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Chester County Understanding Hanukkah, Page 13-14A

Thursday

DECEMBER 13, 2012

Independent

148th YEAR - NO. 32

chestercountyindependent.com

$1.00

Million and a half raised at Benefit Dinner

Here comes Santa Claus! Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Santa Claus waves to the crowd attending the Henderson Christmas Parade last Thursday. Henderson businesses will be open extended hours tonight, Thursday, as the holiday period gets in full swing. See additional photos, Pages 16-17A.

Deadlines are early for the holidays Due to early print deadlines, all deadlines are moved up for the Dec. 27 and Jan. 3 issues of the Chester County Independent. Classified adver tising, yard sales, and real estate ads must be in by noon on the Friday before, and all other ads and copy must be in our offices by noon on the Monday before.

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

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TODAY’S WEATHER

Help us find the 12 Days of Christmas Where can you find five gold rings, two turtle doves, or a partridge in a pear tree? Are they available in Henderson or Chester County? Or what about a unique substitute? If you know where to find all the different items mentioned in the fable poem, “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” then let us know at the Chester County Independent. However, instead of the originals, can you come up with a substitute for the 10 Lords-a-Leaping? What about the eight Maids-a-Milking? Instead of 11 Pipers Piping, where can we find 11 people laying pipe? Send your suggestions to the Independent’s feature writer Marney Gilliam by email at maregill@yahoo.com.

The 48th Annual Benefit a part of that transformation of Dinner at Freed-Hardeman education.” University, featuring former Rice was the second woman Secretary of State Condoleezza and the first African-American Rice, raised woman to $1,480,265 be named “It is good to be in an environment secretary last Friday where faith and reason n i g h t , of state. are not enemies of one another.” Prior to a c c o rd i n g to a release Condoleezza Rice t h a t from the Former Secretary of State a p p o i n t F H U ment, she advanceh a d ment office. The total is the sec- served as President George W. ond-highest in the dinner’s history, surpassed only by the 2010 dinner with former President George W. Bush. “It is good to be in an environment where faith and reason are not enemies of one another,” Rice said concerning her appearance at Freed-Hardeman. Rice discussed global political and economic changes that have affected the United States most in recent years. She listed the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the Great Recession and the growing unrest in the Middle East as “concussive events rocking America.” “The verities we had when we were younger have faded away,” she said. Photo courtesy Freed-Hardeman University Frequently mentioned as a Former Secretary of State potential Republican presidenCondoleezza Rice spoke last tial candidate, Rice declared her Friday at Freed-Hardeman lack of interest in running for University’s 48th annual the office. “I like policy, not polBenefit Dinner, helping the itics,” she said. She described school raise almost one and a herself as happy with her life as half million dollars. a university professor as she talked about the importance Bush’s national security adviser, education has held with her fam- the first woman to hold that ily. position. She had also served on “Education,” Rice said, “isn’t President George H.W. Bush’s about getting job skills, but National Security Council staff. about creating a whole new perCurrently, Rice is the son.” To the donors present for Denning Professor in Global the event, she said, “I want to Business and the Economy at thank you tonight for being a part of this institution and being See RICE, Page 2-A

Transportation commissioner Schroer visits Chester County; TN roads rank third in nation By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

John Schroer, Tennessee Commissioner of Transportation, visited Henderson on Thursday, Dec. 6, as part of his commitment to visit all 95 Tennessee counties over the course of 24 months. Many members of the community turned out for a luncheon in honor of the visit. Schroer stated that Tennessee has no transportation debt and spends less per capita than any other state in the nation on transportation and road management; however, Tennessee roads rank third best in the nation. According to the commissioner, Tennessee has been working on “right-sizing” projects that meet the needs of towns and communities while also considering what will help with long term safety, congestion and economic development issues. Schroer stated that for many years, Tennessee built roads and began projects almost anywhere TDOT was asked to regardless the issue of need or public desire. “We no longer build roads where people don’t want them,” he assured the audience. Locals expressed interest in

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Tennessee Transportation Commissioner John Schroer spoke at a luncheon in his honor last week. Schroer, who was appointed to his position in January 2011, has been visiting all 95 Tennessee counties to listen to communties’ concerns and questions regarding roads and transportation in Tennessee. the two downtown enhancement grants that Henderson and Chester County were awarded last year. Schroer replied that work is indeed coming along on

those projects, but they are currently going through the environmental review process. With no tangible work being done, residents have become con-

cerned that the projects have stalled, but Schroer reassured the community members that See SCHROER, Page 3-A


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Rice the Graduate School of Business; the Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution; and a professor of Political Science at Stanford University. She is also a founding partner of Rice Hadley Gates, a business advisory firm that works with companies seeking to expand into emerging markets. She has authored and

co-authored a number of books including “Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family,” a 2010 best-seller. Her most recent book, “No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington,” was released last year. Funds raised by the event are designated for scholarships. “When you are investing in a young person at FreedHardeman,” FHU President Joe Wiley said, “you are investing in something eternal.” Prior to the speech by

Rice, the Secret Sisters, a duo from Muscle Shoals, Ala., presented a program of traditional country music. “We are very big fans of music that was around before we were,” Laura Rogers, an FHU alumna, said. In 2010, the duo released the self-titled album “The Secret Sisters,” featuring a cover of “Why Baby Why” and the original “Tennessee Me.” Classic recording equipment was used to capture the sisters’ pure sound; the vintage micro-

phones and recording techniques were the same as production teams used 50 years ago. The Secret Sisters’ song “Tomorrow Will Be Kinder” appears on the much-hyped 2012 “Hunger Games” movie soundtrack, entitled “The Hunger Games: Songs from District 12 and Beyond.” Their second album is scheduled to be released in the spring. Prior to the evening’s main address, Rice participated in a question and answer session with approximately 50 FHU students.

City board to discuss Community Development Block Grant; imput from residents is requested The Henderson Board of Mayor and Aldermen will meet in regular session at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 13, in the Council Chamber of Henderson City Hall. On the agenda is a public hearing to discuss the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program, the funds available, the eligible projects and the city’s responsibility in the application process. The city is requesting public input in order to determine priorities for the use of the funds. The public is encouraged to attend. Also, Mike Hewitt of ATA Accountants will be at the meeting to present and discuss the city audit report for year ending June 30, 2012. The board will also con-

sider action on a proposed ordinance amending several sections to the City Zoning Regulations as recommended by the planner and the Planning Commission. They will hold a public hearing on the proposed changes and consider the ordinance for passage. Board members will also consider the final reading on the lengthy amendment to the Sewer Use Regulations per the requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. Also on the agenda, the board will discuss the Fire Department’s Inspection Program; discuss the repairs needed on a sewer manhole between University and Mill Streets; and reappoint

Only Yesterday photo book now available The rich history of Chester County is chronicled in the Chester County Independent’s publication, “Only Yesterday, A Pictorial History of Chester County.” The book is now available for sale at the Independent’s offices at 218 S. Church Ave. The book will also be available at the Chester County High School Band Holiday Mart Dec. 1 at the Chester County Junior High School, and at LaVon’s Timeless Treasures on Front St. Our readers submitted more than 300 photos ranging back as far as 1854! There are school group photos from the 1930s through the ‘60s, early photos of Chickasaw

State Park, downtown Henderson, and store buildings both inside and out as far back as 1906, as well as athletic teams, community gatherings, churches, politicians, and too many others to mention. With more than 50 pages of photos, Only Yesterday is a keepsake for the ages. It makes a wonderful Christmas gift also. The book sells for $12.50 each plus sales tax, with quantity discounts of 10, 20, and 25 percent. For a nominal fee, we would also be glad to ship the books anywhere you desire. There will be a limited supply, so order yours today. For additional information, call our offices at 989-4624.

Nominations sought for Governor’s Arts Award The Tennessee Arts Commission is seeking nominations for the 2013 Governor’s Arts Awards. The Governor’s Arts Awards were established in 1971 to recognize individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the cultural life of Tennessee. The awards are Tennessee’s highest honor in the arts, celebrating the outstanding contributions of artists, arts organizations, volunteers, schools, educators, local governments, legislators and corporate citizens on the state and national level. The 2013 awards will be presented in Nashville during a special ceremony at Conservation Hall, located near the Executive Residence, in the spring of 2013. There are three award categories: The Folklife

Heritage Award, Arts Leadership Award, and Distinguished Artist Award. The nomination form is available on the Commission’s website ( w w w. t n . g o v / a r t s / a r t sawards). The form should be completed online, printed and returned to the Tennessee Arts Commission with no less than three, but no more than five letters of support for each nominee. Nominations may be submitted by organizations or individuals. Nomination forms and letters of support must be received by the Tennessee Arts Commission no later than 4:30 p.m. (CST) Feb. 1. For more information on the nomination process, contact Hal Partlow at 615-532-9801 or by e-mail at hal.partlow@tn.gov.

members whose terms are expiring on the Planning Commission (Bobby Moten), Board of Zoning Appeals (Charles McNatt) and Industrial Board (Joe Pevahouse). In other business, the board will authorize the

Mayor and Police Chief to accept the best bid received on equipment needed for the two new patrol cars. Bids are due on Dec. 14. The meeting is open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend.

Photo courtesy of Freed-Hardeman University

Condoleezza Rice responded to questions from students and faculty during Friday night’s FHU Benefit Dinner.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Zuma landmark is no more

hoto by James A. Webb, Independent

A Montezuma landmark is no more after the Beecham Garage was demolished. The structure had stood for more than 60 years.

UT Extension questions and answers: Influenza By Michele Sides UT Extension Agent

According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, each year in the United States, seasonal influenza kills more than 36,000 people and hospitalizes 200,000 more. The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms: •Fever •Cough •Sore throat •Runny or stuffy nose •Muscle or body aches •Headaches •Fatigue (very tired) •Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults. The flu virus can be spread up to six feet away by people who cough or sneeze. Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose. To avoid this, people should wash their hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcoholbased hand rub. Linens, eating utensils, and dishes belonging to those who are sick should not be shared without washing thoroughly first. Eating

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Schroer the grants continue to move forward. The environmental reviews simply take time to complete. “It takes time to get the work started,” added Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton. Schroer said that his department believes “in helping rural communities enhance their downtowns.” When downtowns begin crumbling, communities lose their sense of origin. Like other states, the

utensils can be washed either in a dishwasher or by hand with hot water and soap and do not need to be cleaned separately. You may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning one day before symptoms develop and up to five to seven days after becoming sick. Some people, especially young children and people with weakened immune systems, might be able to infect others for an even longer time. If you get sick with flu symptoms, in most cases, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people except to get medical care. CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other things you have to do and no one else can do for you. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine, such as Tylenol®.) You should stay home from work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings. This will aid in the prevention of spreading the flu virus to others. There are medications that your doctor can prescribe that will help speed your recovery process and prevent the onset of possible complications. It is very important during this flu season that

cost of maintaining roads in Tennessee continues to rise while the the budget steadily shrinks. Schroer explained that more fuelefficient vehicles are part of the problem. “The more gas people burn, the more money TDOT gets.” However, as vehicles burn less gas, less money goes into TDOT’s budget for maintaining roads. Another portion of Schroer’s right-sizing plan includes merging departments and encouraging additional education and training for TDOT employees.

you check on your elderly neighbors, relatives and friends. The elderly population is more susceptible to developing complications from the flu virus. During this flu season, follow the above mention steps to prevent the spread of flu and if you get sick, one of the best things you can do for yourself, and others, is stay home until you feel better! For more information about the flu virus, visit http://www.niaid.nih.gov/t opics/Flu/understandingFl u/Pages/Treatment.aspx or contact your local UT Extension office.

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Life & Style

Our deepest sympathy goes to the family and friends of Imogene “Jean” Rouse, and also to the family and friends of Van David Harris. On our prayer list this week are Mike Ross, Adam Wise, Laverne Lott, Carroll Connor, Fred and Paul Tucker, Pam Priddy, Teresa Wright, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry, and Minnie Austin, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Jean Latham, Joanne Sells, Connie Barnes, Randy Sells, Carolyn Potter, Gathel Latham, Randy Miller, Joanne Altier, Phillip Ross, Lisa Peddy, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl,

Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Teresa Seaton, Clarence Cooper, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Happy anniversary to Walter and Louella Willis and Jeff and Lisa Church. Birthday greetings to Ward Pusser and Leon Carroll on Dec. 22; Dianne Peddy and Nancy Stovall on Dec. 23; Nona Seaton on Dec. 24; June Priddy and Jimmy Priddy on Dec. 25; John Butler and Norris McCaskill on Dec. 27; Christopher and Ray Mills on Dec. 28; and Donna Latham on Dec. 31. Many thanks to the Chamber of Commerce and everyone that worked so hard in the Christmas Parade, the churches, clubs, marching bands, and others that participated in the parade. There was a big crowd to attend even though it was a damp night. The parade was beautiful and enjoyed by all that attended.

Well, I am feeling better and hope that all who have been sick are better too. Flu is on the rampage and I hope you haven’t had it. Take all of the precautions to prevent getting it. Please continue to pray for our sick: Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Winna Knipper, James Ballard, Carolyn Brasfield, and Edra and Benny Barnett. If you would like to add your family member or friend to our prayer list please call 879-9777. If you see these folks this week wish them a happy birthday. Happy birthday to Ricky Quarles on Dec. 12; Carolyn Brasfield on Dec. 13; Kaitlyn and Hunter Ross on Dec. 16; Katilyn Henson (my sweet granddaughter who will be 14) on Dec. 18. May this day always be a special one for each of you to remember. Big Springs United Methodist Church will have a Christmas play

“The Visit” at 6 p.m. Dec. 15. Everyone is invited to attend. The Bethel Baptist Church play, “Just a little Christmas” will be at 6 p.m. Dec. 16. Hope everyone can attend. Christmas is the most magical day of the year. The whole family gathers around the Christmas tree, exchanges presents, listens to Christmas songs. Every person on the planet can say something unique about this special day. One of my personal favorite quotes about Christmas is “Peace on earth will come to stay, When we live Christmas every day.” by Helen Steiner. This tells us that Christmas is a unique day like no other. On this day all people are in harmony, all fights between them stop and the spirit of Christmas is reborn in everyone. Helen Steiner was a religious writer, so she believed deeply in Christianity, and Christmas was the most important day to her. But Christmas is not just a religious celebration to her - it is a day filled with hopes for a better tomorrow for all the people on the planet surrounded See DEAN, Page 5-A

The year 1912 was particularly notable. It was the year that the Republic of China was established, Arizona became the 48th state, temperatures in Iowa plummeted to minus 47 degrees, the Titanic sank, Woodrow Wilson defeated Theodore Roosevelt in the presidential election, and Iola St. Germain Butterfield was born in a sod house on her father’s homestead on the prairie of Saskatchewan, Canada. Now, celebrating her 100th birthday she enjoys the conveniences of indoor plumbing, hot and cold running water, electricity, central air and heat, the telephone, television, and her washing machine and dryer, refrigerator, and a microwave oven. Her one room home was a simple 20 foot by 20 foot "soddy” constructed of rectangular pieces of prairie sod. Travel to town was by a horse drawn buggy or wagon during the summer months and sleigh during the winter. She is still amazed by the convenience of automobiles and travel by airplanes. "When I was a child, it would take from daylight to dark to travel a mere 25 miles in the buggy,” she recalls. Growing up on the prairie “You have to be tough to survive” she says with a great deal of pride. During the winters the snow would be so deep that it was higher than the fence posts. She often tells that when she was a little girl her mother would let her play outside when it was 40 degrees below zero but not when it was colder. The family of Butterfield are hosting a general reception for her from 2:30-4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15 at the Henderson Church of Christ Fellowship Hall. No gifts please, only your presence is requested. When she was 14-years old Butterfield and her parents moved to Davenport, Iowa where her father, Louis St. Germain, attended the Palmer School of Chiropractic. The great depression of 1929 occurred while they were in Iowa and kept the family

Hello to everyone! On this day, Monday Dec. 10, as I sit at the computer typing, the rain is beating on my window pane, reminding me of when I was a little girl and I would be visiting my grandmother. Mom and Papa had a tin roof top and I would listen to the beat of the rain hitting the roof. What a great sound it made. This is a rainy Monday, but we do thank you Lord for the rain. Guess what? Christmas is only 11 days away and if you are like me you still have so much to do. I will be glad when the day comes for the most of us, we can just set back, relax and enjoy the holidays with no stress. The annual Henderson Christmas Parade was Dec 6. I hope you and your family came out and enjoyed it. Remember last

year how cold it was? This year we had good weather, a little wet but not raining. All of the floats were just great, the dance team and bands did a great job also. This is the last week for me to remind you: Do not forget to email or mail Santa your Christmas wish lists by 5 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12 to santa@chestercountyindependent.com or mail them to Chester County Independent, P.O. Box 306, Henderson, TN., 38340. Get those letters to Santa. There is no charge for the publishing of the letter to Santa. For only $10 you may submit a photo of your child to run with the letter. So get those letters in to Santa, along with a picture, and read your child’s letter to him/her during the Christmas week edition of the Independent on Dec. 20. You know on Friday Dec. 7 we had our flags flying half-mast in remembrance of Pearl Harbor. On that same day we had to say, “We will see you later” to a great man that left a legacy for Chester County. He was a kindhearted man, a hardworking man that treated all people the same. I will miss seeing him around

Chester County, and also at the Commissioner meetings because the meetings will not be the same without him. Mr. Burl Malone, you will be missed but not forgotten. Mrs. Malone, may the Lord keep you and bless you. During that same week we also had to say, ‘We will see you later” to a very dear friend of ours, Jean Rouse. Mr. Don Rouse, may the Lord keep you and the girls. Also during this week we had to say, “We will see you later” to Mr. Parnell Muse from Henderson. All of these people were loved and will be missed. Come out and enjoy The Holidays in Henderson: A Hometown Shopping Event until 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 13. Participating stores are Merle Norman, LaVon’s Timeless Treasures, Main Street Café, Sweetly Ever After, Radio Shack, Chester County Library, Stillwaters Farm and Be Blessed Fashions. Now let’s see what went on last week at one of the most active places in town. This week at Southern Oaks two birthdays were celebrated. Ms. Clara Hopper turned 95-years

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Butterfield to celebrate a century from returning to Canada. In Davenport her dad, Dr. St. Germain, practiced as a chiropractor. He and Iola’s mother soon became naturalized citizens of the United States. Iola recalls that the day she took the oath to become a citizen of the United States was one of the happiest days of her life. During her early adult years Iola played the base guitar in a “Hawaiian Steel Guitar Band” under the direction of her musician husband Dean Paul Butterfield. The band was a family business with Iola’s daughters Gwen and Ruby playing in the band and younger son Ron mostly getting in the way. Until she was 82 she regularly went back to Canada to stay two months with her brother to help him with the harvest. She drove the tractor and did the cooking. While she was there, she convinced her widowed brother-in-law to become a Christian. Being a faithful member of the Henderson Church of Christ, she reads the Bible through each year and still has a passion to teach others about the Lord. From personal experience, she says that you never know when someone might be ready to respond to Jesus. She was converted because a mailman gave her an invitation to a brush arbor meeting. (For those of you younger than 60, that's a gospel meeting held outside under a makeshift roof of brush.) During the revival, she and her two daughters were baptized in a creek. The next week, her husband Paul, who before this time doubted that God existed, was also baptized. After intensive Bible study he left his career as a professional musician and committed his life to preaching the gospel. Iola has been a widow since 1970. Being a family with seven children on a preacher's salary meant cutting corners, and she often made chocolate-chip cookie baked with "Iola's Quality Control." Each cookie had exactly six chips. Following Sunday

evening services, she invited everyone in the congregation over for cookies, coffee, Kool-Aid and an evening of singing hymns. When Iola went to have her driver’s license renewed at age 89 she came back from the Motor Vehicle Department quite upset. When asked why she said, "I told them I was about to turn 90 and all they said was that it was so nice. They didn’t check my hearing, didn’t check my eyesight, and didn’t give me a written test or a road test." When asked why she was upset she said, "No telling who is out there driving on the road." Still driving at age 90, Iola spent time "going to see the old people" who were younger than she. That was the year she gave up her job at the church building. Once a week at 7 a.m., she would head to work in the 800-occupancy auditorium, making sure the songbooks were straight, the pencils sharpened and the attendance cards replenished and straightened in the pews. "Why so early?" some of her helpers questioned. "I need to do it early so it doesn't interfere with all I want to do the rest of the day," she replied. Now that she is less mobile and walks with a walker her job at church is to sit in the foyer after services and give hugs to

everyone who comes by. She has a happy word for each person, the little children especially love sitting on her lap. A few years ago her son Ron took his mother back to Saskatchewan to see if they could find where the old sod house stood. He asked her to tell him things she remembered from living in Canada. Some of her memories were of the bright red uniforms of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as they came over the hills by her house. The Mounties often stayed at the family homestead overnight. She also remembered going into town in a sleigh pulled by two Clydesdale horses and cutting ice from the pond to put in a cave for cooling milk in the summer. About their mom her children say, "She taught us simple pleasures - looking for pretty stones in a creek, going for walks under the stars or in the fresh snow, talking about her life on the prairie, or sledding down a snowy hillside. We never had many material things, but we didn't know it. We had fun. Mom made life an adventure." From a sod house, to a house full of children, to teaching others about Jesus, to life as a widow, to making the most of being a very senior citizen, Iola Butterfield has been and is a joy to know.

young and Ms. Lagusta Jordan turned 88. Happy birthday ladies! And may the Lord keep on blessing you. Friday evening the residents ventured outside on a field trip to Chickasaw State Park to see their beautiful Christmas lighting. They sang Christmas Carols to and from the park while laughing and having a good time being out. They then stopped off at Bell’s Drive-In Restaurant afterwards for an ice cream cone generously donated by Bell’s. Thank you Bell’s for bringing some cheer to these lovely seniors. This weeks’ Bingo caller was Wanda from Avalon who brought some very nice gifts for prizes. The residents also spent their past Bingo winnings on items in our “Country Store” this week. A new group of cheerleaders from our own local High School came on Wednesday to perform manicures. The residents really appreciate all our young people donating their time. They are starting life off right by learning to give of themselves to others. The residents enjoy their weekly Church Services and Bible Studies with Estes Church of

Christ, Freed Hardeman students and Marty Wilkins. There was a lot of cheerful singing this week, starting off with our regular volunteers Janice’s Jingles on Tuesday, Virgil Hooks on Wednesday and Dolores Crumbley on Thursday. On Wednesday morning Wanda Huggins of Savannah came and sang some of her original songs while playing the piano. Wanda has a beautiful sweet voice and writes her own songs. Saturday the group of “Praise Kids” from First Baptist Church came and entertained with Christmas songs and carols. Oh how the residents especially love children and young people! Saturday afternoon the men from Henderson Barber Shop Singers blessed the residents with their harmonious voices. What a treat to have so many beautiful voices echo the halls of Southern Oaks. This week there were many smiles and lots of cheer. Stop by and see the beautifully lighted Christmas Village, one of their three festive Christmas trees, or just sit and talk to the residents. They love visitors and have lots of good stories they can entertain you

with. Catch them on Facebook to see their pictures and videos at Southern Oaks Assisted Living by Americare. The City would like to thank Donna and her staff for all of the hard work they do to keep our loved ones happy and health. On the birthday list this week are Pam Boyer on Dec. 12 and Pam Massengill Stewart on Dec. 16. May you enjoy many more. On the prayer list this week are Julie Arment, Larry Day, the Malone family, the Muse family, the Rouse family, our loved ones in the hospitals, the sick in their homes, our children, teachers, family, our country, all the soldiers and their families. Remember to patronize our local businesses, let’s support our own as much as we can. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City, I need to hear from you, call 989-1907 or e m a i l gloria_holiday@msn.co m. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

IOLA BUTTERFIELD


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

No fire had to be put out quickly, but fast moving silverware could have caused sparks as Jacks Creek firemen and stew crew enjoyed a Christmas meal together at Whiskers. The end of the year brings a thank you to firemen who volunteer to help our community and others. We greatly appreciate firemen volunteers – Al McKinnon, Jim Vest, Jeff Knight, Jamie Miller, Ron Dee, Tonny Barham and Larry Bingham. Thanks are extended to those helping with the stew – Joy McKinnon, Ruby Nell Brewer, Teisha Nichols, LaTasha Phillips and Pat Jones. Ruby Nobles Wright was tenderly remembered. Jacks Creek Community Club dinner meeting is 6 p.m. Thursday. Bring a dish, wear holiday colors, and share a mighty ho-ho-ho. Sadly our club has lost a long-standing member. Jean Lane Rouse (12-2134 to 12-3-12) was the wife of Donald Rouse. When Don and I married we lived in the four apartment complex on Mifflin Ave. Donald and Jean lived in the apartment next to us. I remember Jean’s flaming red hair, her husband was in the service and later worked with my uncle Neal Fletcher at Jimmy Payne Mazda. Lynne was the first-born daughter with her mother’s hair. Donald was very attentive to Jean during her sickness. We extend sympathy to the Rouse family. Prayer is continuted for Wayne Moody. He returned home Friday. Jim Ruth’s eye is giving him trouble. Prayer is needed. He loves Chester County people and loves community news. Give him a call at 901-837-0417. We mailed him a package Monday. Don’s cousin, Ruth Jones Rhodes is at the healthcare. Edward Pitts returned there too. Cards would be nice to receive. Perhaps Santa will bring Wilma Hart a new gown at the healthcare. Kermit “Junior” Bailey is desiring to see Shirley home by Christmas! Dreams do come true with physical therapy. Our community expresses sympathy to the family of Burl Malone (11-19-42 to 12-4-12). Burl was a county commissioner; he wanted to help Chester County. He listened carefully to proposals, voiced his opinion, and voted earnestly. I regret never thanking him for his service in Vietnam. Don and others said he was good with small engines. It would be honorable in seeing a list of Chester County veterans framed in large print, wouldn’t it? Patty G., Enville community news reporter, did a beautiful job listing many names last month in her column. That was work so special. Thanks very much, Patty. Faye Horton Carroll (527-30 to 11-28-12) was a special cultured pearl. Not just a good wife, mother, grandmother, but also a very faithful member of Jacks Creek Primitive Baptist Church. After the death of her husband, Houston, Faye continued to support her church. My mother and grandmother

called her a sister in Christ. I made a last picture of Faye holding her blue picnic box at the September three-day church meeting – a treasure to share. Thanks to all for helping with dinner at Clarks Creek. The family needed this time together to feel a community and church hug. A family that prays together stays together, means a lot. Her sons are Gary, Terry and Rickey. Our community expresses sympathy to Jane McCaig in the loss of her beloved mother, whom she lovingly cared for in her home for several years near Enville. Dorothy Maxwell Plunk Norville (7-28-23 to 11-14-12) was formerly from Jacks Creek. Her parents were Homer and Eve Plunk. Older residents at Jacks Creek know the stretch of road on Highway 22 South called Plunk Hill. Delana Bailey O’Neal helped host a birthday bash for Dorothy four years ago. Many family members came. For a ride down memory lane, Bruce Barton brought Lessie Barton’s Model A Ford. Lessie was the their teacher, and on occasions the Plunks rode in her car. That was the last picture made of all the siblings being together. Billy Plunk died Jan. 21, 2010, and Marvin Plunk died earlier. Other Plunk siblings are Hazel Harris and Carrie Nell Corley from Maryville and Willis Ronald Plunk who lives in Nashville. I will remember Dorothy’s eyes sparkling as her smile spread to her face. She was buried in Gibson County County Memory Garden near her husband, Thomas Norville. She also lost a son, James Norville, and grandsons, Billy Paul Norville and Christopher Carr. Our community expresses sympathy to the families of Van Harris. I graduated with Ray Harris; he was a sweet guy. His sister, Suzanne was friendly too. The other kids were younger, so I didn’t know them. At this writing I didn’t have birth or death dates to share. He was buried Saturday. There are other deaths from former Jacks Creek family or their family members who need to be mentioned. They are Rickey Johnson, Ann Briney and Mary Todds. Tragically, three days before Dorothy Maxell Norville died Hazel Plunk Harris lost her son. Rickey Wayne Johnson (6-2-61 to 11-11-12) died of a heart attack in Washington, Ga. His wife is in the nursing home. He worked two jobs and helped raise her five children. Hazel was raised at Jacks Creek. She and her husband, Carl Johnson (1917-1961) lived in the Glendale community, he died two months before Rickey was born. Carl is

buried at Unity. Ricky is also survived by his siblings – Edward “Eddie” Johnson, Homer Glen Johnson and Laura Evette Tollison. Call 989-7485 for Hazel’s address. Mary Randolph Curtis, formerly from Jacks Creek, lost her sister, Ann Brinley. Medina Friendship Baptist Church had a lunch for the family. Bessie Ann U. Nelms Brinley (4-20-51 to 12-112) was the daughter of the late Henry Coleman and Bessie Nelms from Covington. Ann leaves her husband, Dave Brinley; their two children, Lorie Brinley Harrison (Brent) and David Anthony Brinley (Jen); four grandchildren – Jamie, Katelyn and Coleman Harrison, and Paige Brinley; one great-grandchild, Brayden Nicholls; siblings, Johnny U. Nelms, Linda Umsted Rogers and Rickey U. Davis Other siblings were Martha Umstead, James Umstead Jr. (1-14-11), Roy U. Randolph (3-18-11) and Billy Joe Davis (12-2-11). A former Jacks Creek resident died in Wildersville. Mary Alene “Tincie” Robertson Todds (2-21-41 to 11-20-12) was the daughter of Arthur and Abbiegail Rush Robertson. Burial was in Hare cemetery. Tincie’s favorite teacher was Margaret Bingham, and she loved Van and Louella Griffin. Alline Wamble Maness helped make Tincie’s wedding dress. She played with Alline’s twins, Maxine and Willadean. She even lived in Doris Barton’s childhood home. Doris married the Maness twin’s brother, Andy Maness. Tincie was a surprise guest at one of our Maness Family Reunions. It was fun to hear Tincie talk. It was a fun trip back to a two-room Jacks Creek School. It didn’t matter your age – all were school friends. Tincie recalls Sheila Lott Ryals, Larry Bingham, Larry Tignor, Larry Cochran, Elizabeth Weaver Davis, Gene Ross, Lila Sue Nobles Ross, Gary Rhodes, Shirley Morris Deere Alexander and Mary Elizabeth Morris Bowles. It was happy days – friends cared about each other in a classroom, on a playground, in church or in the cotton patch. We share a connection from the past to the present – now we share the grief. Lots of tender thoughts are twirling in my mind of those gone from our touch. Life goes on for us. How thankful we are for precious memories. God bless all the families going through those “first” holidays. Call or send a card to let them know you remember. It helps them and you. Wonder if a Chester County baby will be born on 12-12-12? That would be the entire 12 days Christmas package, wouldn’t it? It would have to be a lucky number for that baby!

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Revisiting some old favorites: Winter soup is good for the soul I’ve been feeling a bit under the weather this week and haven’t felt like making any new creations, so I thought it would be a good time to share a couple of my favorite winter soups. When the weather turns cold and the holiday season starts to get the

best of you, soup is the perfect comfort food to help beat the latefall/early-winter blues. There are few meals that are easier and better for

the body than a steaming hot bowl of soup. Here are a couple of my favorites from past columns. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

Butternut squash soup Ingredients: 1 (2 ½-3 pound) butternut squash (peeled, seeded, and cubed) ¼ cup butter 1 medium white onion (optional – chopped) 1 large carrot (chopped) 1-2 apples (cored and chopped) 1 (48 ounce) box reduced sodium chicken broth 1 bottle apple juice, apple cider, or hard cider ½ cup sour cream (low fat is a great choice here) ¼ cup shredded cheddar cheese (optional) Gorgonzola cheese, to taste (optional) – enough to sprinkle over bowls 2-4 strips of bacon, crumbled (optional) Directions: 1) Peel, seed, and cube butternut squash; chop carrots, onion, and apples. 2) Melt butter in large pot (6 quart Dutch oven works well) over mediumhigh heat. 3) Add cubed squash and vegetables. Cook, stirring frequently until just tender (approximately 10 minutes). 4) Add apples, broth, and cider. Bring

to a boil. Cover and reduce heat, simmering for approximately 25 minutes or until vegetables and apples are tender. 5) Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. 6) Puree in blender, returning soup to pot when finished. If you have an emersion blender, now is the perfect time to use it, but if you only have a counter top blender or food processor, you may have to puree in batches. 7) Add sour cream and cheddar to soup and heat through. 8) Top with gorgonzola, bacon, and a dollop of sour cream if desired. I prefer grating my own cheddar, rather than buying prepackaged shredded cheese. It tastes fresher, lasts longer, and melts easier. If you’re not a fan of gorgonzola, a flavorful blue cheese, you can use cheddar for a topper, but I suggest you at least try gorgonzola because it seems like the perfect slightly salty contrast to this soup. Although I peel the squash, I don’t usually bother peeling the apples for this recipe. They will be pureed, and I like to leave the skin on for added vitamins and nutrient value.

Crock-Pot Deer Stew Ingredients: 1 meaty deer neck with bone in, cubed ½ pound Yukon gold potatoes 4 carrots, chopped 1 parsnip, chopped 3 stalks celery, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced ½ onion, chopped 1 ½ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon white pepper 1 can tomato paste Beef broth, to cover

From Page 4-A

Dean with love and happiness. Maybe the best quote that describes the spirit of Christmas is “Christmas gift suggestions: To your enemy, forgiveness. To an opponent, tolerance. To a friend, your heart. To a customer, service. To all, charity. To every child, a good example. To yourself, respect.” - Oren Arnold. This is another proof

2 bay leaves, whole Directions: Place vegetables in crock-pot. Add meat, tomato paste and seasonings. Pour beef broth over ingredients until covered (about ¾ of a 16-ounce box). Place bay leaves on top for easy removal. Set crock-pot to cook on low for 8 hours, until meat is tender and falls off bone. Remove bay leaves, and strip remaining meat from the neck bones. Serve alone or over rice. Makes 6-8 servings.

that Christmas is not just an ordinary day. Everyone exchanges big, beautiful gifts on Christmas. But the best present you can give to a person is forgiveness, respect and love. Every person fells something different in his heart on this magical day. Another Christmas “miracle” is how it joins and gathers people. How love is greater than everything at Christmas time. Like Christina Georgina Rossetti said, “Love came down at Christmas; love all lovely, love divine; love

was born at Christmas, stars and angels gave the sign.” These examples easily show how important Christmas is for everyone. How they feel and express these feeling in quotes that remain in time. From Christmas Saying by Google. What does Christmas mean to you? For an excellent Candy Cane Cookies recipe, go to www.joyofbaking.com /CandyCaneCookie.html. It even has a video of how to make them!


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

You Are Welcome

Only Yesterday

By Ronnie McBrayer

“Independent asks writers to remember 6 ‘W’s’” From the files of the Chester County Independent December 11, 1942 “Citizens Ask Council To Regulate Beer” A petition signed by about 90 men and women is before the City Council asking for better regulation of beer taverns in the city. Complaints most generally heard are reported violations of opening hours, sales of beer to minors or intoxicated persons, and almost complete lack of sanitation and toilet facilities in the taverns. The petition does not ask that the sale of beer be stopped. Businessmen generally agree that it would be a blow to Henderson as a shopping center to stop the sale of beer. Revenue of several thousand dollars a year to the city and county is another factor to be considered. The loss of marriage license revenue to the school fund, and the approaching end of the poll tax revenue, coupled with loss of beer revenue would compel heavier taxes by the city and county, informed persons state. The petition sets forth exactly the purpose of the Tennessee Committee of the Brewing Industry Foundation. The Tennessee Committee was organized May 3, 1939, and D. Hurd Hudson, former attorney for the Internal Revenue Department in Washington, is state director. Mr. Hudson recently stated, “The brewing industry is as vigorously opposed to the ‘black sheep’ type of licensed retailer as are those who erroneously hold beer responsible for his misdeeds. The industry wants him eliminated.” “Attention Reporters and Correspondents” Have you ever wondered how the news story is written and how newspaper writing differs from ordinary prose? The first sentence (or first paragraph) of every news story is known as the “lead.” It tells the whole story in a nutshell. It answers six questions known as the six “W’s”: Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How? An example: “Mrs. William Worth was seriously injured today when a screen became unfastened and she fell from the second story window of her home at 701 Waffle Street.” Here is the way the W’s work: Who? Mrs. William Worth. What? Was seriously injured. When? Today. Where? At her home at 701 Waffle Street. Why? The loosened screen. How? In a fall from a window. These six questions should be answered – or the answers should be implied – in the first sentence of paragraph of every news story. The rest of the story simply gives details of the lead. The Independent especially calls this to the attention of those who report church and club activities and its rural correspondents. “18 Months Without A Strike In State” With more than 50 percent of Tennessee industry converted to war production purposed, a record of no strikes in statewide industries since July 1941 speaks volumes for the patriotism and intelligence of Tennessee labor and management. It indicates a mutual willingness to give and take and to place the needs of country before that of personal gain. In every respect Tennessee’s war participation record speaks for itself, and it is something of which every citizen should be proud. “War Objective Is Preservation Of Personal Freedom” The prime war objective is the preservation of individual freedom. All other objectives are incidental, including economic security. Of course, everyone wants economic security. But our form of govern-

ment does not and can never guarantee both freedom and 100 percent security. It just isn’t in the cards. The government that extends the promise of bread and butter to all citizens, must also extend the heavy hand of dictatorial control. This is a highly unpopular fact. But it is none the less true. It is also a fact that we have been working toward greater security for the average citizen by the slow, sure path of enlightened industrial operation, coupled with ever wider distribution of the products of industry. American citizens enjoy the highest standard of living in the world. In peacetime, the worker can pack and go fishing or migrate with his family to another section of the country, with notice to no one. If he does not like an employer, he can choose another. There are millions of employers. If he has an idea, a service, or a gadget that the public wants, he can soon become an employer himself. More important, he can help choose our public ser-

Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Thomas of Henderson are the parents of a son who arrived Nov. 25 at WebbWilliamson Hospital. He has been named Richard Daniel. Mr. and Mrs. Clint Jones of Beech Bluff are the parents of a son, Gary Odell, who was born Nov. 25 at Webb-Williamson Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Guy Walker of Henderson are the parents of a daughter, Alice Sereda, who was born November 27 at WebbWilliamson Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Sonny Record of Henderson announce the birth of a son, James Ray, on November 22 at Jackson Madison General Hospital. Dr. O. M. McCallum Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Plunk of Bemis are the parents of a son who was born November 22. He has been named Randy Glen. Mr. and Mrs. Lester Wade of Henderson announce the arrival of a daughter on November 27. She has been named Cathy Jo.

December 7, 1962

“All They Want For Christmas” What does the GI overseas want for Christmas? His own hometown newspaper, that’s what. This was revealed in a survey by the USO in its 22 clubs abroad ranging all the way from Paris to Istanbul. When all returns were in, requests for pictures of the family rated No. 1 with the serviceman with newspapers a close second. Stateside, magChester County Indpenedent archives, December 5, 1952 azines were in the third spot. vants by secret ballot. He can worAs one GI put it: (the hometown ship as he pleases and say what he paper) is the strongest tie I have pleases at any time and any place. with the states.” If these things do not constitute “Births” independence and security, what in Dr. and Mrs. Donald Dees of the world does? At least these are Memphis have announced the the things our soldiers and marines arrival of a little daughter on Nov. and sailors believe they are fighting 26. She has been named Deborah to save. They can exist only under a Ann. Her paternal grandmother, representative form of government Mrs. B. C. Dees is spending two supported by free enterprise. weeks with Deborah and other December 5, 1952 members of the family. “Holiday Foods Find Place On Henderson Clinic Plentiful List” Mr. and Mrs. Benny Moore of With the holiday season Pinson are the parents of a daughapproaching, homemakers will find ter, Jessie Mae on Nov. 29. plentiful supplies of most of the traDrs. McCallum and Wilson ditional holiday foods at hand. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Nichols Turkeys are the No. 1 feature on of Henderson are the parents of a the December list of plentiful foods, daughter who was born Nov. 30. announces the Production and The proud grandparents are Mr. and Marketing Administration, U. S. Mrs. W. A. Braly of Henderson. Department of Agriculture. Raisins, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roland of chief ingredient of many holiday Bethel Springs are the parents of a sweets, are also featured, as are daughter who arrived Dec. 1. pork and pork products. “Library Has 54 New Other plentiful foods include Borrowers” oranges, grapefruit, table grapes, The Chester County Library had domestic dried figs, tree nuts, and a circulation for the month of honey – all useful in preparing tra- November of 1,768 with 54 new ditional holiday dishes. borrowers for the month. For the Also expected to be plentiful on months of September and October December markets are carrots, dry this library had the highest circulababy limas, lard, vegetable shorten- tion in the region with the exceping, salad oil, and table fats, nonfat tion of Jackson. dry milk solids, cottage cheese, Two books which have been buttermilk and frozen cod fillets. given to the library this month are “Letters To Santa Claus” as follows: Best Sellers given by Dear Santa, Mrs. Mark McAdams in memory of I am a real good girl. Please bring Mr. Mark McAdams, “Dearly me a cowboys suit, a cowboy hat, Beloved” by Anne Morrow and cowboy boots. Lindberg given by Mrs. Homer I want some candy too. My daddy Davis. will open the door for you. December 7, 1972 Love you lots, “Jobless Rate Hits New Low” Sally Unemployment in Tennessee Dear Santa, has plummeted to a six-year low on I want you to bring me a little the heels of an all time high tiny dolly and a lot of doll cloths. I employment record, according to want some paper doll books, too. State Employment Security Love, Commissioner Ernest Griggs. Retta The state’s jobless rate fell to 2.8 Dear Santa, percent in October from 3.1 percent I have been a good girl this year. in September and was the lowest I want a micky-mouse watch and a since October 1966, when unemdoll house. And some nuts and ployment equaled 2.7 percent of the candy too. labor force, Commissioner Griggs Love, said. Annie The jobless rate last month rep“Births” resented 50,300 unemployed in a Dr. H. D. Farthing civilian labor force of 1,829,300. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Tedford of The September rate reflected Pinson announce the arrival of a 55,700 unemployed, while the 2.7 son, Richard Joel, on November 20 percent rate in October 1966 repreat Jackson Madison General sented 44,500 jobless.

Keeping the Faith

I have heard some Mennonites use the term “nonviolent evangelism.” It is a way of sharing faith that does not harm those with whom they share. It is built on mutual respect, love for others, and a commitment to the other person’s freedom. People are treated as seekers, not potential converts, without pressure, arm-twisting or coercion; and no manipulation of words or emotions. Seekers are not vilified, targeted, pursued, or argued with. They are simply invited into radical hospitality where questions and exploration are not only tolerated, but encouraged and expected. These nonviolent evangelists share their faith with a “come and see” attitude, opening their arms and hearts to others, leaving the rest to God. The church could learn a lot from these quiet souls. Many of us, overtly and subtly, have taken a very militant approach in sharing our faith with others. We corner people. We demand immediate decisions. We use emotionally charged environments to wrangle decisions. We are sometimes disrespectful. We say, “Follow Christ and we will let you in.” But maybe we need to learn to say, “Come on in, and learn what it means to follow Christ.” Here is an example: My friend Sabrina, and her husband Blake, live in a Christian community on a working farm. By “Christian community” I mean a group of people who are attempting to live out the way of Jesus while sharing life, space, and the same values. It’s not a commune – Sabrina, Blake and the other two dozen folks living there are definite individuals – it is a community: A group of people helping the world and welcoming others. Welcome, in fact, is what brought Sabrina to the farm. She wasn’t a Christian when she arrived. Actually, she was rather hostile toward faith. But she loved the earth, she was trying to stay sober, and she and Blake wanted to give self-sustaining, organic farming a try while they were still young enough to pull it off. Through a series of inexplicable events, but mostly because of the dramatic welcome others at the farm gave them, this couple found themselves moving out of the city and into the cornfields. Sabrina was going to farm with gusto, but she had no intention of getting involved with what she called, “the Jesus stuff.” And her co-farmers respected that. But one day, after being surrounded by all this grace and love, and having begun to pray again and study the way of Jesus, she woke up in half panic, in half celebration, and all surprise: “Oh, my God, I think I’m a Christian!” It was a beautiful conversion; one made possible by giving plenty of margin, not plenty of manipulation. Maybe it is because I hang around with too many Mennonites now, because I long ago defied my own coercive religious upbringing, or because of precious people like Sabrina, but I have come to the core conclusion that we need to give people some space. Should we share and live our faith? Absolutely! But I believe every person is capable of relating directly to God without coercion or interference by others. In the words of that old Baptist from Oklahoma, Herschel Hobbs: “The Church cannot fasten its iron grip upon anyone’s soul…This is the worst of all tyrannies. And it is made worse by its claim to be in the name of God who created men and women to be free.” Thus, every person should be given the right of free choice in his or her relationship with God (or without God). Every individual should be given the dignity as image-bearing creations of God to arrive at their own spiritual conclusions, choosing to be Catholic or Coptic, a Methodist or a Muslim, a Buddhist or a Baptist, a Jew or a Jainist, an Anglican or an atheist, without heavy-handedness of any kind. No, not everyone will “convert” to our way of thinking or adopt our ideas about faith. But faith isn’t about force; it is about being set free. God entrusted people with that freedom. Let’s do the same. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular e-columns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.net


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Words for the Week: “Remember when …” By Junebug

Now that the digital age is here, do you ever get out your really old pre-digital paper photographs and look at them? Recently I looked through a few that are now stored safely away, and was amazed at the “Remember when …” thoughts that they brought back to mind! Take a couple of hours out of your busy schedule, and go for a trip down memory lane, by selecting a few of your old photos, and see what will flood back into your mind as you look intently at each one of them. Memories that seem to be lost DO have triggers – music, places and most definitely photos. Ask yourself what was going on when this picture was taken – before it – after it – why was it taken??? What can I see in it that I never saw before? Yes – there are answers to

each of those questions, and many times they are supported by other photos. In today’s world, it is likely that physical photo albums sales are down, but you still might find one of the old black albums, and the white corners that you lick and place on the corners of each picture, attaching the photos where you want them on the black page. Old fashioned – YES! But this is accomplished and shared digitally all the time with photo stream, and enjoyed long-distance by all. However, what if you were to sit down with family and/or friends and really look at a physical photo album of old pictures, hearing what versions of “Remember when …” comes out of their mouth? Take this candid photo above – what do you see? Let’s look at it as though it was one of your own photos. What mood was my 3-

year-old in? What does it look like she is doing sitting on that sunny window sill with only the window screen behind her; why isn’t she looking outside; what is she looking at? Let your imagination run away with you – if it reminds you of an event in your life with your child, or you as a child – does it bring up memories of times gone by for you? Now add more information, the window looks out onto the front yard and where the cars are parked … but she is looking straight at what, could it be the front door? Do you see a look of fear or anticipation or happiness in that shadowed face? Is she waiting for a door to open – does she already know who it is that might be coming through that door? Now, do you “remember when …” something similar happened in your life? Know that every photo

has a story – a personal story for each person who sees it or is in it. Many times when we look back in time at photos we can see what we overlooked before, because life was busy then – it is busy now, but can you take some time to revisit those days gone by via pictures. Make that part of your soon to be here vacation time if you can, you will enjoy those memories again, and make new ones with the conversations about the photos. Look back to the above photo of my daughter. What’s the REAL story that photo brings back to life? She was sitting on the window sill in the living room, patiently waiting. She had spent the night with her grandmother, and had just gotten home. She really wasn’t looking at the front door; she was looking at me standing at the base of the

Clayton open house

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Holiday celebrators enjoyed a sumptuous spread Thursday when Clayton Bank held its holiday open house at its downtown branch.

Deadline nears for NRCS conservation programs For agricultural land and non-industrial private forestland producers interested in applying for farm bill conservation program financial assistance in Fiscal Year 2013, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Tennessee has set Friday, Dec. 21 as the signup cutoff date for first evaluation funding consideration. Pending the availability of funds, additional evaluation periods may occur and cutoff dates will be posted on the Tennessee website at http://www.tn. nrcs.usda.gov/programs/. Conservation program financial assistance is contingent on passage of a new Farm Bill and ensuing

Fiscal Year 2013 fund allocations to states. The application deadline applies to the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and EQIP National Initiatives and the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) and WHIP National Initiatives. Eligible producers with a conservation plan for their operation receive priority for financial assistance. NRCS staff is available to help producers create conservation plans. Only projects that are “ready to implement” will be ranked for funding. Applications can be submitted throughout the year. NRCS’s conservation

programs address resource concerns such as soil erosion, soil health, irrigation efficiency, impaired water quality and fragmented wildlife habitat. EQIP, one of NRCS’s largest conservation programs, helps eligible producers plan and implement conservation practices that provide opportunities to improve soil, water, plant, animal, energy, air and related resources on agricultural land and non-industrial private forestland. For additional information, eligible producers are encouraged to contact their local NRCS Service Center. Service center locations and more information on the programs

FHU graduation set for Dec. 14 Approximately 100 students will receive degrees in graduation ceremonies Friday, Dec. 14, at FreedHardeman University. Commencement exercises will begin at 6 p.m. in Loyd Auditorium. Those receiving degrees will

include 85 students who will be awarded baccalaureate degrees and 31 who will be awarded graduate degrees, according to Registrar Larry Oldham. In addition, some students who completed their work in August will participate

in the ceremony. The Office of Alumni Relations will host a reception for graduates and their families immediately following graduation in the auxiliary gymnasium of Brewer Sports Center.

Army Aviation hosting chili cook-off Memorial scholarship funds will benefit from a chili cook-off scheduled for 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15 at the Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3 at 2254 Westover Road in Jackson. Admission is only $2, and entry fee for teams is $15 for up to four persons. There also will be a silent auction and taste-testing and judging. First, second and third place awards will be presented for best chili,

best costume, and best cornbread. A celebrity judging panel will select awards. For more information, contact CW3 Blake Hardison at 425-5640, or email to blake.hardison@us.army.mil. The event is sponsored by the Army Aviation Association of America, a not-for-profit organization established to render support for the college-level education of members of

the association, their spouses, and other family members, both current and deceased.

can be found at www.tn.nrcs.usda.gov. NRCS has provided leadership in a partnership effort to help America’s private land owners and managers conserve their soil, water and other natural resources since 1935. For program information, contact John Rissler at 615-277-2576 or AnnSue Wattenbarger at 615-277-2570.

stairs beside the front door. She was waiting for permission to go up the stairs to the bedroom. WHY was she so excited and happy to see the bedroom? I had explained to her that I wanted to take pictures of her as she came up the stairs, as she was walking into the bedroom, and as she climbed up on the little chair I had put in just the right spot, and finally, especially did I want to take photos of her as she looked over the railing into the new baby bed to have her first glimpse of her new baby brother! When I said she could come up the steps, her slow was not slow at all, she was full of excitement and moving quickly, though not running, but I was able to get the photos I wanted, a real treasure store of emotions on her face at each step of the process. Soon after she saw him, she sat in her little rocker and I let her hold him for the first time, she beamed - he screamed – and I, yep, I was still taking pictures. It was a very exciting day for us all, captured in it’s entirety in photographs. Of all the photos taken that day, even though the others were all in color and are family treasures, I love THIS picture the best. It captured her anticipation, her excitement and her love for a brother she had never seen … yet. A love that even now, 43 years later, is just as bright, just as strong, and just as loyal for the brother she was so excited to meet for the first time that day she sat on the windowsill, waiting for permission to go upstairs.

Now – look at the picture again. Can you see it better now? That is true of YOUR pictures when you share them with your friends and family. The story behind the photo brings it to life and from that point on, looking at that photo retells the story, not for just you, but for everyone you have shared it with. I will have to ask my daughter what does she “remember when …” as I show her the photo in this article! Email your ‘words for the week’ suggestion and/or opinion of this week’s article to jpatterson@chestercountyindependent.com. “Let’s keep life simple, real and fun.” - Junebug


Opinion

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Thursday, December 13, 2012

Does Internet piracy require control? To the Editor and Citizens of Chester County: According to the RIAA [Recording Industry Association of America], from 2004 through 2009 alone, approximately 30 billion songs were illegally downloaded on file-sharing networks. Many recording, cable, and software companies are teaming up with the government to insure that this issue does not continue to get out of control, but many of these tactics are unfair. The correct standards to control illegal downloading have not been put in place. Internet piracy is a very important issue that needs to be controlled. Firstly, downloading materials illegally from the Internet is morally wrong. Developers and producers have worked hard to provide the material that is being illegally downloaded. Artists in the music industry have worked hard to provide an album package to the public, and to freely take what they have made for one’s own personal enjoyment is morally wrong. A study conducted by The Barna Group suggests that less than one out of 10 teenagers believe that music piracy is morally wrong. Mass amounts of people suggest there is nothing wrong with downloading illegal material, but do not realize the morality of the issue. Stealing material from the Internet is just as morally wrong as stealing clothes from a department store. Secondly, millions of people download illegal materials everyday but only a few are actually punished. Punishment varies around the world for downloading illegal material. In many places, heavy penalties are given to downloaders that have been caught downloading illegally. Many people might suggest that since large amounts of people have never been caught downloading illegally that

they don’t deserve some sort of punishment. If one person downloads an album for free and is punished, it is only fair to punish the person who also downloaded the same album for free across the street. Many Internet and cable providers have given warnings, threatened to slow down, and even disconnect the downloader’s Internet service. There are various punishments for those who download material illegally, but most are unfair because they only target a specific amount of people. Lastly, as Internet piracy increases, the revenue made from the material will decrease. The software developers who spend months or maybe even years on making a program will suffer. The producers and song writers who spend many hours a day in a studio will suffer. Record and developer companies rely on the consumer to buy and make the material successful. Some might think if the material is available for free, then they have the right to use it for free. Each time material is downloaded from the Internet, less money is being put back into the pockets of the hard workers who made the material. As this continues in mass amounts, the loss of revenue can affect the economy drastically. In conclusion, Internet piracy affects millions of people and needs to be controlled. By not realizing the moral, punishment, and cost issues of downloading materials illegally, this issue will only continue to worsen. Each time material is taken downloaded illegally from the Internet, it is only fair to treat the same situation with the same solution. Swift action needs to be taken in equally controlling Internet piracy. Brandon Jones Honors English III 4th period Chester County High School

Your vote is only the beginning To the Editor and Citizens of Chester County: Like many of you, my interest in voting was kindled by tagging along with my mom as she cast her vote. My parents made it clear voting was important, and they always made time to exercise their civic duty. Of course, I thought “pulling the lever” was pretty cool, too. So my young son was excited when I told him he could “help” me vote and even help push the buttons. Imagine my surprise when on election day he came downstairs in his newest and nicest “church clothes.” For him to dress up told me he knew what we were doing was important. Here in Tennessee, just short of 2.5 million people voted in the presidential election. Across the country, almost 122 million people voted. Compared to the same election four years ago, though, there were 11 million fewer votes cast. This is in spite

of nearly two years of constant media attention and nearly $2 billion spent on the Presidential campaigns. However, one pattern was clear. Voter turnout was high in large urban and metropolitan areas. Voter turnout in rural and suburban areas fell behind. That is a troubling conclusion when you consider other important facts. Population in America’s largest cities is growing faster than that of small cities and towns. Also, the recently completed census resulted in reapportionment that concentrated more legislative representation in urban areas. That, my friends, is a triple whammy. More people, more representation, and greater turnout will result in urban centers getting the first shot when big decisions are made in Washington, D.C., and Nashville. Think of it this way: In a basketball game between big cities and See LETTERS, Page 9-A

Seeds, suet and crumbs: recipe for winter pastime

Although winter doesn’t officially begin in our section of the country until solstice (December 21, 2012), meteorlogical winter started one week before Halloween when we recorded five inches of snow and winds of 50 mph that denuded the trees. The colors of autumn were blown away to reveal stark brownand-grey timber skeletons that will be with us until April, relieved only by the icy blue and frozen white of precipitation. Already, my bird feeders have become magnets attracting migratory and year-round feathered visitors. It is hard to keep the containers filled. If the animals and birds could talk – and in a way, they can – this would be their way of warning about a long and very cold next five months. Many folks can’t believe one of my hobbies and great pleasures is making bird feeders and preparing special mixtures of seed and grain with which to feed my feathered friends. I don’t buy the store-packaged bird food. It is cheaper and better to make your own. My ingredients include sunflower seeds, wheat, cracked corn, millet, red milo, unsalted peanuts, popcorn (popped), thistle, sorghum, oatmeal, safflower, breadcrumbs, dried fruit, apples and oranges, bacon rinds, cornbread, suet – you name it, and within reason there are birds and wild critters who will find and enjoy the banquet if made available to them. I prefer platform feeders to the tube type. Wide, flat surfaces allow a smorgasbord of treats to

be arrayed. This, in turn, attracts a variety of birds. On a cold December morning, it’s quite a spectacle to watch cardinals, blue jays, house finches, chickadees, titmice, downy woodpeckers, dark-eyed junkoes, Carolina wrens, nuthatches, wild sparrows and the occasional mockingbird gather at the feeders. My wife and I sip hot coffee and watch the feathered parade. Much of the action is below the feeder on the ground. The greedy titmice and chickadees are messy eaters, throwing seeds to the ground in their search for choice morsels. In the dry grass and leaves under the platform is where the wild sparrows and junkoes prefer to forage. Because we live on a farm surrounded on three sides by woods, the bird populations are large, even in winter. In a week’s time, our feeding can easily exceed 50 pounds of seed, not counting the assorted special foods such as suet, peanut butter and popcorn balls, stale bread, raisins and fruit. When snow lays heavy on the ground, our feeding also attracts additional welcome – and some unwelcome – visitors. Whitetail deer and wild turkeys have been known to frequent our yard stations. I try to keep them away with corn feeders up in the pasture, but the deer are addicted to our peanut butter concoctions and can smell them a mile away. The wild turkeys are no problem and can be counted on to clean up what the other birds have left on the ground. The unwelcome guests

include brazen raccoons, crows and hawks. I will suffer squirrels to share in the bird bounty, but not coons or crows, which have robbed me blind during the gardening and corn-growing months. Enough said about them. But the hawks and owls present a conundrum. My wife and I love to watch the raptors, perching in nearby trees. We know, however, there is potential for bloody murder whenever they are lurking. I don boots and coat and hurry outside. Usually, this is enough to cause any bird of prey to take to the air. Not always, especially with the sparrow hawks. I’ve had those little savages glide past my head to snatch a small bird off the feeder. The other birds have a hawk and owl warning system. The linchpin in announcing danger is one of the most diminutive and outspoken species: the Carolina chickadee. I’ve heard the warning trill countless times, and when it sounds the other birds race for cover. Seconds later, a shadow flits over the snow, some-

times followed by the screech of a frustrated hunter. I once read that hummingbirds and chickadees recognize or imprint on human faces. I believe this. When the feeders and platforms have been scrounged of the last morsels, the chickadees seek me out. They’ve even flown inside my tool shed where I’ve been working to alert me. My wife says they are “cussing” me for not filling up the feeders. She might be right, because they don’t exhibit the same behavior toward anyone else. Well, this is my confession that I get a lot more pleasure out of wild birds than I do from some people. So as Christmas approaches and you know someone who could use a wildlife hobby, give them a gift of a bird feeder and bag of good seed mixture. Or get into backyard bird feeding yourself. Winter’s a tough time for our feathered friends in Appalachia. You’d be helping them out while discovering the quiet pleasure of watching marvels of nature through a pane of glass.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

From Page 8-A

Letters small towns, Team Big City has more players on the team, a bigger gym and more fans. Who do you think the odds makers will favor? Why is this important? Many of the pressing issues of our time impact Americans differently based upon where they live. The future of how we consume energy is paramount among them. Whether you use electricity, natural gas, propane, diesel, or gasoline, America’s energy policy affects you in powerful

ways. Further, how will rural areas successfully compete for jobs in the 21st century economy? Access to key infrastructure like roads and bridges, has always been important. But in a changing world, what is the new infrastructure? Access to highspeed broadband is vitally important for the future of rural America. Government has tremendous influence over broadband, and energy providers will increasingly be relied upon to serve the most remote among us. Your local power company is working hard to ensure government does

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not forget about those beyond the city limits. Go to www.ourenergy.coop to learn more about those efforts. You see, our civic duties don’t end at the ballot box; that is where they begin. Now that our elected representatives must govern, they must hear from you. And those who speak the most clearly, with purpose and vision and in the greatest numbers will be successful.

Mike Knotts Director of Government Affairs Tennessee Electric Cooperative Association Nashville

Osborne retires amid community fanfare Courtesy photo

Merchandising practices complaint To the Editor and Citizens of Chester County, I’m hoping to use this space to make a complaint about some of this area’s merchandising practices.

The Ad said, “The first 26 callers could receive a free listening test and 13 days of trying out their super duper listening device.” Also, their best $9,327 device was on sale for 61 percent off for three days

only. I called as soon as I could and was told I was the 27th caller and out of luck. It seems to me they could make an exception in some cases. Clarence Hays Henderson

A special day of recognition was held Dec. 1 for Joanne Osborne, center, who is retiring following 26 years as director of the Chester County Senior Citizens Center in Henderson. Among those paying tribute to Osborne were County Mayor Dwain Seaton, left, and Henderson Mayor Bobby King, right. New Center Director Kay Springfield presented congratulatory certificates and letters from Governor Bill Haslam, Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn, State Senator Delores Gresham, and State Representative Steve McDaniel. Osborne’s granddaughter Bethany Hall entertained with a special piano presentation, and Springfield and Frank Bell sang a duet.

Help 9-yearold collect food for those in need To the Editor and Citizens of Chester County, I am Eli Newsome and I am 9 years old. I’m collecting cans for Faith Hope and Love Food Bank. They give food to people in need, and they are low on food. If you want to give I have a box at Chester County Bank East Branch and Main Branch. Thank you for helping me, Eli Newsom Henderson

Chester County Retired Teachers Association meeting Dec.12 There has been a change in the meeting place for the Chester County Retired Teachers. The Chester County Retired Teachers Association will now meet in the Brown Kopel lobby at FHU at noon on Dec. 12, 2012. The members will be entertained with seasonal songs by a singing group.

Chester County High School Band and Chorus annual Christmas Concert Dec. 13 The Chester County High School Concert Band and the High School Chorus will hold their Christmas Concert at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13. Admission to each concert is $3 for adults and $2 for students.

Country Dance in Mifflin Dec. 14 There will be a weekly country dance from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at the Mifflin Mall every Friday night in December. Come out and join us and dance to live entertainment.

Chester County Choral Christmas program Dec. 16 The Chester County Choral Program directed by Clay Canada, will have their Christmas concert, at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 in Williams Auditorium at the Chester County Middle School. Please note the change of venue since the last concert. The Junior High and High School groups as well as the beginners will perform. Admission is $3 and the public is invited to attend.

Reagan Center Saturday Dance Dec. 15 Saturday, Dec. 15, the Community Center in Reagan will be hosting its regular Saturday night dance. The doors open at 6 p.m., and at 6:30 p.m. there will be free line dance lessons with Bobbie Keeton. Beginning at 7:30 p.m. there will be live music with "Bojack and Rockin' Country." This is an all ages show. Concessions will be available.

Tennessee Department of Labor's Career Coach visits library Dec. 17 The Chester County Library will host a visit from the Tennessee Department of Labor's Career Coach from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 17. The Career Coach will be on hand to help with resume writing for anyone who is interested.

Headhugger Hat Group meeting Dec. 17 The Headhugger Hat Group will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 at the Studio Building behind Henderson Assembly of God Church. Please come and bring your hats for the cancer patients to have during this cold weather. Thanks for your help with this ministry. If you have questions or need further information, call 608-7303.

Free arthritis foundation exercise classes begin Jan. 8 UT Extension in McNairy County will be offering a free Arthritis Foundation exercise class every Tuesday and Thursday for eight weeks starting Jan. 8. The class will be offered at the Selmer Community Center from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. This class is being

taught by a certified instructor and is for arthritis sufferers of all ages and mobility levels that can benefit from the low impact course. Extension educators design each class to meet the needs of all participants. For more information and to register, call UT Extension at 645-3598.

2012-2013 Scholarship announcement The Chester County Republican Party announces the School Year 2012-2013 program to award a scholarship worth $500 each to two deserving Chester County High Schools seniors who are attending a public, private or home school and intend to pursue a post-high school course of study at either a college/university or other post-secondary educational institution. The process is open to all high school seniors regardless of his/her political views. Applicants must submit a written essay by March 31, 2013 on the following topic: “The Bill of Rights, Individual Liberty and Personal Freedom.” The first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution are collectively referred to as the Bill of Rights. Of the rights protected by these amendments, which do you believe offers the most important protection of individual liberty and personal freedom?” The essay must be between 500 and 750 words, typed, double spaced, Arial font and 11-point size, submitted either in Word (DOC or DOCX), plain text (TXT) of a Portable Document Format (PDF), and must be written in English. Submit the essay by mail to Scholarship Committee, Chester County Republican Party, Chester County Republican Party, P.O. Box 243, Henderson, TN 38340, or you may email it to dawn@Bramblettgrp.com. Scholarship packets may be obtained from the school guidance counselor or the Chester County Republican party.

Scholarships Available at the University of Memphis for 2013-14 - Feb. 1 deadline Students who have applied for admission to the University of Memphis for the fall of 2013 are currently being evaluated for scholarship eligibility. A variety of scholarships are funded by the University and by private donors. In addition to academic scholarships, there are scholarships for adult students, community college graduates, transfer students, departmental scholarships, and scholarships for first-generation college students. Scholarships are awarded based on information submitted on the University of Memphis application for admission. A separate scholarship application is not required unless noted. The priority deadline for admitted students to the University of Memphis for scholarship consideration is Feb. 1. For more information about scholarships, go online to www.memphis.edu/scholarships or call 901-678-3213. More information about financial aid is available by phone at 901-678-4825 or online at www.memphis.edu/financialaid.

Jackson Rural Development meetings The Jackson Rural Development Area Office holds meetings from 9 - 11 a.m. the first and third Wednesday of each month in the conference room of Henderson City Hall, 121 Crook Ave. A rural development specialist will be available to assist with rural housing applications. To set up an appointment, call 668-2091.


Obituary/Religion Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Obituaries

Faith: Far more than an opiate By Ronnie McBrayer Keeping the Faith

Hank Watson Freeman Nov. 5, 2012 – Nov. 30, 2012 Hank Watson Freeman, infant son of Wesley and Susanne Freeman, went home to Jesus on Nov. 30, 2012. A Memorial service was held Saturday, Dec. 8, at Malesus United Methodist Church. Arrangements were handled by George A. Smith South Funeral Home, Jackson. Hank was born Nov. 5, 2012. During his 25 days of life, Hank and his precious story touched many people. He inspired all of us to treasure each day and to hold dearly those we love. Hank is survived by his parents, Wesley and Susanne Freeman of Jackson; big brothers, Harrison and Houston; grandparents Fred and Judy Freeman, and Becky Watson of Jackson and Carl and Sandy Watson of Bolivar; great-grandmothers, Ally Long Watson of Bolivar and Laura Hooper of Waverly. The family would like to thank the doctors and nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the JacksonMadison County General Hospital and Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in Nashville for the wonderful care, love, and support they provided for Hank and his family. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 13, 2012

Burl Malone Nov. 19, 1942 – Dec. 3, 2012 Burl Malone, 70, passed away Tuesday, Dec. 4. Services were held Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors-Johnson Chapel in Henderson, with Alan Highers, Barry Smith and Dwain Seaton officiating. Burial followed in the Harmony Cemetery at Chester County. He was born Nov. 19, 1942 in Chester County, the son of the late Ira and Oval West Malone. He was a Vietnam Army Veteran. He was united in marriage to Myrna R. (Redmon) on Nov. 2, 1968. He was a member of the Christian Church, had served as a County Commissioner for the last six years and owned and operated Henderson Chainsaw and Small Engine Repair, that later became known as Malone’s, since 1971. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and talking politics. He is survived by his wife, Myrna R. (Redmon) Malone of Henderson; a daughter, Meredith Malone of Dyersburg; a son, John Malone of Henderson; and four sisters, Brenda Tucker, JoAnn Harville, Kay Arnold and Martha Arnold, all of Henderson. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 13, 2012

Vann David Harris Oct. 8, 1929 – Dec. 6, 2012 Vann David Harris, 83, passed away Thursday, Dec. 06, 2012. Funeral Services were Saturday, Dec. 8, at the Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Hoyt Wilson officiating. Burial followed in the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery near Mifflin. He was born and reared in Chester County, the son of the late Hugh W. and Eula Nell Batchlor Harris. He attended Chester County schools. He married Katherine Vestal in 1946. They made their home in the Luray area all of their married life, where they farmed. He served as a director for the Federal Land Bank for 17 years. He also served as a charter member of the Henderson Elks Lodge, and a member of the Chester County Farm Bureau. He had served on the Democratic Executive Committee, the State Election Commission and the Chester County Election Commission. He enjoyed flying, owning and piloting his own plane. He was a member of the Beech Bluff Methodist Church. He is survived by a son, Hugh David Harris of Luray; two daughters, Susanne Harris of Clifton, and Camille Harris of Newark, Del.; seven grandchildren, Tracy, Ryan, Kasey, Kristen and Kyle Harris, Kevin Daws and Damon Mosier; eight great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. He was preceded in death by his parents, his wife in 2008; a son, Marion Ray Harris; a sister, Janice Glisson; and two grandchildren, Robyn Perry and Tammy Harris James. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 13, 2012

I am sometimes suspicious of how we employ our faith. Don’t get me wrong, faith is important to me, and I have given my life to it. But sometimes I treat my faith like it is a medicine cabinet or a pharmaceutical, going to it only when something is wrong, or if I am looking for a quick remedy. “My head hurts,” so I go to the medicine cabinet looking for a pain reliever. “I have a stomach ache,” so I reach in for a spiritual antacid. “I feel so uncertain,” so I explore my therapeutic options. “I’m feeling a bit anxious,” so I look for something that will serve as divine Prozac. Certainly I am not the only one who does this – it is a common practice – and I’m not the only one to make this observation. Strangely enough (strange because rarely does a Christian writer reference this man), it was Karl Marx who popularized this view, and this analogy would be incomplete without referring to his legendary quote. Marx said, “Religion is the opiate of the people,” and it appears he understood the medicinal, tranquilizing effects of religious faith fairly well. Now, before you write that letter to the editor or attempt to get your pound

of flesh from this simple columnist, understand that I am no Marxist – not even close – I detest anything that smacks of coercion. But that doesn’t mean that some of Marx’s observations about religion were incorrect, even if his means of modification were suspect. Marx felt that religious faith did very little to actually help people. Rather than drilling down to the source of a person’s trouble, he claimed that religion only treated that person’s symptoms. It was a barbiturate that had a numbing influence, instead of resulting in empowerment. The faith that is peddled by many pulpits today is little more than a sedative. It helps people to forget their pain and suffering, helps them sleep at night, and keeps them hanging on for next week’s dose of tranquility; but it does very little to move people to a place of growing, spiritual health. Thus, we can easily succeed in converting our faith into a first-aid kit, only turning to it when something hurts, and leaving it in the cabinet otherwise. Yes, when life hurts I want relief. Yet, the real power of faith is not its ability to magically stop our pain or to provide a fix

Ralph Ray Connor Feb. 10, 1930– Dec. 7, 2012 Ralph Ray Connor, USAF TSGT Retired, passed from this life Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 at the McNairy County Regional Hospital in Selmer. Services were held on Dec. 10, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors in Selmer, Kenneth Kitchen and Ben Martin officiated. Burial followed, with full military honors, in the Finger Cemetery at Finger. He was born in a log cabin near Jacks Creek in Chester County, on Feb. 10, 1930, son of Andrew Jackson Connor and Linnie Reed Connor. He served in the United States Air Force during both the Korean War and the Vietnam War, serving his country a total of 23 years. He retired in 1975 and has made his home in Finger since that time. He is a member of First Baptist Church of Bethel Springs, where he attended church and Sunday school faithfully until he became disabled. He is a member of the American Legion and Air Force Sergeants Association. He married Jeneva Walton Connor on Jan. 1, 1965. He is survived by his wife; their two children, Ray Connor (Paula) of Finger and Sheila Connor Hurst (Poley) of McNairy; one grandchild Hayes Connor Hurst; also have four step grandchildren, Dustin Hurst (Lindsey), Logan Hurst (Molli), Wendy Pittman, and Chasity Pittman; and four step great-grandchildren, Bryson Hurst, Coty Hurst, McKinleigh Pittman, and Hayleigh Pittman. From previous marriages, he is survived by four daughters, Sharon Sweigart of Herndon, Va., Rae-Jean Burke (David) of Buffalo, Okla., Linnie Robinson (Wally) of Devol, Okla., and Janet Newark (Keith) of Burkburnett, Texas; six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; three sisters, Mary Cofield (Robbie) and Nancy Kinchen (Neal) both of Finger, Linda Young (Dennis) of Henderson; six nieces and nephews; five great-nieces and nephews; and six greatgreat-nieces and great-great-nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; and one brother, Kenneth Connor, who died as an infant. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 13, 2012

to get us through a rough spot. Faith simply doesn’t remove our troubles and worries, offering bubblegummed-flavored baby aspirin and cartoonedband-aids. Rather, faith offers us a new way to live, an opportunity to change our lifestyle. It does more than medicate our booboos or make us happy when we have been made sad. On the contrary, faith has the power to transforms us, to shape and fit us for life, making us whole and well. It would do us and Marx well to hear some of the earliest words of Christian faith, written by the Apostle James.

He said to some of the first believers, “My friends, what good is it for one of you to say that you have faith if your actions do not prove it? Faith that does not lead to change is a faith that is dead.” It is possible to find great inspiration in our faith; to be comforted, reassured, and soothed, that feeling that, yes, we believe all the right things. Yet, if such beliefs do not have transformative power in our lives, then we do not have faith at all. Instead, we are addicted to a spiritual tranquilizer that blinds us to the reality of our world and the renewal God seeks to produce in our lives. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

Taking apps for food boxes now The Henderson Church of God will continue taking applications until Christmas for food boxes, which include from $75 to $200 worth of food for a $10 per month donation. If you are on SSI, SSA, SS, Families First, or are elderly, call Sheila to sign up. For more information, call 983-0580. If no answer, leave a message.

Pray the New Year in Come and join Old Path Baptist Church at 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31 for preaching, fellowship and special music as they pray in the “New Year” in at midnight. The Glory Bound Gospel Quartet will provide special music. Join them at Old Path Baptist Church at Cabo for this event. For directions, call Paul Peterson at 688-0052 or 608-6942.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Enville Pentecostal Church Hwy 22A

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT December 4, 2012 Franklin Daniel Cordero, 26, 740 E Fourth St. E54, was arrested and charged with theft of property $500 to $999. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,500 bond. Keario Quintez Utley, 21, 597 Sanford Ave. Apt. 403, was arrested and charged with possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a schedule VI controlled substance a n d manufacture/deliver/sell of a controlled substance. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $10,000 bond. December 5, 2012 Darnell C. Burton, 33, 534 Frankie Lane, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault and aggravated kidnapping. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond. An alleged shoplifting occurred at the Family Dollar Store. December 6, 2012 Eric Steven Arment, 33, 419 Regina Dr., was arrested and charged with burglary, theft of property $500 or less, possession of drug paraphernalia and criminal trespassing. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $10,000 bond. Kyle Richard Patterson, 24, 190 Hickory Corner Road, was arrested and charged with possession of schedule II controlled substance, possession of schedule VI controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,000 bond. December 9, 2012 Anthony Addison Barham, 35, 7010 Old Jacks Creek Road, was arrested and charged with especially aggravated kidnapping and aggravated assault. He is held in the Chester County Jail. Bond had not been set at press time. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT

December 9, 2012 7:57 a.m. - 129 E. University St., FreedHardeman University, Scott Hall, burnt food on the stove. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT December 3, 2012 Antwon Lamar Chaney, 36, 597 Sanford Ave. Apt. 205, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $750 bond. Jason Fox, 35, Fayetteville, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,000 cash bond. December 4, 2012 Markedas Artis, 21, Jackson, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County Jail on furlough. Patsy Darlene Stedman, 50, Lexington, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Felony. She is held in the Chester County Jail. Bond had not been set at press time. December 5, 2012 A report was taken of dogs running at large in the Brown Cemetery Road area. According to the report, the dogs allegedly belong to Loving Paws Animal Rescue. A gas furnace was reportedly stolen from a HUD owned residence on Garland Road. According to the report, a door knob was broken, allowing entry. The furnace is valued at $1,830, and damage to the door is estimated at $20. Gary C. Burton, 46, Sweetwater, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He is held in the Chester County Jail, serving time. December 6, 2012 A gate was stolen from State Forestry property on Island Road. The gate is an aluminum pipe farmtype gate valued at $150. An attempt of breaking and entering was reported

at a residence in the 10000 area of St. Rt. 100E. According to the report, it appeared some person or persons allegedly attempted to pry open doors and gain entry to the residence, but it did not appear that entry was made or that anything was missing. A St. Rt. 22 resident (11000 area) reported finding the home’s crawlspace door on the ground. The complainant reported having heard sounds and believed someone had possibly been staying under the house. Justin Wayne Hays, 21, 1425 Memory Lane, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $300 bond. December 7, 2012 Allen Sebastian Barham, 24, Parsons, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Misdemeanor. He is held in the Chester County Jail. Bond had not been set at press time. Tracie Diane Carter, 36, Sardis, was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000 to $9,999. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,000 cash bond. John Christopher Olsen, 19, 229 North Ave., was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Howard Clifton South, 52, 530 Woods Dr., was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $500 bond. December 8, 2012 Several prescription medications were reportedly stolen from a truck parked on Glendale Road. According to the report, missing medications include 120 200mg Tegrerol, 87 1mg Xanax, 120 35mg Soma, 87 10mg Lortab, 30 10mg Zocor, 30 Ambien, 30 10mg Norvasac and 90 300mg Randaine. December 9, 2012

Kelsey Rayshon Arnold, 28, Lexington, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI) and violation of the open container law. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,250 bond. Christopher Allen Keller, 39, 5025 Sunshine Road, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Misdemeanor. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $650 cash bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Tommy James Bynum Jr., 22, Jackson, was found guilty of Count one aggravated burglary, Count two theft of property $500 to $1,000 and Count three vandalism under $500. Count one: he is sentenced to three years in a TDOC facility, serving 30 percent prior to release eligibility. He was ordered to pay $500 in restitution. Count two: he was sentenced to two years in a TDOC facility, serving 30 percent prior to release eligibility. Count three: Bynum was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County Jail, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. All counts are concurrent, Jeffrey Tyler Jones, 20, 450 County Lane, was found to be in violation of probation on two counts. His probation was revoked and he was ordered to serve the original sentence imposed of two years TDOC for one count and four years, six months TDOC for the other, receiving credit for time served on referenced cases.

Fred’s Super Dollar donates to local fire and police departments

Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Each year since 2002, fred’s Super Dollar stores have commemorated the fallen heroes of Sept. 11, 2001, through a fundraiser for the emergency teams that serve their store locations. The stores sold “Hero Hats” for $1 each with all proceeds going to selected emergency teams around the stores’ location. In addition, all operating profits from store sales on Sept. 11 were donated. Here, Ray Souther, manager of fred’s Super Dollar in Henderson, presents a check to both Greg Lipford with the City Fire Department and Gary Davidson and Jerry Paul Stansell with the Henderson Police Department in the amount of $1,251.58 for each department.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Page 13-A

Hanukkah: A festival of lights and a celebration of freedom By Marney E. Gilliam Staff Writer

With Christmas fast approaching, people are making their lists and checking them twice, but what if you didn’t celebrate Christmas? Not celebrate Christmas you ask? Yeap, what if you celebrated Hanukkah instead? I don’t know much about the Jewish faith. I leave that to my husband who studies religions of the world extensively, but with Hanukkah approaching and having my job as a reporter, I was curious to learn more about a culture that I have never experienced. Chester County doesn’t really have a Jewish population that I could find, but there is a Jewish Temple in Jackson. I interviewed their Rabbi, Jordan Parr and Saul Strosberg, the Rabbi of an Orthodox Jewish Temple in Nashville to find out more about their religion, culture and Hanukkah itself. The Rabbis Rabbi Parr is 53-years old and has been the parttime Rabbi for the Reform Jewish synagogue in

covenant between God and Abraham where Abraham promised to follow the ways of God and God promised Abraham a land and progeny, descendents. And a covenant means that we follow the book of Torah. We follow the commandments of Moses. And [there are] 613 commandments. And to be a good Jew is to not necessarily believe in God fervently but it is to follow the commandments.” The responsibilities of Jews are laid out in the five books of Moses and a book called the Talmud. Judaism also describes a family and ethnic group, descendents of Abraham and Sara. It’s a culture but it’s diverse because Jews are disbursed all over the world. Rabbi Parr deciphers the difference between Judaism and Christianity, “Jews do not accept Jesus as the son of God or a living Messiah.” While they believe he was a rabbi, they do not believe Jesus was divine. Jewish people “think the Messiah is yet to come whereas

Elephants adorn the tables. Elephants were used by the Greeks in the attack on the Jewish people. Jackson, Congregation B’nai Israel, since August. He lives outside of Dallas and comes up several times a year for Sabbath weekends and holidays. Saul Strosberg is the Rabbi for the Orthodox Jewish synagogue, Congregation Sherith Israel, in Nashville. The Jewish Faith As I started my interview, I really wanted to first talk to the Rabbis about what Judaism is and how it is different from Christianity so I could have a base of knowledge to share with readers. Rabbi Strosberg explained that Judaism was the “first monotheistic faith that celebrates the

Christians believe Jesus as the Messiah is going to return. And so … even though Jesus was born Jewish and came from a Jewish family, and Christianity is deeply rooted in Judaism, the two religions are very, very different in that regard. Jews and Christians do worship the same God and hold many beliefs in common “in terms of ethics and how we live are lives.” But in Judaism “there’s no communion, there’s no sacraments as Catholics may understand that or Episcopalians. We don’t have any of those practices in our tradition.” And while Jews do not believe in the Trinity,

The Siever family enjoys a game of Hanukkah Bingo.

The lighting of the Menorah on the first night of Hanukkah. “there is an idea in Judaism … it’s called the ‘Shechinah’” that would be akin to Christians’ belief in the Holy Spirit. While most of us believe in God as a masculine figure, Shechinah is “a feminine idea, it’s a feminine presence of God that dwells within every human being. … Jews and Christians share this belief that God is above and in Heaven, but also that God is within each of us so that part of God that is within each of us is Shechinah. … God is both above and within at the same time.” The Jewish faith does not believe there is a division between God and Shechinah; they are one in the same. To attain salvation Jews “do mitzvot and mitzvot are the commandments that are in the Torah, the five books of Moses. … You don’t have to be Jewish to be in the world to come. You just have to be righteous and for Jews it means following the mitzvot commandments, but everyone can achieve salvation and be righteous in the eyes of God simply by doing ... good things. Not murdering. Not stealing. A lot of this in the 10 Commandments. Being faithful to your spouse. For Jews it’s a little more complicated ... in terms of worship and food and some other rules.” So salvation can be achieved by anyone who believes in one God. “Idolatry is out.” according to Rabbi Parr. Repentance is also important in the Jewish faith. Yom Kippur “is our day of atonement. It’s a fast day in our calendar. We spend the whole day in prayer, asking forgiveness from God. Technically we can’t ask forgiveness from God until we ask forgive-

ness from our fellow human beings for the wrongs we’ve done to them.” Rabbi Parr shares that a famous Rabbi once said “repent one day before ye die” and since no one knows what day they will die, “we have to square ourselves with each other and with God every day. … And that is done through prayer, through self awareness, doing acts of charity you might say, and trying to improve ourselves as human beings everyday and then when we are faced with the situation that led us down the wrong path, … we choose the right path.” That’s how those of the Jewish faith know they have truly changed their behavior. The Jewish service A typical service in a R e f o r m Jewish temple according to Rabbi Parr would consist of “a standard set of prayers that we recite, you know certain prayers affirming God’s oneness, God’s love for us and our faithfulness to God. We read from the Torah which is the five books of Moses so certain … selections based on our calendar. [There are] specific

prayers of course for each holiday as they come up through the year. There’s a sermon typically.” When he is there, the Rabbi gives the sermon but when he is not, a congregate will give a talk. The service will also include “musical selections based on the prayers.” It is a fixed order of service that occurs every week. While Hebrew is their common

Photos by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

ever comes most often is most important so that would make the Sabbath the most important holiday. The Sabbath is really the bedrock of Jewish practice and it’s really the focal point of the week. For Jews who observe the Sabbath properly, it is a day to look forward to every day of the week. It’s a day of peace and of comfort, rejuvenation and

Vickie Bronfman prepares the latkes, the traditional potato pancakes. language, according to Rabbi Parr, and “is their great unifier throughout the world,” about half of their service in Jackson is done in English so that the congregation and any visitors can follow along. This is done so that everyone feels welcome and can take part. Jewish Holidays Rabbi Parr believes their most important holiday is Yom Kippur with a close second being Passover in the Spring. Passover celebrated the exodus of Egypt. During Passover they cannot eat anything made with yeast. The restrictive diet reminds them that when the Israelites escaped Egyptian slavery, the dough was not allowed to rise or leaven so they eat unleavened bread for the week. Rabbi Strosberg elaborates, “Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year and Passover is the most observed holiday of the year, but in Judaism what-

inspiration and presence....” Hanukkah While Rabbi Parr would not rank Hanukkah high as far as its importance theologically, he admits that among American Jews, it is important. “Simply because of where it is on the calendar. Because it’s so close to Christmas and it’s a great excuse for our children to get presents.” Rabbi Parr explains that Hanukkah “celebrates the victory of the Maccabees expelling the Greek rulers from the land of Israel in the second century before the common era, before Jesus was born, and establishing an independent kingdom. And it was quite an accomplishment because it was so unexpected. And later on there was attached to the story, this historical story which is entirely true, there was a miracle story attached to it that they went into this temple in Jerusalem ... to light the eternal light. There is a commandment

See HANUKKAH, Page 14-A


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Advocate dissects traits that help single moms raise leaders With single parents now the norm – nearly two-thirds of births to American women under 30 occur outside marriage – they’re also dominating the big screen. This summer, newly single-in-real life actress Katie Holmes began shooting “Molly,” a film she co-wrote, is co-producing and stars in as the single mother of a daughter. In November, Tyler Perry began shooting “Single Mom’s Club,” a comedy about four women who meet through their kids’ preschool. “I love movies about single moms because they often highlight the qualities that help single moms raise confident, successful kids,” says Cederick Tardy, founder of S.T.R.O.N.G., Inc, a non-profit that provides education and resources to empower youth and families. “Having been raised by a single mother, I know the job can seem overwhelming. Mothers, especially moms

From Page 13-A

Hanukkah in the Bible that says ‘the fire shall be kept burning continuously.’ They went to light this fire which was a small flame that was lit by olive oil. Like a small candle. And there was only enough oil for one night and [by] some miracle it burned for eight nights.” While it was a legend, according to Rabbi Parr, it has grown into a belief and a major reason Jews celebrate the holiday. “And so we light candles for eight nights and every night the kids get presents and [there are] special foods and songs and games attached to the holiday. And so it’s become this huge deal in Judaism and not just in the United States but really all over the world. It’s very big in Israel, too.” The major ritual that takes place during Hanukkah is the lighting of the Menorah, the eight armed candelabra. The Jewish people light the first candle on the first night of Hanukkah and then light an additional candle for each of the eight nights to come. They also celebrate by eating food fried in olive oil. The children may play with dreidels which are four sided tops. Depending on what side the dreidel lands on, children can take coins, usually made of chocolate, out of the pot or put them in the pot. Adults also play gelt which is an English or German word for ‘money.’ Once again the coins used are generally chocolate. “It’s a time honored tradition” but is not high stakes gambling by any means according to Rabbi Parr. Rabbi Strosberg continues and Rabbi Parr agrees that “on the surface it would appear that all Jews celebrate Hanukkah the same way by lighting the Hanukkah Menorah for

eight nights, one candle the first night, two candles the second night, and there’s a giving of pres-

of boys, may feel like they’re doing well just to get their sons through adolescence alive and with no criminal charges.” Tardy interviewed dozens of single mothers for his book “The Seven Secrets: The Manual for Raising Boys to Men” (www.cedericktardy.com) and those who raise leaders share certain characteristics. They also take definitive steps, such as setting firm boundaries and instilling in their children a sense of purpose, that help keep their sons motivated and on course. What are some of the other qualities they share? Tardy points to the movies and five of his favorite single moms: • “The Karate Kid” (1984) – Single moms should ensure their sons have strong male role models and, while Lucille LaRusso didn’t actually find Mr. Miyagi for her son, Daniel, she allows the relationship to flourish, rounding cultures and faiths. And for us that is very much the message of Hanukkah. I mean the broadcast message that most people hear is a message of hope. … We light lights during the darkest time of the year when

I also sat down with Cindy Rubin, the Education Director, who stated that Hanukkah is the “first recorded battle for religious freedom” and is a “celebration of the rights of all and freedom.” She says that the lights

Rabbi Parr leads the congregation in their celebration of Hanukkah. ents and eating of special Hanukkah foods. And everyone kind of tells the same story about the Temple being rededicated and there only being enough oil to last one night. But I think the messages of Hanukkah are a little different. I think ... the real traditional Jewish message of Hanukkah is that the Jews fought against the Hellenist. That is the Jews fought against the assimilation and acculturation of Israel Jews in Israel, Palestine. So that today the message would be one of staying Jewish amidst an American, Christian world or wherever a Jew finds oneself, the idea that the few can survive among the many and one can be steadfast in their faith despite the sur-

Matt Gilliam dressed for the Live Action Dreidel game.

there is the least amount of daylight, we bring more light into the world. The way we fight evil is not by diminishing evil but by increasing goodness in the world.” The Hanukkah Festival to Congregation B’nai Israel in Jackson To add another layer to the story, my family and I decided to take Rabbi Parr up on his invitation to attend the Hanukkah Festival at his synagogue. When we arrived we were greeted by a very friendly group busily decorating and cooking. While they worked, several of them broke away from their duties for a brief interview. Melodi Claycon, 12, stated that her favorite part of Hanukkah is “lighting the candles every night because I’m with my whole family at that time and it’s fun.” Samuel Claycon, 15, most enjoys “eating.” He especially likes the latkes, which are traditional potato pancakes. Samantha Claycon’s, 13, favorite part of Hanukkah is “definitely the presents but spending it with family is a lot of fun too.” She was looking forward to the special dreidel game they had planned. “It’s a live action dreidel game where the kids are going to be the dreidels … So you have a dreidel costume and the adults spin you around and you have a blindfold so you have no idea which way you are facing and whichever part of the box is facing the person you’re the dreidel of, then that’s the one they get.” Participants were going to win candy. She explains that Hanukkah is “a time for family and fun.” Kristy Brooks, 35, shared that she loves “eating and lighting the candles.” She explained that “Hanukkah is a celebration of Jewish faith.”

bring hope, freedom and joy and that’s why so many religions all over the world use lights. “The first night of Hanukkah, tonight, is also the end of Shabbat. Shabbat ends at sunset and so the first things we’re going to do is our Havdalah ceremony which is our separation for the end of Shabbat going back to the regular week. … And then we’ll begin with a potluck dinner … which is something unique to our congregation.” The night’s festivities then began with the service to end the Sabbath, the Menorah on each table was lit, and the smallest children were called forward to help with the blessing of the meal. My son, Matt, particularly liked this part because it included praying and then getting to sample the special bread that they used as part of the prayer. Next, it was time to eat and eat we did! I sampled the latkes and let me tell you, they were delicious as was the entire meal. After we ate, there were Hanukkah songs and the teenagers took the stage to explain the significance of each of the eight candles that are lit as part of the Hanukkah celebration. There were games as well with the live action dreidel game and Hanukkah bingo. We all then enjoyed various desserts including some beautifully decorated and equally tasty Hanukkah cookies. The night we spent with this wonderfully open and friendly congregation was educational and fun! We truly felt welcome and as though we were a part of one large family. I encourage everyone to embrace the love and fellowship this season affords and remember that though we may have different beliefs, we can all share peace and joy.

Tardy says. “They don’t get better than Mr. Myagi, the Army veteran and Medal of Honor winner who teaches young Daniel karate.” It’s not enough to simply provide role models and hope some good rubs off, Tardy notes. “As with Mr. Myagi, there should be a plan, a mission, something specific your son can learn that will move him closer to his goals.” • “Erin Brockovich” (2000) – If kids’ basic needs aren’t being met, you can’t expect them to be able to focus on the higher pursuits for which leaders-in-themaking must aim, Tardy says. “The first thing Erin does right in this movie is to doggedly pursue getting a job,” he says. Then, though she’s just a legal clerk, she discovers a puzzling case file and follows her intuition to dig into it and learn more. She eventually uncovers a large company’s complicity in contaminating a town’s water supply. “Erin believed in herself – she knew her questions were valid and she pursued them. And she thought for herself – she didn’t accept the big company’s pat answers,” Tardy says. • “Forrest Gump” (1994) – Forrest Gump appeared to have a lot of disadvantages, starting with a low IQ, but his mother, Mrs. Gump, believed in him and never stopped teaching him valuable life lessons, including, “Life is like a box of chocolates ... you never know what you’re gonna get.” Tardy notes that she communicated with Forrest in the way he best understood. • “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991) – Targeted for death by a nearly indestructible killing machine in the first movie, Sarah Connor not only survives, she is impregnated by a man from the future and then slays the terminator. In the second film, we find her institutionalized during her son’s boyhood because everyone thinks she’s crazy. Despite all of that, when she is finally able to reconnect with her son, Sarah throws herself into teaching him how to be the leader of the human resistance.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Double fundraiser

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Ashley Carroll, right, helped two causes Saturday at the Holidays in Henderson Holiday Mart held at the Henderson National Guard Armory. Proceeds from the Holiday Mart went to the Chester County Imagination Library fund, and Carroll’s sale of handmade jewelry also benefitted children in Kenya.

Tips for extending life of holiday trees, plants By Melinda Myers Gardening expert, TV/radio host

The holidays can be a wonderful, yet stressful time. Reduce stress and enhance your families’ enjoyment this season by increasing the benefits of holiday décor and gifts and by taking a few shortcuts to properly care for holiday trees and plants. 1. Keep your Christmas tree looking its best by keeping the tree stand filled with water. Make this a daily chore for someone trying to stay on Santa’s nice list. Don’t worry if good help is hard to find. Purchase or make your own selfwatering device. Use a decorative tin or plastic bucket set in a box and wrapped to hide its presence. Fill it with water and run a piece of plastic tubing from the bucket to the tree stand. Weight each end of the tubing, so it stays at the bottom of the reservoir. Test before leaving town to make sure it is in working order. 2. Add some holiday plants this year. Many studies have shown that indoor plants can boost mood levels, reduce fatigue and even lower stress. Plus, it’s easy to extend the life of your holiday plants. Place them in a cool bright location away from drafts of hot or cold air. Water thoroughly and often enough to keep the soil moist. Pour off any excess water that collects in the saucer, basket or foil wrap to prevent root rot. Save time and improve your plants growing conditions by placing pebbles in the base of the saucer or foil to elevate the plants above the excess water. As the water evaporates, it increases the humidity around the plants. Or purchase one of the saucer inserts, like rubber grids, that work the same way. 3. Use nature-inspired decorations that provide enjoyment throughout the holiday season and beyond. Colorful stems, white painted allium seed heads and wooden stars can add beauty throughout the holidays and much of

the year. Red wood wreaths are festive enough for the holidays and timeless enough to leave hanging on your wall year round. Luminaries can be used to light the entrance to your home or the path to your outdoor living space during warmer months. Use a few roosting pocket bird houses to decorate trees and greenery and then move them outside for the birds. These decorations can provide beauty and enjoyment way beyond the holiday season and remove some of the pressure to take down all of the holiday decorations by a certain date. 4. Spruce up indoor plants with a few holiday flowers, spangles and lights. Place a few cut flowers in floral picks filled with water. Place these in one or more of your houseplants for some seasonal color. Or add one of the miniature poinsettias, kalanchoes or cyclamen to a large planter. Simply sink the flowering plant, pot and all, into your houseplant container. Replace the small flowering plants as they fade or the seasons change. Add colorful stems, ribbons and winter branch lights to your houseplants and planters for a bit of seasonal sparkle. Branch lights are also a festive way to light an entrance, bathroom, or other out of the way space. Look for lights with timers to extend the life of the batteries and reduce your workload. 5. Increase value and extend enjoyment with gifts that give twice. A tabletop spruce tree, perfect for any size home can add greenery and fragrance long past the holidays. And, once the weather is suitable for planting, move your tree into the garden. Or re-gift it to a friend or relative looking to expand their landscape. Make this a holiday you can relax, enjoy and remember throughout the coming year. For more gardening tips and information, visit www.melindamyers.com

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Thursday, December 13, 2012

Christmas Christmas Parade Parade 2012 2012

Page 16-A

Hundreds lined the streets of downtown Henderson Thursday for the annual Christmas Parade sponsored by the Henderson/Chester County Chamber of Commerce. The unusually warm weather warmed the hearts of the parade watchers who very enthusiastically cheered as the many floats, bands, and walking units passed along the nearly mile-long parade route. First Baptist Church of Henderson was judged as Best Overall with their walking nativity scene. Other winners included, in the Civic category, first place to Arvin Sango, Inc.; second place Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling; and third place to Cub Scouts Pack 25. In the religious category, first place was Friendship Baptist Church; second place Finger Baptist Church; and third place to Faith Baptist first through sixth grade girls. In total there were a dozen floats, and 50 entries of cars, tractors, horses, trucks and others. Bands came from sixth grade, junior high and high school. After the color guard, politicians and beauty queens led the way, and of course Santa Claus arrived riding atop a city of Henderson fire truck.

Photos by James A. Webb and Trish Worsham, Independent

Stan Clayton, Jada King and Kim Clayton. Katelyn Faulkner, Miss Henderson.

Madison Newman, Junior Miss Henderson. Ed Angel, Emiliano Angel, Daniela Arroyo, and America Angel enjoyed the parade from in front of the Chester County Courthouse.

James and Kim Vincent.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Eden Burleson, 6, and Canaan Burleson, 3.

Photos by James A. Webb and Trish Worsham, Independent

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

WC students accompany Santa in parade

City Fire Dept. honors Firefighter of year

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Pictured, three West Chester Elementary students pose with Santa prior to accompanying him in the fire truck during Henderson’s Christmas Parade last Thursday. Each child was a first place winner in their school’s recent Fire Prevention poster contest, and were granted the opportunity by the City of Henderson Fire Department. Pictured are, from left, Keith Marbury of Heather Bates’ first grade class, Tori Snodderly of Janice Whitman’s second grade class, Zane Bolton of Denise Davidson’s third grade class and, of course, Santa himself. Each child’s poster has been sent to Nashville for the state contest.

Eastern Star donation

Courtesy photo

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Eastern Star No. 120 last week presented more than 100 stuffed animals to the Chester County Sherriff’s Department to be distributed to children through the department. From left are Worthy Matron Judy Phillips; Leslie Weaver, wife of Sherriff Blair Weaver; and Assistant Patron Jimmy Helvering.

Hunter Cash was named the 2012 Volunteer Firefighter of the year by the City of Henderson Fire Department last week at the annual Christmas Dinner. Fire Chief Glenn Bryan said “Hunter is always willing to help with whatever needs to be done around the station. He also assists in training new volunteers and does a good job in emergency situations. He has earned it.” Cash, originally from Union City, is a senior at Freed-Hardeman University, studying to become a Youth Minister.


Sports Page 1-B

Thursday, December 13, 2012

CCHS gets district win The District 14-AA basket schedule began Friday for Chester County, and the Eaglettes took an easy 81-17 victory over Jackson Central Merry at Eagle Gym. CCHS was out in front 27-5 after one period, and 52-11 at intermission. Thirteen different players scored for Chester County including 15 each from Tamacha Couch and Elantra Cox, and a dozen from Madison Cherry-Reed. The pickings were not so easy on Saturday night, however, as Scotts Hill jumped to a quick double-digit lead and held off a furious CCHS rally, 46-43. The host Lady Lions scored the first seven points of the game, and led 16-8

after one quarter. They ran off nine straight in the second period for their biggest lead of the game 25-9. However, Chester County changed from a “gal to gal” to a zone defense in the third period, and stymied the Scotts Hill offense. It also ignited the Eaglettes offensively. Cox scored 10 points in the third quarter, the last coming on a steal with less than a minute to play pulling CCHS within a point at 35-34. Scotts Hill would not quit, and ran off seven straight spanning the quarter break to go back up eight. But Amos scored on a putback, Couch hit a three, See CCHS, Page 3-B Photo courtesy Monty McNeal Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County High School’s Darby Miskelly, seated at center, will continue her soccer career next fall playing for the Freed-Hardeman University Lady Lions. Present for the signing include her parents Christy and Scott Miskelly (seated left and right); and standing from left: CCHS coaches Stacy Pruett, and Jason Judd, Miskelly’s brother and sister Madelyn and Wilson Miskelly, and FHU head coach Jason Elliott.

Miskelly to play soccer at FHU Chester County’s Darby Miskelly will continue her soccer career next fall playing for the Freed-Hardeman University Lady Lions. Miskelly, the daughter of Scott and Christy Miskelly of Henderson, currently is a senior on the Eaglettes. She is the school’s all-time leader scorer with 21 goals in a

season and 46 for her career. Honors include All-District, All-Region, and All West Tennessee her junior year, and AllDistrict, All-District Tournament, and AllRegion this past season. “We look forward to having Darby on our team,” said FHU soccer coach Jason Elliott. “She is a good leader on and off

the field. I’m impressed with her character. She will be a good influence on our campus and on our team. “Darby has good talent, and she is a hard worker on the field. She can score, play on top, and find the net. She needs to keep improving in order to play the college game,” he conclud-

ed. Academically, Miskelly is one of the leading students at Chester County High School. She is a member of the student council where she serves as president, BETA Club member, and a HOSA member. At FHU Miskelly will likely play forward or midfielder.

Tamacha Couch of CCHS runs the fast break against Scotts Hill Saturday at Scotts Hill.

Makeup date announced Chester County’s scheduled game with Trinity Christian Academy on Dec. 4 was postponed due to illness. The TCA Lions and CCHS will make up the games at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26.

Eagles gaining ground, beat Scotts Hill Lions The Chester County Eagles have begun to gain traction in the young basketball season. After struggling in the first series of games, CCHS has now won two of its last t h r e e , including a 61-55 vict o r y Saturday at Scotts Hill. After quickly falling behind the Lions 3-0, CCHS ran off nine straight points and never trailed again. They led by as many as 10 in the first half, and 11 in the second

half. Up 51-48 with just under four minutes to play, the Eagles put the ball in the “deep freeze,” and hit nine of 14 free tosses in the final minutes to secure the win. Unofficially, the Eagles shot 40 percent from the field to a tick under 33 percent for the Scotts Hill Lions, with the rebounding just about even. However, the Eagles let SHHS have hope by turning the ball over 22 times. Konner Lindsey had 18 See EAGLES, Page 3-B


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Nash selected for youth all-star bowl While attending an Offense-Defense Football Camp this summer, Colton Nash, 11-years old, of Cordova, was named an Offense-Defense All American and invited to participate in the seventh annual Offense-Defense Bowl Week festivities taking place at Reliant Stadium in Houston, Texas. Colton is the son of Shawn and Misti Nash of Cordova. He is the grandson of Tim and Pam Nash of Jackson,; Phyllis Clayton of Henderson; and Mike and Toni Tignor of Luray. Nash is also the great-grandson of Patsy Lewellyn of Henderson, and Jean Tignor of Luray. Colton, a defensive lineman for Harding Academy of Memphis, was selected for this honor from a group of young athletes numbering in the thousands across the country. The Offense-Defense Youth All-American Bowl is part of a week-long series of events including the televised bowl, an All-Star football game showcasing 88 of the top high school seniors in the country and has featured current NFL pros such as Cam Newton, Carlos Dunlap and Dez Bryant among others before they were collegiate stars. For more information, visit http://www.o-d.com.

COLTON NASH

FHU Lady Lions now ranked No. 2 in NAIA After an 8-0 start through the end of the first rating period, the Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions moved up one spot to No. 2 in the first in-season NAIA Division I Women's Basketball Coaches Poll released Dec. 4. FHU started the season ranked third, and a pair of losses by preseason No. 2 Shawnee State University opened the door for a jump in the first ratings. The Lady Lions received one first-place vote with the other 10 going to top-ranked Lubbock Christian University, which is 11-0 with many of its wins coming against NCAA Division II opponents. It marked the 155th consecutive poll in which FHU has been ranked, tied for the longest streak in the NAIA.

Three over Faulkner Entering Saturday's game with No. 25 Faulkner University at Montgomery, Ala., the Lady Lions ranked atop the NAIA in both threepoint shooting and scoring defense. One of those elements went missing, but the other did its job well enough to help keep the No. 2 Lady Lions unbeaten on the year with a 5249 road win. FHU, which was shooting 45.3 percent from three-point range coming into the day, missed its first 11 shots from behind the arc and made just twoof-22 by the end of the game. However, the second three-pointer came at a very crucial time. Natalie Shumpert finally connected on her eighth attempt to answer a threepointer from Faulkner's Shannon Evans and tie the game at 44-44 with 2:47 to play. The basket triggered a decisive 8-0 run that gave the Lady Lions a 50-45

lead with 35 seconds to play as FHU scored on four straight possessions while limiting Faulkner (92) to a sole free throw. Evans' three-pointer with 3:19 left was, in fact, the last shot the Eagles made from the field. Freed-Hardeman left the door slightly ajar by missing two of four free throws in the final minute but Faulkner was unable to capitalize and trailed by six with nine seconds to play after Ashley Tate made the back end of a double bonus. Grace Alonso de Armino fouled Leticia Cueller on a late three-point attempt and Cuellar made all three free throws to cut the final margin to three points. Faulkner took advantage of the poor shooting and led for most of the game. The Eagles' 23-21 halftime lead quickly grew to an 11-point margin with 14:55 to play thanks to an 11-2 run that opened the second half. But the Lady Lion defense, which was allowing an average of 45.0 points per game coming into the contest, clamped down and held Faulkner to three-of-15 shooting from that point forward while also forcing eight turnovers. And when they had to make shots, they did. FHU got a pair of double-doubles from Alonso de Armino (17 points, 10 rebounds, both career highs) and Amber Alexander (10 points, 12 rebounds) as the Lady Lions won the battle of the boards, 42-35, against a team that was leading the nation in fewest rebounds allowed entering the game.

Shumpert gets 33 Shumpert scored a season-high 33 points, 18 in the second half to make sure that No. 20 Auburn Montgomery would not make a comeback. The

result was a 75-49 win over the previously undefeated Warhawks at Montgomery on Friday. It marked the seventh time in her career that Shumpert had scored 30 or more points. Only two players - Qiana Elam (13) and Meribeth Boehler (eight) - recorded more 30-plus point games in their careers. For the second straight game FHU did not get off to the quickest of starts and trailed the hosts, 11-6, with 12:42 left in the first half. But a jumper by Shumpert and a threepointer by Brittany Montgomery to tie the game changed that, and the Lady Lions did not trail again. The first half stayed tight until a 7-0 run by the Lady Lions gave them a 29-19 lead with 3:29 left. AUM (10-1) pulled within seven points before FHU scored the final five points of the half including a buzzer-beating layup by Shumpert. Hayley Newby was the only other Lady Lion to score in double figures, netting 10 points while

playing a few extra minutes in place of Bagwell, who got into foul trouble early in both halves. Alexander pulled down 10 rebounds while Ashley Tate dished out seven assists.

FHU out-races ‘Dega Dec. 3 at Talladega, Ala., FHU earned an 83-51 victory over Talladega College. The Lady Lions, found themselves down 12-11 six minutes into the game, thanks largely to Talladega guard Arielle George who made three quick three-pointers. George's first threepointer gave the Tornadoes a 3-2 lead, marking the first time that FHU has trailed since early in the season opener totaling nearly 316 consecutive minutes. That lead was shortlived as the Lady Lions went on a 15-2 run over the next seven minutes, scoring on six of seven possessions. Bagwell led all scorers with 18 points while Shumpert added 14. Alexander and Alonso de Armino chipped in 13 and 11 points respectively.

Fourth straight won by Lions The Freed-Hardeman Lions extended their winning streak to four games after picking up a 69-52 victory over Harris-Stowe State University on Friday night in St. Louis. The Lions (8-5) took the lead for good on a bucket by Reginald Gilmore with 11:42 left in the first half and led by as many as 12 in the half before a couple of late baskets pulled the Hornets within eight points, 29-21, at the end of a low-scoring first half. After HSSU (1-7) scored the first four points of the second half to get within four of the lead, FHU rolled off six unanswered points - four by Orlando Bass - and kept

the Hornets from getting any closer than seven the rest of the way. An Isaiah Harrison basket with 9:21 left gave the Lions a 14-point lead at 52-38, and back-to-back three-pointers by Bass a few minutes later put the game away. Gilmore led FHU with 14 points while Bass had 12 and Harrison added 11. Harrison's streak of double-doubles ended, though he grabbed a team-high eight rebounds. The Lions shot 44.4 percent from the field while holding the Hornets to 32.3 percent shooting. Freed-Hardeman has a week off before visiting No. 17 Faulkner University on Dec. 15.

Freed-Hardeman Women’s Basketball Date Dec. 19 Dec. 20

Opponent Puerto Rico-Bayamon Puerto Rico-Rio Pedras

Time 11:00 11:00

Opponent Faulkner Auburn-Montgomery

Time 4:00 6:00

Location M’gomery, Ala. M’gomery, Ala.

Chester County High School Basketball

Boys Junior Varsity Time 4:30 4:30

Location Eagle Gym Eagle Gym

Girls Junior Varsity Date Opponent Dec. 18 Hardin County

Time 4:30

Location Eagle Gym

Chester County Junior High Basketball Date Opponent Dec. 13 Northeast

Time 6:00

Location Henderson

For the second year in a row, Freed-Hardeman Unversity's Fernanda Ferreira has been chosen as a Tachikara-NAIA Volleyball All-American. Ferreira was again a third-team selection after being named to the same squad last year. The TranSouth Conference Player of the Year was the only conference player to make any of the first three teams. The senior from Minas Gerais, Brazil, was among the nation's leaders in kills, placing third in kills per set (4.6) and 25th in total kills (484). She also had 27 aces, 44 blocks and 219 digs in 105 sets played. Ferreira is the first two-time NAIA All-American in program history. Renata Pedreira (third team, 2005) and Karina Souza (third team, 2007) were also honorable mention selections in 2006. Ferreira was an honorable mention selection in 2010. Other players receiving All-American honors are Crissandra Perez (third team, 2008) and Diana Silva (second team, 2009).

UTM hosting prospect camp The University of Tennessee at Martin baseball program is hosting a Winter Prospect Camp from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 20-21. The first day is a hitting camp for high school prospects, and the second day is for pitching and catching prospects. Cost is $75 per person per day, or $125 for both camps if payment is received by Dec. 17. Cost the day of the camp is $85 per day, or $150 for both. For more information, email Brad Goss at bgoss@utm.edu, or call 881-3691.

From Page 1-B

CCHS and following a Lady Lion turnover, Amos scored again cutting the edge once again to one point, 44-43. However, the teams exchanged turnovers in the last 12 seconds, and Scotts Hill hit two free throws with only four seconds to play, and a desperation three by CCHS at the buzzer was just off the mark. Unofficially, the Eaglettes hit only 31 percent from the field. They controlled the boards, 2714, but had to since the Lady Lions were running their offense to perfection and hitting 51 percent from the field.

Eagles

Date Opponent Time Location Dec. 14 Lexington 6:00 Eagle Gym Dec. 17 Scotts Hill 6:00 Eagle Gym Dec. 18 Hardin County 6:00 Eagle Gym Dyersburg Christmas Tournament, Dec. 27-29, TBA

Date Opponent Dec. 14 Lexington Dec. 17 Scotts Hill

Ferreira repeats as volleyball All-American

From Page 1-B

Location Puerto Rico Puerto Rico

Freed-Hardeman Men’s Basketball Date Dec. 15 Dec. 17

FERNANDA FERREIRA

Photo courtesy Monty McNeal

Chester County Eagle Zach Phillips flies to the basket in the Eagles’ victory Saturday night at Scotts Hill.

points and three-pointer for the Eagles, and Zach Phillips added 14. CCHS shot 22 of 32 from the charity stripe. The Hays boys, Clay and Garrett led Scotts Hill with 14 and 12 respectively. The Eagles went to the stripe in even more the night before against Jackson Central Merry, but made five fewer enabling the JCM Cougars to hold off CCHS 73-61. Lindsey and Phillips led on this night also with 14 and 13 points. Courtney Cobb added 11. For JCM, Shyhein Woods had an extraordinary night with 28 points and a trio of threes. Dec. 7 at Eagle Gym

Dec. 7 at Eagle Gym Jackson CM 5- 6- 4- 2=17 Chester Co. 27-25-22-7=81 JCM – Samuels 6, Williamson 5, Reaves 3, Bell-Cox 3. CC – Tamacha Couch 15, Elantra Cox 15, Madison Cherry-Reed 12, Miskelly 6, Morris 8, Luttrell 6, Amos 4, Sims 4, Robinson 3, Sneed 2, McCaskill 2, Griswell 2, Rogers 2. Three-point shots: JCM – Reaves, Bell-Cox. CC – Reed, Couch, Miskelly, Robinson. Records: JCM – 0-6. CC – 41. Dec. 8 at Scotts Hill Chester Co. 8- 4-22-9=43 Scotts Hill 16-11-10-9=46 CC – Sims 13, Cox 10, Amos 7, Couch 5, Reed 4, Luttrell 4. SH – Roberts 16, Grant 14, Wyatt 11, Rosson 3, Reeves 2. Three-point shots: CC – Cox 2, Reed, Couch. SH – Grant, Rosson. Records: CC – 4-2. SH – 8-1. Jackson CM 18-22-15-18=73 Chester Co. 16-16-17-13=61 JCM – Shyhein Woods 28, Musgraves 13, Wilkes 11, Marshall 10, Shaw 8, Johnson 3. CC – Konner Lindsey 14, Zach Phillips 13, Cobb 11, Humphry 7, Clayton 6, Hardee 3, McPherson 2, Hilton 2, Burton 2, Page 1. Three-point shots: JCM – Woods 3, Shaw 2. CC – Lindsey 2, Phillips, Cobb. Records: JCM – 1-5. CC – 14. Dec. 8 at Scotts Hill Chester Co. 12-22-12-15=61 Scotts Hill 6-20-11-18=55 CC – Konner Lindsey 18, Zach Phillips 14, Humphry 8, Hilton 4, Phillips 3, Hardee 3, Holman 3, McPherson 3, Clayton 2, Burton 2, Cobb 1. SH – Clay Hays 14, Garrett Hays 12, Tyler Renfroe 10, T. Rogers 8, Milam 5, J. Rogers 2, Hale 2. Three-point shots: CC – Hardee, Lindsey, McPherson. SH – C. Hays 2. Records: CC – 2-4. SH – 3-3.


Education

Page 4-B

Inside CCHS By Garrett Michael Bowen The first semester of the high school academic year is almost over. The mid-term exams begin on Friday, Dec. 14. The exams will conclude on Tuesday, Dec. 18. School will be dismissed at 10 a.m. on Friday Dec. 18. If a student is exempt from all the exams on a particular day, he or she does NOT have to come to school. There has been a change to yearbook prices. Anyone may buy a yearbook for $80 from Mrs. Hays until school is dismissed this semester. Through January you may buy a yearbook online at yearbooksforever.com. Until January the price will still be $80, and after that the price will be raised to $100. If you wait until the yearbooks arrive at the school, the price will be $120, so you can save some money by ordering as soon as possible. Mrs. Hunt would like to give a special thanks to the Chester County Bank for donating checkbooks and check registers for her use in

By Misty Hall Parents, you are invited to our Holiday program at 1 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 in the gym. Please dress your child in a red or green shirt for the program and come ready for a festive mood! With cold and flu season upon us, please remember that your child must be fever free (without medication) for 24 hours before coming to school. Also remember to call and let the office know any time that your child will be absent, late, or checked out early. If your child’s transportation changes we need that called in before 2 p.m. so that we can get your child home safely. The office has noted that there are still some who have pictures and money out from the fall and we ask that you PLEASE take care of this before Christmas break. Kindergarten students have been reading up a storm this year. There are even a few students who will be working on first grade reading materials after Christmas break! Third-graders are busy mastering multiplication and division facts and are diving deeper into truly understanding those operations. Whether they are using the distributive property to break factors apart, working with fun manipulatives to solve division problems that include remainders, or using fact family knowledge to quickly switch between the two operations, stu-

By Rosemary McKnight

her business classes. The chance to learn money management while still in high school is crucial for students. Credit Recovery’s last day for this semester is Wednesday, Dec. 12. The students at the Chester County High School have a community service project known as the Angel Tree. The Angel Tree is a way for students to purchase presents for the needy children of Chester County. Through various clubs and students, the Angel Tree project helped at least 142 less fortunate children.

dents have been hard at work during their math block! Parents, please be sure to continue to work with your child daily to help him or her master multiplication facts. Teachers are conducting daily timed drills to help students master each set of facts, and additional practice at home is invaluable. Mrs. Whitehead’s class enjoyed a live web cast from the Smithsonian this week. Zoologists and biologists from the museum showed the students different types of amphibians, including a salamander that is over five feet long. Students were particularly fascinated by the wood frog, which can actually freeze solid and then thaw, unharmed! Mrs. Starla’s STAR (Super Testing Accelerated Reader) Awards for the month of November are: Ben Clayton, Cooper Bates, Chandler Cranford, Kylee Crawford, Peyton Griswell, Jacob Matthews, Brooklyn Rush, Alaina Sanchez, Hannah Wakefield, Jessica Wood, Skye Smith, Michael Moore, Kloey Creasy, Kendall Vandiver, Evan Hutcherson, Francisco Perez, Zane Bolton, Ariel Butler, Nicholas Baker, Gavin Crawford, Kenneth Dix, Josie Frye, Ashlinn Kaneer, Ty Maness, Dafne Perez, Morgan Quarles, Flora Sullivan, John Tidwell and Zoey Zdravkov. Class parties will be held at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18. You can check with your child’s teacher about what to bring. Remember that school will dismiss at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 18. Please make arrangements for your child ahead of time. Have a Holly Jolly week West Chester family!

“It’s Beginning to Look a lot Like Christmas” is a popular holiday song, and East Chester is bringing that song to life. Signs of the season are everywhere. As you walk in the building, a bulletin board that says “‘Tis the Season for Reading” greets students. Walk a few more feet and students see a unique Christmas tree. It is made of books stacked in the shape of a tree with lights draped around it and Frosty standing beside it. The tree was created by librarian Melinda Carroll. As students walk down the halls in any direction there is artwork, Gingerbread Baby stories, and other holiday greetings. Every student at East Chester has completed a yellow light bulb that names their favorite holiday book and a drawing from the book. Classes have strung the Christmas lights in the hallway to emphasize that reading lights the way to success. Books about generosity have been read to students in the library. Last Tuesday evening students delighted parents and guests with the annual PTO Christmas program. Students partic-

ipated with Ms. Kim and Ms. Spring in the reading of “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas.” A chorus of students in red and green sang “Rudolph,” “Up on the Housetop,” and “We Wish You a Merry Christmas.” The gym was beautifully decorated with reindeer and a big Christmas tree. Orders from the PTO Yankee Candle sale arrived last week and should have been delivered. The Freed-Hardeman University baseball team made their final visit to East Chester. These players have visited classrooms five times during the semester to teach lessons about bullying, name calling, tattling vs. reporting, and respecting differences in one another. East Chester would like to thank these young men for their time and the attention they gave students throughout the semester. All East Chester students took their STAR assessments in both reading and math. Administrators, teachers, and students have been analyzing data to measure progress that has been made during the past nine weeks. On Wednesday, teachers met to share ideas of how they use data and how they share it with students. East Chester will dismiss for the holidays at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18. Classes will resume on Thursday, Jan. 3. The faculty, staff, and students want to wish everyone the happiest of holidays.

FHU showcases senior’s art Freed-Hardeman University senior Danny Martin’s art exhibit entitled “Face Value” is now in the Troy Plunk Art Gallery in the Bulliner Clayton Visual Arts Building. The exhibit will remain in place through Friday, Dec. 7. Martin is a studio art major from Pinellas Park, Fla. His exhibit focuses on portraits that “depict individuals who have been helped by the compassion of others.” When Martin sells his paintings, the proceeds go

to a related nonprofit. For example, a Club Quest mission group built a home for a child named David, from El Zorrillo, Mexico. All of the profits from prints and the portrait of David go to support Club Quest. Every portrait has a different face, story and organization or person supported by the profits. Prints of the paintings will be available during the exhibit. For more information, visit facevalueproject@gmail.com or fhu.edu.

FHU student wins T-shirt design competition Logan Thomas, a Freed-Hardeman University junior art major from Jackson, has won the second annual Tshirt design competition for Freed-Hardeman’s art and design students sponsored by Shirts for the Body. Students were asked to create a design based on the biblical principle of baptism. Designs were submitted to the company’s email by Nov. 17. Shirts for the Body posted all designs on Facebook Nov. 18. Votes for favorite designs were tallied by “likes” on each page and

voting ended Dec. 1. More than 300 people selected Thomas’s design as their favorite from the submitted entries. Logan will receive a cash prize of $500 and a free shirt with the design on it. T-shirts with the winning design are available for $15 each and can be ordered via Facebook or by email at shirtsforthebody@gmail.com In reaction to winning, Thomas said, “I felt excited and relieved. I was happy to win but at the same time it felt like the world was lifted off my shoulders.”

Thursday, December 13, 2012

By Ally Rogers The Junior High band had a concert on Tuesday evening, Dec. 11 at Williams Auditorium. It was a wonderful evening full of enchanting Christmas songs! At 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 at Williams Auditorium, the Junior High choral department will host a concert showcasing their talents. I hope you be able to attend this Christmas concert! Thanks to Mr. Canada and Mr. Brown for their work with our band and chorus students. Our basketball teams played Thursday evening against Lexington. The girls had a big win, but the boys fell short. There will be another home game on Thursday night, Dec. 13 against Northeast Middle School. Please try to come and support our players, the coaches and the cheerleaders! Congratulations to all the participants in the Junior Miss Henderson pageant, and especially to the winners. They were: Queen-Maddy Collins, first Maid-Kamirra Arnold, second MaidAnslee West, third MaidAbby Rees and fourth Maid-Grace Wray. Each girl looked stunning!! The Student Council sponsored this event. Please make sure your student has all of their lunch money paid in full. If all charges are taken care of, we will have dress down days during exam times! Fees must be paid by Wednesday. Mid-term exams will be given Friday, Dec. 14,

Monday, Dec. 17 and Tuesday, Dec. 18. There have been some policy changes regarding the exams. All students will have to come to school each day exams are offered, EVEN IF THEY ARE EXEMPT. If they are exempt from exams, they may check out beginning at 11:30 a.m. Exams will be given in the afternoons, except on Tuesday, when the exam will begin promptly at 8 a.m. No exam exemptions will be given to students who have unexcused check outs, absences or out of school suspensions. If a student has two or fewer excused absences, and a passing grade, they may choose to exempt an exam of their choice. No checkouts will be allowed on the exam days after an exam has begun. Auditions for the upcoming production of “Hillbilly Wedding” were held this past Monday and Tuesday. The play will be held in the spring and is being directed by a parent volunteer. We appreciate her hard work and look forward to seeing it come alive! Because of their effort and support during Homecoming and our Eagles’ Nest Support drive, all sixth-graders will be treated to a morning at Up-N-Jumpin’ on Friday, Dec. 14. Please make sure that the consent forms are signed in order for them to attend. Congratulations to this enthusiastic class! Yearbooks are on sale and can still be ordered by going to our Chester County Schools website and clicking the link for Junior High and then the link for Yearbook. These are valued keepsakes that you will want to make sure you don’t miss out on! If you have any questions, contact Mrs. Marilyn Davis.

Deadline nears for Tenn Tech scholarships Students planning to attend Tennessee Tech University next fall should apply for scholarships now. More than 550 scholarships are available to TTU students, and the application system is open until Dec. 15. TTU offers a variety of generous scholarships funded by the university and private donors. In fall 2012, more than a quarter of the freshmen class received nearly 800 academic scholarships worth more than $1.8 million.

Prospective students, including incoming freshmen and transfer students, do not have to be admitted to TTU to apply for scholarships. They can apply for admission to TTU and immediately apply for scholarships. Current TTU students are encouraged to apply for scholarships each year, as new or different opportunities may become available. For more information, or to apply for 20132014 scholarships, visit tntech.edu/scholarships/home/


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Page 5-B

University strives to help international students adjust

Courtesy photo

FHU students are reaching out to the international community on campus. Pictured are some of the PANGEA members: (seated) Isaac Barantes, Costa Rica; Stefano Brasso, Brazil; Minor Perez, Costa Rica; Jessica Veira, Widlord Thomas, Haiti; (standing) Breno Oliveira, Brazil; Philipp Baier, Germany; Simba Zvaita, Zimbabwe. Their name says it all. International students at Freed-Hardeman University have chosen to call their new organization PANGEA. Students created an acronym, People And Nations Gaining Educational Advantage. Based on a Greek word that means “all lands,” “pangea” also alludes to the theoretical supercontinent that broke up, allowing the continents to drift apart. If the sponsors and students involved with PANGEA have their way, however, the continental drift may reverse itself at Freed-Hardeman. The club seeks to bring cultures together and to assist international students in their transition to life at Freed-Hardeman. Two students from Costa Rica, Minor Perez

and Isaac Barrantes, approached Rhonda Thompson and Linda Moran, both FHU Spanish teachers, last spring with their idea for a new organization that would help international students overcome culture shock. In less than a semester, the group has begun to realize some of its goals. Many international students come to the United States without everything they need for life in a residence hall. “You aren’t going to bring a wastebasket, cleaning supplies, or even a bedspread when you fly here from another country,” Moran said. Many of these students come to an unfamiliar place without the essentials. Even clothing suitable for the winter has been a problem for some coming from warmer cli-

mates. “They come here and they don’t even know who or how to ask for help,” Moran said. She recounted the story of a student from Panama who got here, but his luggage did not. “We were able to supply what he needed until his own belongings arrived,” she said. One student who arrived in January from a tropical climate recounted his own difficulties with the cold weather. “I was so cold,” he said. “I was freezing.” When his roommate arrived, he commented on how cold the room was and was asked, “Why don’t you turn on the heat?” At that point, the international student learned he could have controlled the temperature in the room. Such incidents highlight the need to help these stu-

Dodge presents big check to East

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Clint Allen, right, with Helms Motor Company in Lexington, last week presented a check for $2,400 to East Chester Elementary following the Drive for Dodge promotion at the school’s fall festival. From left are East Principal Kim Scott, and third grade students Tatum Reidheimer and Tucker Allen.

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools and Chester County Middle School *Milk choice offered daily Monday, December 17 Ham and cheese sandwich Turkey and cheese sandwich Harvest cheddar sunchips Carrots Chocolate chip cookie Apple Fruit juice Cold milk choice

Tuesday, December 18 School dismissed for Christmas Break at 10 a.m.

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Also, Stuffed crust pizza served as pizza choice each day Monday, December 17

Monday, December 17 Ham and cheese sandwich Turkey and cheese sandwich Harvest cheddar sunchips Carrots Chocolate chip cookie Apple Fruit juice choice Cold milk choice

Cheeseburger/ hamburger/doritos Pizza/salad 2 Whole grain cereals Fruit or vegetable choice Sandwich trimmings Baked beans French fries Mandarin oranges apple, orange, banana 100% juice Milk choice

Tuesday, December 18 School dismissed for Christmas Break at 10 a.m.

Tuesday, December 18 School dismissed for Christmas Break at 10 a.m.

dents as they adjust to the U.S. and to FHU. PANGEA hopes to meet that need. They want to establish a mentoring program that would include assigning a new international student with a returning student, someone who could help orient the new student to his surroundings. The group has already begun to help in other ways. It now sponsors what they’ve termed a “mini-mart” established on campus. It provides snack items, cleaning supplies, clothing and sundries to students who because of lack of cash or transportation have difficulty getting them. The “mart” began in the spring of 2012 with items donated by students. Since then, faculty and staff, and members of

local congregations, have donated additional supplies as well. The hope is that international students will return useable items so they can be given to the next student who needs them. A recent addition to the group’s projects is a student lounge for international students located in Draughon Education Building. A map on the wall pinpoints the 25 countries represented in this year’s student body. The space is being used for studying, tutoring and general “hanging out.” Latinos, European students and Asian students can congregate there, share their experiences and learn from each other. “If you’ve ever spent much time in a foreign country,” Moran said, “you know sometimes you just

need to get away from everything for a while.” The lounge serves that purpose as well. Thompson and Moran see themselves as advocates for the international students. “We want to help them get what they need; we want to see them succeed,” Thompson said. Although these students need to learn to adapt, some of them isolate themselves. PANGEA seeks to bring people and cultures together. Sponsors of the group, in addition to Thompson and Moran, are Larry Moran, Stan Mitchell and Terry Reeves. Any of them would be delighted to talk with those desiring to assist with this effort. “We very much want this to be a continuing ministry,” Thompson said.


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

FOR SALE

FOR RENT

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9-5 & Sun. 9-4 - Murfreesboro Mid-TN Expo Center (1209 Park Ave) Exit 81 off I-24. Buy - Sell Trade. Info: (563) 927-8176 (TnScan) GUN SHOW DEC. 15-16 Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-4 - White Pine Great Smoky Mountains Expo Center (1615 Pavilion Dr) Buy Sell - Trade. Info: (563) 927-8176 (TnScan) ADOPT WE WILL PROVIDE a happy, loving home, beautiful life for your precious newborn baby. Expenses paid. Married couple Walt/Gina. Call for info: 1800-315-6957. (TnScan) Become a DIRECTV Dealer: Earn $500 per sale. Looking for Tennessee businesses to sell DIRECTV at events, D2D or retail. Contact: matt.pesler@perfect-10.tv for details. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR pre-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan)

Vacations. Call 877-826-4605 or w w w. d r i v e f o r t a n g o . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS: CLASS A CDL Driver Training. $0 Training Cost with employment commitment if you enroll in the month of December! Central Refrigerated (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CLASS A FLATBED Home Every Weekend! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, Full Benefits, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED COMPANY Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) COMPANY TEAMS. It’s All True!! GUARANTEED MILES DRIVING NEW EQUIPMENT!! Paid Holidays! Benefit Choices! Vacation! Incentive Package! Qualifications: 1 yr. OTR within last 3, Doubles Endorsement, Above average MVR. NO Felony convictions ever. No DUI/DWI in last 5 yrs. (1) lifetime. IT’S ALL HERE!! 877-349-9303 ext. 103 (TnScan) CRST OFFERS THE BEST Lease Purchase Program. Sign On Bonus. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call: 866-538-9575 (TnScan) NEW & ABANDONED manufactured homes moved to your land. Easy terms. Phone 870-9351708. Apply by phone or set an appointment. (TnScan)

NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)

GUN SHOW DEC. 15-16 Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-4 - Murfreesboro Mid-TN Expo Center (1209 Park Ave) Exit 81 off I-24. Buy - Sell Trade. Info: (563) 927-8176 (TnScan)

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25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1888-407-5172 (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Students with CDL-A welcome. Call 888-6914472, or apply online at w w w. s u p e r s e r v i c e l l c . c o m (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079 (TnScan) DRIVER: CDL-A VAN & Flatbed *New Pay Package! *Very New Trucks *Benefits After 30 Days *Great Miles, Pay *Dependable Hometime *Start Immediately! CDL Graduates Needed! 877-917-2266 drivewithwestern.com (TnScan) DRIVER. TANGO TRANSPORT NOW hiring Regional OTR Team. Top Pay Plenty of Miles Great Home Time. Family Medical/Dental. 401k. Paid

ADOPT WE WILL PROVIDE a happy, loving home, beautiful life for your precious newborn baby. Expenses paid. Married couple Walt/Gina. Call for info: 1800-315-6957. (TnScan) Become a DIRECTV Dealer: Earn $500 per sale. Looking for Tennessee businesses to sell DIRECTV at events, D2D or retail. Contact: matt.pesler@perfect-10.tv for details. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR pre-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE - WORK - PARTY PLAY Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York Hiring 18 - 24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-574-7454 (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 13, 2012

Public Notices NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on July 11, 2002, RICKY L. OSBORNE AND DONNA M. OSBORNE, by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 218, at Page 215, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Fifty Three Thousand One Hundred Twenty Five and 00/100 Dollars ($53,125.00), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, on January 3, 2006, RICKY L. OSBORNE AND DONNA M. OSBORNE, by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 278, at Page 288, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Eighteen Thousand Five Hundred Fifty and 00/100 Dollars ($18,550.00), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointments executed on October 30, 2012, and recorded in Record Book 367, at Page 420 and Page 421, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situate in the 5th Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, bounded and as described in a Warranty Deed from Merchants and Planters Bank, to Ricky L. Osborne and wife, Donna M. Osborne, dated July 11, 2002, and of record in Record Book 218, page 213, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Map 43, Parcel 18.01 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 1705 Sweetlips Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. A Notice of the Intent to Foreclosure, pursuant to T.C.A. 35-5-117 was given. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 13th day of December, 2012. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated June 19, 2006, and the Deed of

Trust of even date securing the same, recorded June 21, 2006, at Book 285, Page 767 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by James Earl Goff and Yonnie Goff, conveying certain property therein described to Holmes, Rich & Sigler, PC as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., a separate corporation acting solely as nominee for Community Bank and Community Bank’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 3, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a stake in the center of the Henderson-Jacks Creek black topped road, this point being the Southwest corner of a lot conveyed by the grantors herein to Ronnie Edward Hanna and wife, Elizabeth Ann Hanna by deed of general warranty dated May 14, 1976; runs thence North 3 degrees and 35 minutes West 655 feet to a stake in a wire fence; this point being in Segerson’s South boundary line; runs thence with wire fence, North 87 degrees and 15 minutes West 209 feet to a stake; runs thence South 3 degrees and 35 minutes East 763 feet to a stake in the center of the Henderson-Jacks Creek black topped road; runs thence with the center of said black topped road North 64 degrees and 20 minutes East, 225 feet to the point of beginning, containing 3.26 acres, more or less, after excluding 25 feet in width for black topped road right-ofway. (Legal description taken from prior deed). ALSO KNOWN AS: 3605 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: James Earl Goff; Yonnie Goff The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 872228206 DATED December 6, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_tcrow_121206_ 947 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated July 6, 2004, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded July 12, 2004, at Book 254, Page 679 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by V. Ray Bishop and R. Ann Bishop, conveying certain property therein described to Robert M. Wilson, Jr. as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender and America’s Wholesale Lender’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 3, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester

County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pin on the north margin of Jacks Creek Road (17 feet at right angles from centerline) at the Southwest corner of Mary Taylor as recorded in Deed Book 47, page 605 in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence with the North margin of Jacks Creek Road South 76 degrees 04 minutes West a distance of 93.92 feet to a pipe at the Southeast corner of Chester County School property; thence with the East line of said school property North 14 degrees 47 minutes West a distance of 379.12 feet to a pipe at the Southwest corner of Reba Cupples; thence with Cupples’ South line North 83 degrees 00 minutes East a distance of 94.56 feet to an iron pin at the Northwest corner of Taylor; thence with Taylor’s West line South 14 degrees 49 minutes East a distance of 367.70 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 0.80 acres, as surveyed by David Hall Land Surveying Company, R.L.S. number 943, on January 11, 1995. ALSO KNOWN AS: 655 Jacks Creek Cove aka 655 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 383405709 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: V. Ray Bishop; R. Ann Bishop; Union Planters Bank, NA; Heirs of R. Ann Bishop; Estate of R. Ann Bishop; Estate of V. Ray Bishop; Heir of V. Ray Bishop The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726203158 DATED December 4, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTN-Shellie_msherrod_121204_1155 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated October 19, 2005, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded November 1, 2005, at Book 275, Page 582 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Troy Frye Amy Frye Troy Frye and Amy Frye, conveying certain property therein described to Robert M. Wilson, Jr. as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., a seperate corporation acting solely as nominee for Americas Wholesale Lender and Americas Wholesale Lender successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 3, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Lying and being situated in the Eight Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pin on the East margin of Silerton Road (25 feet at right angles from centerline) at the Southwest corner of Cliff Hannah as recorded in Record Book 184, Page 685 in the Register’s Office of Chester

County, Tennessee; thence with Hannah’s South line, South 37 degrees 33 minutes 49 seconds East a distance of 138.40 feet to an iron pin; thence south 18 degrees 47 minutes 05 seconds West a distance of 54.77 feet to a point; thence South 25 degrees 11 minutes 57 seconds West a distance of 112.20 feet to an iron pin; thence South 31 degrees 46 minutes 52 seconds West a distance of 129.07 feet to an iron pin; thence South 44 degrees 31 minutes 57 seconds West a distance of 62.25 feet to an iron pin; thence South 59 degrees 42 minutes 33 seconds West a distance of 56.72 feet to an iron pin on the East margin of Silerton Road; thence with the East margin of Silerton Road, North 20 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 63.11 feet to an iron pin; thence North 16 degrees 19 minutes 29 seconds East a distance of 113.33 feet to an iron pin; thence North 14 degrees 39 minutes 28 seconds East a distance of 101.18 feet to an iron pin; thence North 20 degrees 45 minutes 16 seconds East a distance of 107.89 feet to the point of beginning, containing 0.85 acres, as surveyed by David Hall Land Surveying Company, R.L.S. #943, on March 25, 2004. Legal Description revised according to Attorney’s Affidavit filed 8/29/2007 in Record Book 305, Page 394. ALSO KNOWN AS: 2295 Silerton Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Troy Frye; Amy Frye; Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.; Old Republic Insurance Co.; Troy Frye; Amy Frye The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726122683 DATED November 30, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTN-Shellie_msherrod_121130_1358 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated January 3, 2007, executed by TRACY BROWDER AND PATRICIA BROWDER, conveying certain real property therein described to ROBERT M. WILSON, JR. as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, on January 22, 2007, as Instrument No. 28093, in Book 295, at Page 357; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-OA2 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA2, who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose (“Notice”) was given in compliance with Tennessee law by the mailing a copy of the Notice to the parties at least sixty (60) days prior to the first publication of the Substitute Trustee’s Sale. WHEREAS, the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., having been appointed by as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as Substitute Trustee or its duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on January 3, 2013, 11:00 AM at the Chester County courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held At the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, TN, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN SET IN THE SOUTH MARGIN OF PLEASANT RIDGE ROAD WHICH POINT IS LOCATED THE FOLLOWING CALLS FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF DONLAD

ROUSE AS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 63, PAGE 692 REGISTERS OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY TENNESSEE SOUTH 76 DEG 19’26” EAST 824.05 FEET SOUTH 76 DEG 41’43” EAST 190.00 FEET THENCE FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND WITH THE SOUTH MARGIN OF PLEASANT RIDGE ROAD THE FOLLOWING CALLS SOUTH 76DEG 41’43” EAST 97.25 FEET SOUTH 74 DEG 52’09” EAST 92.79 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT THENCE SOUTH 03 DEG 40’55” WEST 210.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 4 THENCE WITH THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 4 NORTH 76 DEG. 14’ 58” WEST 189.74 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2 THENCE WITH THE EAST LINE OF LOT 2 NORTH 3 DEG 40’55” EAST 211.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.9 ACRES AS SURVEYED BY ADVANCED LAND SURVEYING INC R.L.S. #1999 ON JANUARY 24, 2005 AND BEING KNOWN AS LOT 1 CLAYTON HILLS ESTATES SECTION I. PARCEL NO.: 068 03101 000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 85 PLEASANT RIDGE RD, FINGER, TN 38334-1979. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): TRACY BROWDER AKA TRACEY L BROWDER AKA TRACY LEE BROWDER and PATRICIA L BROWDER OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: n/a The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Substitute Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 Tel: (800) 281-8219 Fax: (866) 681-5002 Registered Agent: CT Corporation System 800 South Gay Street, Suite 2021 Knoxville, TN 37929 Tel: (865) 342-3522 TS#: 09-0151787 FEI#1006.73439

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on January 15, 2013 at 10:00AM local time, at the south door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee, pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Franklin A. Doucette, Sr., and Annie C. Doucette, husband and wife, to Wesley D. Turner, Trustee, on February 27, 2001 at Record Book 194, Page 622; all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Owner of Debt: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2001-1 The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and encumbrances of record: Described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described in deed of record in Record Book 194, Page 622; in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee Parcel Number: 064-003.00 Current Owner(s) of Property: Annie C. Doucette The street address of the above described property is believed to be 215 Rinks Lane, Enville, Tennessee 38332, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description referenced herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117 have been met. All right of equity of redemp-

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tion, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP 555 Perkins Road Extended, Second Floor Memphis, TN 38117 Phone (901)767-5566 Fax (901)761-5690 File No. 12-042581

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated September 28, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded October 10, 2007, at Book 307, Page 300 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Allen Hudson, conveying certain property therein described to Kathy Winstead as Trustee for JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on December 20, 2012 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Land lying and being in the Second Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows, to wit: Beginning at an iron pin found in the South margin of Highway 100, which point is the Northeast corner of Wilson Mays as recorded in Record Book 139, Page 596, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence from the point of beginning and with the South margin of Highway 100, North 73 degrees 40 minutes 35 seconds East 1595.53 feet to an iron pin set in the Northwest corner of William Donnelly; thence with the West line of Donnelly South 04 degrees 01 minutes 58 seconds West 612.12 feet to an iron pin set in the North line of Lot 10 of Eastview Estates Subdivision (unrecorded); thence, with the North line of Lots 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 of Eastview Estates Subdivision the following calls: South 89 degrees 56 minutes 35 seconds West 1004.27 feet to an iron pin found; North 89 degrees 06 minutes 56 seconds West 476.22 feet to an iron pin found at an interior corner of Mays; thence with the East line of Mays, North 02 degrees 50 minutes 30 seconds West 156.00 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO KNOWN AS: 8500 State Route 100 E, Jacks Creek, Tennessee 38347 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Allen Hudson; Alexandria Frances Hudson The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700212342 DATED November 19, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTN-Shellie_msherrod_121119_1031 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM


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Chester County Independent 12-13-12  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 12-13-12