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Chester County

Thursday

DECEMBER 22, 2011 147th YEAR - NO. 33

chestercountyindependent.com

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS Independent offices closed Monday

$1.00

St. Nick stops here

The offices of the Chester County Independent will be closed Monday, Dec. 26, in observance of Christmas Day. The deadline is noon this Friday, Dec. 23, to submit ALL ads and copy. Also, our offices will be c l o s e d Monday, Jan. 2, 2012, in observance of New Year’s Day.

Lifeline Blood Services coming to Henderson Dec. 23 There will be a December Blood Drive in Henderson that is open to the public from 12-6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 23, at "It Don't Matter," 549 Highway 45 Bi-Pass North.

Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling Dept closed Dec. 25 The Henderson Convenience Center, part of the Chester County Solid Waste and Recylcing Department will be closed on Christmas Day.

Chickasaw State Park hosts “First Day Hike” Chickasaw State Park will be hosting the “First Day Hike” of the year at 2 p.m. on Jan. 1, 2012. The guided hike along the Friends Trail will begin and end at the main parking lot near the swimming area. There will be a short program about the history of the park and upcoming 75th anniversary events prior to the hike. The hike concludes with a campfire at shelter number one with coffee, hot chocolate, and marshmallows. The hike will be approximately one and a half miles long and is classified as easy to moderate, as it does have a few hills. For more information, contact the park office at 989-5141.

3 Sections Life & Styles Opinion Right to Know Obituaries What’s Happening Sports Education Classifieds Santa Letters

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TODAY’S WEATHER

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Santa won’t have to guess where to land his sleigh at Nathan and Katie Saunders’ Beene Road home, as they have thoughtfully prepared a landing strip atop their roof, with easy access to the chimney, of course. Lights are twinkling across Chester County, with final touches still being added in some cases, all in preparation for Christmas festivities. From our family to yours, remember to stop and enjoy the magic in the gathering of family and friends.

Leadership Chester County: (Part 2 of a series) A government working to serve its people By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Being part of the Leadership Chester County class means exploring all areas of the county’s organization. The first session of development after the group gets to know one another is known as “Local Government.” In November, the 2012 class met with the Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling Center, Henderson Mayor Bobby King and City Recorder Jim Garland, Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton, and took a tour of the Chester County Justice Complex. It’s amazing what one can learn about one’s hometown. According to Solid Waste Director Danny Benard, Chester County has made great strides toward recycling during the past year. While Henderson has implemented citywide recycling pick up, and Chester County has five recycling convenience centers located throughout the county, disposal of solid waste is still a major concern monetarily. Dumping trash is expensive, but recycling helps the county save money in the long run. In 2010 alone, the county recycled 1,200 tons of trash that was destined for the landfill, saving thousands of dollars that simply would have been buried without a recycling program. This year, the county received a $282,000 recycling grant, which will help Chester County double its money from recycling. With the grant, Benard told the Leadership class, the county plans to build a new addition to the recycling center, and the extra space will allow the center to process the recycling of other cities and counties in West Tennessee. Benard stated that Chester County’s facility is slated to be a prototype for other recycling

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Leadership Chester County 2012 members Gloria Holliday and Joretta Ellison marvel at the amount of recycling Chester County collects. Recyclable plastic bottles, carboard and aluminum are valuable assets for the county, and because of the community’s dedication to recycling the local recycling center will soon become a hub for the region. centers. At the moment, the recycling center processes cardboard, paper, aluminum cans, batteries, oil, tires, and clothing. Following the Leadership class’ visit to the recycling center, it is important to understand how the city and county government works. Mayor Bobby King explained that the city is selfruled with a “weak” mayor whose authority is provided by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. At any point, King said, the board can change, take away or give more power to the mayor. The six elected aldermen chose the heads of the city’s departments. In turn, the department heads can hire and fire employees within their jurisdiction. King and City Recorder Jim Garland explained the roles that departments play in city government. Unfortunately, as is the nature of a monthly class, See CLASS, Page 3-A

Santa Claus wears a different suit - er, jersey By James A. Webb Editor in Chief

Santa Claus will arrive Sunday wearing his famous red suit, bearing gifts for all, and bringing cheer to the season. However, last week a Santa of a different sort came not wearing but bearing a crimson jersey, and left smiles all around in a Jacks Creek home. Former NFL player Kevin Turner played the role of surprise Santa at the Danny Vales home Thursday. Turner has Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, ALS, a condition commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, and Vales is afflicted with the disease also. The surprise visit by Turner left the Vales home uplifted and Vales’ wife said the visit “made our Christmas.”

“I told Mr. Turner we could not have had a better present for Christmas for my husband than what he gave us,” Teresa Vales said. “It was just so awesome having him come here to meet my husband. He was just a sweet person.” Danny Vales was diagnosed with ALS in June 2010. It progressed really fast in him, getting progressively worst, and within six months he could no longer walk. His voice was affected, and he has difficulty talking and swallowing. His wife has to do most common every day chores for him. ALS is a form of motor neuron disease characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy throughout the body caused by degeneration of the upper See VALES, Page 3-A


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

From Page 1-A

Vales and lower motor neurons. Those affected by the disease live a year or two, but with some, such as Turner, surviving 10-15 years or longer. Turner played college ball at Alabama and played eight seasons in the NFL for the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles throughout the 1990s. However, he suffered the second of his two career concussions while returning a kickoff for the Eagles against the Packers in 1997. After the hit he recalls not knowing what stadium he was in, but returned to the field a few series of plays later. However, the symptoms of ALS soon appeared, and Turner’s career in football was over. Since then it has been determined that professional football players have rates of ALS many times higher than the normal population, leading to speculation that it could be caused by brain trauma.

From Page 1-A

Class time ran out before all areas could be explained in depth. Leadership class members take an interest in their community and many questions go unanswered because time has a tendency to rush past. In the newly finished Criminal Justice Complex Sheriff Blair Weaver took the group on a tour. Beginning in the courtrooms, the Leadership class was privileged to see the inner workings of the jail from an outsider’s perspective. Having only been open since 2010, the 2012 Leadership class

Vales recently watched a country music video featuring Turner and Ty Herndon. “It was a really uplifting and beautiful song, and I thought if Danny could get a jersey signed by Turner it would be beautiful,” said Teresa Vales. She contacted Beth Baumgartner with the West Tennessee ALS organization which has a program to help families with Christmas wishes, hoping simply to get Turner to sign a jersey and send it to her husband. When a vehicle arrived at the Vales home Dec. 14, Teresa Vales was expecting someone from the West Tennessee ALS organization to simply be bringing the jersey from Turner. To her and her husband’s surprise, Turner himself emerged from the car. “We just talked about everyday struggles with ALS,” said Teresa Vales. “He was just an awesome guy. He gave a signed jersey, plus a game ball from the Dolphins’ and Eagles’ game on Oct. 20, 1996.” Teresa Vales describes some of the heartache experienced by those

afflicted with ALS. “Danny has always been very active. He was hurt on the job in 2005 and had to have back surgery. He has not worked since then. He was always very athletic and energetic. He always wanted to be outside doing something. “It’s been a big challenge. For a man to have to be in the role of protector provider, ALS is a hard thing to deal with. Danny has bad days, but his face lit up when he saw Turner. I was just expecting a jersey, not the whole man. That was a great thing. “The fact that he took time out to come all the way to Jacks Creek, not many people do that kind of thing anymore,” she said. “It was totally unexpected.” Turner, 41, might not have football anymore, but he insists that what he’s doing now is the most important thing he could do with his life. He is using his story and experience with medical professionals as a basis to move forward the conversation about the head injury risks of high-contact sports, such as football.

was second to take the tour of the state-of-the-art facility. Most law-abiding Chester Countians never have an opportunity to see the inside of the complex, but it is worth a visit for anyone who has the opportunity. The final stop of the local government day ended with a visit to Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton. Unlike the department heads in the city, county officials are all elected, Seaton explained. In September, Chester County had an unemployment rate of 10.1 percent, which was the best in the state of Tennessee, Seaton added. He hopes that the county will con-

tinue to grow and attract prospective employers, such as Arvin Sango, which opened its assembly lines earlier this year. However, an educated workforce is key to growth, and Seaton stressed that Chester County must continue to pursue educational opportunities for as many residents as possible. While this is just a brief summary of a very important class, I hope it provides a taste of how Leadership Chester County is helping residents develop a greater appreciation of their community. Enrollment for the course opens each summer.

Shiloh Park commemorates 150th with Civil War Sesquicentennial Tennessee’s Sesquicentennial Commission announces the state’s third annual Sesquicentennial Signature Event April 4 and 5 during the 150th commemoration of the Battle of Shiloh. The twoday event will take place at Pickwick Landing State Park and Shiloh National Military Park. The theme for the special commemoration is “Invasions by Rail and River.” Tourism Commissioner Susan Whitaker and Director of MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation, Dr. Carroll Van West, co-chairs of the Commission, will serve as event hosts. Among the special guest speakers are Dr. John Marszalek, Mississippi State Univeristy (ret.). Dr. James L. McDonough, Auburn University, and noted Civil War authors, Wiley Sword and Larry J. Daniel. Dr. Timothy B. Smith, University of Tennessee-Martin, will speak on “Shiloh: The Preservation Story.”

The two-day battle of Shiloh, which took place April 6 and April 7, 1862, resulted in nearly 24,000 killed, wounded, and missing. The interpretation of Shiloh, one of the Civil War’s most momentous battles, will be provided through historical discussions, musical performances, stories and living history demonstrations. Tennessee is the only entire state designated by the U.S. Congress as a Civil War National Heritage area. Tennessee, ranking in the top two states for Civil War battlefield sites, joins four other states in this important project. The entire program has been identified by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of the most successful and sustainable heritage tourism programs in the nation. Registration for Tennessee’s Sesquicentennial Signature Event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit tncivilwar150.com.

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Courtesy photo

Former NFL fullback Kevin Turner was in Jacks Creek Thursday to personally present a signed football jersey as a Christmas surprise for Danny Vales. Turner and Vales each suffer from ALS. From left are Cameron Vales, Danny Vales, Teresa Vales, and Turner.


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Life & Style

Matthew Cooper, son of Anthony and Betty Cooper, graduated from Freed-Hardeman University Dec. 16 with a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice. The flag donated by the Woodmen of the world is now up at the center. Robert and Carolyn Brasfield celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Friday, Dec. 15. Ella Clair Murley cele-

brated her second birthday, enjoying a cupcake party with her immediate family. The cupcakes were decorated with seasonal and Disney characters. Jo Ellen and Alfred Garner will celebrate their anniversary Dec. 24. Please remember the Carroll family in the loss of her mother, Ms. Kathryn. I hope you all have a very merry Christmas and a wonderful New Year. Remember all those less fortunate than we are. Remember to call Wanda Cook (989-3724) or Celia Murley (989-5300) with your events, happenings, or your family news.

Happy Birthday wishes go to Chance Fletcher, Cooper Lutz and Stephanie Ivey on Dec. 22; Mike Haley and Jennifer Haley on Dec. 25; and Lindsay Haley on Dec. 28. Happy Anniversary to Roger and Debbie Hanna on Dec. 23; Danny and Kay Swafford on Dec. 24; and Nelson and Maxiene Crowell on Dec. 25. It is CHRISTMAS: C- The Christ child that was born in Bethlehem. H- The Heavenly Father who sent His son for mortal men. R- Our Redemption plan, this Christ child's birth did bring. I- The Intercession for our sins from Christ our King.

S- Brightest Star that led the wise men on their way. T- The Treasured babe God sent to us that day. M- The Meaning that the Christ child birth conceived. A- His Atonement, with grace, that saves those who believe. SGod's greatest Sacrifice, His son's life for you and me. From www.alighthouse.com. Everyone has his or her own beliefs and way of celebrating Christmas. It is our own choices to make. I like to keep Christ in Christmas and if there were gifts that I could give you, they would be God's gifts of wisdom, understanding, knowledge, mercy, prayer, discernment, encouragement and faith. My wish to everyone is a joyous holiday and a merry Christmas filled with family, friends, laughter, and love. If you have something to share, call me at 9890212.

Today’s date is very important to me. My grandmother turns 100years young in heaven. Ethel Ann Maness Dunn, “A Rose like No Other,” named after her grandmother, Roseanna. Born fifty years too soon - she loved life and wanted to see what would be invented tomorrow. Mama Beck didn’t have educational opportunities, but yet she never stopped learning. She didn’t want to die; she wanted to live, but God has his plans. She is high on the mountain top there with my dear momma. Happy birthday, mama Beck. Do you hear what I hear? Turn to Dish Network channel 196, Travel Station, and listen for a former Jacks Creek feller’s voice, Matthew Wilson, son of Billy Wilson and Polly Inman, and grandson of Geneva Perry. He is doing Garmin Holiday commercials in Kansas City. You can also find Matt on Garmin’s Holiday 2011 and check out Matt Wilson on Facebook. Matt attended performing arts school and has four years in college music. Cheers to Matt! Aunt Kathy Mays is proud of you. Saturday night a car ran off the road on Highway 22 North, hitting a power pole. Without electrical power we panic, but the Southwest team had

power restored within an hour or so. Check out the new pole located third pole from the second bridge. You can see some debris. Hope the driver is okay. Blue Velvet is a beautiful song to hear, and Red Velvet cake is a beautiful dessert to eat! Secret Santa must be making early deliveries to the elderly. The cake is gone and its red cake saver is washed. Hey! It may have been a one-horse open sleigh delivery, but truly, more than one heart was touched. A picture paints a thousand words - let’s share a joyous memory. Was it a surprise or a gift from above? Tears show that a heart was touched a napkin to wipe tears and crumbs. Send clues. I want to know who this secret Santa is. I’m smarter than I look – right?!!! Spirit of Christmas by light or window displays is showing, but some are missing in action this year. Surely it’s not because Mr. Age stood on the ladder in your way. Others are showing the spirit by delivering baskets to the shut-ins or elderly. The Jacks Creek Community Club did this show of love. Decorative lights provide a warm and festive atmosphere, but most important the lights direct our thoughts to the birth of the one true light for whom the season exists. Silent Night has many meanings. Do for others. Remember those in nursing homes. Don’t desert animals, God created them. Spay or neuter, this is the only way to solve over population of unwanted animals. Do your part. Someone dumped nine puppies on Highway 22.

FCE Club News

Thursday, December 22, 2011

News from the City

By Billie Noles The Town and Country Family and Community Education Club held its monthly meeting Thursday, Dec. 15, at the home of Linda Kent. Elna Roland was the co-hostess. An enjoyable luncheon of soup, sandwiches and desserts was served to the 15 members and guests. After the luncheon, announcements were made, games were played and gifts were exchanged. Everyone expresses gratitude to Linda Kent for sharing her home with its lovely antique furnishings. The FCE Country Council meeting for Chester County FCE clubs will be 1 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 4. The next meeting of the Town and Country Club will be on Jan. 26, at the home of Dare McAdams. Through the rich history of more than 75 years, Family and Community Education Clubs have grown from small community clubs to a national network, focused on growth through education. The local extension agent, Michele Sides, can be contacted at the University of Tennessee Chester County Extension office, 126 Crook Avenue, Suite 202, or you may call 989-2103. For more information, call Billie Noles at 983-5135.

By Gloria Holiday Hello to everyone! Greetings from the City. “This is the day the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.” No matter what life brings us we always have something to be glad about. Let us not worry about what we do not have, but be happy for what we do have.

This week is a special week. It is the week that we will be celebrating the birth of Jesus. It is all about him. So this week the City would like to say to all, “Have a merry, merry, Christmas.” On the birthday list this week: happy birthday Jesus, Dec. 25. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City, I need to hear from you. Call 989-1907 and leave your message or email it to gloria_holiday@msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

Jacks Creek Community Club News The Jacks Creek Community Club met on Dec. 8 for our Christmas supper. We had a delicious potluck meal prepared by our club members. Ralph and Kathy Mays did a wonderful job decorating the dining area. Patsy

Denton led the crowd in singing Christmas carols. There were 44 members and six guests present. President Ralph Mays discussed our annual project of making fruit baskets. We make the baskets and before Christmas we deliver them to the elderly

and shut in residents in the Jacks Creek area. The nominating committee, led by Dwight Jones, voted to keep our 2011 club officers for 2012: President - Ralph Mays, Vice President - Pat N. Jones, Secretary JoAnn Jones and Reporter

- Shelley Pusser. Join us at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 12, 2012, at the Community of Christ Church for our next meeting. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to everyone!

The Christmas holidays are here and schools are out for the teachers to do their festivities and shopping, and for the children to have some days to enjoy before and after Christmas. The parties

have begun and the family get-together is to come, we are really looking forward to being with our family, and enjoying our two little great-grandsons. We wish everyone a merry and joyous Christmas. May God bless our service personnel, our sick where ever they are, and their families. Our father passed away five years ago at Christmas so we understand how it feels to be away from loved ones. On our prayer list this week are Pam Priddy, David Thomas, Carroll

Williams, Doris Sells, Mary Faye Brewer, Joanne Sells, Frenzola Morris, Shirley Gaddy, Faye Tucker, Gathel Latham, Ollie Dean Kennedy, John Kent Sells, Carolyn Potter, Jean Latham, Dianne Wells, Bobbie Nell Wells, Lisa Peddy, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Shirley Rietl, Joanne Altier, Rachel and Gayle Ellington, Ernie Reeves, Randy Miller, Sharon Dailey, Dobber Dyer, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. May God bless you all.

Our deepest sympathy goes to the family and friends of Kathryn Carroll. She and I worked together at school for 20 years and were very close friends. Happy anniversary to Walter and Louella Willis and Jeff and Lisa Church on Dec. 27. Birthday greetings to Dianne Peddy, Dec. 23, Nona Seaton and Nancy Stovall Dec. 24, Jane Priddy and Jimmy Priddy, Dec. 25, John Butler and Norris McCaskill Dec. 27, Christopher Ray Mills Dec. 28, and Donna Latham Dec. 31.

Primitive Baptist Churches near and far to hear the word. From childhood lingers tender remembrances of Kathryn and Lois walking into church with a nestling of human stair-steps following quietly and reverently – those same five siblings are still close. A family that prays together stays together can be applied here. Kathryn was a cook at junior high. She had a greeting and a smile as someone hunted for the largest bowl of cobbler. Dusty and I visited Kathryn, often running into one of the girls. Kathryn has found her way home - sleep in heavenly peace dear mother of five. Ola Mae Hall Beller (10-2-28 to 12-14-11) was a friend to Dusty and me. Not only was she interesting to talk to alongside her husband, Roy, she had a yearning to read. Residents were amazed that she could read small print without glasses, thus many books were given to her. After her husband died in 2009 she still kept a positive attitude and gave thanks for the good times she had. Though several pictures of her posed beside hubby and Dusty were given to

her, they kept disappearing, but I kept my last promise to her. Upon hearing Ola had died, I carried the readied 5x7 picture to her funeral. Her children, Gail and Larry were pleased to display this trio picture. Ola was a lovely lady with an interest toward the person she was talking to at the moment. Her life was not about me-me-me! Glad she didn’t know Dusty died. He brought smiles to her face; she brought smiles to other faces; wouldn’t want to take that smile away. Frances Brewer Busby (9-4-23 to 12-18-11) was a friend of Regina Brooks, so Regina lovingly styled her hair one last time for a good customer. Walter Edgin (5-11-21 to 12-1811) served in WW II. Debbie Clayton Jones (225-52 to 12-17-11) was a year behind me in school, and her brother, Roger, was a year ahead. Debbie was a caregiver to her mother. Ed Phillips, Jr. (11-28-23 to 12-15-11) was one of those special men from the Greatest Generation. Donnie Joe Carroll (1951 to 12-19-11) was a l969 classmate, a sweet boy, quiet, kind, and well-mannered. His dad, Frankie, was on the school

board, so Donnie knew rules. Andrea Patrick McCadams attended twelve years of school with Donnie starting in Enville. Along with Donnie’s death there have been about 164 obits listed in Chester County Independent this year. Life is short. And our deepest sympathy goes to the families of the 4,474 Americans who died between March 20, 2003 and Dec. 15, 2011, during a long war. This number (4,474) represents the number of Americans killed in this war. Also 32,000 wounded Americans are suffering and $800 billion was spent from our U.S. Treasury. Our troops are headed home, a mixture of joy and tears for many. God bless these troops, their families, and our dear United States of America. “It is an unfortunate fact that we can secure peace only by preparing for war.” (JFK) I still believe in Santa Claus, just like dear Virginia. Our soldiers are singing that famous line, “I’ll be home for Christmas, if only in my dreams.” Merry Christmas to us all – every one. Just tell me where the year went! Call 989-7485 with tidbits.

Can you help find homes? Silently he appeared at church, dressed, not wrapped, but still a gift. Was Dennis Phillips presence the gift, or was him being present the gift? I guess coming home for Christmas from Pennsylvania is an early gift. Peppermint stripes on Janice Kelly Stones fingernails were “tasty-looking”. Teresa Crouse did something different. Wonder if all that sugarlook will make one hyper! Special wrappings of love to Lois Wilkinson, Alene Johnson, Cordie Tucker, Geneva Perry, Kathy Mays, Mamie Essary, Shane Lott, Vickie Ellis, Keith Richie, Mary Curtis, Lily Weaver, Wilma Hart, Memphis Barnes, Precious Thomas, Lavelle Bushnell, Dr. Jerry Jones, Eva Jones, Arlene Ivy, Pauline Belew, and all going through these “firsts” without their loved ones. Tylene Seaton is blessed to have Will Seaton and Timothy Berry back from Iraq to hug. Share hugs, it’s good for what ails you. All cards and gifts are cherished; kept to reread sweet words of love. Thank you. New school lights have been installed. They have enhanced school security and permitted our community to have a school set upon a hill serving as a beacon of light and knowledge. Our community expresses sympathy to several families. Johnny “Monkey” Ward (2-17-55 to 12-13-11) who died at the age of 56. Kathryn Young Carroll (12-29-29 to 12-14-11) who was a friend of mine and a sister in Christ to mother and mama Beck. All attended


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

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Holidays are a great time to preserve family baking traditions The holidays are a time for tradition. This is the time of year, more than any other, that people long for family recipes and dishes that have been handed down throughout generations. Even as we marry and blend families, we look for ways to preserve our favorite parts of the holidays. This week, I share with you two recipes: one from my grandmother and one from my husband’s grandmother. I brought dessert to a Christmas party recently, and these were the two recipes I chose. Meme’s fudge recipe is extremely simple; if you don’t have a favorite fudge recipe already, give this a chance. You can even spice it up with crushed peppermint pieces, caramel or any of your other favorite fudge ingredients. I reduced the amount of vanilla that I use because it seems that some brands of vanilla prevent the fudge from setting firmly. One year, I made fudge for a New

Year’s Eve party, and it was so runny that we ate it with spoons. This year, however, the reduced vanilla content allowed it to set up perfectly. If you like chewy cookies, you will probably want to substitute butter for the shortening in the chocolate chip cookie recipe. I almost never use shortening, and I was surprised by how flakey these cookies turned out. If you like pecan sandies, these have a similar texture. They are delicious. Grandma Gina, my husband’s grandmother, is a wonderful cook, and I’ve never eaten anything of hers that I didn’t like. Her original recipe calls for chocolate chips and chopped nuts, but I had some extra toffee and coconut on hand and decided to make surprise cookies. Mix in your favorite flavors. If you pre-

fer butterscotch or peanut butter cup pieces, add those instead. The joy of baking is that you can customize recipes to your own personal taste. Here is a short note from Grandma Gina that she included when she shared her recipe with me: “To make the baking time go more quickly, I usually tear off three pieces of aluminum foil, the length of my baking sheet. If the recipe calls for a greased cookie sheet, I grease 12 places on each piece of foil. “Place the cookies on the foil, slide foil onto baking sheet; when cookies come out of the oven, slide the foil piece containing the baked cookies off onto a heat-proof surface, and slide foil containing unbaked cookies onto hot baking sheet and continue.”

Holiday home fire safety tips offered Family gatherings, entertaining and festive decorations are among the highlights of the holiday season. According to the United States Fire Administration, during the Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and New Year's season, there is an elevated risk for home fires due to extensive cooking, decorations, home heating and open flames. Paul Davis Restoration of West Tennessee offers the following tips to make the holidays safe for you and your family. Holiday Decorations: Decorate with non-combustible or flame-resistant materials. Never use lighted candles on a tree, ever-

greens or other flammable materials. Don't place candles near children, pets or gift wrapping. Lights: Make sure there are no frayed wires, broken sockets or loose connections. Check labels to be sure about the proper use of indoor and outdoor lights. Don't overload electrical outlets. Trees: Cut a few inches off the trunk of a live tree and fill the stand with water to keep it from drying out and becoming a fire hazard. An artificial tree should be labeled "Fire Resistant." Place trees away from fireplaces, radiators or portable heaters. Fire Escape Plan: Make sure everyone understands the escape routes

and where to meet once outside. Smoke Alarms: Make sure your smoke alarms are in proper working order and change the batteries at least twice a year. Fire Extinguishers: Make sure there is a working fire extinguisher in the kitchen, laundry room, and garage. Learn how to use the fire extinguisher. Fi re p l a c e / C h i m n e y : Have your fireplace and chimney inspected and cleaned by a professional chimney sweep. Never burn greens, boughs, papers, or other decorations in the fireplace. Check to see that the flue is open before starting a fire.

The good news is Thursday, Dec. 15, the war in Iraq officially ended. Most of the soldiers will be home for Christmas. The cost for the U.S. was high. It is sad to think about all the brave U.S. soldiers who chose to serve their country and paid the ultimate sacrifice. They and their families should never be forgotten. Freedom is not free. Continue to pray for all our military and leaders of our country. Kenneth and Teresa Burkhead of Hickory Corner have once again decorated their home for the holidays. There are over 30,000 colorful lights on display around their home. Teresa says she will

have the lights on for you around 5:50 each evening. Also, drive by and see the beautiful Christmas displays at the home of Virgina Rowland on Old Montezuma Road. Oh, yes, Teresa and Virginia do believe in Santa, and we appreciate all they do so that others may enjoy the spirit of Christmas. On Dec. 10 around 70 people attended the Hickory Corner Community Center Christmas party. Our thanks go to Kay Springfield, who was our special guest and entertained us with beautiful Christmas carols. Also thanks go to Larry Beshires who baked the Christmas ham. Everyone enjoyed the food and fellowship. Pay attention when shopping! Before leaving the cashier station always check your receipts when using your credit or debit card. The FCE Club celebrated Christmas Thursday, Dec. 13, in the home of

Linda Kent. Linda and Ellna Roland hosted the luncheon. Following the meal there was lots of fun and laughter as the women exchanged gifts and played Dirty Santa and Bingo. Fifteen women attended and enjoyed the snacks throughout the afternoon. Linda’s home was decorated beautifully for the holidays. The MAC members (Mature Advantage Club, a service of West Tennessee Health Care) enjoyed a trip to Nashville Saturday, Dec. 17, attending the “Radio City Christmas Spectacular,” starring the Rockettes, at the Grand Ole Opry House. It was a fantastic show and each scene was beautiful, with the last scene being the “Living Nativity,” which was awesome. “One Solitary Life,” a miniature book states, “Nineteen wide centuries have come and gone and today he is the centerpiece of the human race and the leader of the col-

Chocolate Chip Surprise cookies

Drop by small spoonfuls onto a greased baking sheet. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown.

(Adapted from a Dunbar family recipe)

Microwave Fudge

Ingredients: ½ cup shortening ¼ cup granulated sugar ½ cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla 1 egg, beaten 1 cup, plus 2 tablespoons, all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup chopped nuts 1 cup chocolate chips ¼ cup toffee chips 1/3 cup shredded coconut (optional) Directions: Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream together shortening, sugar, brown sugar, and vanilla. Add 1 egg, lightly beaten. Sift together and add flour, soda and salt. Once all above ingredients are well blended, stir in all or a combination of nuts, chocolate chips, toffee and coconut.

Ingredients: 1 pound powdered sugar ½ cup cocoa ¼ cup milk 4 ounces butter 1 tablespoon vanilla (reduce to 2 teaspoons if fudge won’t set) ½ cup nuts Directions: Blend sugar and cocoa in a 2-quart mixing bowl. Add milk and butter. Microwave on high for 2 minutes. Remove bowl from microwave and beat until smooth. Add vanilla and nuts, and stir with a spoon until well blended. Pour fudge onto either a buttered or wax paper-lined 8 x 8-inch dish. Refrigerate until firm. To serve, cut into squares in dish or run a knife along edge of the dish, turn upside down on a plate, and remove the wax paper.

umn of progress. I am far within the mark when I say that all the armies that ever marched, and all the navies that ever were built, and all the parliaments that ever sat, all the kings that ever reigned, put together have not affected the life of man upon this earth as powerfully as has that one solitary life.” - James Allen Francis Have you noticed that no mention of Christmas is made at some of the larger retail stores? They say, “Happy holidays,” if they say anything at all. I make an effort to greet people with, “Merry Christmas,” as we are celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. “Merry Christmas” and God bless to all who read the Hickory Corner News.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011 Chester County Independent archives, Dec. 21, 1951

Mr. C.M. Foy, Crosley dealer, and owner of C.M. Foy Hardware, is pictured above presenting check of $100 to Mr. Jack Bulliner for the Youth Fellowship of the Methodist Church in the presence of Mr. H.M. Frye, one of the judges in the recent local Crosley American Way Contest. Gene Horn’s essay won first prize and, according to the terms of the contest which gave the winner the right to designate the organization of his choice, Mr. Foy presented the additional $100. Other judges were Mrs. Jo Miller and Mr. N.S. Martin.

Only Yesterday “Chrismas shoppers receive parking break” From the files of the Chester County Independent December 26, 1941 “Christmas Trade Sets Record Here” Henderson merchants and business houses report that the holiday trade this year established new high records in most every line. It was first feared that the shock of sudden war might confuse people, but here as elsewhere over the nation, citizens soon adjusted themselves to the new problem. All determined that everything must be done to win the war, but at the same time common sense dictates that folks must go on working and living. Prosperity from the cotton and other crops was felt in all stores, and while perhaps more attention was given to practical gifts, never-the-less other merchandise moved at a swift pace over the counters. Predictions by authorities seem to indicate that 1942 will be an even more prosperous year. Farmers, they say, are apt to receive still higher prices for crops and more wage earners will be employed as factories go on a 24 hour, seven day operating schedule. Henderson merchants had prepared the holiday business and an unusually complete line of all merchandise and gift articles was to be had here. Some stores reported an unusually large number of shoppers from out of the county. “Late War News” Latest Radio flash tells of failure by the Japanese to land large forces on Luzon Island in the Philippines. American and native troops inflicted heavy damage to the Jap invaders. Radio flashes as we were going to press told of fresh Russian victories, the capture of several important towns and vast quantities of war supplies. Manila – Japanese flotilla of 80 troop transports sighted off Gulf of Lingayen, 110 miles northwest of Manila in apparent beginning of all-out drive to take the Philippines. Singapore – British strengthen defenses in Malaya; Hong Kong continues to hold out. Washington – American naval have sunk or damaged at least 14 U-boats in the Atlantic and “dealt effectively” with several Jap subs in the Pacific. San Francisco – 22 crew members missing after Jap sub torpedoes tanker, shells lifeboats in one of two attacks off California; planes scan sea for raiders. Berlin – Hitler fires army leader, assumes supreme command himself. Reich believed facing its greatest crisis. Cairo – British claim Axis will not be able to defend Bengazi, in Libya. Moscow – Red Armies keep Nazi armies in retreat. “O. Foy & Son Winners In Contest” O. Foy & Son of Henderson have received notice that they won fifth prize in a nationwide contest conducted by the Locke Stove Co., makers of Warm Morning stoves. The Chester County Independent received from the Locke company a check for $60 to be presented to Mr. Foy. In commenting on the successful sales of Warm Morning stoves, Mr. Foy stated first cause of its popularity was the stove itself – attractive in appearance, economical to operate and reasonably priced. He said second reason

was the advertising carried exclusively in the Chester County Independent. “Farm Defense Facts” Triple A committeemen are contacting 6,000,000 farmers in the signup for increased food production to supply sufficient quantities of foodstuffs at fair prices for American families and produce enough to fill Britain's needs. The government needs iron and steel scrap for manufacture of armament to beat Hitler. The Tennessee USDA Defense Board is conducting a campaign for scrap collection. Farmers are being urged to check their machinery and order needed repairs immediately. A scarcity of machinery and machinery parts is expected in 1942. December 21, 1951 “Cotton Ginning Report Is Given” Census report shows that 9,086 bales of cotton were ginned in Chester County from the crop of 1951 prior to December 1 as compared with 5,028 bales for the crop of 1950, according to a report by Hubert Seaton, special agent for the U. S. Department of Commerce. “Letters To Santa Claus” Dear Santa, I am a little boy 8 years old. I am in the third grade at Phillips School. I try to be a good boy at home and at school, too. Please bring me a Roy Rogers cowboy suit, also a gun and holster. I will be glad to get anything else you wish to bring me. Remember my teacher Miss Tucker and my Sunday School teacher Miss Martha Phillips. Your friend, Charles Stumph Jr. Dear Santa, Please bring us some toys, nuts, fruits and candy. We have tried to be good. Don't forget the little boys and girls whose Daddies are in Korea. We love you. Your little friends, Third Grade – Glendale School Dear Santa Claus, I am a little girl five years old. I've been very good this year. I don't want very much. Only a pair of house shoes, gloves and a doll. Don wants a tractor. Santa, remember my little cousin Ricky. And don't forget my uncle who is in Korea. You will find some cake and coke under our Xmas tree. Your friend, Nancy Faye Smith P.S. Santa, don't forget my baby sister, Dianne. “Births” Mr. and Mrs. Alf Moody of Rapid City, S.D., announce the arrival of a daughter, Laura Lee on Dec. 5. Mr. and Mrs. Dan McCorkle of Jackson are the parents of a daughter, Dannie Lynne, born on Thursday, Dec. 13. Mr. and Mrs. Fentress Casey of Henderson are receiving congratulations upon the arrival of their first child, a son who was born on Dec. 17 at the Steadman-Guy Clinic. He has been named Robert Reed. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Edwards of Abbeville, Louisiana, announce the birth of a daughter, Katherine Elizabeth on Dec. 14. Mrs. Edwards is the former Miss Jean Martin of Henderson. Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Rubenstein of Booneville, Miss., are announcing the arrival of a daughter on Dec. 18 at Methodist Hospital in Memphis. Mrs.

Rubenstein is the former Miss Martha Bell McAdams of Henderson. Dr. J. B. Stephens Mr. and Mrs. John Hopper of Jacks Creek announce the arrival of a daughter, Katherine Gene on Nov. 29. Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Robbins of Finger are the parents of a girl born Dec. 10. She has been named Dorothy Gean. Mr. and Mrs. Max Lott of the Friendship community are announcing the arrival of a daughter, Melinda Jill, on Dec. 16. Born to Allin and Martha Howell: a daughter Barbara Lee, on Nov. 30. Dr. L. C. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Richard Melton of Henderson announce the arrival of a son, Guiley Richard, on Nov. 17. December 22, 1961 “Children's Party Set Thursday Night” The annual Jaycee Party for underprivileged children in Chester County will be held on Thursday night at 7 p.m. in the Chester County High School gymnasium. The announcement was made today by Jaycee President, Gene Maness, who said that 150 children are expected to attend. The evening's entertainment will feature a film entitled “God's Greatest Gift” and two cartoons. There will also be group singing of Christmas carols. A large Christmas tree will be loaded with gifts for the children. Captain Norman Helinske is chairman of the event. “Births” Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wetherholt of Knoxville announce the arrival of a daughter, Karen Elizabeth, on Dec. 6. The grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Clement of Henderson. Mrs. Wetherholt is the former Joy Clement. Henderson Clinic Mr. and Mrs. Larry Edward Maness, Finger, announce the arrival of a son, Michael Edward on Dec. 17. Drs. McCallum and Wilson Mr. and Mrs Talmage Murley of Henderson are the parents of a son born December 18. He has been named Talmage Kenneth. Born to Mabel and Rufus Trice of Henderson, a son, Dexter Eugene, on Dec. 18. December 23, 1971 “Shoppers Receive Parking Break” Christmas shoppers in Henderson were given a break this week when the mayor and board of aldermen ordered sacks placed over downtown parking meters. The “park without charge” program will continue through Christmas, the city officials stated. “One Of Every 10 Countians Receiving Food Stamps” According to the latest figures just released by the United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, there were 1,030 low-income Chester county people receiving Federal Food Stamps during the month of October. This represents one person out of every nine in the county. The 1970 census showed 9,974 persons living in the county. The October figure represents an increase of 11 persons over the month of September, according to Russell H. James, Southeast regional administrator of the program, although James noted that on a state-wide basis food stamp users showed a decrease of 9,222 in October compared to September. All of the decrease, it was said, was in the food stamp program now operating in 84 Tennessee counties. The total on this program dropped from $99,983 to $89,961 – a decline of $10,022.

Chester County Independent archives, Dec. 22, 1961

Chester County Independent archives, Dec. 21, 1951

James L. Fish of the Deanburg community is pictured with the 200 pound 10-point buck which he killed recently on the railroad behind Bethel Church. Bill Cooper of Montezuma bagged a 115 pound 5-point buck in Hardeman County near Silerton and Bonnie Hopper of Deanburg shot a 200 pound 8-point buck on the Roy Holloway farm.

Chester County Independent archives, Dec. 22, 1961

Southern Oaks names new administrator Southern Oaks, Assisted Living by Americare, recently named Donna Signaigo as administrator. Signaigo has worked at Southern Oaks since January as Program Director. “I am very excited about this new opportunity,” she said. “After working in education for 32 years, I feel very honored to begin another career with an assisted living facility. We have so much to be proud of here. I hope to build on those strengths to keep our center the facility of choice in Henderson.” Signaigo has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Education and a Masters Degree in Education, and also a Masters Degree in Administration and Supervision. During her career in education, she was Supervisor of Instruction for a school system with 300 teachers and 5,000 students. She also worked in all aspects of education throughout her career. She lives in Henderson

DONNA SIGNAIGO and is married to Brian Signaigo, Chester County Extension Agent. She has a daughter, Sara, who lives in Knoxville. According to Vicky Norton, the facility’s operations director, “We are very pleased to have someone of Donna’s caliber at Southern Oaks. She has had a very successful career in education, and I am sure she will be an asset to our community at Henderson.” Southern Oaks is located at 558 White Ave. in Henderson. It is licensed as an assisted living facility by the State of Tennessee.

‘Tis scam season for seniors, tips offered to protect them By Bo Bradshaw Tennessee News Service

Investment scams are a multibillion-dollar business - and like Christmas presents, they come in many shapes and sizes. Anyone can be taken advantage of, regardless of their age, income or education level. Bob Denz, a spokesman for the American Association of Retired Persons, AARP, says senior citizens are a favorite target of fraudsters, especially now, with shrinking investments and falling home prices making more and more older people anxious about their finances. That makes the holidays a good time to check in on parents, grandparents and loved ones, he says. “When you’re at their home, take a look around for warning signs: lots of phone call messages, lots of requests to call back, solicitations, many magazines around or magazine subscription come-ons, batches of mail and so forth.” Denz warns people to tread lightly with seniors regarding their finances and possible scams, but says it’s also important to start the conversation if

they are at risk of being taken advantage of. Denz suggests reminding seniors of some red flags, even writing them down and putting the list in a place where they’ll see it regularly. Some of the most popular phrases used by con artists, he says, are: “Your profit is guaranteed;” “amazingly high rate of return;” “There’s no risk;” “You can get in on the ground floor and get in now, because this is an offer that won’t be here tomorrow;” “I’ll get you the paperwork later! Just make out a check to me;” and “You would be a fool to pass this one up.” Because many seniors tend to be trusting and polite, Dentz says to remind them to never answer the door unless they know who is knocking; to get caller ID on their phone; and to register for the national “Do Not Call List” to avoid phone solicitations. When it comes to email, he adds, advise them never to open attachments or share personal information with senders they do not know and trust. More information and safety tips can be found at www.aarp.org.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

Page 7-A

Civitan’s celebrate 50 years! The Henderson Civitan Club celebrated its 50th anniversary at its Christmas party on Dec. 13 at Southern Skillet Restaurant in Henderson. The club was chartered on Dec. 5, 1961, with J. Walker Whittle as its first president. Whittle continues to be an active member of the club and was recognized for his service at the buffet dinner meeting. President Ray Eaton welcomed the members and guests. Civitan Courtney Bingham read the Civitan Creed, and the

invocation was given by President-elect Roger Penn. Immediate PastPresident J. D. Thomas presented the Citizen of the Year award plaque to Teresa King. Mayor Bobby King and his wife Teresa were guests at the dinner. The honoree has served for several years as BBQ pit crew chair at the Chester County Barbecue Festival. She is a past president of the Chamber of Commerce and is a Chamber board member. She is a past

Electric cooperatives urge safety during holidays The winter holiday season is traditionally a festive and eventful time of year, filled with celebrations, family gatherings and houseguests. In fact, results from a national survey conducted by Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) indicate that nearly 60 percent of Americans typically host guests in their homes during the holidays. It’s easy to get caught up in the hectic pace of holiday entertaining – cookies to bake, decorations to hang, presents to wrap – but ESFI and the electric cooperatives of Tennessee urge you not to overlook safety during the holiday rush. The winter holiday period is, unfortunately, also a peak time of year for home fires and preventable injuries. The good news is that it’s not difficult to make sure your home is ready to host all your favorite holiday activities. First, take time out from your party preparations to test your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and to make sure your home is protected by an adequate number of alarms which should be installed on every level of your home and outside each sleeping area. Additional smoke alarms should be installed inside each bedroom. Be sure to share your family fire escape plan with any overnight guests or babysitters. Arrange your holiday displays to avoid overloading electrical outlets with too many decorations or devices. Inspect all decorations, cords and outlets for damage before use. Keep electrical cords out of doorways and high-traffic areas where they pose a tripping hazard. Do not pinch cords or affix them to walls, ceilings or floors

with staples or nails, which can damage the insulation. Keep young visitors safe by preparing your home before they arrive. If your home is not already “childproof,” install tamper-resistant receptacles or use safety covers on all unused electrical outlets, including those on extension cords and power strips. Store breakables, candles, matches and other potentially dangerous items in inaccessible or locked areas safe from curious little ones. Don’t forget to put away small items like buttons, coins and jewelry, which could pose a choking hazard. Use safety gates at the top and bottom of stairways to keep babies and toddlers safe. Safety doesn’t stop when the party gets started. Adopt a proactive approach to safety during your holiday festivities as well. Keep decorations, gifts and other combustibles at least 3 feet from heat sources or open flames. Never leave the kitchen when something is cooking. Make sure children are supervised at all times in the kitchen and in rooms where heat sources or open flames are in use. Turn off and unplug all decorations before leaving home or turning in for the night. Remember that a safe and happy holiday is by far the best gift you can give your friends and family this year. Happy Holidays from the electric cooperatives of Tennessee.

chair of the Chester County Relay for Life and continues as a Relay committee member and leader of Relay activities. She also works with the Carl Perkins Center for the Prevention of Child Abuse. Mrs. King helped organize and worked tirelessly with the recent RAM medical clinic program. She organizes neighborhood events on O’Neal Lane, decorated for the Tour of Homes, and decorates such places for Christmas as Shackelford Funeral Homes’ Johnson Chapel. Civitan board member Shirley Eaton awarded the Civitan of the Year plaque to Courtney Bingham. Bingham works for the Jackson Energy Agency. She joined Civitan in the club year which ended Sept. 30 and has distinguished herself as a sales leader for Boston Butt and other projects. President Eaton made a special presentation of an iPad to a handicapped citizen who will be able to

Submitted photo

Teresa King, left, was named Citizen of the Year, and Courtney Bingham was named Civitan of the Year, as the club celebrate it’s 50th anniversary Dec. 13. use it to learn and to communicate audibly. Proceeds from the sale of Claxton fruit cakes will cover the cost of this assistive device. Eaton also served as quizmaster for a Christmas trivia game enjoyed by attendees. The benediction was given by Civitan Tom Childers.

Ground beef recalled Tyson Fresh Meats Inc., a Dakota City, Neb. establishment, is recalling approximately 40,948 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced. The following products are subject to recall: 10-pound chubs of “CHUCK FINE GROUND BEEF 80/20,” packed in cases containing eight chubs. The products subject to recall have a “BEST BEFORE OR FREEZE BY” date of “11/13/11” and “EST. 245C” on the box label. Consumers with questions may call (866) 328-3156.

This gal is very friendly and lovable and loves her back scratched.

This fella is very friendly and lovable. He would love a family of his own and yard to romp and play in.

This fine gentleman is very friendly and loves to be petted. All he wants for Christmas is a home of his own.

This little gal is very friendly and energetic. She appears to be a terrier mix. She would love to have her own family with kids to play with.


Page 8-A

Opinion

Thursday, December 22, 2011

This Christmas is going to the dogs –and the cats aren’t thrilled Christmas this year is going to the dogs – literally. After years of being a dedicated cat person and swearing that I would never have a dog, my husband talked me into getting a puppy. It’s funny how after a few years of marriage, your spouse suddenly pops up with a seemingly out of character idea. Chris – to the best of my knowledge – had always been a cat person, too. He talked about his cat, Spike, often while we were dating, and after we got married, I drove 10 hours to pick her up so Spike could live with us. That all changed last year when his friend got a puppy. Suddenly, my cat-loving husband became a dog person. I held him off for months, but last week, we brought home a long-legged black and white standard poodle puppy that chose Chris when she was only a few weeks old. I’ve had my reservations – and still do to some degree – but so far, the first few days of puppy parenthood haven’t been too bad. The day after we got Clover, Chris left me alone with her for several hours while he went to work. My idea of puppy parenthood is to wear the puppy out. A tired puppy is a quiet, still puppy, and that makes for a happy owner. So Clover and I raced around the backyard until she plopped over in a pile of leaves and informed me that she had no intention of fetching her stuffed duck one more time. I brought her in, let her eat and drink, and then she slept under the coffee table, When she woke up, we went back outside to expel her energy all over again. I’m not as bonded with her as my husband is, but for a dog, I think she’s pretty cool. She’s cute, relatively smart for a puppy, and now that she’s learning to sleep through the night, I think we’ll get along much better – which brings me back to Christmas and why this year it is going to the dogs. As soon as Chris found out we could have a puppy that would be ready to go home a week before Christmas, he informed everyone that all he wanted this year was puppy stuff. I gave him the aforementioned stuffed duck for his birthday at the beginning of December, his sister gave him a doggy brush and nail buffers, and his uncle presented him with a tennis ball launcher. Every Christmas, I get my cats a few treats and toys for their stocking. Well, of course, they have a stocking, but they all share it. They usually get colorful, furry catnip mice and a few soft catnip toys. One year, I even made them all homemade toys out of socks that I cut, stitched and embroidered to look like mice. I like to make videos of them playing with their new toys for the first time; they are so funny and enthusiastic. This year, I’ve resorted to looking for toys that are more or less dog-proof. Instead of catnip mice, I got them a catnip infused scratch pad that hangs from a doorknob. Instead of soft toys, they got a kitty condo with a hammock. Standing in the pet store yesterday, I had to be mindful that anything I picked for my poor cats would probably also be shared with the puppy, so their stocking stuffers are less soft and cuddly and more practical this year. While I was at the pet store, I kept Clover in mind. She and Chris will have a nice supply of toys, treats and puppy accessories under the tree. Oddly, none of the kitty toys I picked out sparked comment from the cashier, but as soon as she saw that I was looking at a leash, she told me that her dog had the exact same pattern and that it was adorable on her. That launched us into a discussion about dogs and puppies, and I actually found myself bragging about how smart Clover is: “She learned to sit in less than a day”; “Clover already knows how to walk on a leash”; and of course, “She is really cute.” The cats are adapting, but they aren’t overly thrilled. Spike has swatted her several times, and Christabelle gives me a traumatized look every time the puppy tries to sniff her. Stryker pretended to throw up the first time he met Clover, and Snowbird only comes out of hiding when the puppy is asleep or outside. As I’m writing this, Clover is asleep in her kennel, and the living room is full of content, peaceful kitties. They are all acting as if the new family member doesn’t exist, but as soon as she wakes up, the kitties will disperse until she naps again. Last night, Chris had the puppy’s attention diverted, so Snowbird crept downstairs. She sat on the stairs and looked at me with the saddest kitten eyes. It was late, and I was exhausted, but I couldn’t go to bed and leave my poor, sensitive fluffy cat. I carried her to her new food and water place, which is out of reach of the puppy. Then I took her to bed. She rarely sleeps with me, so I stayed awake until Snowbird was comfortable. Unfortunately, Clover bounded into the room just as Snowbird settled down to sleep. Even though the puppy ignored her, she promptly left the room, not to be seen again until she perched behind me on the couch while I sipped my coffee and checked emails. It feels like a funny Christmas buying my husband dog presents rather than human presents, but that’s what he asked for. The kitties are disconcerted – Snowbird hasn’t slept under the tree, and Christabelle hasn’t tried to climb it. So far, however, the tree is still standing and the puppy hasn’t chewed through the light cord. The kitties aren't completely traumatized, and we all have something to unwrap on Christmas morning. The fact that we’ve all survived the first week of puppyhood counts for a lot.

Hard Candy Christmas was Appalachian tradition

Almost all children of Appalachia who grew up in the 1940s can recall Hard Candy Christmases. Or your mothers and fathers might have told you about the holidays observed during tough economic times, when there was no money to buy anything and nothing to buy anyway. Folks in the hills and hollows eked by as best they could. Today’s holiday largesse – even in this period of 21st Century recession – would have been foreign during those times. Mountain and river valley people, for the most part, were penny-pinchers in the best of times and subsistence farmers in the worst. A full corn crib, cured hams in the smoke shed, tobacco hanging in the barn, canned garden produce in the pantry and a couple of good milk cows might make a family feel rich, but any extra cash went toward paying the land rent or note at the

bank – and you prayed a mule didn’t take lame. Most of the time, there was no cash period and nothing to barter unless trapping yielded skins and the market price was decent. Many an Appalachian family awaited a check from the fur buyers before splurging on “Santy Claus,” usually the result of a carefully composed mail order from the pages of the Sears & Roebuck wish book. Shoes, coats, gloves, hats, work clothes and hand tools predominated, no “play pretties,” as my Granny Brown called children’s toys. Boys might get a box of .22 rifle cartridges or shotgun shells, girls a hairbrush and comb or a personal diary. Hard Candy Christmas was about the only special treat. If there wasn’t money to order from the wish book, Hard Candy Christmas was the sole concession to the holiday, except for church services and a day of rest. I remember one Hard

Library thanks Drama Dept. Very special thanks go to the Chester County High School Drama Department and the cast and crew of the recent production of Steel Magnolias. The group donated proceeds from the play to the library and we have placed the donation in our building fund account to help us reach our goal of a badly needed addition. We appreciate being the recipient of the hard work that we know went into the play. Thank you so much. Sincerely, Nancy Canada, Library Director Chester County Library To the Editor and concerned citizens in Chester County: As a member of the Chester County High School Class of 1971 [sorry I missed the 40th reunion, but I had an international union convention to attend], I figure I am entitled to bend your ear once every couple of decades with a letter to the editor. Here it goes: Congress is currently considering a pair of bills ("PROTECT IP Act" and "SOPA") which are blatant violations of American constitutional jurisprudence. They create a mechanism whereby an entire website can be shut down without proper judicial review, based on any assertion of a supposed copyright violation (however trivial or inadvertent). As a professional writer and editor, I myself have intellectual property, which I protect quite zealously; but these bills' approach is highly un-American, with their "guilty until proven innocent" methodology, which could lead to total shutdown of such vital resources as Wikipedia. Sincerely, Michael J. "Orange Mike" Lowrey Sunrise Book Reviews, Milwaukee, Wis.

Candy Christmas at my grandparents’ house. It was in the wake of the post-WW II recession that lasted in many parts of Southern Appalachia well into the 1950s. There were no jobs. Farmers were losing their land. A northern migration was underway. Young men and women traveled to Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Michigan to find work and send home money. I was born during this migration and for a period of time lived with my grandparents on their Tennessee River farm. Grandpa was selling parcels of property to “meet his notes.” He was forced to accept far below market value and eventually lost nearly everything. My uncles and aunts were searching for factory jobs in Chicago, Detroit, Indianapolis and Cleveland. My mother and father were hired at an Arvin’s plant in Columbus, Ind. There was no money to hire a baby-sitter, something almost unknown in Appalachia in the first place. Extended family cared for the new generation while our parents toiled hundreds of miles away. Grandpa’s money troubles mounted. He made poor deals on land sales to survive, and we celebrated a Hard Candy Christmas. But no one was ashamed. This Christmas without gifts to give and receive occupies a special place in my memory. I believe it was closer to the true holiday than almost any experienced in my six decades. On Christmas Eve, Grandpa called us cousins, from toddlers to five-year-olds, to the hearth, where he revealed a giant candy cane. It was nearly a foot

long, the diameter of a broom handle and hard as a rock. I had never seen the like before or since. He put it in a clean pillowcase, whooped like he was calling his coonhounds and slammed the candy cane against the stonework. Granny toasted pecans and peanuts in the embers of the fireplace, popped corn and we picked slivers of candy from the pillowcase to suck on until bedtime. The next morning, we each had a bulging sock on the hearth. Inside were oranges and a treasure of candy: King Leo soft peppermint sticks, taffy, horehound drops, licorice, coconut slices in three colors, crème drops, chocolate-covered marshmallows and granny’s rock candy flavored with lemon extract (this also was a favorite cold medicine when melted in spring water with a dash of moonshine). The adults enjoyed homemade peanut brittle, whiskey soaked fruitcake and cups of boiled custard. They peeled our oranges for us, and Granny collected the rinds to boil and make another delicacy: orange peel candy. This was our Hard Candy Christmas. “Hard,” because this was how the world was in Appalachia in those days; “Candy,” because sweets were always something celebratory; and “Christmas,” because even poor people don’t forget the Greater Gift to mankind and strive to find a way to be happy at this special time of the year. My hope is that everyone will take a second to count their blessings and remember those who came before us. Merry Appalachian Christmas!


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT December 12, 2011 Henderson Police Department responded to B&B Outdoors on Hwy 45 South to take a report that someone had cut a wire to the alarm. The alarm had reportedly gone off at the business Thursday, Dec. 8, but nothing was found disturbed at that time. It is believed the wire was cut at that time. December 13, 2011 G r e g o r y Hollingsworth, 44, 326 N Church Ave., was arrested and charged with criminal trespassing, simple possession and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $25,000 bond. December 14, 2011 Brandon Allen Kilzer, 29, 1490 Parker Loop, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license, simple possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a schedule IV controlled substance, introducing contraband into a penal facility and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,500 bond. December 15, 2011 A Henderson resident reported having received a bill notice from Capitol One for an account he had not opened. Officers advised him to send a copy of the report to Capitol One. A black wallet was found behind Xtreme Carwash. December 17, 2011 Michael Anthony Goff, 50, 608 Cloud Circle, was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $250 bond. December 18, 2011 A counterfeit $20 was allegedly used for a purchase at Oden’s, 375 N Church. According to the report, the suspect was a white male, approximately late 20’s, wearing camouflage and driving a late 1990’s or early 2000’s model, beige full size lowered Chevrolet truck with chrome wheels and a scoop on the hood of the truck. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT December 17, 2011 8:14 p.m. – 3825 Hwy 45 N, Henderson Food and Fuel, fire alarm, grill fire, extinguished before arrival. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT December 13, 2011 Timothy Tyler Jones, 20, 4940 St. Rt. 100 W, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 bond. December 14, 2011 A Chester County resident reportedly received a call from AT&T concerning a past due phone bill for an account she claims is not hers. According to the report, she spoke to an investigator for the company and was informed it was probably a scam and she would receive more information in the mail. Michael Douglas Forsythe, 19, 463 White Ave., was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released

from the Chester County jail on his own recognizance. Jeffery Lynn Jones, 41, 326 Church Ave., was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County jail on his own recognizance. Nathan Lee Rowsey, 37, Lexington, was arrested and charged with failure to pay child support. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 cash bond. December 15, 2011 Alex Cawthon, 39, Finger, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdemeanor. He was released from the Chester County jail on probation. Donald H. Maben, 38, Jackson, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $90 cash bond. Jackie Dwain Matthews, 37, Finger, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $1,000 bond. December 16, 2011 Frozen meat, a live chicken and other items were reportedly taken from a property on Weaver Thomas Road. Missing items included six fourpound packages of deer meat valued at $15 each, eight pound bag of chicken leg quarters, valued at $10, 10-pound bag of pork chops valued at $17, one package of banana popsicles valued at $2.50, eight loaves of white wheat bread valued at $2.50, a 50-pound bag of dog food valued at $18.99, 50pound bag chicken feed valued at $16, 50-pound bag scratch grain valued at $14, a black and white speckled hen valued at $30 and three tubs cookie dough valued at $12. Damage to the inside panel of a camper door where some of the above was apparently stored, was estimated at $300. Additionally, the resident reported a rooster valued at $30 was found recently with its head cut off. Justin Thomas Grantham, 22, Medon, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County jail on probation. December 19, 2011 A 16-foot cattle gate valued at $180 was reportedly stolen from the entrance to a farm on Enville Road. Edwin Ansel Burnett, 30, 945 Mayfield Road, was arrested and charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 bond. Carver G. Cathey, 44, Jackson, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $1,000 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT Justin W. Hays, 1425 Memory Lane, pled guilty to simple possession. He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail with a 90-day furlough, supervised, and ordered to pay court costs plus $750 in fines.

Bethany A. Pusser, 953 A Woodland Dr., pled guilty to writing worthless checks up to $500. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, except for 364 days, to remain in treatment. Mary Trice, 6500 Old Jacks Creek Road, pled guilty to writing worthless checks up to $500. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, furloughed, supervised, and ordered to pay restitution. Vicky Ables, 295 Plunk Road, was charged with three counts of theft up to $500 and one count auto burglary. She was waived to the action of the Grand Jury on each count. Stevie L. Mooney, Enville, was charged with driving under the influence (DUI) second offense, failure to appear and violation of implied consent. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury for each charge. Jerry T. Sanders, Jackson, was charged with driving while license revoked, habitual traffic offender, violation of the light law and failure to appear. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury for each charge. Carrie M. Taylor, 738 Mifflin Ave., pled guilty to writing worthless checks up to $500. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days, all suspended, supervised, and ordered to pay court costs plus restitution and $100 in fines. Anthony Mosier, 1380 Hurst Road, was charged with vandalism up to $500, criminal trespassing and theft of property $1,000 to $10,000. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury. Paul Andrew Chance, 2580 N Pisgah Road, pled guilty to driving while license suspended. He was sentenced to six months in the Chester County jail, suspended and supervised, and ordered to pay court costs plus $100 in fines. Billy Joe McNeal, 463 White Ave., Apt. 9, was charged with public intoxication, vandalism up to $500, criminal impersonation and domestic assault. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury. Janet L. Cox, 990 Cox Road, pled guilty to writing worthless checks up to $500. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, furloughed, all suspended, supervised, and ordered to pay restitution. Alma Hodge, 139B Newsome Ave., pled guilty to writing worthless checks up to $500 and was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail all suspended except 90 days, furloughed, supervised and ordered to pay court costs

plus restitution and $100 in fines. Melissa M. Middleton, Enville, pled guilty to driving while license suspended. She was sentenced to six months in the Chester County jail, to serve; supervised and ordered to pay court costs. Emily Shae Hensley, 557 Mifflin Ave., was charged with vehicular assault. She was waived to the action of the Grand Jury. Valencia Kenshae Johnson, 557 Mifflin Ave, was charged with aggravated assault. She was waived to the action of the Grand Jury. Luis Lugo, 1760 Old Montezuma Road, was charged with burglary – auto and vandalism up to $500. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury on each charge. Jarvis Dearrow Smith, 209 Whitley St., was charged with aggravated assault. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury. Joseph W. Shields, Adamsville, was charged with aggravated burglary. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury. Michael Hallman, 2095 Simmons Road, was charged with driving while license suspended, failure to appear, theft of property $1,000 to $10,000 and burglary – auto – attempt. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury for each. Scottie L. Hunt, Trenton, was charged with reckless driving, driving under the influence (DUI) second offense, driving while license suspended and violation of implied consent. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury for each. Ronnie Lee Mooney, Jacks Creek, pled guilty to unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia – attempt, and was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail all suspended, supervised, and ordered to pay court costs plus restitution and $150 in fines. Kelly Ann Revnoc, Jacks Creek, pled guilty to writing worthless checks upt o $500. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, furloughed and supervised, and ordered to pay fines. Barrie L. Wilson, 80 Jamar Lane, pled guilty to writing worthless checks up to $500, and was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, furloughed, suspended, supervised, and ordered to pay court costs and restitution. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Billy Joel Pusser, 31, Enville, was fount to be in violation of probation. His probation was revoked and he was ordered to serve the original sentence imposed.

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Obituary/Religion

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Obituaries Kathryn Young Carroll Dec. 29, 1929 – Dec. 14, 2011 Annie Kathryn Young Carroll, 81, passed away Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011, at the Chester County Healthcare. Funeral services were 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 17, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Glenn Harris and Randy Hysmith officiating. Burial followed in Clarks Creek Cemetery at Chester County. She was born in McNairy County and grew up in Chester County, the daughter of the late Edgar Dwight and Patie Brooksie Tedford Young. She married Lois Wayne Carroll in 1952 and they made their home in Henderson, where Mr. Carroll was Command Sergeant Major of the Tennessee National Guard, and she worked over twenty years in the cafeteria at the Chester County Junior High. While their girls were growing up she was a Girl Scout leader, and they were very involved in the Chester County Saddle Club. She was a member of the Clarks Creek Primitive Baptist Church. She is survived by four daughters, Kathy Ward (Howard Bud) of Henderson, Anne Duke (Johnny) of Lexington, Judy Shostrand (Mark) of Henderson and Joyce Pruitt (Jerry) of Finger; a son, Larry Carroll (Caroline) of Sikeston, Mo.; nine grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; three brothers, Fred Young of Henderson, Neal Young of Jackson and Jerry Young of Henderson; and a sister Claudette Taylor of Henderson. She was preceded in death by her husband, Lois Wayne Carroll, in Sept. 1992; two brothers, James Ray Young and Harold Young; and a sister, Maxine Johnson. Chester County Independent

Frances Brewer Busby Date of death – Dec. 18, 2011 Frances Marie Brewer Busby, 88, passed away Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011, at the Regional Hospital of Jackson. Funeral services were 11 a.m. Tuesday at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Rick Babin and Bro. Billy Smith officiating. Burial followed in Faith Baptist Church Cemetery. She was born and reared in Chester County, the daughter of the late Robert Spencer and Maranda Elizabeth Davis Brewer. She attended Chester County Schools. She married William Ward Busby in 1939. They made their home in the Sweetlips Community all their married life. She worked for Salant & Salant Mfg., Chester Mfg. and Scotts Hill Mfg. Mrs. Busby was a member of the Faith Baptist Church. She is survived by two sons, Don Busby (Mary) and Tex Busby (Rose); a daughter, Patsy Davis (Kenneth) all of Henderson; five grandchildren, Tina Davis, Crystal Davis White, Darryn Busby, Clint Busby and Keith Busby; three great-grandchildren; and a brother, Robert Brewer of Henderson. She was preceded in death by her husband, William Ward Busby in 1990; two brothers, Joe Brewer, Douglas Brewer; two infant brothers; and three sisters, Bessie Rankin, Blanche Tedford and Johnnie Bryant. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

(Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

Ed Phillips Date of death – Dec. 15, 2011 Ernest Edgar Phillips Jr. passed away Thursday, Dec. 15, 2011, at the Tennessee Veteran’s Home in Humboldt. Funeral services were 3 p.m. Sunday at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Paul Jhin and other family members officiating. Burial with Military Honors followed at Bethel Cemetery. He was born in Blytheville, Ark. and grew up in Henderson. He is the son of the late Ernest Edgar Phillips Sr. and Lillie Miller Phillips. He graduated from Chester County High School and later received his bachelor’s degree from Texas A & M University. He entered the U.S. Army and served in World War II, the Korean War and one tour of duty in Vietnam. He retired as a Major with 20 years of service. He made his home in Memphis and owned an independent trucking company pulling mobile homes and hauling cotton seed for Planters Oil Mill in Tunica, Miss. He loved to play golf. Mr. Phillips is survived by four daughters, Pam Phillips of Memphis, Peggy Stricklen of Arlington, Patty Coalburn of Olive Branch, Miss. and Sarah PhillipsDurst of Tallahassee, Fla.; two sons, Ed Phillips III of Memphis and John Phillips of Ashland City; two sisters, Mary Miller and Polly Gowan both of Memphis; two grandchildren, Dustin Stewart and Dawn Stewart–Murphy; and two great-grandchildren, Dylon and Jared Lee. He was preceded in death by a brother, Bob Phillips; and sisters Ernie Bullington, Katy Leavitt, and Addie Mae Powers. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials be made to the Lille M. Phillips Scholarship Fund at FreedHardeman University. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

Donnie Carroll Date of death – Dec. 18, 2011 Donnie Joe Carroll, 60, passed away Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011, at his home at Enville after a short illness. Funeral services were 2 p.m. Wednesday at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Ben Flatt officiating. Burial followed in Woodlawn Cemetery at Enville. He was born and reared in Enville, the son of the late Herbert Franklie and Lotha Jane Hutton Carroll. He graduated Chester County High School in 1969. He grew up helping his father farm and also in the dozier business in the Enville area. He had worked at Grinnell Corporation, Chester Mfg. and Johnson Controls in Lexington. Donnie was a member of the Enville Methodist Church. He never married. He was preceded in death by his parents; a younger brother, Jeffery Lynn Carroll; aunts, Ginny Carroll Brewington (Ronney) of Enville, Molene Hutton Harwell (Ken) of Savannah and Maxine Carroll (Thomas) of Enville; and first cousins, Ricky Harwell of Savannah, Mike Carroll (Yoga) of Enville, Christine Carroll of Enville and Ann Peterson of Nashville. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Walter Dee Edgin Date of death – Dec. 18, 2011 Walter Dee Edgin, 90, passed away Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011, at the Chester County Healthcare. Funeral services were 11 a.m. Wednesday at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Ron Davis officiating. Burial followed in Chester County Memory Gardens. He was born and reared in Scotts Hill, the son of the late Walter Boyd and Finis Duck Edgin. He married Lois Cathrine Gordon. He worked as a commercial fisherman on the river as a young man. He entered the U.S. Army and served overseas during WW II. After the service he worked for Daniles Construction as an iron worker, constructing high rise buildings in many states across the country. They made their home in Henderson while he followed construction work. He was a Mason and a member of the Masonic Lodge in Waverly. He was a member of the Living Waters Fellowship. He is survived by two sons, Duane ‘Bubba’ Edgin and Michael Edgin both of Henderson; five daughters, Phyllis Skinner of Deanburg, Linda O’Brien of Henderson, Brenda Crowe of Fla., Kay Thompson of Jackson and Jan Denbow of Henderson; 14 grandchildren; 28 great-grandchildren; 1 great-great-grandchild; and a sister, Dorothy Jewell Edgin of Indiana. He was preceded in death by his wife Lois Cathrine Gordon Edgin in 1991; and a daughter, June Crossno. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

Johnny Ward Date of death – Dec. 13, 2011 Johnny “Monkey” Ward, 56, died Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2011. Shackelford - Casey Chapel is in charge of arrangements. A memorial service is to be announced at a later date. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

Debbie Clayton Jones Date of death – Dec. 17, 2011 Debbie Clayton Jones, 59, passed away Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011. No services are planned. Shackelford - Casey Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 22, 2011

Forty Forks Baptist Church to hold Worship Services on Dec. 25 Forty Forks Baptist Church, 672 Ed Barham Rd, Bethel Springs, will have Worship Services at 10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 25. No Sunday school or evening services will be held. Bro. Randy Smith, the pastor, invites everyone to attend this special day service celebrating the birth of our Lord, Jesus Christ. For more information, call 934-7457 or 934-7668.

Gateway Holiness Chapel having watch service At 10 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 31, Gateway Holiness Chapel, 2342 Refuge Road, Bethel Springs, will be having a watch service. Breakfast will be served after the service. Everyone is invited to come. For more information, call 934-9476.

New Year’s Eve Spectacular planned in Savannah Come ring in the New Year Saturday, Dec. 31, with great southern gospel music in Savannah at the Hardin County High School Auditorium. J.A.F. Promotions presents the second annual "New Year’s Eve Gospel Music Spectacular." The lineup includes some of gospel music's finest, featuring Host Group, Josh and Ashley Franks, The Kelly’s from Lawrenceburg, award winning soloist Mark Bishop, and one of the premier quartets in southern gospel music Mark Trammell Quartet. The doors will open at 7 p.m. and at 8 p.m. the program will begin. For more information, call 607-1948 or visit www.JoshandAshleyFranks.com.

West Tennessee Healthcare wins Positive Images of Aging Award West Tennessee Healthcare has been presented with the Positive Images of Aging Award by the Southeastern Aging Network. The Network consists of eight southeastern states and the award was presented at their 38th annual SE4A Awards Luncheon in September in Memphis. The Positive Images of Aging Award has been presented annually since 1987 in recognition of groups or businesses that have presented a positive image of older adults to the public, either through media campaigns or in their personnel or marketing policies. Accepting the award for West Tennessee Healthcare was Regina Smith, Senior Services coordinator. Smith is responsible for managing the Mature Advantage Club (MAC) for the system that includes membership affiliates at all six hospitals. “West Tennessee Healthcare cherishes our community’s seniors, and this award recognizes our commitment to maximizing the potential of the aging population,” said Lisa Piercey, MD, vice president of Hospital Services. “I am very proud of Regina and our Mature Advantage Club (MAC) for their vital contributions to the health and well-being of our area’s seniors, by providing numerous screening, educational, and social events throughout the year,” she continued. For more information about this award and programs and services for seniors through West Tennessee Healthcare, go online to www.wth.org/seniors.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

Sweetlips Baptist Church

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

Deer are forgotten victims in collisions

Lifeline Blood Services coming to Henderson Dec. 23 There will be a December Blood Drive in Henderson that is open to the public from 12-6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 23, at “It Don’t Matter,” 549 Highway 45 Bi-Pass North.

C.C. Solid Waste and Recycling Dept closed Dec. 25 The Henderson Convenience Center will be closed on Christmas day (Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling Dept).

Stroke Support Group to meet The Stroke Support Group will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 26, and the fourth Monday of each month, at the Chester County Senior Citizens building. For more information, contact Steve Simmons from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Extendicare Home Health (989-1912).

Southwest HRA announces transportation assistance to voters in 2012 for Photo ID Starting in 2012, registered voters in Tennessee will have to show government issued photo identification in order to cast a ballot at the polls. The Rural Public Transportation system is designed to benefit the entire community including the elderly, preschoolers, dialysis patients and disabled. Vital transportation services are provided to the rural areas of Southwest Tennessee, linking these residents to doctors, grocery stores, employment, senior citizen centers and recreation. Southwest HRA Rural Public Transportation will now offer transportation to the Driver Service Centers (or county clerk partner locations that apply) to voters who otherwise would not have transportation. Voters may call our agency at 1-800372-6013 for more information about scheduling your trip and trip fares that apply. For more information about Rural Public Transportation or Southwest HRA, you may visit our website at www.swhra.org.

Chickasaw State Park to host the “First Day Hike” Chickasaw State Park will be hosting the “First Day Hike” of the year at 2 p.m. on Jan. 1, 2012. The guided hike along the Friends Trail will begin and end at the main parking lot near the swimming area. We will have a short program about the history of the park and upcoming 75th anniversary events prior to the hike. We will conclude the hike with a campfire at shelter number one with coffee, hot chocolate, and marshmallows. The hike will be approximately one and a half miles long and is classified as easy to moderate, as it does have a few hills. For more information, please contact the park office at 989-5141.

CCHS Project Graduation Meeting to be held Jan. 5 At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5, a CCHS Project Graduation Meeting will be held on in the CCHS cafeteria. All parents are encouraged to attend.

Pre-Registration for Chester County Head Start on Jan. 10 Pre-registration in Chester County Head Start Center for three and four-year-old children to attend Head Start classes beginning in the Fall of 2012, will be from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 10 through Thursday, Jan. 12, at the Chester County Head Start Center, 1495 White Ave. in Henderson, next door to the Southwest Human Resource Agency. Required information to bring with you includes the child’s name, the child’s birth certificate, child’s immunization form (shot record) from the local Health Department or the child’s physician, a copy of the child’s TennCare card, social security number for all family members, food stamp case numbers and family income verification provided by individual Income Tax form 1040, W-2 forms, pay stubs, pay envelopes, written statements from employers or AFDC/Foodstamp Determination verification. Please make every effort to enroll your child on one of these three dates. The minimum immunization requirements for enrollment in Head Start is: D.T.P. (DiptheriaTetanus-Pertussis), four; Polio, three; MMR (Measles-Mumps-Rubella), one; Haemophilus (HIB) three or four; Varicella (Chicken Pox) one; Hep B, three; Hep A, one; and PCV, four.

Senior Centers plan trips Selmer Senior Center is sponsoring a wonderful 11 day, 10-night trip Aug. 25-Sept. 5, 2012, to Alaska. Tour highlights include round trip airfare, 7 days aboard the Sapphire Princess with stops in Ketchikan, Juneau, Skagway and Anchorage, scenic touring through Glacier National Park and College Fjord. We will then board the Denali Express Train for Denali National Park. Also included are a tour of Fairbanks, a gold mine tour plus much more. Those who book early get the best prices, best cabin locations and their preferred dining time. Payment in full is due by May 11, 2012. For pricing and more information, contact Hollie Knight at 645-7843.

Master Beef Producer Program If you are interested in the Master Beef Producers Program, administered by the UT

Extension, please call 989-2103.

Artifacts needed for CC Museum Leadership Chester County Class of 2011 is now accepting artifacts for the Chester County Museum that will be housed in the Tennessee Room of the Chester County Library. Categories for items that will be accepted are Native Americans, Civil War, farming, industry, education, the Henderson Centennial, or other pieces of history that are prior to 1980. Items donated must be particular to Chester County. For information, contact the library at 989-4673 or check out the museum page on Facebook.

CC Senior Center offers daily meals and activities The Chester County Senior Center, among many other activities, has a hot meal served daily at 11:30 a.m. For a reservation, call by 9:30 a.m. the day before. These are for all seniors 60 years of age or older. All the volunteers that deliver homebound meals are appreciated. You are invited to come for fitness at 10:30 a.m. or anytime in the fitness room. The Center has many programs and day trips. Call 989-7434 for information. This is your Senior Center – come and support it.

Alcoholics Anonymous The Henderson group of Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. each Tuesday (closed discussion), 8 p.m. on Thursdays (open discussion) and 3 p.m. on Sundays (open discussion and big book). Meetings are now located at First United Methodist Church on North Ave. in Henderson. For more information, call 989-8348.

Hospice volunteers needed Hospice of West Tennessee is looking for volunteers to sit with cancer patients, run errands, read to them and provide companionship. Hospice volunteers are needed in Henderson and surrounding towns. For more information, call 664-4220.

Quilt Group meets monthly “Quilters Without a Clue” meets the third Saturday of each month at the Chester County Library from 9:30 to noon. Quilters/needle workers of all experience levels are welcome. Lessons will be given for beginning quilters. For more information, call Carol at 608-2974 or go by the Fabric Corner, 110 E. Main St. in Henderson.

Recycle cell phones The Chester County Senior Center and the Chester County Solid Waste Department have joined together to recycle cell phones. You may drop them off at Miller’s Big Star, all five convenience centers, or the Senior Center. It helps the environment and is a fundraiser for the Senior Center. Used ink cartridges are also recycled.

Yoga Classes Yoga classes are being offered at First United Methodist Church. The classes are taught by Carleen Miller, certified yoga instructor, and are held every Monday from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the church’s Christian Life Center gym. The cost is $5 per session. For information, call the church office at 9892732.

Family History Books available at library The Chester County Family History Book, Volume I, and the Chester County Pictorial Book, Volume II, can be picked up at the Chester County Library.

Jackson Rural Development meetings The Jackson Rural Development Area Office holds meetings from 9 - 11 a.m. the first and third Wednesday of each month in the conference room of Henderson City Hall, 121 Crook Ave. A rural development specialist will be available to assist with rural housing applications. To set up an appointment, call 668-2091.

Loving Paws Fundraiser Loving Paws Rescue is having a special fundraising campaign to raise money to treat nine heartworm positive dogs. All the money received in the collection canisters is now designated for heartworm treatments rather than general funds. If you wish to donate, an account has been set up at Chester County Bank for heartworm treatments. Donations can be mailed to LPR, PO Box 95, Luray, TN 38352. For information, email luvdogz@bellsouth.net or call 9890319.

Head Start Program The Head Start Program is for three and four year-old children of low-income families. Applications are taken Monday through Friday at the Southwest Human Resource Building located on White Ave. Go by the office to fill out an application for your child to have a head start. For information, call Marilyn Myhan or Gloria Holiday at 9895111.

Caregivers’ Support Group A Caregivers’ Support Group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Morningside of Jackson, 1200 North Parkway. The group is open to anyone caring for a loved one at home, in a facility or in a hospital. Call Angela Warren at 423-1004 for further information.

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Deer are often the forgotten victims when a deer-vehicle collision occurs. Because of reported overpopulations of deer, it is not uncommon to hear of wrecks involving deer, and detailed information of damage the vehicle and its occupants sustained in the encounter. The deer itself often seems to be the last contributing factor to be considered, as seemed to be the case with the young deer pictured above. It was found curled up in a ditch on Hwy 200, apparently having been hit by a vehicle. Deer often live through a wreck, only to die slowly on the side of the road. In this case, a passerby contacted TWRA to intervene. The animal, having been badly injured, was euthanized and donated to someone in the area.

News from UT Extension: Parenting classes help divorcing parents By Michele Sides UT Extension Agent

Parents going through a divorce are often so busy with the legal details and hurt caused by the divorce, that they are not aware of how the divorce is affecting their children. Although parents want what is best for their children, they often are so blinded by all of the changes that they don’t see how the divorce is affecting the children involved. Tennessee law requires divorcing parents with minor children to take at least four hours of classes about parenting through divorce. The class help parents understand that, when it is safe, both parents need to spend time with their children after divorce. Also, parents need to work together to plan for their children’s care after the divorce. The University of Tennessee Extension offers a class called Parenting Apart: Effective Co-Parenting that helps parents understand the impact of divorce on their children. They also learn ways to help their children through the process. Extension agents who specialize in family and

consumer science teach the classes using discussion, videos, handouts and books. These teachers get training every year about issues related to children and divorce. With the high number of divorces in our country, it’s important that we understand the effects of divorce on children involved. It’s important to know that they will go through stages of grief over the loss of the family structure. It’s also very important to know what key behaviors to watch for during the process. Although parents never intend to hurt their children, saying things like, “You are just like your dad/mom” can be very hurtful to a child. The child knows that you have divorced the other parent and therefore must not love that parent any longer. If you are comparing the child to the mom/dad, does that mean you also don’t love the child? People who completed the classes reported that they are less likely to put their children in the middle of their conflicts. They reported decreases in sending messages to the other parent through the

child, insulting the other parent in front of the child, arguing in front of the children and asking the child about the other parent. Children who have adjusted successfully to their parents’ divorce usually have these protective factors: they live with a parent who is competent and functioning adequately, they have frequent contact with an involved noncustodial parent and their parents have decreased their level of conflict or avoided exposing their children to their conflicts. The Parenting Apart: Effective Co-Parenting classes have helped divorcing parents to focus on their children’s needs as they have gone through divorce. If you are going through a divorce and would like more information on this class, please contact your Extension office at 989-2103.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

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Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT Thursday, December 22, 2011

ARM delivers message on motorcycles more importantly, gaining insight from the bikers’ experience battling addictions. At the close of the visit, the bikers donned their helmets and leathers and rode away, the bikes’ low rumble fading into the dis-

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

By Holly Roeder Staff Writer

“Hi, I’m Mike, I’m an addict.” This familiar line was issued when recovering motorcyclists visited Tennessee Children’s Home – West Saturday morning, delivering Christmas gifts, but more importantly, to share messages of wisdom, experience and perseverance. The Children’s Home residents listened quietly as “Flash” told them his story, of how he began to “use” at a young age, and began having problems with school and truancy as early as nine to 10 years old. He shared his struggle with abuse, explaining how he had been in four treatment centers in his lifetime, battling an addiction with drugs and alcohol, sometimes staying sober for only two to three months at a time. He disclosed encounters with law enforcement, of running and hiding, and of finding he had nowhere left to hide. Flash told the young

Members of ARM visited Tennessee Children’s Home – West Saturday afternoon to deliver gifts and share a message of wisdom, experience and perseverance. Both groups share a certain anonymity, or confidentiality, as well as many of the same experiences. men residing at the chilCarrying the message, with ARM, motorcycle dren’s home about years “There’s a better way, riders must be involved in of abuse, of doing “what- without drugs and alco- a 12-step program, such as ever it took to get more hol,” Association Alcoholics Anonymous or drugs or alcohol,” and of Recovering Motorcyclists, Narcotics Anonymous. finally hitting bottom. He also known as Area The organization is not an told them he remembers a Recovering Motorcyclists, “MC,” or motorcycle club, police officer telling him, (ARM) ride together and but an extension of each “We’re here to get you offer a community of sup- member’s recovery prosome help.” It was the port, a brotherhood or fel- gram. first time it had been put lowship of recovering After Flash addressed to him that way, and he addicts. ARM was created the group, the children’s was ready. He went to jail, in 1984 in Wisconsin and home residents and bikers but he prayed, he said, a now exists in five coun- mingled, in a mentoringtruly sincere prayer, and tries in addition to chap- sort of setting, the began the long climb ters across the United younger lot learning a bit uphill. In court, Flash said States. To be associated about the motorcycles, but he asked for long-term treatment. He knew the shorter-timeframe programs were not enough. Eight clean years later, “Life is pretty good,” Flash smiled. He told the residents he no longer worries about where and when he will get the drugs or alcohol, or whether law enforcement will catch up to him. He said he realized at some point, the people he hurt the most were those closest to him – friends and family.

tance, leaving the young men with the message of perseverance and hope, a better way, and plenty to think about. For more information about ARM, check out their website, www.arm–intl.com


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Thursday, December 22, 2011

Eaglettes rolling, win three straight Several close losses early in the season have turned now into victories as the Chester County Eaglettes near the close of the first half of the basketball season. CCHS won three games last week, holding opponents to an average of less than 40 points per contest. The wins, include two district victories, brought the Eaglettes record forward to 6-6 for the year. Saturday at Eagle Gym, CCHS topped the week with its second victory this year over Scotts Hill, 58-43. The SH Lady Lions are 9-3 this season, and are coming off a state tournament run last season. The CCHS defense clamped down on Scotts Hill, forcing many bad shots. They eventually opened up a double-digit lead in the third period. The Lady Lions mounted a furious final quarter run, scoring 22 points in the period. However, the Eaglettes were up to the task, scoring 23 including 11 in the fourth quarter by Tamacha Couch. She had

22 for the game. Dee Dee Jones added 16, Darby Miskelly notched eight. Chelsea Wyatt and Miranda Hayes had 13 each for Scotts Hill. Friday in Lexington, CCHS picked up its second straight district win, 42-34. The defensive Girls District 14-AA (Unofficial) All Dist Team 1. McNairy C. 7-3 3-0 2. Chester Co. 6-6 2-1 2. Lexington 4-5 2-1 2. Bolivar C. 4-5 2-1 5. South Side 4-6 1-2 6. Fayette-W. 2-8 0-3 7. Liberty n/a n/a 8. Jackson CM n/a n/a effort by the Eaglettes was superb, again limiting the opponent to single digit scoring in each of the first three quarters. The Eaglettes’ ball-handling has improved dramatically, while at the same time gaining valuable confidence. On Tuesday, Dec. 13, Chester County hosted Fayette-Ware from Somerville, winning 5942. Other than three-point See CCHS, Page 2-B

Cobb’s late basket lifts Eagles to win Trannard Cobb scored a basket on a put-back with 13 seconds left on the clock, and the Eagle defense forced turnovers by the opponent on consecutive possessions, as Chester County picked up its third victory of the season Saturday, 63-62 over Scotts Hill at Eagle Gym. CCHS improved to 3-9 while Scotts Hill fell to 55. Cobb’s basket was only his second of the game. However, it appeared for much of the contest like the Eagles would not need heroics, as they built a double-digit lead early in the third period and seemed to have the game well in hand. However, the Lions mounted a comeback, taking the lead twice in the final minutes, ahead of Cobb’s game-winner. Austin Cavaness scored a team-high 18 points for the Eagles, a season high for the senior guard who connected four times from three-point range. Cameron Phelps added 17, and Zach Phillips 13. Nick Hayes of the Lions took game-high honors with 21. Friday in Lexington,

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

The Chester County Eagles team-up on defense, above, and the Eaglettes show cooperation on the offensive end of the court, below, during basketball doubleheader Saturday at Eagle Gym when CCHS took on Scotts Hill. CCHS won both contests to end the first half of the season.

the Eagles scored only six points in the first quarter, and trailed by 15 at halftime. They made a minicomeback in the third quarter, but faded in the fourth. Tony Phelps hit a Boys District 14-AA (Unofficial) All Dist Team 1. Bolivar 11-2 3-0 2. Fayette-W. 6-3 3-1 3. Liberty n/a 3-1 4. South Side 8-2 1-2 4. McNairy C. 5-5 1-2 4. Lexington 4-5 1-2 7. Chester Co. 3-9 1-2 8. Jackson CM 1-9 0-3 trio of threes for the Eagles, plus game-high honors with 17 points. Carlos Hart dominated play for the Fayette-Ware Wildcats, scoring 33 points including five three-pointers to lead his team to a 78-73 win Dec. 13 at Eagle Gym. FW turned a three-point halftime lead into a nearly 20point edge mid-way of the fourth quarter. Yet, CCHS mounted a furious comeback, reducing the deficit to only two points with a minute to play. However, they turned See EAGLES, Page 2-B

Lions add Chaminade to OT victims Chaminade (Hawaii) University has taken on and lost to - well-known teams such as UCLA, Georgetown, and Tennessee so far this season. Now FreedHardeman can be added to that list. The Lions defeated their fourth NCAA Division II opponent of the year with a 101-97 overtime win over the Silverswords on Sunday afternoon in Chaminade's McCabe Gym in Honolulu, Hawaii. FHU, ranked No. 17 in the NAIA, won its fifth straight and improved to 10-3 on the season. It also marks the fourth overtime win this season for FreedHardeman. The Lions almost won in regulation, but Anthony

Sampson fouled Lee Bailey on a three-point attempt with two seconds left. Bailey made all three free throws to knot the game at 90 each. Chaminade scored first in the extra period on a pair of Matt Cousins free throws, but FHU took control with an 11-3 run that decided the outcome. The Lions forced t w o turnovers in the final minute that were converted into four points, the second of which created a Michael Young layup that put the Lions up by five with 24 seconds left. After Chaminade opened the game with seven straight points, the Lions answered with a 19-

2 run and led by as many as 12 points in the half before the Silverswords went on an 18-2 run. FHU battled back three times throughout the remainder of the half to tie the game, the last time on a 6-0 burst to end the first half. Neither team would put together a big run in the second half though the Lions managed to take a ninepoint lead on two occasions, the second coming on an Orlando Bass three-pointer with 6:54 to play. Chaminade followed with back-to-back threepointers and later cut the lead down to two points with 3:56 remaining, meaning the Lions would need some big shots down

the stretch. Chandler Mack came up with the first, connecting on a three-pointer that put FHU back on top by five at the 3:34 mark. One minute later, after a Bennie Murray threepointer pulled CUH within one, Kyle Teichmann countered with a threepointer of his own. Mack, however, missed two free throws with 27 seconds left and FHU ahead by three. Chaminade quickly got a basket on its end and fouled Mack again with 17 seconds. This time, the freshman made both to put the Lions ahead by three before the game was sent to overtime. Teichmann and Sampson both posted douSee LIONS, Page 2-B

Lady Lions overcome cold shooting to defeat CBU The No. 3 Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions struggled through another cold shooting performance, but used defense and rebounding to pick up a 55-39 win over NCAA Division II Christian Brothers University on Friday night in Memphis. FHU (10-2) shot 28.8 percent from the field and made only four-of-18 from three-point range, but out-rebounded the host Lady Bucs 55-32, including 30 on the offensive side. The Lady Lions also forced 20 turnovers and held CBU to 34 percent shooting. Despite the shooting troubles, Freed-Hardeman never trailed in the game and turned a tight contest into a 16-point halftime lead by scoring the last 12 points of the first half. That lead extended to 18 points shortly after intermission, but a 9-0 CBU run cut the lead in half. However, FHU got a well-timed spark off the bench in the form of Brittany Montgomery, who scored all eight of her points in a stretch of just under three minutes to help the Lady Lions keep Christian Brothers from getting any closer. Her points were part of a 10-2 run that saw Freed-Hardeman push back ahead by 17 (47-30) with 7:39 to play. The lead stayed between 13 and 18 points for the remainder of the game. See FHU, Page 2-B


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

From Page 1-B

Eagles the ball over on the offensive end, and FW hit just enough charity shots in the last minute to hold off the Eagles. Cameron Phelps returned from the gridiron to the basketball court to lead CCHS with 22 points. Kirk Atkins muscled his way to 17 inside, and Tony Phelps was next with 16. CCHS is off this week, but returns to action next week in the tournament at Hardin Academy.

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CCHS shots, Fayette-Ware scored only two points in the second half. Overall the Lady Cats connected on seven three-pointers. The Eaglettes had a single three coming in the fourth quarter by Miskelly, but Dee Dee Jones was unstoppable for CCHS with 26 points. Chester County led by only two at intermission. The Eaglettes are scheduled to play in the

Dec. 13 at Eagle Gym Fayette-Ware 16-17-23-22=78 Chester Co. 15-15-19-24=73 FW – Carlos Hart 33, Shaq Cooper 14, Rosser 8, Richardson 6, Richardson 4, Perry 4, Miller 3, Monteague 2, Lewis 2, Morgan 2. CC – Cameron Phelps 22, Kirk Atkins 17, Tony Phelps 1, Zach Phillips 10, Cavaness 4, Humphry 3, Cobb 2. Three-point shots: FW – Hart 5. CC – T. Phelps 3, Phillips 2, C. Phelps. Records: FW – 5-2. CC – 2-8. Friday Lexington Chester Co. 6-11-18-18=53 Lexington 17-15-14-20=66 CC – Tony Phelps 17, Cameron Phelps 13, Kirk Atkins 11, Phillips 5, Cavaness 4, Holman 2, Cobb 1.

Lx – Dillon Smith 14, Kristopher Williams 14, Jacob Bolen 15, Justin Belew 11, Frazer 7, Burton 4. Three-point shots: CC – C. Phelps 3, Cavaness, Phillips. Lx – Smith 3. Records: CC – 2-9. Lx – 4-5. Saturday at Eagle Gym Scotts Hill 15-15-16-16=62 Chester Co. 12-26-15-10=63 SH – Nick Hale 21, Garrett Hayes 17, Dalton Anglin 10, C. Hays 4, Branch 4, Smith 2, Renfroe 2, Rogers 2. CC – Austin Cavaness 18, Cameron Phelps 17, Zach Phillips 13, Atkins 7, T. Phelps 7, Cobb 4, Lindsey 2, Holman 2. Three-point shots: SH – None. CC – Cavaness 4, C. Phelps 2, T. Phelps, Phillips. Records: SH – 5-5. CC – 3-9.

Dyersburg Christmas Tournament, Dec. 27-29.

Lx – Andrea Moffitt 10, McGill 4, Nichols 3, Hale 1, Minor 3, Sparks 9, Goff 4. Three-point shots: CC – Naylor 2. Lx – Sparks 3, Minor. Records: CC – 5-6. Lx – 4-5. Saturday at Eagle Gym Scotts Hill 8- 9- 4-22=43 Chester Co. 12-12-11-23=58 SH – Chelsea Wyatt 13, Miranda Hayes 13, Reeves 9, Roberts 8. CC – Tamacha Couch 22, Dee Dee Jones 16, Miskelly 8, Amos 5, McEarl 5, Cox 2. Three-point shots: SH – Hayes. CC – Couch. Records: SH – 9-3. CC – 6-6.

Dec. 13 at Eagle Gym Fayette-Ware 8-13- 7-14=42 Chester Co. 7-16-12-24=59 FW – McNeal 20, Williams 13, Moore 2, Springfield 2, Hobson 2, Horton 1, Neal 1, Douglas 1. CC – Dee Dee Jones 26, Couch 7, Amos 7, Miskelly 6, Sims 6, Reed 5, Cox 2. Three-point shots: FW – McNeal 4, Williams 3. CC – Miskelly. Records: FW – 3-5. CC – 4-6. Friday Lexington Chester Co. 11-10- 9-12=42 Lexington 7- 5- 9-13=34 CC – Tamacha Couch 19, Dee Dee Jones 12, Naylor 6, Amos 3, Miskelly 2,

CC Football Banquet set for Jan. 21 Tickets go on sale Jan. 5 for the Chester County High School Football Banquet which will take place at Henderson Church of Christ. The event is scheduled for 6 p.m. Jan. 21, and will celebrate the Eagles’ 10-3 season of 2011. Tickets, which are $10 each, can be purchased from any football player or Quarterback Club officer, as well as at the high school office, or at the football field house.

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FHU Maria Bagwell posted her fifth double-double of the season with 12 points and 11 rebounds, leading FHU in both categories. It marked the sixth time in the last seven games that Bagwell grabbed at least 10 rebounds. Hannah Parsley was the only other Lady Lion to score in double figures, getting all 10 of her points in the

Sports Schedules Chester County Junior High Basketball Date Opponent Time Place Jan. 5 Decatur County (b) 6:00 Parsons Jan. 9 Univ. School Jackson (*) 6:00 Jackson Jan. 19 Lexington (b) 6:00 Henderson Jan. 23 Selmer (g) 6:00 Selmer Jan. 24-27 Best of the West TBA TBA g – girls b-game; b – boys b-game; * b-game both

Chester County High School Basketball Date Opponent Location Time Dec. 19-21 Harding Tournament, Memphis (Boys only) Dec. 27-29 Dyersburg Christmas Tournament (Girls only) Jan. 3 McNairy Central Selmer 6:00 Jan. 6 Liberty Tech Eagle Gym 6:00 Jan. 7 Madison Academic Eagle Gym 6:00 Jan. 10 Bolivar Central Bolivar 6:00 Jan. 13 South Side Jackson 6:00 Jan. 17 Jackson-CM Eagle Gym 6:00 Jan. 20 Fayette-Ware Somerville 6:00 Jan. 23 Hardin County Savannah 6:00 Jan. 24 Lexington Eagle Gym 6:00 Jan. 27 McNairy Central Eagle Gym 6:00 Jan. 31 Liberty Tech Jackson 6:00

Chester County High School Freshman Date Jan. 9 Jan. 12 Jan. 19 Jan. 30

Opponent Crockett County Adamsville Bolivar Central Crockett County

Location Eagle Gym Adamsville Bolivar Alamo

Time 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00

Chester County High School Junior Varsity Date Jan. 3 Jan. 10 Jan. 17 Jan. 23 Jan. 24 Jan. 27

Opponent McNairy Cent. (b) Bolivar Central (b) Jackson C-M (b) Hardin County (g) Lexington (g) McNairy Cent. (g)

Location Selmer Bolivar Eagle Gym Savannah Eagle Gym Eagle Gym

Time 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30

Freed-Hardeman Women’s Basketball Date Opponent Dec. 29Menlo College Dec. 30Holy Names Jan. 5 Blue Mountain Jan. 7 Cumberland Jan. 14 Union Jan. 16 Trevecca Nazarene Jan. 19 Martin Methodist Jan. 21 Mid-Continent Jan. 26 Lyon Jan. 28 Bethel

Time TBA TBA 6:00 2:00 2:00 6:00 6:00 2:00 6:00 2:00

Place TBA TBA Brewer Center Lebanon Brewer Center Nashville Pulaski Brewer Center Batesville, Ark. Brewer Center

Freed-Hardeman Men’s Basketball Date Opponent Dec. 30Shorter Jan. 5 Blue Mountain Jan. 7 Cumberland Jan. 14 Union Jan. 16 Trevecca Nazarene Jan. 19 Martin Methodist Jan. 21 Mid-Continent Jan. 26 Lyon Jan. 28 Bethel

Time 3:00 8:00 4:00 4:00 8:00 8:00 4:00 8:00 4:00

Place Rome, Ga. Brewer Center Lebanon Brewer Center Nashville Pulaski Brewer Center Batesville, Ark. Brewer Center

From Page 1-B

Lions ble-doubles as Teichmann had 25 points and 10 rebounds and Sampson had 12 points and 11 assists. Mack came off the bench to score 15 points while Young and Jonathan Milewski each had 12. The Lions get 12 days off before heading back to take on No. 4 Shorter University on Dec. 30.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Tony Phelps of the Chester County Eagles does a “jack knife” move through the Scotts Hill defense Saturday at Eagle Gym. The Eagles won in the last few seconds, 63-62. first half. This contest was the lowest shooting percentage that FHU has posted this season, coming in underneath the team's 29.5 percent shooting night against The Master's College on Nov. 17.


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EEdduuccaattiioonn

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Local teen published in Word Weavers announces volume of local writers annual writing results Two short stories by a Henderson teenager have been included in a volume of stories and poems by West Tennessee writers. Macy Sumler, 16, was among several writers from the area to be featured in Main St. Publishing’s 11th annual poetry and short story contest. Main St. Publishing held its book signing and awards ceremony on Dec. 10 for the new book Enlightenment, Volume XI. Sumler’s stories “Forget-Me-Not” and “Safe” were included in the book. Copies can be purchased at Something To Read bookstore on Main St. in Jackson. Sumler is the daughter

Word Weavers, a group of writers based in Chester County, recently announced the winners of the annual writing contest. In the elementary category, Mallorie Gray received first place for her story, “Kam Learns a Lesson.” Pearce Walker received second place for “The Sad Snow Man.” Carter Welch and Noah Price tied for third for their stories, “Outside in the Snow” and “The Mean Sun” respectively. High school winners included first place, Macy Sumler, for “Forget-Me-Not”

Adrienne Riggs, Thomas Riggs, John D. Harris, Algene Steele, Margaret Payne, Richard L. Cave, and Clarence Hayes.

Short stories by Hays published A Henderson man is among several local writers to have short stories published as part of the 11th annual short story and poetry contest, sponsored by Main Street Publishing, Inc. Clarence Hays had two stories published in the book entitled “Enlightenment: The Talent Among Us XI: Enlightenment.” His two stories were called “Door Openings,” and “Christmas Strings.” His works were among several that were judged to be tied for third place in the contest. Hays, who is retired from the railroad, is not a novice to the writing business. For many years he wrote a column each week which appeared in The Kentuckian in Paducah, Ky. His column, “Old Man Wayne,” was a parody of the employees

of the railroad. Other local residents with works included in the publication include Adrienne Riggs, with three poems winning a first place award, tied for second, and she submitted a third poem which placed third. Riggs son, Thomas Riggs, had a poem selected for publication. John D. Harris submitted a short story which placed second, as well as two other short stories. Algene Steele submitted a short story which placed third and two other poems selected. Two poems submitted by Margaret Payne were selected for publication, as well as a short story submitted by Richard L. Cave. Also, Macy Sumler, 16, submitted two short stories.

FHU to offer Creole class during spring 2012 semester Freed-Hardeman University will offer Introduction to Creole in the spring semester, beginning Jan. 18 and continuing through May 11. The class will include learning basic phrases such as greetings, food

Kam Learns a Lesson By Mallory Gray First place, Elementary

MACY SUMLER of Eddie and Lisa Sumler of Henderson. Other local residents with works included in the publication include

names, directions, and asking questions. The class will be taught from 6-8 p.m. on Monday nights. It may be taken for one, two, or three hours of credit or it may be audited. Community members may audit the course for $125.

The class will be particularly useful to mission and service teams who plan to visit or work in Haiti, according to Amy Brewster, a French instructor at FHU. She may be contacted at abrewster@fhu.edu.

Kam is a rabbit and he has a best friend named Marry. She is a rabbit just like Kam. They like to explore places together. One day Kam went camping in the woods and found a cave. He wanted to explore the cave. In his backpack he had some matches so he could set a fire. Kam gathered some wood and built a fire. He went exploring in the cave he couldn’t. Marry smelled smoke and followed it to the cave. She called 911 for help. The fire trucks came as fast as their wheels would take them. Marry was the one who put out the fire. Kam learned that you should never start a fire and walk away. That was a very important lesson. So never set a fire and walk away and you should never ever set a fire without an adult. The Sad Snowman By Pearce Walker Second place, Elementary “Oh no!” said the snowman. “Don’t worry I will help.” Said his friend the bird. “You can?” ask the snowman. “Yes I can,” said the bird. “But I am so sad,” he said, “because someday I am going to melt.” “Oh, I cannot help that,” called the bird. Then the snowman cried again, “Oh no, what am I going to do?” Outside in the Snow By Carter Welch Third place tie, Elementary Once upon a time two little kids and a mom lived where it snowed a lot. One morning they woke up and it was snowing. They woke up Mommy and said, “Can we go build a snowman? Please, pretty please?” And they did. But they forgot that tomorrow was spring. It was spring and the sun came out. The snowman was melting all day long. When they went out that night, their snowman had melted. The kids were sad and their snowman was gone. The Mean Sun By Noah Price Third place tie, Elementary He was sad because he was melting from the hot sun. He was scared of the sun. He didn’t want to melt. The sun was melting everything and the snowman was sad. He wanted the sun to go away. He wanted to stay alive even if it was getting summer.

Why don’t young people vote? Children’s book teaches kids importance of participation Barely a quarter of young people made it to the polls in the last midterm election, and Mary Jane McKittrick thinks it’s just not right. “In school, we teach them about the revolutionary war and all the wars our country has fought in order to protect our freedoms, so it doesn’t make any sense to me why young people do so little to participate in the democracy we teach them about every year in school,” said McKittrick, author of the children’s book Election Day, part of the Boomer and Halley series (www.boomerandhalley.com). “I’m not sure what happens when kids turn 18 and decide they don’t need to vote, but I think it’s a problem worth addressing.” The statistics that worry McKittrick show that most midterm elections have traditionally drawn only 22 to 25 percent of voters aged 18-30. Keep in mind, that only tracks the number of registered voters in the mix, and doesn’t even tabulate the millions of young people who don’t bother to register to vote. According to the figures compiled by

The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, a project by Tufts University, youth voting has been up slightly in presidential elections in recent years. In 2008, 51 percent of voters age 1830 voted, up two percent from the 2004 elections. Still, such anemic voter turnout got McKittrick thinking about what needs to happen in order to turn those statistics around. “I believe that children need more than just a history lesson about democracy,” said McKittrick, a former broadcast journalist who studied speech communication in college. “I think they need to be shown how the democratic process works and how people can make changes locally and around the country by raising their voices and availing themselves of their rights as citizens in a free and democratic society. More than that, I think parents should be more conscientious about teaching the importance of voting from a young age, so that it is a right and an action that kids look forward to taking. Our power in the voting booth is the single

most significant individual power we wield as citizens and it’s a right that many around the world don’t possess. We should teach our kids to value it and to use it wisely.” McKittrick suggested parents can help teach their kids about democracy by doing the following: Vote – It’s difficult to teach your child about the election process if you don’t vote. You should make a point to vote, and when age-appropriate, bring your children with you when you do. If you vote via absentee ballot, show your child the form and explain how important it is to make sure your vote counts. Connect laws to their lives – Children may not have a frame of reference for how a law is passed, but they encounter government in action practically every day. When there is road construction on the way to school, it represents tax dollars being spent to improve the community. When a new playground opens, or old equipment is replaced with new equipment, it can be traced back to the local government. When they see campaign signs

and second place, Leah Belew with “The Miracle.” Sumler also received the Best of Show award for her submission. Adult division winners included Stan Mitchell, first place, for “The Mission.” Billie Noles received second place for “Joys Remembered” and Bebe Christopher received third for “Take a God Look at Yourself.” A reception and awards ceremony was held in their honor May 26 at Henderson City Hall.

all around during an election cycle, it’s another opportunity to explain what it’s all about. Don’t talk politics, talk issues – Politics can be boring for kids, and they may not have a frame of reference for it. But issues, like whether the school year should be longer or why they take standardized tests at school, can be discussed easily because it’s relevant to their lives. Ask questions like “Do you think it’s fair that the rules are this way?” or “If you could make the rules, what would you do?” It will get them thinking and caring about democracy and their role in it. About Mary Jane McKittrick: Mary Jane McKittrick is the creator, author, producer and publisher of the Boomer and Halley books for ages 4-8. The books feature Boomerang, an Australian Shepherd dog, and Halley’s Comet, a silver streak of a cat. The stories teach core values in a funfilled way. McKittrick is a former broadcast journalist and holds a dual Bachelor’s degree in Theatre Arts and Speech Communication.


Page 4-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

New orthopedic center opens at General Hospital Jackson-Madison County General Hospital now provides a newly renovated center for patients after orthopedic surgery. A group of hospital leaders, community leaders, and officials were present last week for the grand opening of the new Orthopedic Center, which is located on the fourth floor at General Hospital. “Jackson-Madison County General Hospital continues its focus on the needs of the patients,” said David Pearce, MD, chairman of the Department of Orthopedics. “The goal of the new orthopedic floor is to improve the comfort of patients and the efficiency of the caregivers. It is a new, beautiful environment that should enhance the patient experience,” he continued. Dave Sickle, MD, orthopedic surgeon, said, “We are very excited about the opening of the Orthopedic Center at General Hospital. This represents another step in the hospital’s commitment to providing state-ofthe-art care to the patients of this area. It helps us to continue to provide the finest quality orthopedic and rehab services in West Tennessee. We’re proud to be able to offer this level of care and service to our patients.” “The investment we

have made is to improve the patient’s experience. In these new suites, we hope to ease the stress that people feel when they have to be hospital patients,” said Renee Peebles, RN, director of Orthopedics. The new Orthopedics Center is located on the fourth floor in the B Tower. Suites are said to be spacious with modern amenities to enhance the healing environment and include: 24 large suites; Bariatric equipment— lifts, wheelchairs, doorways, restrooms, showers, to provide more comfort and safe mobility; Showers to accommodate patients with hip and knee surgeries and/or breaks; Upgraded telemetry monitoring system of patients; New designated hand, arm, and shoulder rooms; New Stryker beds specialized for orthopedic care and traction; Upgraded nurses stations for efficiency for optimum communication and patient care; New physical therapy gym to provide motivation and healing therapy for the best recovery; Space for equipment so that it is easily accessible; New sleeper sofas for room-in family, visitors, or caregivers; and upgraded and additional computers and work stations for physicians and staff. Orthopedic patients at

Submitted photo

Ribbon cutting ceremony was held last week for the new Orthopedic Center, which is located on the fourth floor at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital. General Hospital typically are recovering from these procedures: hip or knee replacement, carpal tunnel surgery, plus other procedures of the hand, foot, knee, or hip. Surgeons at Jackson-Madison General Hospital are now performing the Legion Total Knee replacement. The Legion knee is designed using advanced engineering concepts to fit the size and shapes of the knee. Surgeons are also using the Visionaire Patient Matched Instrumentation. These patient-specific surgical instruments are custom made for the precise alignment of the person’s knee. This technique increases the implant longevity and

comfort. “Patients undergoing orthopedic surgery at General Hospital receive first class care using the latest technology, surgical techniques, and rehabilitation methods,” said Kim Rush, RN, executive director Med Surg Nursing. Many patients, of various ages and activity levels, receiving hip or knee replacement surgery have experienced pain and swelling from years of wear and tear on their joints. “Orthopedic surgery at General Hospital involves providing optimal results for each patient through a team approach,” said Dr. Pearce.

Tennessee River Run donates $200,000 to fight against cancer The work of several hundred volunteers paid off in a big way when the Darryl Worley Foundation recently donated $200,000 to the Darryl Worley Cancer Treatment Center. The funds were raised through Darryl Worley’s Tennessee River Run, which celebrated its 10th anniversary in September. Worley recently presented the check on behalf of the foundation to Jack Adams, board member for the Hardin County Medical Center. Regarding this donation, Worley said, “The work that volunteers have been doing for 10 years is what makes this gift possible. Each year I cannot believe all that people give to help their neighbors. I’m humbled to work with so many who give unselfishly year after year.” The 10th anniversary of Worley’s Tennessee River Run included concerts headlined by Montgomery Gentry, Kansas and

Worley, a gala, two-day bass tournament, golf tournament, arts and crafts festival, 5K, youth fishing tournament, motorcycle poker run and boat poker run. Songwriter-in-the-round events were held in Tupelo, Memphis, Jackson and Murfreesboro to raise money, as well. Bumpus Harley-Davidson sponsored the Tennessee River Run, which was named favorite outdoor adventure in West Tennessee by the readers of The Tennessee Magazine and best music event on the water by Life on the Water magazine. Existing since 2001 to serve special needs for people in West Tennessee, Northwestern Alabama and Northeastern Mississippi, the Darryl Worley Foundation has received $1,200,000 and has paid out $1,150,000 in grants. The foundation receives general donations and memorials

How to survive holiday gatherings and avoid having an aneurysm For those of us from families built on Debbie Downer DNA, there’s only one direction a mood can go during holiday gettogethers and that’s down. Whether you’re the smiley face among frowners, or a bit of a Depressing Dan yourself, there are tricks you can use to keep the table talk from getting lethal, says Paula Renaye, a professional life coach and author of The Hardline Self Help Handbook, (www.hardlineselfhelp.co m). “You can take control simply by thinking about what you choose to say – or not say,” Renaye says. “If you hear yourself criticizing, judging or complaining, you’re part of the problem. Happy, selfrespecting people don’t find it necessary to dump on others to make themselves feel good. “If someone else is the problem, simply don’t give them the ammunition they need,” she says. Instead try these tactics: Do not say anything negative. Period. And no one-downing! Onedowning is the opposite of one-upping. It’s the art of coming up with something worse when someone else talks about their problem. No matter what negative thing anyone says, or how much you agree with it or don’t, resist the urge to respond with a negative. Instead …. Dodge, distract and detour. Turn things around with a question — a positive one. If you need to, make a “happy list” of questions before you go, so you’ll have some at the ready. And remember, there’s no law that says you have to answer a question just because someone asked it. With negative people, it’s

best if you … Do not talk about yourself. The only reason negative people care about what you’re up to is because they want something to ridicule, brag or gossip about to make themselves look or feel good. Don’t go there. Whether you just filed bankruptcy or won a Nobel Prize, keep it to yourself. No good can come of it. None. And why do you need to chatter like a chipmunk about yourself anyway? Might want to think on that one, too. Better to find some praise for someone else than to expect someone to praise you. Do not share your woes. Even if you’re in a tough place and could really use a shoulder to cry on, don’t start laying your woes on a Negative Nell. Even in a weak moment, when you’ve had a terrible day, talking about it with a negative person is a bad idea. You might get a microsecond of sympathy, but that’s only so they can launch into telling you how much worse they have it. So, no talking about yourself unless you want to be the talk of the party, the family and the town. Do your homework and become like Teflon. Think of the times people said things that made you feel bad or made you feel the need to defend or explain yourself. If you want to avoid going down that trail again, start hacking away at the jungle of your own emotions. Get over needing anyone’s approval or blessing. If you are still waiting for negative relatives to validate you, you’re in for a long wait. Don’t set yourself up to be miserable. Get over it and go prepared.

Shiloh National Military Park celebrates “birthday”

Submitted photo

The Darryl Worley Foundation recently donated $200,000 from Worley’s Tennessee River Run to the Hardin County Medical Center. Worley (right) presents the check to Jack Adams, board member of the Hardin County Medical Center. These funds will be used to serve people through the Darryl Worley Cancer Treatment Center. throughout the year but the Tennessee River Run has provided the majority of its funds during the past 10 years. Opening and maintaining the Darryl Worley Cancer Treatment Center is just one of the projects funded by the Darryl Worley Foundation. The foundation also supports St. Jude

Children’s Research Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and others. The Darryl Worley Foundation is a 501c3 public benefit corporation. More information is available at www.darrylworleyfoundation.org.

On Tuesday Dec. 27, Shiloh National Military Park will commemorate the 117th anniversary of its establishment as a Civil War military park. The program begins at 1:30 pm in the visitor center auditorium with a power-point presentation about the establishment of the park. Following the 30-minute program, the Hardin County Visitor and Convention Bureau will present a cake to the park for visitors to enjoy. This event is free and open to the public. Shiloh was established on Dec. 27, 1894, during a wave of nationalism and preservation in the United States. By the 1890s, many Americans had

grown tired of the sectionalism which tore the country apart in the 1850s and 60s and the Reconstruction period that followed the war. In addition, many civilians and veterans wanted to pay tribute to the bravery of Civil War soldiers, both North and South alike. Shiloh was one of the first five military parks created, along with Chickamauga, Vicksburg, Antietam, and Gettysburg. The visitor center is open from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. every day except Dec. 25. The bookstore is open from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. in the winter. For more information contact 731 689-5696 or visit www.nps.gov/shil.

Mayan calendar predictions had frightening accuracy We’re one year from the end of the Mayan calendar, and “doomsday” is on most everyone’s lips, especially given the deteriorating global economy, devastating natural disasters and uprisings from Egypt to Oakland. But few people know much more about the ancient Central American civilization, the significance of its complex calendar, and its history of accurately predicting the future. Best-selling novelist Steve Alten immersed himself in Mayan culture as he researched his latest release, “PHOBOS: Mayan Fear” (Tor/Forge) that reveals a very real 2012 threat, not just to humanity, but the entire planet as well. The story, third in an international bestselling Mayan Prophecy series, is rooted in a people that have fascinated scientists, historians and dreamers alike for decades. “The Mayan culture began around 500

BC, likely an offshoot of the Olmec civilization,” Alten says. “The Mayan civilization peaked around 900 AD during the time of Kukulcan, a mysterious bearded white man who arrived in Chichen Itza possessing a wealth of knowledge of astronomy, engineering and agriculture. The Kukulcan pyramid in Chichen Itza is a testament to his knowledge. The foursided temple has 91 steps on each side; add the platform on top and you get 365 – as in the days of the year. Each equinox, for over a thousand years, the shadow of a giant serpent appears on the pyramid’s northern balustrade where it proceeds to slither down to its stone head. This special effect draws 10s of thousands of tourists to Chichen Itza, many of whom believe it to be an ancient warning pertaining to the calendar’s prophecy.” “A calendar is an instrument that charts the Earth’s revolution around the

sun. Before you dismiss the Mayan calendar’s prophecy, you should know that it happens to be one 10 thousandth of a day more accurate than the Gregorian calendar, which is what we base our modernday calendar on, even though it is 1,500 years older! Like the Kukulcan pyramid, the Mayan calendar charts cyclical astronomical changes. It consists of three calendars built in one, like the working gears of a clock, plus a fourth, the Long Count. The calendar separates its prophecies into 20-year epochs, called katums, as well as five great cycles. Each of the last four cycles ended in cataclysm. Our present cycle, the fifth, ends on a date equating to the winter solstice of 2012 – Dec. 21. Doomsday.” In 1519, another bearded white man, Hernando Cortez, arrived in the Yucatan, along with the Spanish Armada. That event was predicted by the calendar and

the Mayan’s most important prophet, Chilam Balam, one of the main characters in PHOBOS. “When the Spanish priests read the codices pertaining to the Mayan calendar, they burned almost everything, including vital information pertaining to the 2012 end date,” Alten says. What will happen in 2012? In “PHOBOS: Mayan Fear,” the author draws a thin line between fiction and fact, but spares no detail in linking our pending disaster to the “Big Bang” experiments now being conducted by the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. “The LHC’s experiments are producing miniature black holes,” says Alten. “While this may be fodder for a novel, the scariest part of PHOBOS is that we’re already experiencing powerful earthquakes, tsunamis and climatic changes associated with a potential cause and effect relationship.”


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

FOR SALE FOR SALE – Land and Lots —YEAR END SPECIAL —- This is not a misprint and only good until 01/01/2012. Prices will never be this low again. 1 Acre — - $5,000 —- $50 Down —- $50 / Month. 2 Acres —- $10,000 —$100 Down —- $100 / Month. 3 Acres —- $15,000 —- $150 Down —- $150 / Month. 5 Acres —- $18,000 —- $180 Down —$180 / Month. 10 Acres —$34,000 —- $340 Down —- $340 / Month. 15 Acres —- $48,000 — - $480 Down —- $480 / Month. No Restrictions and NO CREDIT CHECK. Has Driveways, Building Site, Light Poles. Lots of Wildlife. Great Hunting. Chester County 731-989-4859 —- 7 Days a Week. (TFC) FOR SALE – 35 Acres, Wooded, In Chester County, Adjacent Creek. Owner Financing. $49,900. Call 983-2766. (TFC) FOR SALE – Great House at 914 West Main. Former Home of The Scotts. Features: 3 BR, 2 BA, Large Den, Fireplace, Sunroom, Full-Size In-Ground Pool, Pool House with Full Bath. Valued at $135,000 —- Sale for Only $95,000. Call 608-2225. (TFC) HOME FOR SALE by Owner – 210 Shannon Dr. Henderson, TN. 3 BR, 2 BA. 1,800 Sq. Ft. Excellent Neighborhood. $159,900. Call 731-234-2679. (33P) COUNTRY ROCKING CHAIRS for Christmas at the Country Market on South Church. $39 — Limit 2. (33C) FOR SALE – 1.4 Acres, Includes Well, Storage Building, Circle Driveway. Great for Mobile Home or New Home. No Restrictions. Call 731-608-6804. (33C) NEW CROP PECANS - $2.99 / lb. and Old Fashion Candy at the Country Market on South Church. (33C) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – New 4 BR, 2 Bath Homes, Delivery & Setup. $44,500. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER of Corinth, MS. 1/4 Mile Past Hospital on Hwy. 72 West. 662-287-4600. (35C) FREE PUPPIES – Dachshund Mix (Look Like Dachshund). 4 Months Old. 2 Girls and 1 Boy. Call 731-608-2120. (33P) LOT FOR SALE – 65 Mitchell Lane. Call 731-612-3690. (33P) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – New 3 BR, 2 Bath Homes, Delivery & Setup. $29,950. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER of Corinth, MS. 1/4 Mile Past Hospital on Hwy. 72 West. 662-287-4600. (35C) FURNITURE SALE! SpongeBob & Camo Child’s Recliners - $79. Microfiber Sofa / Love Suite - $549. Full or Queen Mattress Set - $199. King or Queen TempurPedic Type Mattress Set - $799 / $899. Wood Bunk Beds $179. Microfiber Rocker Recliner - $199. Lay-A-Way & Free Delivery. Call 731610-1811. (34P) FOR SALE – Clearance Sale on Display Homes. Save $$ on your New Home. Double & Singlewides available. Large Selection. WINDHAM HOMES, Corinth, MS. 1-888-287-6996. (TFC) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – New 2 BR Homes, Delivery & Setup. $25,950. CLAYTON

HOMES SUPERCENTER of Corinth, MS. 1/4 Mile Past Hospital on Hwy. 72 West. 662287-4600. (35C)

FOR RENT FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. $1,500. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex. Excellent Location. No Pets. 1 Year Lease. Appliances Furnished. Call 983-2766. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home, CHA, appliances, 3 acres. 580 Loop Road (Deanburg). $550 / month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes and Houses in Lexington. Weekly With Utilities or Monthly Without. Call 731-968-9689. (40P) FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA, New Carpet, New Paint. Rent or Rent To Own. Call 731-608-6804. (33C) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, 3 acres. 765 Cemetery Road, Enville. $495. United Country Realty 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3-bedroom brick house, new carpet / paint, carport, appliances, fenced yard. 478 Woods. $625 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Renovated 4 bedroom, 2 bath, living room, den. 2570 sq. ft. house. 934 Sand. $995 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 BR Frame Home, Enville. $400 Plus $350 Deposit. No Pets, City Water and Gas. References Required. 731687-3508 after 6 p.m. (33P) FOR RENT – Renovated 3 bedroom, 2 bath, living room, den, double garage, storm shelter. 1100 Stewart (Sweetlips). $850 / Month. Call 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 Bath Duplex Apartment. Appliances furnished with 1 car enclosed garage. Located on Deer Drive. Credit check, references and oneyear lease required. No pets. $300 Deposit. $550 / Month. 989-4979 or 608-4885. (TFC) FOR RENT – Larger 2 bedroom house. 431 W. Main. $500 / month. United Country Real Estate. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 833 Kindra Drive. 3 BR, 2 Bath Home in Great Neighborhood. Appliances Furnished. Enclosed Garage. $500 Deposit. $950 / Month. Credit Check, References & One Year Lease Required. No Pets. Call 608-4885. (TFC) FOR RENT – In country, Henderson. Auto body shop, could be used as a warehouse or other business. 5 minutes from Henderson, 20 minutes from South Jackson. Featuring 2 and possibly 3 bays. Main shop area measures 14 ft. x 70 ft. Connecting paint booth size is 14 ft. x 30 ft. 12 ft. rollup door on front. Back entrance has rollup door. Gas heat. Enclosed apt. with bath which can be used as office or living quarters. $450 / Month with $200 Deposit. 731-989-

5648. (33C) FOR RENT – Efficiency apartment. 326 N. Church. Fully furnished, electric, water, and cable. No pets. $150 / Week. 731-9895648. (33C)

MISCELLANEOUS LOST BILLFOLD at FHU Walking Track. Call David at 9897146. REWARD! (33P) JIM’s TRASH SERVICE - $15 / Month. $12 / Month for Senior Citizens. Call 731-608-5165 or 989-8958. (32P) CHILD CARE in my home. Stay-at-Home Mother. Reasonable weekly rates. Kidfriendly home. Call anytime 731616-7040. (33P) WANTED LAND OR STANDING TIMBER on 10 acre tracts and larger. Pine & hardwood. Carter Timber & Land. Since 1993. Ted Carter 731-607-0777. (TFC)

STATEWIDES HOME SECURITY SYSTEM Valued at $850. Call Today & Receive it Free with $99 installation fee. First 10 callers receive a Free Medical Pendant. Call Heartland Security Today: 1-800913-9853 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (TnScan) ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com (TnScan) TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR Trade-In 1980 or Newer. Call 731-307-9320 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Tuition Assistance, Medical Benefits, Monthly Paycheck - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) DRIVER- DRY AND REFRIGERATED. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Daily Pay! Various hometime options. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) DRIVERSREGIONAL FLATBED Home Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Full Benefit Package. CDL-A Required to Apply. Flatbed training available. Call 1-800-9927863 ext 158 (TnScan) $1000 - $1250 - $1500 Sign On Bonuses. Hiring Over The Road Drivers. Van, Flatbed, Refrigerated Openings. Call Roehl 1-888-867-6345 AA/EOE (TnScan)

DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A NEED EXTRA Cash for the Holidays? Experience Pays! Up to $3,000 Bonus Sign-On Bonus! Get the money & respect you deserve! 6 mos. OTR exp. & CDL Req’d. Call Today! 877-521-5775, www.usatruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVER- STABLE CAREER, NO Experience Needed! Sign On Bonuses Available! Top Industry pay & quality training, 100% Paid CDL Training 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A OTR DRIVERS Start up to 44¢ per mile!! • Lease Purchase Available! • Great Hometime • Experience Req’d. Call Today! 800-441-4271 X TN100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: RUN 5 STATE Regional! Get Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39¢/mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. req’d. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 1-800-572-5489 ext. 227 (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! We Have The Miles! OTR positions available! Teams Needed!! Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d 800-942-2104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.totalms.com (TnScan) CDL-A DRIVERS - STEADY MILES, New Equipment, Regular Hometime. Dry Van and Flatbed ($500 Sign-On for Flatbed). Benefits after 30 days! CDL Graduates Needed. 888-8015295. (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! • Top Earnings Potential • 100% Fuel Surcharge- Own Your Own Business! Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) TIPTON COUNTY Remodeled Country Home. 3BR, 2BA, Office, Workshop/Garage, Brighton schools, Stove, Dishwasher, and Gas Heat furnished. $1400/Mo., plus deposit. 901-475-1918. (TnScan) NEW 3 BR/2 BA Under 27900. Lay-Away Now For Income Tax Money - 3 Left Call 901-2123040 (TnScan) 2012 - 3 BEDROOM / 2 BATH Single-wide -$27,900 Includes Delivery and Set, Low Payments Call Clayton Home 731-968-4937 (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 94 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 22 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) HOME SECURITY SYSTEM Valued at $850. Call Today & Receive it Free with $99 installation fee. First 10 callers receive a Free Medical Pendant. Call Heartland Security Today: 1-800913-9853 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (TnScan) ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com (TnScan) TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR Trade-In 1980 or Newer. Call 731-307-9320 (TnScan)

TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Tuition Assistance, Medical Benefits, Monthly Paycheck - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan)

Page 5-B

Needed!! Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d 800-942-2104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.totalms.com (TnScan) CDL-A DRIVERS - STEADY MILES, New Equipment, Regular Hometime. Dry Van and Flatbed ($500 Sign-On for Flatbed). Benefits after 30 days! CDL Graduates Needed. 888-8015295. (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! • Top Earnings Potential • 100% Fuel Surcharge- Own Your Own Business! Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan)

NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)

TIPTON COUNTY Remodeled Country Home. 3BR, 2BA, Office, Workshop/Garage, Brighton schools, Stove, Dishwasher, and Gas Heat furnished. $1400/Mo., plus deposit. 901-475-1918. (TnScan)

DRIVER- DRY AND REFRIGERATED. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Daily Pay! Various hometime options. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan)

NEW 3 BR/2 BA Under 27900. Lay-Away Now For Income Tax Money - 3 Left Call 901-2123040 (TnScan)

DRIVERSREGIONAL FLATBED Home Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Full Benefit Package. CDL-A Required to Apply. Flatbed training available. Call 1-800-9927863 ext 158 (TnScan) $1000 - $1250 - $1500 Sign On Bonuses. Hiring Over The Road Drivers. Van, Flatbed, Refrigerated Openings. Call Roehl 1-888-867-6345 AA/EOE (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A NEED EXTRA Cash for the Holidays? Experience Pays! Up to $3,000 Bonus Sign-On Bonus! Get the money & respect you deserve! 6 mos. OTR exp. & CDL Req’d. Call Today! 877-521-5775, www.usatruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVER- STABLE CAREER, NO Experience Needed! Sign On Bonuses Available! Top Industry pay & quality training, 100% Paid CDL Training 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A OTR DRIVERS Start up to 44¢ per mile!! • Lease Purchase Available! • Great Hometime • Experience Req’d. Call Today! 800-441-4271 X TN100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: RUN 5 STATE Regional! Get Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39¢/mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. req’d. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 1-800-572-5489 ext. 227 (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! We Have The Miles! OTR positions available! Teams

2012 - 3 BEDROOM / 2 BATH Single-wide -$27,900 Includes Delivery and Set, Low Payments Call Clayton Home 731-968-4937 (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 94 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 22 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) HOME SECURITY SYSTEM Valued at $850. Call Today & Receive it Free with $99 installation fee. First 10 callers receive a Free Medical Pendant. Call Heartland Security Today: 1-800913-9853 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (TnScan) ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com (TnScan) TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR Trade-In 1980 or Newer. Call 731-307-9320 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Tuition Assistance, Medical Benefits, Monthly Paycheck - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan)


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011

Public Notices NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated August 20, 2002, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded August 27, 2002, at Book 220, Page 110 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Jason Lee Morris and Deana Morris, conveying certain property therein described to Arnold M. Weiss, Esq., 208 Adams Avenue, Memphis, TN 38103 as Trustee for Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc.; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 19, 2012 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: First tract: beginning on a stake in the south right of way margin of Plainview black topped road 25 feet from the center, being the northeast corner of lot conveyed to James R. Mount and wife, Julie Mae Mount; runs thence with the south right of way margin of said toad south 87 degrees and 10 minutes east 326.50 feet to a stake at the intersection of a black topped road leading south 25 feet from the center of either road; thence running with west right of way margin of black topped road south 0 degrees and 50 minutes east 132 feet to a stake in west right of way margin of black topped road 25 feet from center; thence running with a new line north 87 degrees and 6 minutes west 341.60 feet to a stake, the southeast corner of the James R. and Julie Mae Mount lot; thence running north 3 degrees and 36 minutes east 131 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1 acre, more or less. Second Tract: Beginning on an iron stake, this point being the southeast corner of Mount lot; runs thence south 87 degrees 10 minutes east 341.60 feet to a stake on the west right of way margin of Sweet LipsPlainview Road; runs thence with the west right of way margin of road south 0 degrees 50 minutes east 131 feet to a stake; runs thence leaving road north 87 degrees 10 minutes west 351 feet to an iron stake; runs thence north 3 degrees 36 minutes east 131 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1.0437 acres, more or less. However, there is included within the two lots above described, and expressly excluded from this conveyance a 20 inches x 262 inches strip of land conveyed to James R. Mount and wife, Julia M. Mount by Aron Paul Hodges and wife, Barbara Hodges by Warranty Dead dated February 10, 1988, of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in Deed Book 83, page 656. However, there is included within the two lots above described, and expressly excluded from this conveyance a 20’ x 262’ strip of land conveyed to James R. Mount and wife, Julia M. Mount by Aron Paul Hodges and wife, Barbara Hodges by Warranty Deed dated February 10, 2988, of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in Deed book 83, page 656. ALSO KNOWN AS: 1140 Plainview Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340-7729 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Jason Lee Morris; Deana Morris The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 1286218610 DATED December 13, 2011 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_bsims_111213_1322 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE DEFAULT having been made in the terms, conditions and payments provided in certain Deed of Trust

executed by Melissa Darlene Maness Miller AKA Melissa D Melton to Arnold M. Weiss, Trustee dated May 13, 2004 in the amount of $77,600.00, and recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Deed Book 252, Page 345, (“Deed of Trust”); and, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust having been last transferred to The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association, as Trustee, fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A., as Trustee, as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RASC 2004KS6 by assignment; and, The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association, as Trustee, fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A., as Trustee, as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RASC 2004KS6, as the current holder of said Deed of Trust (the “Holder”), has appointed as Substitute Trustee the undersigned, , any of whom may act, by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; therefore, NOTICE is hereby given that the entire amount of said indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Holder, and the undersigned as Substitute Trustee, or a duly appointed attorney or agents by virtue of the power and authority vested by the Appointment of Substitute Trustee, will on Thursday, January 5, 2012 commencing at 12:00 PM at the Main entrance of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee; sell to the highest bidder for cash, immediately at the close of sale, the following property to-wit: Beginning at a iron pin on the North side of Benson Road at the Northwest corner of the Gorded Millner tract recorded in Deed Book 50, Page 454; and the Northeast corner of the Johnny Benson tract of which this is a part of, runs thence with the West line of Millner South 19 degrees 00 minutes East 52.90 feet to a iron pin; thence South 7 degrees 53 minutes 05 seconds East 317.45 feet to an iron pin; thence south 75 degrees 21 minutes 54 seconds West 200.00 feet to a iron pin; thence North 18 degrees 17 minutes 34 seconds West 437.36 feet to a iron pin in the South line of the Don Childers tract; thence South 89 degrees 56 minutes 40 seconds East 270.00 feet to the point of beginning containing 2.17 acres as surveyed by Richard Dodds RLS #352 on April 6, 1999. Subject to the County Road right of ways and utility easements of record. Being the same property conveyed to grantors herein by Deed of record in Deed Book 172, Page 706, Registers Office for Chester County, Tennessee. Parcel ID No.: 39-30.01 Map & Parcel No.: 3930.01 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 320 Benson Road, Reagan, Tennessee 38368 CURRENT OWNER(S): Melissa Darlene Maness Miller SUBORDINATE LEINHOLDERS: N/A OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, however, the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The sale will be held subject to any unpaid taxes, assessments, rights-of-way, easements, protective covenants or restrictions, liens, and other superior matters of record which may affect said property; as well as any prior liens or encumbrances as well as priority created by a fixture filing; and/or any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. If the U.S. Department of Treasury/IRS, the State of Tennessee Department of Revenue, or the State of Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development are listed as Interested Parties in the advertisement, then the Notice of this foreclosure is being given to them and the sale will be subject to the applicable governmental entities` right to redeem the property, as required by 26 U.S.C § 7425 and T.C.A. § 67-1-1433. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the holder of the Deed of Trust. The notice requirements of T.C.A. §35-5-117 were satisfied prior to the first publication of the Notice of Substitute Trustee`s Sale. Substitute Trustee reserves the right to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. MCC TN, LCC 3525 Piedmont Road NE, Six Piedmont Center, Suite 700 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404) 3 7 3 1 6 1 2 www.mccurdycandler.com File No. 07-12623 /CONV Ad Run Dates: 12/8/2011, 12/15/2011, and 12/22/2011 THIS LAW FIRM IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Ad #17589

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated April 25, 2008, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded April 29, 2008, at Book 314, Page 502 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Jeremy W. Davis and Jessica K. King, conveying certain property therein described to Larry F. McKenzie as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Freedom Mortgage Corporation and Freedom

Mortgage Corporation’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 19, 2012 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a stake at or near the driveway of Horace Beene in the Southern margin of the Henderson-Montezuma Road and runs thence Southwestwardly with the Western line of Beene 320 feet to a stake; runs thence North with the severance line of Mable Leith Tarpley 255 feet to a stake in the Southern margin of said Henderson-Montezuma Road; runs thence Eastwardly with the Southern margin of the same 320 feet to the place of beginning, containing about 1 acre, be the same more or less. Said legal description is the same description as contained in the previous deed of record. ALSO KNOWN AS: 1965 Old Montezuma Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Jeremy W. Davis; Jessica K. King; Secretary of Housing & Urban Development The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700207336 DATED November 30, 2011 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee FHA No. 482-3909173-703 DSaleNoticeTN-Shellie_msherrod_111130_1141 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated August 14, 2002, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded August 20, 2002, at Book 219, Page 659 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Jacqueline D. Taylor and Tracy W. Taylor, conveying certain property therein described to Hunter Simmons, Trustee as Trustee for First South Bank; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 5, 2012 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe found in the eastern right of way of Pisgah Road, the southwest comer of the Carolyn Hurst lot, see Deed Book 65, page 342; thence north 87 degrees 33 minutes 46 seconds east for a distance of 209.82 feet with the southern boundary of Hurst to an iron pin; thence South 16 degrees 26 minutes 40 seconds east for a distance of 213.11 feet with a new line to an iron pin; thence south 88 degrees 24 minutes 03 seconds west for a distance of 210.00 feet with a new line to an iron pin; thence north 16 degrees 36 minutes 23 seconds west for a distance of 210.09 feet with the eastern right of way of Pisgah Road to the point of beginning., Together with and subject to covenants, easements and restriction of record. Said property contains 1.000 acres more or less as surveyed by James A. Martin, R.L.S. Number 14G9 on December 9, 1998. ALSO KNOWN AS: 2480 North Pisgah Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340-5319 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to

the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Jacqueline D. Taylor; Tracy W. Taylor The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 1286218418 DATED December 7, 2011 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_bsims_111207_1250 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE DEFAULT having occurred in the performing terms of a promissory note described and secured by a Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 337, Page 538, Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee; and executed on February 18, 2010 by Cornelius Charles and wife, Joyce Charles conveying the property therein described to Anthony R. Steele, Trustee, to secure said indebtedness therein described to Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance , Inc. Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc. executed and Appointment of Substitute Trustee, naming R.N. “BO” TAYLOR as Substitute Trustee, which is of record in Record Book 355, Page 677 Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee. And DEFAULT having been made in the promising terms of said Deed of Trust, which contains the power to sell upon default, the owner and holder, in accordance with the terms of said Deed of Trust, hereby declares the entire debt due and payable and demands that the said R.N. “BO” TAYLOR, Substitute Trustee, sell the property in accordance with said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that I, R.N. “BO” TAYLOR, SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me by said Deed of Trust, will on January 25, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at the front door of the Courthouse in Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, and free from the equity of redemption, homestead, dower and all other exemptions of every kind, all of which are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, the following land in Chester County, Tennessee, described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pin set in the south margin of Northchester Lane, which point is the northeast comer of Lot 15 and the northwest corner of the herein described tract; thence, from the point of beginning and with the margin of Northchester Lane, North 64 degrees 58 minutes 31 seconds East for 250.00 feet to the northwest comer of Lot 17; thence with the west line of Lot 17, South 26 degrees 12 minutes 29 seconds East for 811.40 feet to the north line of Lot 18; thence with the north line of Lot 18, South 66 degrees 11 minutes 18 seconds West for 290.93 feet to the southeast comer of Lot 15; thence with the east line of Lot 15, North 23 degrees 18 minutes 34 seconds West for 805.43 feet to the point of beginning, containing 5.0 acres, being Lot 16 of the Northchester Subdivision. Said legal description is the same description as contained in the previous deed of record. This being the same property conveyed to Cornelius Charles and wife, Joyce Charles, by deed of record dated August 4, 2009, filed August 12, 2009, and recorded in Record Book 331, Page 247, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Map 10, Parcel 38.25 This property includes a 2010 Clayton mobile home, Vin Number CS2011309TNAB which was purchased under an installment contract-security agreement which evidences the deed of trust and which will stay with the land. The sale of this property is pursuant to Section 9-604 of the Uniform Commercial Code and Tennessee Annotated 47-9-604. The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Said sale will be in bar of the right and equity of redemption, homestead and dower, but subject to all tax and prior liens of record in the Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, which are applicable to this property and unpaid real estate taxes, if any. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to

another day, time and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. The 60 day notice of the right to foreclosure, in accordance with T.C.A. 35-5-101, was sent by United States Mail, postage prepaid to, Cornelius and Joyce Charles on July 15, 2011. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated, this 9th, day of December 2011 R.N. “Bo” Taylor, Substitute Trustee Attorney at Law 305 Fourteenth Avenue, North Nashville, Tennessee 37203 (615) 859-0060 SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDERS: OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: N/A

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the terms, conditions, and payments provided in a certain Deed of Trust dated OCTOBER 30, 2008, executed by JOHNATHAN KESLER, A SINGLE MAN to LARRY MCKENZIE, ATTORNEY AT LAW, Trustee, of record in RECORD BOOK 322, PAGE 74, for the benefit of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST STATE BANK, in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee and to J. PHILLIP JONES, appointed as Substitute Trustee in an instrument of record in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee, to secure the indebtedness described; WHEREAS, the said Deed of Trust was last assigned to TENNESSEE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AGENCY; the entire indebtedness having been declared due and payable by TENNESSEE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AGENCY BY AND THROUGH ITS SERVICER AND AUTHORIZED AGENT, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as provided in said Deed of Trust, I, J. PHILLIP JONES, will by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as Substitute Trustee, on TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012 AT 12:00 P.M. (NOON), AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE CHESTER COUNTY COURTHOUSE IN HENDERSON, CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, sell to the highest bidder for cash, free from the equity of redemption, homestead, and dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived, and subject to any unpaid taxes, if any, the following described property in CHESTER County, Tennessee, to wit: PROPERTY LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF CHESTER, TENNESSEE: BEGINNING AT A NAIL AND CAP IN THE CENTER OF MASSEYVILLE-FRIENDSHIP ROAD, AT A POINT 398 FEET EAST OF BENNETT’S SOUTHEAST CORNER; RUNS THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREE WEST 235 FEET TO A STAKE; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 41’ EAST 210 FEET TO A STAKE; RUNS

THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 51’ EAST 235 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP IN THE CENTER OF SAID ROAD; RUNS THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES WEST 100 FEET TO A POINT IN THE CENTER OF SAID ROAD; RUNS THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 04’ WEST 110 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 1.15 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO JOHNATHAN KESLER, HIS HEIRS AND ASSIGNS FOREVER, BY DEED DATED OCTOBER 30, 2008 OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 322, PAGE 72, IN THE REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 5310 OLD FRIENDSHIP ROAD, FINGER, TENNESSEE 38334. MAP 086 PARCEL 012.00 THE SALE OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, AND IS FURTHER SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF ANY TENANT(S) OR OTHER PARTIES OR ENTITIES IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY. THIS SALE IS SUBJECT TO ANY UNPAID TAXES, IF ANY, ANY PRIOR LIENS OR ENCUMBRANCES LEASES, EASEMENTS AND ALL OTHER MATTERS OF RECORD INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE PRIORITY OF ANY FIXTURE FILING. IF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY/ INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, OR THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT ARE LISTED AS INTERESTED PARTIES IN THE ADVERTISEMENT, THEN THE NOTICE OF THIS FORECLOSURE IS BEING GIVEN TO THEM, AND THE SALE WILL BE SUBJECT TO THE APPLICABLE GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY, ALL AS REQUIRED BY 26 U.S.C. 7425 AND T.C.A. 67-1-1433. IF APPLICABLE, THE NOTICE REQUIREMENTS OF T.C.A. 35-5117 HAVE BEEN MET. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY, TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE IN THE EVENT THE HIGHEST BIDDER DOES NOT HONOR THE HIGHEST BID WITHIN 24 HOURS, THE NEXT HIGHEST BIDDER AT THE NEXT HIGHEST BID WILL BE DEEMED THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER. OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: NONE OF RECORD THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. This day, December 12, 2011. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 5310 OLD FRIENDSHIP ROAD, FINGER, TENNESSEE 38334. J. PHILLIP JONES SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE 1800 HAYES STREET NASHVILLE, TN 37203 (615) 254-4430 www.phillipjoneslaw.com F11-2855


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 22, 2011


Chester County Independent 12-22-11