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This Show Has No Title How are curators made? Louise Hobson is a young curator, whose first exhibition, Catherine Biocca, Cornelia Baltes, Rosalie Schweiker, at Swansea’s Mission Gallery, brought three artists together for the first time, with the support of the first Jane Phillips Award curatorial residency. She describes her curatorial journey to Emma Geliot. Emma Geliot: Who is Louise Hobson and what makes her tick? Louise Hobson: I’ve come to use the phrase ‘independent creative practitioner’ when asked what it is that I do. I work across and between the roles of curator, producer and artist, so neither feels quite right to offer as a definitive title. I see my position as that of an initiator, approaching the exhibition/event/project as a space constructed over time through a cumulative process of collaboration – a layering of conversations, ideas and actions. My curatorial practice is therefore not so much about the curator-artist-public triumvirate, but a more selfdetermined discursive form of practice, which continuously overlaps and intersects with other forms of practice in an ever-shifting cluster of changing elements. That last sentence seems a bit jumbled, but perhaps it’s appropriate for the messiness of cross-disciplinary working and the dual roles we assume to sustain practice. EG: Could you talk about what the Jane Phillips Award offered you, and how you used it as a starting point for something even more ambitious? LH: The award offered me a studio at Elysium Studios in Swansea for one month’s research and development; a £500 travel award to

support overseas research; and the proposition of a three-week slot in Mission Gallery’s programming March to April 2016, again with a budget of £500. Within this framework I applied to Wales Arts International to travel to New York and undertake a month long residency with Residency Unlimited and Flux Factory; and I approached the Arts Council of Wales for funding to build on the proposition of the show, and receive mentoring from Gavin Wade, director of Eastside Projects. This may sound all rather practical, however I’ve personally found that there can be a lack of transparency around the practicalities of production and the actions that contribute to the making of things – ‘things’ here being an exhibition and two associated events. When I began the residency in April 2015, I set out to understand what it means to curate a group exhibition within an institutional context. From researching to funding, emailing, explaining, travelling, persuading, budgeting, coordinating, adapting, collaborating, transporting, borrowing and reflecting – I wanted to make sense of the entire process. In many ways, the exhibition was a practical exercise. It’s show #1 for me, which is why, perhaps, I approached the artists I did with the open and honest proposition of the gallery space, three-week show, the budget and an ongoing conversation. I was aware of how small my invitation might seem and how, where I saw great potential, they might see risk.

Profile for CCQ magazine

CCQ magazine issue 9  

We have gone to Ghana with this issue where we have collaborated with Serge Attukwei Clottey and we spoke to the cultural visionary Nana Ofo...

CCQ magazine issue 9  

We have gone to Ghana with this issue where we have collaborated with Serge Attukwei Clottey and we spoke to the cultural visionary Nana Ofo...

Profile for ccqmag
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