · 48, 62, 72, 81, 116 maltitol · 70 mannitol · 70 maple syrup · 69 margarine · 3, 8, 17, 29, 32–34, 36, 40, 61, 81, 111 Mediterranean diet · 30, 65 medium-chain fatty acids · 62–67 melanoma · 118–119 milk homogenised · 121 powdered · 37, 122 raw · 61, 121–122 solids · 37, 122 minerals · 35, 62, 69, 114 monounsaturated fats · 30, 36, 65–67, 111–112 mood · 5, 20, 26, 37, 91, 117–118, 121 muscle recovery · 64 tone · 95–96, 118 loss · 40, 82, 93, 106 myths · 111–122 neurological disorders · 64–65 niacin · 69 Nikolai Anitschkov · 13 nutraceuticals · 69 obesity · 3, 12, 29, 60, 71, 81–82, 86, 90, 120–121 oil smoking point · 31–32, 75 Okinawans · 49–50 olive oil · 23, 29–31, 112 omega- 3 fats · 29–31, 56, 73, 121 omega- 6 fats · 29, 121 organic · 56, 60, 62, 73 paleo diet · 126 palm oil · 17, 77 pasteurisation · 61–62, 121 Persians · 46 pharmaceutical industry · 22, 27–28 phytic acid · 116 phytoestrogens · 116 Plasticisation · 32 polyunsaturated fats · 3, 10, 31, 36, 65–67 potato · 55, 75, 88 powdered milk · 37, 122 premature ageing · 29, 35, 40–42, 118, 121 primal societies · 45–50, 56, 104, 112–114, 120 exercise · 49, 90–92 sweet food · 68 protein · 8, 14, 40–43, 45, 47–56, 58, 63, 75, 104, 114–115 raw dairy · 61, 121–122 raw honey · 68–69 rectal bleeding · 121 reproductive organs · 29, 118 riboflavin · 69 rice · 50–55, 85, 120 rice syrup · 69

roughage · 112–113 salt · 117 blood pressure · 117 saturated fat · 2–34, 36–39, 40–75, 77, 80–89, 92, 99–109, 111–119, 121–122 sea salt · 117 seed oils · 3, 8, 17, 29–34, 36–38, 40, 63, 65, 81, 111, 119 Seven Country Study · 9, 50 short-chain fatty acids · 31, 61, 67 skin · 29, 34–35, 40–43, 118–120 care · 126 smoking point · 31–32, 75 sodium chloride · 117 Soft drink · 8, 36, 59 soy · 17, 42, 50, 54, 62–63, 116 fermented · 54 reduced libido · 116 toxicity · 54 starch · 40, 52–55, 70–71, 88 stevia · 68–69, 71, 78, 102–103, 106 stomach cramps · 121 stress · 37–38, 91, 98, 106 stretching, 91 stroke, 2, 11–19, 25, 36, 46, 50–51 studies · 10–25 sugar · 8–9, 15, 17, 26, 29, 34–38, 40–43, 48, 53, 55, 58–59, 63, 72–73, 75–76, 81–86, 100–104, 109, 113, 117, 124 addiction · 75, 124 sugar alcohol · 68–70 sun bathing · 119 sun exposure how much do we need? · 119–120 safest · 119 what time is best? · 119 sunburn · 119–120 sweeteners · 68 agave syrup · 70 artificial sweeteners · 71 brown rice syrup · 69 dextrose · 71 glucose · 71 healthy · 68 maple syrup · 69 raw honey · 69 stevia · 68 sweets eating with fat · 101 healthy · 68 teeth · 2, 46–47, 50–51, 61, 74 thiamine · 69 thrombosis · 37, 121 thyroid · 29, 61, 63, 116, 121 thyroid cancer · 116 tofu · 54, 116 tooth decay · 18, 35, 48, 51 toxins · 36, 53–54, 71, 107–113, 116 trans fats · 30–34, 119 UVB rays · 119

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Conclusion

UVA rays · 119–120 vegan diet · 20, 41–42, 45, 54–55 vegetable oil · 3, 8, 17, 29–34, 36–38, 40, 63, 65, 81, 111, 119 canola oil · 30–31 corn oil · 30 deep frying · 32, 75, 111 margarine · 3, 8, 17–18, 29, 32–34, 36, 40, 61, 81, 111 Mediterranean diet · 30, 65 monounsaturated · 30, 36, 65–67, 111–112 olive oil · 44 polyunsaturated · 3, 10, 31, 36, 65–67 skin damage · 119–120 smoking points · 31–32, 75 vegetables · 3, 40, 45–46, 49, 50, 55, 75, 84, 88, 104, 112–115, 120 do we need five to eight? · 114–115 potato · 121 vegetarian diet · 40–43, 45, 53, 55, 121 Vilhjalmur Stefansson · 46 viruses · 58, 63 vitamin A · 61, 75, 114 vitamin B · 69, 75, 114–115, 120, 121 vitamin C · 75, 108, 114, 121 vitamin D · 20, 34, 61, 75, 114, 118–120 vitamin E · 31, 61, 75, 114 vitamin K · 61–62, 75, 114 vitamins fat soluble · 61, 114 water how much to drink? · 117–118 weight gain · 29, 34–35, 52, 60, 70, 83–84, 92 carbohydrate · 83, 84 coffee · 106 constipation · 107 cortisol · 92–93, 105–106 digestion · 106–107 emotions · 108 overexercising · 105–106 stress · 106 weight loss · 5, 14, 25, 31, 55, 63–67, 80–109 burning fat for energy · 102–105 fast · 102 Weston Price · 46, 62 wheat · 46, 53, 85, 121 modern · 53 women and heart disease · 16 wrinkles · 20, 40–41 Wulzen factor · 61 xylitol · 70 yang · 91–93 yeast · 103, 106 yin · 91 zinc, 75, 114, 116, 121

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The Fat Revolution - A look inside  

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