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146th YEAR - NO. 25

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County prisoner dies while in jail An investigation by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is currently underway, as well as an autopsy, to determine the causes and circumstances surrounding the death of a Henderson man who died Friday while being held in the Chester County Jail. According to the report from the Chester County Sheriff’s Department, Johnny F. Hemby, age 25, of 116 W. Third St., was pronounced dead at JacksonMadison County General Hospital after being found unresponsive in his cell at 5:45 a.m. At 5:10 a.m., a corrections officer entered the housing unit to wake another inmate and reported that Hemby was asleep on his stomach and was snoring. However, at 5:45 Hemby was found unresponsive, and officers began resuscitation efforts as well as notifying Medical Center E.M.S. which transported Hemby to the hospital, accompanied by a deputy. The report states that the previous day Hemby had received medical treatment at a local medical facility for a bee sting he had received while on work detail. Hemby was being housed in the Chester County Justice Center for violation of parole.

Storm Spotter Advanced Class The Chester County Amateur Radio Club is sponsoring an advanced storm spotter class at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28, at the Henderson Fire Station, 505 Sanford St., in the training room. All are invited.

Arts in the Alley, Business after Hours slated Thursday Henderson Arts Commission’s monthly Arts in the Alley is scheduled for 6 p.m. Thursday on N. Union Ave., in the alley beside Besso’s. In addition to live music, vendors will be offering paintings, stained glass, jewelry, and a variety of other items. Also, The Bramblett Group and Besso’s is hosting the monthly Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours Thursday from 5-6:30 p.m. at 106 W. Main St. Suite C. Wear a mask and receive a free Besso’s gelato. There will be live music, karaoke, and a remote broadcast by WFHU radio station, 91.5 FM.

October 28, 2010

SERVING CHESTER COUNTY SINCE 1865

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HPD investigating weekend shooting incident Bullets sprayed across the Bull Market parking lot Friday night in a shooting incident in which there were no reported injuries. Local authorities arrested Jeffrey Pirtle, 25, of Henderson, and charged him with attempted murder, reckless endangerment and intimidation. According to the police report, a witness flagged down police officers at approximately 10:50 p.m. on Oct. 22 and stated he was sitting in his vehicle at Bull Market when he heard “a loud bang” believed to be a gunshot and felt something impact the driver’s side of his vehicle.

The witness said when he looked up he saw two males standing near the entrance of the Bull Market and fleeing the scene in a brown Ford Taurus. Officers indicated the gun shot had penetrated his driver’s side door. Authorities interviewed another witness that said he was smoking outside the building and noticed two males arguing and they began to fight. Video surveillance of the incident revealed the two men arguing that led to an altercation, then one male subject pull a handgun from his right pants pocket and fired a shot at the other. That

subject was later identified as Jeffrey Pirtle with clothing and vehicle descriptions. Pirtle was later located at his Cedarhurst residence and placed into custody. He is scheduled to appear before a judge this Friday, Oct. 29. This incidence marks the second in the past few months where a shooting occurred that led to attempted murder charges. Matthew Ross faces attempted murder charges when he was arrested Sept. 15 after witnesses alleged Ross fired two shots towards them outside his passenger window as they were

Athletic Director Mike McCutchen. “Throughout his Heisman Trophy winning career at Ohio State and his highly successful career as a Tennessee Titan running back, Eddie George has demonstrated the importance of hard work and a commitment to excellence and he continues to apply these traits in is business endeavors. We are excited to have Eddie as our featured speaker this year and I’m especially excited that our student-athletes have the opportunity to learn from him. I hope you will be able to attend

our 2010 SAC Benefit Dinner and support Freed-Hardeman University student-athletes.” The native of Philadelphia made an immediate impact in the NFL, earning Offensive Rookie of the Year honors by rushing for 1,368 yards and eight touchdowns. He went on to be a four-time Pro Bowl selection and a two-time All-Pro selection. George finished his career with 10,441 rushing yards and 78 total touchdowns. After the NFL, George has quietly built businesses aimed at helping improve the quality of

PIRTLE standing near their home on West Third Street.

Eddie George to speak at FHU Sports Benefit Former Heisman Trophy winner and NFL Pro-Bowler Eddie George will be the featured speaker at the 2011 FreedHardeman University Sports Advisory Council Benefit Dinner. The dinner is scheduled for April 15, 2011, and will include a silent auction and live auction of sports memorabilia and other items before George’s keynote address. George was a four-year letterman at running back for the Ohio State Buckeyes, winning the Heisman Trophy in 1995 after rushing for a school record 1,927 yards and 24 touchdowns. He left Ohio State ranking second in program history in rushing yards (3,768) and third in rushing touchdowns (44) and was drafted in 1995 with the 14th overall pick by the Houston Oilers, who soon relocated to Nashville as the franchise was renamed the Tennessee Titans. “Eddie George is an exceptional athlete but, more importantly, he is an exceptional person,” said Freed-Hardeman

life for all Americans. George, who recently received his MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in Chicago, understands that he is mostly known for his athletic accomplishments. “Since I’m mostly known for winning on the football field, a lot of people seem surprised when they hear that I’ve used my education, experience and passion to build these exciting businesses. They say ‘you’re a See GEORGE, Page 3-A

Brush fire threatens homes, Saturday Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

A brush fire Saturday afternoon threatened several homes before quick work by county firemen brought the blaze under control. According to County Fire Chief Jim Vest, the fire broke out at approximately 12:30 p.m. behind the Chester County Solid Waste collection center on Talley Store Road, burning toward homes along Highway 100. Units from Station One, Hilltop, Jacks Creek, and Enville, as well as State Forestry, responded to the blaze which consumed about five to six acres. The entire region of West Tennessee was on alert as lack of rainfall sparked wildfires thatspread across Madison and Lauderdale counties threatening homes this past week.


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

Flames engulf Deanburg mobile home Photo by Whitney Brant, Independent

A fellow neighbor tried to save what is left of this Deanburg mobile home Tuesday afternoon as a fire extinguished the 2805 Deanburg Road residence. What ignited the fire was not known at press time Tuesday afternoon.

Chester County to debut “Ladies Day Out” The Chester County Drama Department and Coordinated School Health have partnered together to host the first “Ladies Day Out” on Saturday, Nov. 20. The event will be held at Chester County High School. The day begins at 9 a.m. with workshops geared especially towards women’s issues. Then at 11:30 a.m., lunch will be provided as “Cancer Queens” of Tennessee take the stage. Next, you can shop ‘til you drop at the women’s expo. There will be more than 30 area vendors available to you. Everything from jewelry, make-up, spas, home décor, and crafts will be

featured. The day will conclude with the women of Chester County presenting “Steel Magnolias” at 2 p.m. Cost is $15 each. Parties of 10 or more will

be given the discounted rate of $12 per ticket. Contact Chester County High School at 989-8125 or Heather Griffin at 9895148 to reserve your tickets.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

School board scheduled to meet The Chester County school board will meet in regular session at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1. Their agenda includes considering policy manual changes, discuss federal education jobs program and report on projects and events. Cherrie Pipkin currently serves as interim superin-

tendent of the Chester County School Board. The board members include the following: Bob Moore, Sam Jones, Dwight Bingham, Glenn Naylor, Ronald Jones, and Norris Frank. The pubic, as always, is invited to attend the meetings.

Miss Henderson Pageant is Thursday at Williams Auditorium Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

One of these lovely young ladies will soon wear the crown as the next Miss Henderson. The pageant is at 7 p.m. tonight, Thursday, at Williams Auditorium. Admission is $5 for school age children and adults, and $3 for children age 5 and under. All proceeds from the event go to CCHS Student Council Scholarships. Contestants include Taylor Watson, Bailey Henley, Iesha Sims, Logan McEarl, Alyssa Gately, Elizabeth Morris, Caitlin Hill, Taylor Clayton, Ashtyn Walker, Taylor Henry, Reneshia Boyd, Jessica Weeks, Katie Hatch, Taylar Webster, Morgan Williams, Taylor Fortune, Lauren Mobley, Kelsey Geary, Allison Gladish, Daela Whited, Brandi Maness, Peyton Jenkins, Brooke Seratt, Bethany Blackstock, Angel (Beth) Flatt, Madison Hurst, Macy Bolton, Brionna Welch, Piper Davis, Elizabeth (Brooke) McAdams, Natasha Turner, Paisley Emison, Haley Wilson, Kimberlee Byrd, and Ashley Swope.

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George businessman, too?’ I like that reaction,” he said. George’s vision of healthy people and healthy places is being brought to life through the commitment of everyone at George Enterprises. Since his football career ended, his business and philanthropic interests have been focused on creating a stronger America through the development of healthy people and healthy places. He has developed programs to promote healthy lifestyles because he believes that each of us has the ability to reach our full potential as human beings through personal choices that impact our mind, body, and spirit. Through his company, EGX Lifestyle, George has developed the NFL Mom’s Fitness Challenge (now promoted as part of

the Dr. Oz Show), a series of Kids Fitness Challenges conducted in various communities, and was appointed by the Governor of Tennessee to inspire participation in the state’s fitness program, “GetFitTN”. In addition, George’s planning and design company, The EDGE Group, has become a leader in the visioning and implementation of sustainable communities and redevelopment areas throughout the United States. Beyond leading these organizations, George’s life is filled with media appearances, entertainment roles, acting, speaking engagements and philanthropy. He finds his work with charities very rewarding, donating his time and money to various organizations, including his own non-profit organization, Visions with Infinite Possibilities (V.I.P). George is married to

Tamara “Taj” JohnsonGeorge, a Grammy-nominated singer with the R&B group SWV (“Sisters With Voices”), which sold more than six million records. She was also featured on CBS’s Survivor television show in 2009, and voted one of the fan favorites, and also made a guest appearance on the Survivor program. Taj and Eddie George live in Nashville. They are the loving parents to two sons, Jaire and Eriq. They enjoy a busy life of friends, family and kids’ sporting events. As an example to others, Eddie continues to train hard and find balance to maintain his peak physical, mental and spiritual condition to meet the challenges of his demanding schedule. For information on tickets and sponsorship opportunities, contact McCutchen at 989-6900 or atmmccutchen@fhu.edu.

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Life & Style

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The Halloween party will be at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30, at the Montezuma Community Center. Costumes are a must for a good time guessing who is who. There will be three age categories in judging. Hot dogs, chili and all the trimmings will be served. Bags of candy are needed to be donated for kids to choose from. Cakes or other goodies are needed for the cakewalk. The cakewalk is always a huge LARRY AND BERNICE PETER

Peter 50th anniversary Larry and Bernice Peter of Finger celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, at the First Methodist Church gym in Henderson. A host of friends and relatives from six states gathered at noon to laugh and cry with them at a program of tribute put together by their children, Johanna Jess of Smyrna, James Peter of Wichita, Kan., and Mark Peter of Henderson. Larry and Bernice retired to Tennessee from Kansas in 1995. Gifts from their children included a Tournament of Roses plaque of Paul Harvey fame; books and tapes of well-known speakers Bernice enjoys; communication from Larry’s high school wrestling coach, 86-year-old Elias George of IL fame; and a picture album from his high school, college and Navy years. James included a moving tribute to his father with “Dance With My Father Again,” by Luther Vandross, and invited those present to stand and dance with or just hold their loved ones present.

I hope everyone had a great week. Get well wishes to Phillip Ragan, Sonny Grimm, Winna Knipper, Archie Knipper, Dennis Bain, Edra Barnett, Freddie Murley Smith, Brenda Collins and Charles Murley. Remember our soldiers and their families. Visit a shut-in this week. Don’t forget Haunted Hollow will be Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights again this week. Tickets will be sold from 7-10 p.m. on Thursday, and 7 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday.

Come and get in on all the fun and good food. Happy birthday this week to Christine Collins on Oct. 29; Corey Pleasant on Oct. 31; and Hub Fleming and Nicole Evans on Nov. 1. Sincere condolences go out to the Dennis Evans family. He died Friday and was buried at Bethel Baptist Church on Monday. His son Jeremy Evans is our community club president. The next community club meeting will be Thursday, Nov. 4, due to the election on Nov. 2. The FCE Club will be serving food at the community center on Election Day. Have you ever wondered who the first movie star was and what the first Hollywood movie was? Florence Lawrence was the first film performer to be identified on screen and the first movie star.

He sang the Beatles song, “When I’m Sixtyfour” just like he meant it! On his 64th birthday Don Jones came eagerly into the Memphis kitchen to the smell of C & R tenderloin singing these words, “Will you still need me? Will you still feed me when I’m sixty-four?” Willadean Maness Thrasher and I decided to help him eat his words on his special day. He was fed waffles, fried eggs, tenderloin, blackberry jam, and fresh fruit; soon afterwards a DonnieDo list was presented (replace three light bulbs, hang 14 cleaned ceiling vents, repair mailbox, repair remote, and remove water fountain from storage). Now he knows when he turned 64 he was fed and needed! That will be a memorable birthday with or without Lemon Supreme Cake! We drove home in the rain, and so

thankful for every drop. Jacks Creek received almost two inches - the rain dance was great! I took a walk in the rain, no puddles, but still fun! Craving turkey and dressing? Jacks Creek Fall Fest is Oct. 30. Carry-outs ready at 4:30 p.m. and the turkey can be gobbled down at 5 p.m. for $5. Kids can have hot dog plates, so it is a family affair for sure. Afterwards choose a hayride around a nearby farm or ride the fairest wheel. Inside play bingo, plunko, jumpers, cakewalk, kid cakewalk, or sit on the side and watch the fun. If Alma Jones or Cynthia Pierce Grimsley attends the Fall Fest, they can walk for a birthday cake. One is 82 and the other 61 that very night. Five generations would make a lovely photo since baby makes five (Lois Rhodes, Donette, Dawn, Sarah, and Payten) Lois will be making a larger pot of chicken and dumpling before long. I’ve heard through the use of computers she has already seen the Illinois baby girl. Another five generations

Congratulations to the CCHS Eagles on winning the game Friday. Happy birthday wishes go to Tanya Harwell on Oct. 28; Malcolm Weeks and Scot Kendrick on Oct. 29; Liz Flanagan on Nov. 1; and Wayne Pugh and Jill Mooney on Nov. 2. Those wishing to set up for the Trick-or-treaters this Saturday, Oct. 30, need to arrive at the community center to be ready by 6 p.m. All children in the community are invited.

success; please help if you can. Betty Cooper has pears if anyone is interested. She will be glad to give them away. Call her at 989-7835. A breakfast is being planned for November. I’ll have more on that next week. Our prayer list includes Brandon Thomas, A.C. and Donna Stidham, Utah Stidham, Bonnie Cooke, James Lott and Troy Cooper. Happy birthday to Jerry Cook, Roy Allen Hemby and Renee Thomas on Nov. 2; and Shondra Thomas on Nov. 3. Call Betty Cooper at 989-7835 to rent the center. Call Wanda Cook at 989-3724 with your news. Vernon McCombs is looking forward to having breakfast at the Enville Store on Wednesday, Nov. 3. The Senior Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 3, at the United Methodist Church. The Veterans and Senior Citizens dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, at the community center. All Veterans and Senior Citizens in the community are invited. Every day may not be good, but there’s something good in every day. Author unknown. Have a great week. If you have an event coming up, a birthday, anniversary, or any news, call me at 989-0212 or email envillecommunitynews@yahoo.com or wildgoosenews@aol.com.

Born in Hamilton, Ontario in 1886, Florence was an entertainer for most of her life. When she was age 3, she and her two brothers became members of their mother’s Lawrence Dramatic Company. They traveled from one small town to another, presenting vaudeville-type short productions. Her life changed considerably when she was 10. Her father died an accidental death in Hamilton. Her mother moved the family to Buffalo, N.Y., to live with her widowed mother, and to enroll the children in school. In 1906, Lotta and Florence applied for work at the new Edison Studios in New York. Both were hired to act in a 20-

scene film about Daniel Boone. After short stints in Broadway shows, Florence made the rounds of the moving picture offices. At Vitagraph Company, she was the first woman to play Shakespeare’s Juliet on film. This fact is cited in the American Film Institute Catalogue and the National Archives records. During 1908, she made 38 movies for Vitagraph. Later that year, Florence began work with famed director D.W. Griffith at Biograph Studios. As all performers of the time, Florence was anonymous. Studio bosses knew that if the performers were identified, they See DEAN, Page 5-A

is just as happy on the other side of the tree (Charles and Frances Ada, Tommy, Dawn, Sarah, and Payten). Frances will be making a bigger pot of salet and turnips. Little baby Payten Renee Weisman was born Oct. 21, 2010, in Sidney, Ill. Wouldn’t it be a wonderful Thanksgiving harvest if the bundle of pink arrived in Chester County for a five-generation photo shoot? If they come, I’ll furnish the turkey! Sixty-five kissin’ cousins arrived on Sunday, Oct. 24, to represent the Robertson family. Alma Jones and her “brood” (Sandra, Janice, Freda, and Lloyd) met at Jacks Creek for a reunion with good food and shared memories. The little ones really enjoyed playing with their cousins. The Robertson family consisted of twins Oscar and Arthur, Jim, John, Luther, Ed, and a lucky sister, Mary S e a g r a v e s . Representation from all made the family tree blossom. Prayer has been requested for Viola

Patterson. She is a knowledgeable lady at age 98. She lives at Chester County Healthcare. Prayers go to Jackie Gilliam, son of Jesse and Frances, has an arm injury from last Thursday. He is self-employed and Christy stays home with the kids. He will not be able to work until this injury heals. While in Memphis, we carried the Independent. Sadly, I read Sally Hathcoate had been buried. Too many conflicts kept me from taking the Pepsi I had bought for her to McNairy County. She was a kind and very sweet lady. I don’t know or have her family’s address to mail the recently made picture of her, do you? We are happy Scott Pusser is home from the hospital. We pray Adrain Pusser’s hand will heal with physical therapy. Daddies and sons need each other while mothers pray in the distance. God bless sick friends and neighbors. God is watching us from a distance. Special hugs and prayers to the family of Jason King for such comforting words back to me.

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Rev. Russell Gilmore of Jackson preached at Holly Springs Methodist Church on Sunday due to the absence of Rev. Bill Evans. On our prayer list this week are Nancy Connor, Herman Arnold Jr., Joanne Altier, Lavada Howie, Alexis Boggs, Pam Priddy, Gerald Stanfill, Carroll Williams, Glen Jones, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Jean Latham, John Kent Sells, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Bill and Shirley Gaddy, Carolyn Potter, Dianne Wells, Edward Pitts, Gathel Latham, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. In the Enville news, Pattie was asking if any-

one remembered Mary Lou (Stanfill) Stanford. Yes, our entire high school class of 1950 that are still here remembers Mary Lou. I believe that she was at our 50th reunion at Chester County High School. We have a class reunion every year at Arnold’s Restaurant in Henderson on the first Saturday in October at noon. Mary Lou, we are glad that you take the Chester County Independent and keep up with us. Hope you and your spouse can come next year. Please send us your address. Happy anniversary to Norris and Nancy McCaskill on Nov. 2; and Charles and Wilma Cupples on Nov. 4. Birthday greetings to Tina Holder and Tina Thomas on Oct. 31; Jeff Holder, Donald Compton and Bertha Jones on Nov. 1; Charles Dyer, Patty Joyner, Danny Jones, Adam Wise, Sammy Connor and Jason Bozza on Nov. 2; and Amanda Stovall on Nov. 4.

The descendents of J.W. and Montie Mae McEarl will have their yearly family gathering on Oct. 30 at the home of Bobby and Sarah McEarl. Rebecca Williams and son, Elijah, 5, of Nashville, were here visiting their Uncle Lou Williams. On Saturday, they were treated to a fishing trip. They made several catches that day. Mr. Lou couldn’t decide if five was too young to be out on the boat (loss of interest), or at 76 too hard to keep up with! Our community meal will be at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 9. Bring a covered dish and a drink and join us. The mission group has a tentative date of Nov. 9 for their next trip to Appalachia. There will be a baptismal service following preaching at Hopewell Baptist Church on Oct. 31. Our heartfelt sympathy is extended to the family

and friends of Rayford Mayfield and Olivia Newman. On our prayer list are David Varvel, Loretta Pickett, Ernie Merriman, Frank McEarl, Marvin Weaver, Alyse Rietz, Ralph and Geneva Connor, Betty Stout, Coy and Geraldine Jones, Jim and Alice Alexander, Mary Russell, Johnnie R. Smith, Brenda Collins, Patsy Newsom, Ore Lea Barham, Butch Russell, and our military and their families. Happy birthday to Dorthy Anderson on Oct. 29; Tabitha Tedford on Oct. 30; Lou Williams, and Dillon and Fallon Faulkner on Oct. 21; Charlotte Cupples and Robyn Russell on Nov. 1; and Keith Price on Nov. 3. Please keep in mind all the little ghosts and goblins that will be out and about. If you have news to share, call 989-7523. Thought for the week: Take time for all things. Great haste makes great waste. Have a great week. Here’s witching you a bootiful, screaming good Halloween! Remember the Holyween event at 5 p.m. Oct. 30 at Faith Baptist Church.

We never know how our words affect others. I take my job seriously as a labor of love. No matter how much we get hurt in life – it is still a beautiful world. Our community expresses sympathy to the families of Johnny Hemby (1-6-85/10-22-10). Barbara loved and wanted success and happiness for her children. For Barb he was her Johnny angel – may His wings cover her with His love; Dennis Evans (1127-47/10-22-10); Mike Whited (9-27-51/10-1810), a man my age that made us laugh over coffee

while he hosted WHHM radio; Harry Ward (11-734/10-19-10); Florine Miller ((4-7-20/10-24-10), a southern lady; Olivia Brown Newman (2-251/10-24-10); and Rayford Mayfield (4-3-51/10-2410). I visited Rayford, Carolyn, and Jeanetta on Wednesday before leaving for Memphis. Dusty and Rayford posed for a picture - priceless photo to share. His smile that day will never end… only broaden. “In time there is no present, In eternity no future, In eternity no past.”


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

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Chester County Independent archives, October 29, 1970

PREDICTS VICTORY – Rep. Bill Brock, seeking to unseat Democrat Albert Gore for the U.S. Senate, predicted he will win the contest by a big margin during a brief stop here Tuesday afternoon. Rep. Brock said he was picking up votes every day while his opponent seemed to be slipping. The popular candidate is pictured above with Mrs. Gene A. Maness, wife of Chester County Finance Chairman, and Pat Armour.

Chester County Independent archives, October 28, 1960

CHILDREN’S PARADE held during our Centennial attracted many of our young citizens. Pictured left to right are Mrs. Odell Hatch, Mrs. G.W. Rush and three daughters, Shelia Hatch, Ben Deming and Mrs. B.F. Deming, Jr.

Only Yesterday “Chester Farmers Turn Out To Hear Plans For Rural Electrification” From the files of the Chester County Independent October 31, 1940 “Chester Farmers turn out to hear plans for rural electrification” “Farm men and women from more than a dozen Chester County communities interested in obtaining the benefits of rural electrification, attended a meeting at the courthouse here Tuesday afternoon to hear R. B. Hicks, agricultural engineer in rural electrification for the Extension Service, and Harold Sartin of the Southwest Electric Membership Corporation explain how current could be provided them under the new low revenue guarantee of $8.50 per pole line mile. “Don’t worry about how far you are from a line now, or even where the current will come from,” Mr. Sartin, line foreman and assistant superintendent for the Southwest Cooperative, told the audience. “If enough sign up minimum bill contracts, electricity will be brought to you.” “Draft No. 158 Gathers Fame as First Drawn in National Lottery” “Henderson and rest of the nation clustered close about radio receiving sets Tuesday to hear the first number drawn in the great national lottery to determine the priority in which Selective Service registrants will be called by local draft boards throughout the country to consider their availability for military service. That number, drawn by Secretary of War Stings and immediately announced over the radio by President Roosevelt – was serial No. 158 – and every holder of it in every draft board area in the U.S. automatically was assigned Order No. 1, slated to be the first classified in this area. “Chester Negro is First” As the number was announced, a woman in the audience in the huge Government auditorium in Washington where the drawing was conducted,

uttered a low scream, plainly audible over the radio – her 21-year-old son had that number. Here in Henderson, folks turned hastily to copies of last week’s Independent to check up on Chester County’s No. 158. It’s holder proved to be Brady Howard Trice, colored teacher at Oak Grove School” “Chester Farmers Get Over $49,000 in Cotton Parity Checks” “With a total of $6,345.15 in cotton parity checks received at the county agent’s office this past week for distribution to Chester County farmers and landowners cooperating in the 1940 AAA program, the amount received this season to date has now grown to $49,036.35.” “Sweet Lips News” “By Mrs. Dolly Robinson” “Most all the farmers are nearly through picking cotton in and around this community. “Miss Nell Dunn returned home from Bemis Thursday of last week. “Miss Lois Ruth who spent last week with her brother, Ocie Ruth of near Henderson, returned home Saturday.” October 27, 1950 “Henderson Charter Member of New Grid Conference Formed in West Tennessee” A new football conference was formed on last Monday night, when principals, coaches and newspapermen representing eleven West Tennessee towns met in Lexington High School … and set motion plans for a grid conference comparable to the Big Ten. “Charter members of the conference are Henderson, Bemis, Selmer, Savannah, Bruceton, Huntingdon, Camden, Parsons, Decaturville, Lexington, and North Side of Jackson.” October 28, 1960 “Schools open November 7” See Only, Page 6-A

Chester County Independent archives, October 27, 1950

Pictured above are three boys who are making gridiron history at U.T. Junior College at Martin this year. They are remembered for their prominent sports activities at Chester County High School where all three were very active during their years spent at C.C.H.S. They are, reading left to right: Bill White, Cordell Hatch and Allen Peddy of Henderson.

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Dean would demand larger financial returns. Many fans were interested in her identity, but she was given only the title, “The Biograph Girl.” A new actress from Canada, Mary Pickford, was later given the title. Florence earned the reputation of being a willing and hard working actress with fine dramatic ability. Carl Laemmle, owner of the Independent Motion Picture Company (IMP), made a lucrative offer to Florence that she accepted. She was blacklisted by the Motion Picture Trust headed by Thomas A. Edison. Lawrence and her husband, director Harry Solter, joined Laemmle’s company as featured players. In 1910, Laemmle pulled off a publicity stunt that drastically changed the fledgling movie-making industry. He started a rumor that the extremely popular actress was killed by a streetcar. The story received great coverage in the country. At an opportune moment, Laemmle advertised nationally that Florence Lawrence was not dead, but was working

for him. Suddenly, everyone knew who she was. Laemmle then arranged a public appearance for her in St. Louis, Mo., where she was met by huge crowds of fans. Lawrence appeared under her own name in her first IMP film “The Broken Oath” in 1910 and in subsequent films. The result was increased earnings for her and for Laemmle. She was the biggest star in the business. Soon, the names of more actors and actresses appeared in the

media. The star system was born. The first movie made was “In Old California” in 1910 by the Biograph Company. It was produced and directed by D. W. Griffith, and starred Marion Leonard and Frank Powell. Thought of the week: “Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.” Abraham Lincoln Have a great week and keep smiling. Call me at 879-9777 with your news.

Lifestyle Pricing The Chester County Independent charges the following prices for lifestyle articles: • Engagement announcements with photo — $30 • Wedding announcements with photo — $30 • Anniversary announcements with photo — $30 • Birth announcements without photo – No Charge • Birth announcements with photo — $25 • Birth announcements with color photo — $35 • Birthday announcements with photo — $25 • Birthday announcements with color photo — $35 • Class reunion photos - $30. In color - $40. • Miscellaneous lifestyle photos — $30 • Hunting/fishing photos — $25 For more information, contact our office at 731-989-4624, or email to news@chestercountyindependent.com


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

Foster care seminars offered Youth Villages will hold free foster care information sessions and foster parent training in West Tennessee for adults interested in becoming foster or adoptive parents. Youth Villages offers foster care information and training sessions in Jackson, Dyersburg and Paris. An info session is set for Nov. 23 at 5:30 p.m. at the Youth Villages office in Jackson at 24 Weatherford Square. Single and married adults over the age of 25 living in West Tennessee are eligible. Adoption through Youth Villages is free. Youth Villages’ foster parents receive a monthly stipend to help them offset the costs of adding a child to their household. For more information, call Scott Fields, senior foster care trainer, Youth Villages, at 731-288-4612, or visit www.youthvillages.org.

Now or later Some years ago there was a television commercial representing an auto repair service. The catch phrase they used to emphasize the importance of making the repair when it was small rather than waiting until it was large was, ‘pay now or pay later.’ Their point was you can pay a little now or pay a lot later. Grief is always painful and difficult, and it does take effort on the mourner to travel through to their new life. It is never pleasant and perhaps that is why some people choose to deny them, and thus choose to prolong their healing and their move forward. Try as we might we cannot run from our pain and suffering. When we were children more than likely we were taught by our guardians not to procrastinate, but what needs to be completed to do it now not to delay. Healing requires we walk through the valley of death or loss and change that we did not ask, desire, or prepare. This transition requires us to move forward and moving forward demands living with pain, acknowledging the reality of our loss as well

From Page 5-A

Only “The Chester County School Board, at a called meeting on Tuesday night, set November 7 as the date to reopen schools after the cotton picking recess. “At a previous meeting the Board agreed to dismiss school on November 24 and 25 for the Thanksgiving holidays. It also set December 23 as the last day of school before the Christmas holidays and Jan. 2 as the day to resume school after the holidays. The schools do not dismiss for any other holidays during the year.” “Winners Given In Shave-Off” “Winners of the Brothers of the Brush

DAVID COY as our feelings in relation to our loss. Doug Manning in his book “Don’t Take My Grief Away From Me” correctly states for time to assist in our healing requires choice and will. We must choose to move forward in our healing and willing to work through what is necessary to successfully make the transition in acceptance of our new changed life. We will need support from family, friends, church group, or professionals. It will be easier if we find someone whom we may share our experience on a frequent and regular basis if needed and desired. This will make our journey easier. Our life will also be enriched if we educate ourselves in grief and mourning. This is Sunrise. Shaveoff held last Friday night prior to the pageant were Larry Woody, first; Hershel Essary, second and Lois Connor, third. They received a complete Remington Rand Shave kit.” “Straw Vote at FHC Favors Nixon and Lodge 433 to 57” “The students, faculty and staff of FreedHardeman College, Henderson, Tennessee, voted 433 for Nixon and Lodge to 57 October 29, 1970 “Thomas receives Outstanding Award for ‘70” “John David Thomas, Academic Dean of FreedHardeman College, has been chosen to receive the outstanding Young Men of 1970 Award. This

Chester County Independent archives, October 31, 1940

Diet suggested as autism treatment Dr. Shauna Young is a believer in the words of German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer who related the three steps of truth: “First, it is ridiculed; “Second, it is vigorously opposed; “Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.” Young has been living through the first two stages of that evolution with regard to her views on how diet can affect Autism Spectrum Disorders, but feels the third stage is just around the corner. “When it comes to our research, we’re a bit like the square peg in the round hole,” said Young, Chief Medical Advisor for the NoHarm Foundation (www.noharmfoundation.o rg). “It’s not that other doctors aren’t gaining interest in what we’re doing with regard to diet and autism, and it isn’t that the results aren’t remarkable. It’s more that the medical community just isn’t accustomed to something this new, and the established protocols for publishing findings just don’t fit when dealing with something truly unique like this. Traditionally, findings like ours would be an offshoot of previous research, and publishing an article about it would include lots of references to other articles, which is the standard. But what we’re doing has both the virtue and the vice of not having ever been tried before, and there is just no mechanism in the bureaucracy set up for what we’ve discovered. “At face value, we’re using our Spectrum Balance Protocol Diet to

control disorders that have baffled researchers for decades. How do you present results like that to an established medical community without a chorus of disbelief, especially when our research isn’t based on anything that’s come before? So, in spite of the resistance from the medical community, I’m taking the track record we’ve accomplished over the past five years out directly to the families of autistic children because they deserve to have this information now - independent of the ‘process’ that the system expects”. Young’s approach to helping autistic individuals primarily using just food, does not involve expensive drugs or large amounts of supplements, and it does not promote specific products or treatment services. Instead, it simply suggests a highly specific diet that is designed to reduce the unwanted symptoms of autism. “The problem we have theorized has actually been indirectly supported with plentiful historic third party research. We have located many studies that attribute manganese sensitivity as being one of the root causes of various neurological disorders, which looked suspiciously to me like the symptoms of autism. Since the problem occurs most specifically within the brain chemistry, neither blood nor hair testing alone will necessarily reveal and/or confirm this condition,” she said. “Specifically, we are talking here about individual sensitivity to manganese, and not a syn-

Halloween scary for children, parents Randy O’Brien Tennessee News Service

Parents are being urged to observe some safety rules this Halloween, like making sure every child has a flashlight, a mask that doesn’t restrict vision and a costume that fits without dragging on the ground. Experts also advise that parents inspect all the goodies, throwing out food that has a torn or loose wrapper. Choking hazards are award is presented annually to young men of America in honor of their outstanding achievements and abilities.” “Hog cholera outbreak” “For the first time in two years hog cholera has been diagnosed in Chester County. This case occurred in the Four-Way Community on October 23. State and Federal officials are presently involved in tracing the origin of the outbreak. “To prevent spread of the disease, a state Federal quarantine was placed on a portion of the county.” “Weather holds key to voter turnout” “Old man weather will determine whether voters turn out in Chester County for next Tuesday’s elections, it was predicted

another consideration, for children age five and younger. “Halloween’s always dangerous. Some toys - a robot, for example, or little race cars that you open - have inside them small pieces of candy, and the pieces are so small that they can actually choke a child,” said Nashville attorney Randall Kinnard. Tort reform that would restrict lawsuits continues to be touted as a way to control healthcare costs. this week. With much of the cotton and soybeans still in the fields, good weather will mean farmers will be in the fields gathering their crops instead of taking time to vote. On the other hand, if rain continues to fall, the vote will be heavy. Just how heavy or light vote will affect the various candidates is not known.” “Mrs. Garland hosts Town and Country Club” “The Town and Country Home Demonstration Club met in the home of Mrs. Jo Ann Garland, with Mrs. Louise Burns as co-hostess. “Upon arrival, members and guests were served delicious home made cake and coffee. Mrs. Bessie Simmons held the lucky cup and received a potted plant.”

drome that can be applicable or susceptible to all children or adults. I often use the analogy of a person being allergic to a food such as peanuts: As one person could eat a pound of peanuts and have no ill effects and the next person may experience a violent allergic response to a miniscule exposure, it is obvious that the response produced by the peanuts is far more important in the equation than the amount of peanuts that might be measured and quantified in one’s body.” She acknowledged that there is much disagreement and conflicting information in nutritional/toxicology research fields as to what actual levels of ingestion and retention of manganese is even considered “safe” above very trace amounts. However, she said her team has found numerous studies internationally that have pointed to negative consequences suspected from manganese levels that are currently considered to be within acceptable standards. That means that children eating what could be considered a healthy diet could still be ingesting

enough manganese to affect their brain chemistries in a negative fashion. “We’ve designed a diet based on food choices that are healthy and inviting, inexpensive and simple to prepare that limit the amount of manganese and specific anti-nutrients in the body,” Young added. “It is this diet that we supply in detail for free on the Foundation’s website, which is helping many people — not all — achieve better outcomes than their current regimens on medications. We’ve seen it and we’ve documented it, and now we want to share those results, no matter how unlikely they may seem, with the families of autistic children. As these protocols involve no drugs or medications of any kind, they do “no harm” whatsoever. There is nothing to lose and no medical risk involved with this regimen. And for the families all around the world who have seen the differences in their children from applying these methods, we know that the very least these protocols offer is new hope.”


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • October 28, 2010 Page 7-A

Did you know? Making a Jack-o-lantern last Longer Cash for Clunkers Perhaps no government program drew more adulation (and ire) in 2009 than the Cash for Clunkers program. Nearly everyone who was aware of the program had a strong opinion as to its merits in the early stages. Under the program’s guidelines, anyone in the United States who turned in their old vehicle and purchased a new fuel efficient vehicle was eligible for a government tax credit between $3,500-$4,500 toward the purchase of that new automobile. After initially approving $1 billion for the program, the government soon discovered the program’s popularity was overwhelming, forcing either cancellation of the program for lack of funds or the Congressional approval of additional funds to keep the program afloat. The latter option proved victorious, and in early August an additonal $2 billion was approved to keep the program going. In those early stages, the most popular cars among those purchased under the program were the Ford Focus, Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic, Toyota Prius,and the Toyota Camry.

Foreclosures in 2009 According to a survey from the National Association of Realtors, the median home price in the second quarter of 2009 rose 4 percent compared to the first quarter, increasing to $174,100 from $167,300. That increase from first quarter to second quarter is significant for the sagging economy, as it is a possible indicator that the economy is on the rebound. Lower interest rates and first-time buyer tax credits were likely contributors to the higher median prices for homes in the second quarter. However, when compared to the same period a year ago, median home prices fell a record 15.6 percent in 2009. Much of this record decline can be credited to foreclosures. While foreclosures haven’t quite gripped the headlines in 2009 like they had in late 2008, that is not due to a reduction in the number of homes in foreclosure. In fact, the first six months of 2009 witnessed a record 1.53 million properties in the foreclosure process according to RealtyTrac. The total number of 1.91million foreclosure filings in the first half of 2009 translates to 1 in every 84 U.S. properties receiving at least one filing during that period. Though that number is high, banks repossessed less than 400,000 of those properties during that time.

Life expectancy rates Life expectancy refers to the projected amount of years the general population will live. In the 16th through 18th centuries, individuals were expected to live until the age of 40. Even as early as the beginning of the 20th century, an age of 45 was thought to be a long life, considering individuals from classical Rome and Greece only lived until about age 28. Thanks to modern medicine and better disease prevention in most developed areas of the world, the current world average is 67.2 years. In much of North America, the average is 77.5 to 80. Women tend to have a lower mortality rate than men. Geographic location, climate, availability of medical care, and diet play a large role in life expectancy. Black or African populations tend to have lower life expectancy rates due to war, starvation and disease in countries of origin. Residents of the People’s Republic of China boast the world’s highest life expectancy at 84.4 years.

Jack-o-lanterns are a staple of Halloween decorations. Making one last throughout the season is a trick of the trade even some veteran carvers struggle with. People young and old head to pumpkin patches to pick out the ideal pumpkins. Some prefer perfectly round ones, while others like tall, oblong ones. Whatever the decision, the majority of these pumpkins will be brought home and turned into jack-o-lanterns, or pumpkins carved with a design. The key to having a jack-o-lantern ready and prime for Halloween haunting is carving it at the right time. Carved pumpkins will not last forever, so timing it right is key. In general, carved pumpkins will last for about a week if kept in a cool place and out of direct sunlight. A pumpkin left in midday sun and heat will likely rot or mold much more quickly. For those planning on carving pumpkins for Halloween, it’s best to do so a day or two before the big day. This way the design will be crisp and fresh. There also are ways to increase the jack-o-lantern’s longevity. Some of the best methods involve inhibiting mold growth and dehydration of the pumpkin. One trick is to submerge the cut pumpkin in a bucket of water for a few minutes after carving to moisten the flesh. Others say that spreading petroleum jelly on the inside of the carved pumpkin will help. Commercial chemical products that reduce the decay of the pumpkin may be effec-

tive as well. One can also try using a bleach-and-water solution to keep mold from growing. Those who will simply allow nature to take its course should keep the pumpkin as cool as possible and remove as much of the flesh from the inside when carving. However, because no method is foolproof, the jack-olantern will most likely not make it more than a week, unless the goal is to discover new strains of mold growth. For those who want a permanently ghoulish jack-olantern, it’s best to purchase a plastic or ceramic variety instead.

High Fructose Corn Syrup might get a sweet new name

Trick or Treat?

High fructose corn syrup has been getting bad press for a while now. Food manufacturers are pulling it out of some products, and everyone from soccer moms to nutritionists are blaming obesity rates on consumption of corn syrup. Is this sweetener really at the root of obesity? While the nutritional value or detriment of corn syrup is still open for debate, companies that manufacture high fructose corn syrup are trying to rename the product to give it a better public relations spin. The Corn Refiners Association wants to change its name to corn sugar, after consumption of the sweetener reached a 20-year low. The corn syrup industry is already using the name in advertising and seeking the approval for the name change from the Food and Drug Administration. Such approval could take as long as two years. The Corn Refiners Association claims sugar is sugar, whether it comes from sugar cane or corn. The body uses it the same

way, and corn syrup and cane sugar are nutritionally the same. That means the products that contain sugar are just as likely to contribute to obesity as those with corn syrup. Sugars are found in many products, including cereals, pickles, breads, and even pet foods. Nutritionists urge individuals to cut down on consumption of all sugary products for a healthier diet. It is still unsure whether “corn sugar” will be adopted and whether consumers will be “fooled” by the name change. If history repeats itself, it just may be a boon to the corn industry. When “prunes” were changed to “dried plums,” the fruit was more warmly received. Although public relations officials deny that the former Kentucky Fried Chicken was changed to KFC to limit usage of the word “fried,” connoting unhealthy foods, the name change did help alter the image of the chicken, though how much or how little is likely impossible to calculate.

There are many traditions surrounding Halloween, the most popular of which is trickor-treating. This custom may be traced back to Ireland. On Halloween, Irish peasants would beg the rich for food. For those who refused, the peasants would play a practical joke. So, in an effort to avoid being tricked, the rich would hand out cookies, candy and fruit — a practice that evolved into trick-or-treating today.


Opinion

Page 8-A

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Dear Editor, Beware! Watch the cash register as you check out. Almost every week, I am charged the regular price on a sale item because it has not been changed in the computer. That’s happened twice in Henderson during the past few days, and occurs regularly in Jackson stores and other areas. The one at the register is not to blame, and I hope each incident is either an accident or is just negligence. Many people are paying more because they don’t pay attention. Beware and WATCH. Paying attention may save paying money. Ben S. Flatt Henderson

Hummingbirds’ sudden departure signals autumn Someone once asked me if I believed in reincarnation – and, if so, what creature I would like to return as in another life. I do not believe the human spirit after death can reside in an animal. This would be a step backward, no matter how noble the beast. However, if I had the power to assume an animal’s form, I would choose to become a 500-lb. hummingbird. A hummingbird of such proportions would be a formidable critter. The normal sized ruby-throated hummingbirds that throng around my wife’s sugar syrup feeders are fearless fighters capable of taking on larger birds, cats and even dogs that encroach on their feeding territory. One weighing 500 pounds with a 12-ft. wingspan would be master of the sky, an iridescently plumed monster with a rapier for a beak. In reality, the hummingbirds zipping through the summer heat on our farm are miracles of the Lord’s creation, tiny as they are. As I write this column on the first day of September, I know the flock of hummingbirds raised here this spring will suddenly disappear in two weeks. They’ll wait for a storm front to catch a north wind and wing south toward wintering grounds in lush tropical settings. It will become strangely calm and quiet around our patio. Instead of the squeaky twittering of the hummers as they chase and dogfight around the feeders, we will hear only an autumn breeze soughing through the yellow maple tree leaves and the cawing of distant crows. For months the hummers have entertained us in the evenings and on weekends. Pulling our lawn chairs near the feeders, we’ve become part of the scenery for the fearless fliers. They buzz around our heads, perch within inches of our faces and make us feel part of their wonderful aerial chaos. This has been an excellent breeding season for hummingbirds. In April, they began to mate and nest. One morning while I sat behind the farmhouse trying to tempt a wild turkey gobbler into range of my shotgun, I witnessed a female hummer building her nest at the tip-end of a scaly bark hickory tree limb. She zipped to and from

the nickel-sized basin that would hold her clutch of eggs, carrying spider webs and lichen. Once, I moved to ease a root that was jabbing me in the back. She detected my shift of position and flew down to hover in front on my face. I felt the breeze from her blurry wing beats, an exhalation of life force from such a diminutive member of God’s creation. Apparently assured I would pose no threat to her young, she set off again to gather nestbuilding materials. The hummingbird hatch was a big one. In early June, we started glimpsing half-grown birds around the feeders. It seems this year’s crop went heavily toward females. One group of them, perhaps from the same nest, we named the Four Sisters. They dominated a single feeder in the flower garden, four lovely little lasses politely perched around the rubycolored glass bulb, sipping nectar. They guarded the feeder as a squadron. The swooping foursome drove off interloping birds. After the chase, they would return to the feeder and array themselves around d it, dipping their beaks into the syrupy goodness and recharging their internal dynamos. The Four Sisters have grown since they first appeared. Next year, if they survive the migrations and time in the wintering grounds, they might return and nest where they were born. Another generation of graceful and colorful birds will be propagated and attracted to our feeders, as if we didn’t have enough hummers already. They will be missed in a few weeks. One evening, they’ll swoop and chase and twitter in joy around the feeders. They next day, they will be gone – their absence a harbinger of the change of seasons. If I were a 500-lb. hummingbird, I would go with them. Who wouldn’t want to spend the winter in the tropics, drinking nectar and playing aerial tag? But I will be forced to endure the snow and frigid winds, merely a man waiting for the warmth of April and straining to hear the hum of beating wings in a new season of flowering growth and possibilities.

Healthcare reform and the election: Money, power, and death By Jane M. Orient, M.D. Association of American Physicians and Surgeons

Many of the issues swirling around before this election are mere distractions. At its center is the giant power struggle between the ruling elite and productive Americans. The appealing message from our rulers is “empowerment.” But this does not mean empowerment of the uninsured, the unemployed, food stamp recipients, illegal aliens, and other needy persons. It means consolidation of power at the top, and the disempowerment of any potential rivals: successful industries, prosperous professionals, even small businesses that are still solvent and independent. Like small doctors’ practices. Giving people a handout instead of a hand up never makes them stronger. It makes them more dependent, and turns them into an army of pawns who can be counted on to do the will of those who feed them. They reliably vote for their supposed benefactors. And some of them also register illegals to vote, disrupt town halls or tea parties, key cars displaying signs for challengers, steal campaign signs, disseminate slander, and try to intimidate people. If things get really bad, they could become an army of rioters, looters, and worse. The productive Americans who work every day, mind their own business, take care of their families, obey the law, and make the country function are being bled through redistributive taxes, which primarily benefit those who will soon be strong enough to trample their liberties and reduce them to poverty. The tax donors will have to cooperate with the rulers, and censor their own protests—or else. NPR sent a message through Juan Williams. If they can do it to someone with an audience as large as his, nobody is safe from the thought police. Nowhere is the threat to professionals and those whom they serve more apparent than in ObamaCare—if you read the actual law and not the glossy flyers sent by Medicare at taxpayer expense. The requirements of the law are so costly and onerous that most physicians, if they continue to practice at all, will be forced into “accountable care organizations.” Accountable to whom? To the System, that is to the elite “decision makers.” Accountable for what? For reducing “costs” (that means spending on medical care), and for implementing “best practices.” The first target is the “elderly” (those over the age of 65), and others who might be near the “end of life,” since that is where most of the medical money goes. Not incidentally, judging by the crowd at tea parties, older Americans can also be a problem just because they know something of American history and have lived most of their lives in a free society. We have heard that ObamaCare is funded partly by redistributing Medicare “savings” of some $500 billion over 10 years. This is less than half a truth. If the 10year period starts with full implementation in 2014 rather than in 2010, the amount is $800 billion, states Peter Ferrara in his book The ObamaCare Disaster. And over the first 20 years of implementation, the amount rises to nearly $3 trillion. ObamaCare advocates claim they can do this by cutting out the 30 percent of services that are “unnecessary,” as determined by them. A knee replacement, for example, probably doesn’t save your life—it is not “necessary” to be able to walk or to be pain free. And it will also cut out “fraud”—which increasingly is defined to include “unnecessary” services, as well as those coded incorrectly or not meeting the established “standard of care.” There are no death panels. And no euthanasia. In fact, the law takes care to specify that physicians and institutions are protected against discrimination or retaliation for refusing to participate in physician-assisted suicide.

However, this protection explicitly does not extend to refusal to participate in overmedication or withdrawal of treatment or food and water. More ominously, we already see state laws proposed to immunize physicians from criminal or civil liability, or discipline for carrying out the terms of a POLST form (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment), though they may be disciplined for failure to do so. Keep in mind that these days “life-sustaining treatment” includes food and water, especially if “artificially” administered, say because the patient is too heavily medicated to be able to swallow. Such “palliative sedation” is a new subject for discussion in the medical journals that have been advocating Obama-style “reform” for decades. No, the sedative doesn’t kill the patient—it just keeps her more comfortable while she is dehydrating, and also keeps her from taking deep breaths or moving around. So within two weeks she is dead—if not from the underlying disease, then from dehydration, or the pneumonia or blood clots resulting from immobility. It’s not a very long stretch to envision doctors being prosecuted for failing to carry out patients’ alleged wishes for early death through sedated dehydration. Before it comes to that, doctors will just be co-opted into the System, or marginalized as being “greedy,” “disruptive,” or “paranoid” if they insist on following the Oath of Hippocrates. In the days just before the election, incumbents are desperate. They will do anything to prevent reasoned debate on the central issue of where America is headed—toward the consolidation of central government power. They may even admit to minor errors and promise to “tweak” fundamentally flawed laws like ObamaCare. Look for a blitz of attack ads, false accusations, and outright election fraud. “Reformers” talk a lot about “fragmentation”—of things like medical care. Their real fear is fragmentation of their power. That’s what a thorough housecleaning this election would mean. It would give Americans who believe in our founding principles a chance to take back our country. Failure to seize this opportunity probably spells the death of freedom–and literal death, for the most vulnerable first.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

Friendship Baptist Live Performance “Unexpected: Police Line Do Not Cross,” a live performance, will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 28-29; and at 6 p.m. on Oct. 30, at Friendship Baptist Church, 720 New Friendship Rd. at Beech Bluff. Admission is free. Walk-ins are welcome, but reservations are recommended. This event is not for children under age 10.

Storm Spotter Advanced Class The Chester County Amateur Radio Club is sponsoring an advanced storm spotter class at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28, at the Henderson Fire Station, 505 Sanford St., in the training room. All are invited.

Arts in the Alley Henderson Arts Commission’s Arts in the Alley will be at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28. They will have paintings, stained glass, wood crafts, hand sewn crafts, books, photography, jewelry, hair accessories, face painting and more.

Miss Henderson Pageant The annual Miss Henderson Pageant will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28, at Williams Auditorium at Chester County Middle School. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children under age 5.

Band Boosters collect canned goods for Gleaners’ House The Band Boosters will be accepting canned goods at all football games for the Gleaners’ House. There will be a box inside the gate to make your donations.

Stew and Bake Sale There will be a stew and bake sale on Oct. 30 at Henderson Church of God, 931 U.S. Hwy. 45 North. Cost is $14 per gallon, $7 half gallon, $4 a quart, and $2 a pint. Bring your own container; no container furnished. Call 983-0580 for information.

Fall Festivals and Activities Unity Baptist, 2475 State Rt. 22A North at Jacks Creek, will host a Free Fall Fun event at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 29. Activities include a cakewalk, face painting, hair painting, lucky ducks, fish pond, and the Balloon Lady will be there. There will be no costume judging this year; wear non-scary costumes only. Chili and hot dogs will be served starting at 6:30 in the fellowship hall with games to follow in the gym. Canned food items will be accepted to give to RIFA. Finger First Baptist Church will have Trunk or Treat from 6:30-8 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. All ages are welcome. Jacks Creek Elementary will have their annual Fall Festival beginning at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. Turkey and dressing or hot dog plates will be available. Activities include a child-sized Ferris wheel, a slide and hayride outside, and a silent auction that includes a DeWalt 13-inch planer. Middlefork Road Baptist Church, 3955 Middlefork Road at Luray, will have a free Fall Fun Fest from 3-6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. Activities include Video Van and Hamster Balls from Gamz 2 U and the slide from Up N Jumpin from 3-5 p.m., and games, candy, and hot dogs. There will be a supper and hayride from 5-6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Forty Forks Baptist Church,, 672 Ed Barham Road at Bethel Springs, will host a Fall Festival at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. There will be food, fun, games, prizes, and something for everyone. For information, call 934-7457 or 610-1716.

Glendale Fundraiser Glendale Community Center will have its annual fundraiser at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 30. They will have their annual Halloween party that includes supper, fish pond, costume contest and cakewalk. Chili, hot dogs and homemade desserts will be served. All proceeds go toward building expenses.

A Field of Flags In its third year, A Field of Flags returns to the courthouse lawn in November. A spectacle of red, white and blue, each American flag represents the life of a patriot. All honorees will be recognized at the Veteran’s Day ceremony at City Hall on Nov. 11. To purchase a flag for $25 or for more information, contact Kim at 989-2363, Monica at 989-2991 or Janeane at 989-7222.

Historical Society meeting Join the Chester County Historical Society for their meeting at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 1, at the Senior Center. Bill Jewell, of Henderson, will discuss the history of Veteran’s Day and about the role Chester Countians have played in our nation’s military. Visitors are welcome, and new members can join for $5.

Project Graduation Fundraiser Project Graduation 2011 is asking the community to come out and support them from 5-8 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 3, at Henderson Pizza Hut. Pizza Hut is teaming up with CCHS Project Graduation and they are donating a percentage of sales at that time for carry out, delivery or dine in. In order to get the donation, contact a graduating senior or their parents for a coupon that has to be presented at the time of service.

St. Jude Trail Ride The fourth annual St. Jude Trail Ride will

be Nov. 4-7 at Chickasaw State Park. Scheduled activities are: Thursday at 7 p.m. Donkey Penning (with pay back); 6 p.m. on Friday, games and horse activities; and Saturday registration begins at 7:30 a.m. with breakfast available, organized rides from 9-11:30 a.m. and from 2:30-4:30 p.m., barbecue lunch at noon, an auction at 12:30 p.m. live entertainment mechanical bull and bouncy house; Sunday at 9 a.m. Cowboy Church and the Ultimate Cowboy Competition at 11 a.m. Everyone is encouraged to bring an auction item; concessions available. For information, call Mike Howell at 609-6562.

Mt. Zion CME Fundraiser Mt. Zion CME Church on Second Street in Henderson will have a fundraiser from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6. Plates will sell for $7 each and includes chicken (barbecued or plain), catfish (steaks or fillets), spaghetti, white beans and cole slaw. Desserts and drinks are extra. For information, call Steve or Geneva Croom at 9893210 or 608-4818.

CC Basketball League Signup The Chester County Basketball League will have signups on Saturday, Nov. 6. Times are 9 a.m. for 2nd, 3rd and 4th graders, and at noon for 5th and 6th graders. Cost is $35. For information, call Janice Cooper at 9898135 or email Cooperj@tennk12.net

Roby VFD Fundraiser Roby Fire Department will have its fall fundraiser starting at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 6. There will be chili, hamburgers, hot dogs and a cakewalk. Everyone is invited.

5K Run/Walk for the Paws Friends of the McNairy County Humane Society has scheduled the first annual “Run for the Paws” 5K Run/Walk at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 6 in Adamsville at “The Marty-Community Center.” All proceeds will go to the Humane Society. For more information and registration forms, email bebjoe65@yahoo.com or call 731-632-0391.

Free Sports Physicals Free sports physicals will be offered every second and fourth Thursday of each month from 1:30-5 p.m., compliments of Dr. Paul Schwartz; Scott Miskelly, FNP; and April Downing, FNP, at Main Street Family Medicine, 1306 Hwy. 45 North in Henderson. This service is being provided to high school and junior high athletes to help support our local teams and the families of Chester County. Call 989-9899 to set up an appointment time and bring your sports form completed and signed by parent or legal guardian.

Second Annual Craft Mart The second annual craft mart will be held Nov. 12 through Nov. 14 at the Selmer Community Center. If you would like more information or would like to participate, call the Selmer Community Center at 645-3866.

Medicare Part D Enrollment Medicare Park D open enrollment and counseling will be from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 18, at the Chester County Senior Center. Bring your medicine and Medicare card.

American Legion 8th District meeting The Eighth District dinner/meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 19, at American Legion Post 228, 70 Front St. at Big Sandy. Fish with trimmings, dessert and coffee or tea will be served; cost is $6 per person. Call Commander Joseph McAlpine at 593-0876 to make reservations.

CC Senior Center plans trip The Chester County Senior Center is planning a trip to the Great Smokey Mountains Nov. 29-Dec. 1. Cost is $375 single, $325 double, $315 triple or $300 quad. Deposit is due by Sept. 20 with balance due by Nov. 8. For more information, call 9897434.

Quilt Group meets monthly “Quilters Without a Clue” meet the third Saturday of each month at the Chester County Library from 9:30 to noon. Quilters/needleworkers of all experience levels are welcome. Lessons will be given for beginning quilters. For more information, call Carol at 608-2974 or go by the Fabric Corner, 110 E. Main St. in Henderson.

Hospice volunteers needed Hospice of West Tennessee is looking for volunteers to sit with cancer patients, run errands, read to them and provide companionship. Hospice volunteers are needed in Henderson and surrounding towns. For more information, call 664-4220.

Word Weavers meets each month Word Weavers, a local writing group, meets at 10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Chester County Library. Word Weavers is a group for anyone interested in writing. Visitors are welcome.

Volunteers needed to deliver meals Volunteers are needed to deliver meals to shut-ins one day per month. Call the Chester County Senior Center at 989-7434 and ask for Shirley Stanfill.

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT Oct. 18, 2010 An employee of Department of Human Services office on N. Church Ave., reported that someone took a Samsung Black Jack No. 2 cell phone from her desk. October 19, 2010 A break-in was reported on Woodland Drive. A piece of trim around the back door was broken. The owner stated that the door was still locked and nothing was missing. October 20, 2010 A break-in was reported on Woodland Drive. Entry to the residence was apparently gained through the kitchen window. Items taken include a Sony Vaio Laptop computer, an X-Box 360 and two controllers. The estimated value of the missing items was $1,450. A 2007 Ford Fusion parked in the parking lot of Benson Hall on the campus of FreedHardeman University was vandalized. A Garmin GPS, valued at $150 was reported missing. The theft of a Garmin Nuvi GPS was reported stolen from a parked car at 324 Courtney Cove. October 22, 2010 Several items were taken from a Toyota Corolla parked on Barham Ave. A bank envelope containing $560 in cash and a Gateway laptop computer were reported stolen. October 23, 2010 A computer was reported stolen from Extendicare Home Health, located at 426 N. Church Ave. Access to the building was gained by prying open a door on the North side of the building. Brandon M. Lyles, 25, was arrested and charged with public intoxication. October 24, 2010 Two vehicles, parked at 373 E. University St. were

reported vandalized. The estimated cost to repair both vehicles was $400$500. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT October 17, 2010 A 30-30 Marlin rifle and a 9mm handgun were taken from a residence on State Route 200. The guns were valued at $700. A utility trailer valued at $2,000 was taken from a residence on Rabbit Ranch Road. October 18, 2010 A 1987 Toyota Truck was vandalized on Sweetlips Road. There appeared to be nothing missing from the vehicle. An attempted break-in was reported on Glendale Road. According to the report there were marks around the front and back doors of the home, which appeared to be where someone was trying to wedge the door open. Neither door appeared to have been opened and nothing was missing from the residence. October 19, 2010 A fuel tank containing approximately 40 gallons of fuel was taken from a shed on Sweetlips Road. The value of the tank and fuel is estimated to be $500. A black box containing a “very elaborate device which appeared to be designed to smoke marijuana” was discovered at a residence on State Route 22. October 20, 2010 Two rare breed sheep were taken from a pasture on Pisgah Road. The sheep were valued at $1,000. Matthew Comer, 34, Big Sandy, Texas, was arrested and charged with violation of community corrections – felony. He remains in the Chester County Jail where he is

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being held without bond. Serena Shaw, 24, Reagan, was arrested and charged with theft of property $500-$999. Angela F. Parrish, 55, Luray, was arrested and charged with writing worthless checks. October 22, 2010 John Darryl Davis, 31, Sevierville, Tenn, was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. October 23, 2010 Jeffrey Edward Pirtle, 20, 534 Cedarhurst Dr., was arrested and charged with attempted second degree murder and reckless endangerment. Brandon Micheal Lyles, 25, Bethel Springs, was arrested and charged with public intoxication. Ronnie Hampton, 25, 20 Howard Road, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. Brent Thomas Durrance, 42, Sevierville, was arrested and charged with assault. October 25, 2010 Matthew McIntyre, 20, Finger, was arrested and charged with possession of a weapon with intent of going armed, theft under $500, and possession of a legend drug without prescription. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT October 18, 2010 12:32 p.m. – Benson Hall, Freed-Hardeman University, grease fire. October 21, 2010 2:57 p.m. – Old Finger Road, grass fire. October 23, 2010 12:32 p.m. Talley Store Road, woods fire.


Obituary/Religion

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Obituaries Rayford Mayfield Date of Death – Oct. 24, 2010 Rayford Fowler Mayfield, 59, of Henderson, passed away Oct. 24, 2010, at Chester County Healthcare after suffering a long illness with a malignant brain tumor. His wife and close family took care of him at home for 15 months before he entered the nursing home, where he only lived 12 days. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28, at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel with Bobby Barnes, John Talbott and Mike Russell officiating. Burial will follow at Chester County Memory Gardens. The family will receive friends at Casey Chapel from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday. He was born and reared in Chester County, the son of Martha Sue “Jean” Fowler Mayfield and the late Homer Mayfield. He graduated from Chester County High School in 1970. Rayford started his working career for Pepsi Cola, and then later began working for the City of Jackson and became shop superintendent over vehicle maintenance. He retired with the City of Jackson after 33 years of service. Rayford worked two jobs most of his life. He was a member of Harmony Baptist Church. He loved fishing and being outdoors Rayford was preceded in death by the late Kay Cherry Mayfield, and is survived by his wife, Carolyn Farrow Mayfield; his mother, Martha Sue “Jean” Mayfield; sister-in-law, Virginia Mayfield; and two daughters, Jeanna Cupples (Ben) and Brandi Whitman (Jeremy); two stepsons, Chris Ward and Nathan Ward (Amy) and five grandchildren. He was also preceded in death by his father, and a brother, Harold Renard Mayfield. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Mike Whited Date of Death – Oct. 18, 2010 Michael Warren Whited, Sr., 59 of Henderson, passed away Oct. 18, 2010, at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were held Oct. 22 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel with Dr. Billy Smith officiating. Burial followed in Henderson City Cemetery. He was born in Newbern and grew up south of Jackson, the son of the late R.C. and Martha Warren Whited. He graduated from South Side High School in 1969 and attended the University of Tennessee at Martin. He worked at various radio stations while in college and lived at Waverly. They moved to Henderson and he worked as the morning disc jockey at WHHM AM 1580, which later became FM 107.7. He also was a sportscaster and he retired when the Henderson station closed. Mike loved all sporting events and was an avid U.T. fan and enjoyed auto racing and golf. He is survived by a son, Mikey Whited of Tacoma, Wash.; a daughter, Kristy Riddell of Jackson; five grandchildren; a companion, Threse Mealer of Henderson; and two sisters, Brenda Chandler of California and Jan Satterfield of New Johnsonville. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Olivia Brown Newman Date of Death – Oct. 24, 2010 Olivia Diane Brown Newman, 59, passed away Oct. 24, 2010, at her home. Memorial services will be at 1:30 p.m. Oct. 27 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel with Bro. Ben Flatt officiating. She was born and reared in Harrisburg, Ark., the daughter of the late Ollie Radie and Mildred Othalee Keeney Brown. She went to school in Harrisburg and graduated in 1968. She married Donald Newman of Covington in 1969. They made their home in Henderson since 1971. She worked for Walmart for over 25 years and was assistant manager of the electronic department. She liked to go fishing and take care of the home. She was Church of Christ. She is survived by her husband, Donald Lindsey Newman; two sons, Christopher Lindsey Newman and Kevin Donald Lindsey, all of Henderson; five grandchildren; and three brothers, Fred Brown and Bobby Brown, both of Little Rock, Ark., and Tony Brown of Fort Smith, Ark. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Johnny Fay Hemby Date of Death – Oct. 22, 2010 Johnny Fay Hemby, 25, of Henderson, passed away Oct. 22, 2010. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. Oct. 27 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Johnson Chapel. Burial will follow at Big Springs Cemetery at Five Points. He was born in Madison County, the son of Donnie and Barbara Autry Hemby. He attended schools in Chester County. He was employed by Casey Industries working as a carpenter and a concrete mason. He was a member of the Plainview Church of Christ. He was an avid fisherman and hunter. He enjoyed riding four-wheelers and spending time with his family. He is survived by his father and mother, Donnie Hemby and Barbara Autry Hemby of Henderson; a sister, Jessica Hollin of Lexington; and his grandmother, Imogene Graham of Henderson. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Thurman Autry, Annie Hemby Anderson and Johnnie Hemby. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Florine Glenn Miller Date of Death – Oct. 24, 2010 Florine Nolia Glenn Miller, 90, of Henderson, passed away Oct. 24, 2010, at Southern Oaks in Henderson. Funeral service will be at 11 a.m. Oct. 27 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson - Casey Chapel with Billy Smith, Eddie Miller, Jack Hilliard and Ben Flatt officiating. Burial will follow in the Estes Cemetery near Henderson. Mrs. Miller was born in Lakin, Kan., and grew up in Blue Springs, Mo. She was the daughter of the late James William Glenn and Minolia Audrey Doll Glenn McMinn. She graduated high school in Blue Springs and attended the University of Missouri. In 1945, she married Samuel James “Jim” Miller. They lived in various parts of Missouri and Arkansas, where Mr. Miller worked as a journeyman welder. Mrs. Miller worked as a teacher’s assistant in Malden, Mo., and also for Headstart in Portageville, Mo. They moved to Henderson in 1983. Mr. Miller preceded her in death in 2000. Mrs. Miller was a member of the Henderson Church of Christ and a member of the FCE Home Demonstration Club. She is survived by two daughters, Judy McKenzie (Larry) and Donna Farris (Johny), all of Henderson; a son, Eddie Miller (Sue) of Santa Fe; a daughter-in-law, Debbie Oldach of Lexington, Ky.; one sister, Frances Glenn Baxter of Pleasant Hill, Mo.; nine grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren; and a special friend, James Lott of Henderson. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jim Miller; and two sisters LaVerne Higgenbotham and Myrtle Glenn Zellner. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Lilly Ann Melton Date of Death – Oct. 24, 2010 Lilly Ann Melton, newborn daughter of Mike Melton and Angela King Harmon, passed away Oct. 24, 2010. Services were held at Norton Hospital in Kentucky, with Morgan’s Funeral Home in Princeton, Ky., handling the cremation. She is survived by her twin sister, Libby Jo Melton; great-grandparents, Wiley Delawson of Princeton and Pat and Bettye King of Jackson; grandparents, Paula and Harold Massey of Caldwell County, Ky., Jerry and Lora Melton of Benton, Ky., and Chris and Cindy Moss of Henderson; aunts and uncles, Charles and Michelle Sivells, Shane and Melissa Martin, Terry and Johanna Melton, all of Kentucky, and Kayla Moss and Bobby King of Henderson; and many cousins that will always cherish her memory. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Dennis Evans Date of Death – Oct. 22, 2010 Dennis Evans, 62, of Henderson, died Oct. 22, 2010. Funeral services were held Oct. 25 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel. Burial followed in Bethel Cemetery in Chester County. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 28, 2010

Harvest Time’s Women’s Day Harvest Time Church of God in Christ, 414 Beechwood St. in Henderson, will host “Women’s Day” at 11:30 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 31. This event is to shed light on the importance of women in the ministry for Christ. Harvest will be giving a token of encouragement inside a helium-filled balloon and sending them off at noon. Everyone is invited to take part. For information, call 438-0539, 394-4789, or email Juanita Szaabo at szaaboj@gmail.com.

Special Services The Meeting Place Worship Center, 631 W. Main St. (across from Simmons Lumber), will have a Community Harvest Fest Drive-Thru and Fellowship starting at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 31. They will be handing out treats for the kids and refreshments for adults. Forty Forks Baptist Church, 672 Ed Barham Rd. at Bethel Springs, will have its fifth Sunday Fellowship on Oct. 31. It will begin at 5 p.m. with a cookout; singing and worship starts at 6 p.m. For information, call 6101716, 931-7668 or 934-7457. Pinson Baptist Church will celebrate Homecoming at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 31. Four Fold will be in concert. A potluck lunch will follow services. Everyone is invited. Middlefork Road Baptist Church, 3955 Middlefork Road at Luray, will have revival services at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 31, and at 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, Nov. 1-3. Bro. Ken Kitchen will preach. A nursery will be provided for children age 3 and under. Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, 6185 Rowsey School Road at Bethel Springs, will be having a special series of messages entitled “Give Thanks,” beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 31. On Oct. 31, Pastor Mike Hollaway will share “Give Thanks in Everything”; Nov. 7, Lt. Col. Larry Kirk will share “Give Thanks for our Veterans,” all veterans are invited to attend and a special meal will be served; Nov. 14, Rev. Tim West will share “Give Thanks for our Savior, God’s Greatest Gift”; Nov. 21, Rev. Scott Stout will share “Give Thanks for the Church”; Nov. 28, Rev. William Burney will share “Give Thanks for the Family.” Each service begins at 10 a.m. Everyone is invited. For information, call 645-8868 or Pastor Hollaway at 610-1077.

Judgment House 2010 First Baptist Church of Selmer presents Judgment House 2010 – Land of the Free, Home of the Brave! A Soldier’s Journey Home. It is a multi-scene drama that reaches across generation lines and touches audiences from age 10 to 80. The event will be Oct. 30 and 31. Call the church office at 645-5326 to make reservations or for more information.

Youth Convention There will be a Youth Convention at Soul’s Harbor Church in Scotts Hill at 7 p.m. Oct. 27-29, with special guest Bro. Efren Palacios from California. After the Friday night service, there will be pizza, a hayride and bonfire.

Pleasant Springs Fundraiser Pleasant Springs United Methodist Church, in the Deanburg Community, will have a fundraiser at 4 p.m. on Nov. 6. Grill Master Tony Concialdi and Bob Tulley will be preparing half chicken BBQ plates. Cost is $6 per plate and includes baked beans, slaw and a roll. Half chicken plates with only chicken are $5. To go plates will be ready at 4 p.m. There will be a raffle at 5:30 p.m. A $100 gift card will be given away. Tickets are $1. If you choose to eat in the fellowship hall there will be free hot dog plates for the children. Everyone is welcome.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • October 28, 2010 Page 11-A

Trinity United Methodist Church West Main Street, Henderson


Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

New chamber member Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Local officials were on hand Thursday for a ribbon cutting to officially welcome Los Portales Restaurant as a Chamber of Commerce member. Los Portales is located at 1314 U.S. Highway 45 North. They have daily specials and are open from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Those present, including Los Portales employees, include, from left: Oscar Lopez, Jesus Sanchez, Cesar Gallardo, Russell Epperson, Rogelio Salvador, Patricia Ledford, restaurant manager Roy Salvador, Nathaniel Salvador (in front), Emily Shelton, Mayor Bobby King, Vicki Dickson, and Renee Phelps.

Wind Beneath My Wings

Submitted photos

Leah Page, right, was presented with the Wings Beneath My Wings Award last May following the 2010 Relay for Life. Page is a care-giver for breast cancer patient Chris Page, who is known for her smile and the nickname “Sunshine.” Making the award to Leah Page was Teresa King.

Red Cross, Pitney Bowes team up for “Touch of Home” The American Red Cross and Pitney Bowes Inc. are teaming up to deliver holiday cards to service members, their families and veterans, many of whom will be far from home this holiday season. Now in its third year, the Holiday Mail for Heroes program provides Americans with the opportunity to extend holiday greetings and thanks to service members and veterans. Between Nov. 2 and Dec. 7, the public is invited to send a “touch of home” through holiday cards that contain messages of cheer and appreciation. The Red Cross and Pitney Bowes will then screen cards for hazardous materials, sort and package the cards, and deliver them to military bases and hospitals, veteran’s hospitals and other locations during the holidays. Pitney Bowes is providing all screening, packaging and shipping at no charge. The Red Cross will utilize hundreds of volunteers to sort and box cards for delivery to service men and women, vet-

erans and family members in November and December. “It’s an honor for our community to help make the holidays special for American heroes,” said Wanda Stanfill, Director of Community Outreach and Public Affairs. “The American Red Cross serves and supports members of the military, veterans, and their families by providing emergency communications, comfort and assistance each day. The Holiday Mail for Heroes program continues the Red Cross tradition of service to the armed forces.” Last year, with the help of Pitney Bowes, hundreds of volunteers screened, sorted and packaged cards that were delivered to military bases, veteran and military hospitals across the U.S. and around the world. “The men and women who serve our country in uniform deserve our thanks every single day, and sending just one card is all it takes to make a difference in the life of one of our nation’s heroes,” said Jon Love,

President of Pitney Bowes Government Solutions. “We are honored to participate in this important initiative again with the American Red Cross and look forward to helping the public say happy holidays and thank you.” Holiday cards should be addressed and sent to: Holiday Mail for Heroes; P.O. Box 5456; Capitol Heights, MD 20791-5456. Please be sure to affix adequate postage. Cards must be received no later than Dec. 7. Cards received after this date will be returned to senders. For reasons of processing and safety, participants are asked to refrain from sending “care packages,” monetary gifts, using glitter or including any inserts with the cards. Visit Redcross.org/holidaymail for a full list of recommended guidelines and best practices on the Holiday Mail for Heroes program. For additional information, visit www.redcrossjac.org to learn more about the Jackson Area Chapter Service to the Armed Forces.

Under the law no Social Security COLA for 2011 Monthly Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for more than 58 million Americans will not automatically increase in 2011, the Social Security Administration announced last week. The Social Security Act provides for an automatic increase in Social Security and SSI benefits if there is an increase in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W) from the third quarter of the last year a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) was determined to the third quarter of the current year. As determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is no increase in the CPI-W from the third quarter of 2008, the last year a COLA was determined, to the third quarter of 2010, therefore, under existing law, there can be no COLA in 2011. Other changes that would normally take effect based on changes in the national average wage index also will not take effect in January 2011. Since there is no COLA, the statute also prohibits a change in the maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax as well as the retirement earnings test exempt amounts. These amounts will remain unchanged in 2011. Information about Medicare changes for 2011, when available, will be found at www.Medicare.gov. The Department of Health and Human Services has not

yet announced if there will be any Medicare premium changes for 2011. Should there be an increase in the Medicare Part B premium, the law contains a “hold harmless” provision that protects more than 70 percent of Social Security beneficiaries from paying a higher Part B premium, in order to avoid reducing their net Social Security benefit. Those not protected include higher income beneficiaries subject to an income-adjusted Part B premium and beneficiaries newly entitled to Part B in 2011. In addition, almost 20 percent of bene-

ficiaries have their Medicare Part B premiums paid by state medical assistance programs and thus will see no change in their Social Security benefit. The state will be required to pay any Medicare Part B premium increase. For additional information about the 2011 COLA, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/co la. For additional information about changes in the national average wage index, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/OACT/COLA/A WI.html.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • October 28, 2010 Page 13-A


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010


SSppoorrttss Special teams spell CCHS victory

Page 1-B

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Chester County’s special teams were superb Friday night in the Eagles’ home football game against Bolivar Central. The Tigers’ special teams were good, but not good enough with three major miscues that allowed CCHS to hold on late for a 21-20 District 14-AA victory. Chester County scored on a botched punt by the Tigers in the second quarter, as well as a 53-yard punt return. The Tigers missed a potential gametying extra point try in the fourth quarter, not once but twice, then saw a potential game-winning field goal go wide left in the final minute. The win assured the Eagles of at least third place in the eight-team district, and probably locked them in to what would be a school-record third straight state playoff

berth. CCHS, now 5-4 overall and 5-1 in the district, beat Bolivar for the third straight year despite being out-gained, unofficially, 315 yards to only 170 for the Eagles. The Tigers also had 19 first downs to only nine for CCHS.

However, special teams forced Bolivar to drive 78, 78, and 75 yards for its three scores, while Chester County had one scoring drive of 75 yards, plus a 53-yard punt return for touchdown, and scored on a botched punt attempt by the Tigers. In the fourth quarter, after marching from their own 16-yard line to the Eagles’ 17, the Tigers converted on a fourth-down

District 14-AA Football Team Dis. 1. Lexington 6-0 2. Chester Co. 5-1 2. Liberty Tech 5-1 4. McNairy Cent.3-3 5. Bolivar Cent. 2-4 5. South Side 2-4 7. Jackson C-M 1-5 8. Fayette-Ware 0-5

All 7-2 5-4 7-2 3-6 3-6 2-7 1-8 0-7

try giving them four more downs with 3:37 left. But on second down, CCHS senior Derek Platt sacked Bolivar quarterback B.J. Neely for a five-yard loss. A four-yard run on third down set up a fourth down and 11 situation. Following a timeout, the Tigers lined up for the kick but a high snap from center threw off the timing of the play, and kicker Collin Howell missed wide-left on an offbalance try. “When we got on that goal line, we came together. We said for our community we have to stop them,” said Platt. “I’m just See CCHS, Page 3-B

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Ryan Turner breaks free for yet another long punt return for touchdown, helping the Eagles to a 21-20 victory over Bolivar Central Friday at Eagle Stadium.

Victory Friday could mean first-ever home playoff game The Chester County Eagles have likely already gained an at-large TSSAA state football playoff berth with a 5-4 record, 5-1 in the district. The official announcement of that will not be made until noon Saturday.

However, a victory Friday for CCHS against Liberty Tech at Eagle Stadium would put a lock on the post-season and could give the Eagles home field for the first time ever. Liberty, 7-2, 5-1, lost

last week to Lexington which clinched the District 14-AA championship, while CCHS was defeating Bolivar Central. Last year the Eagles were beaten by Liberty, giving the Crusaders the District title, and relegating CCHS

to a three-way tie for second. Chester County has plenty of film on the Crusaders and coaches worked overtime over the weekend to develop a game plan. The Lexington/Liberty game certainly showed Coach

Jeff Cupples and staff where they need to attack the Crusaders. “We need to be physical with them, that’s our challenge,” affirmed Cupples. “Defensively they play a base defense. They rarely get out of it, so we want to

take advantage of that.” Cupples stressed also the importance of execution and matching Liberty’s play calls. “We have to tackle well in space, keep our containment, and play fast and aggressive.”

Heartbreaker sends Eaglettes packing

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Lauren Lay refuses to give up control of the soccer ball in Chester County’s region tournament game Thursday night in Lexington.

Chester County rallied from a two-goal deficit to force overtime, but eventually fell to Lexington 3-2 in girls’ high school soccer Thursday in Lexington. The loss in the region tournament quarterfinals ended the Eaglettes’ season. “Our girls never quit, that has been a staple of ours all season,” said CCHS head coach Jason Judd. “I’m so proud of the effort our girls put forth, unfortunately we came up short. It has been a great season.” CCHS trailed 2-0 at half-time, however, as the second half played out, the momentum shifted Chester County’s way. Randa Hart scored

Defending TranSouth champion FHU Lady Lions open Saturday The Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions’ basketball team did the unthinkable last season, winning the TranSouth Conference championship by upsetting No. 1 Union University on their home floor and becoming the first road team to win the tournament championship in TSAC history. The Lady Lions open the 2010-11 season at 2 p.m. Saturday hosting Asbury College at the FHU Sports Center. However, as head coach Dale Neal enters his 17th season at FHU, there are some questions to be answered as the new sea-

son approaches. Gone are four-time NAIA All-American Jana Cross and Tara Deatheridge, who was also an All-American and a four-year starter. While those are the only two losses of players who saw significant action, their production and experience will prove difficult to replace. This year, expect the offense to run through senior Meribeth Boehler, a first-team all-conference selection and second-team All-American in 2010. Boehler, who was second on the team in scoring (14.1 ppg) and rebounding

Freed-Hardeman University 2010-11 Women’s Basketball Roster No. 2 3 5 20 21 23 24 32 33 35 40 44 51 55

Name Brittany Montgomery Shelby Taylor Hannah Parsley Leslie Morgan Karissa Dyer Cynthia Woodward Haley Stewart Maria Bagwell Whitney Johnson Natalie Shumpert Summer Waggoner Katie Pate Meribeth Boehler Jenilee Pate

Class Pos. FR G FR G JR G SO G/F FR P FR G FR G SO G/F SR G SO G SO F FR P SR P JR P

Ht. 5-8 5-4 5-8 5-10 6-3 5-7 5-8 5-7 5-4 5-4 5-10 6-2 6-2 5-10

Hometown Bath Springs Livingston Rector, Ark. Philadelphia, Ms.

Baxter Smithville Madison, Ala. Nashville Lexington Paducah, Ky. Chapel Hill Rutherford Ramer Rutherford

(6.7 rpg), came on strong during conference play and averaged 18.4 points during the month of February. Returning in the backcourt is a trio of talented guards in Hannah Parsley, Whitney Johnson and Natalie Shumpert. Like Boehler, Parsley (5-8; Jr.) exploded in February, averaging 15.1 points per game during the month. Parsley proved deadly from well beyond the arc, knocking down many deep 3-pointers while shooting 39.2 percent for the season. Johnson (5-4; Sr.) and Shumpert (5-4; So.) have very similar styles of play with their quickness and ability to break defenses down off the dribble. Both are also tenacious defenders, combining for 108 steals last season. Also returning in the frontcourt alongside Boehler are Maria Bagwell (5-7; So.) and Summer Waggoner (5-10; So.). Bagwell was a pleasant surprise last season, See FHU, Page 3-B

CCHS’s first goal off an assist from Mikayla Whitman with 12 minutes left. Continuing to battle, they knotted the score at the three minute mark on a goal by Darby Miskelly. Alas, the host “Tigerettes,” as they used to be called, got the gamewinner in the extra period. Jessica Weeks had five saves in the first half for CCHS, and eight in the second period, plus three more in overtime. On Oct. 18, CCHS hosted Jackson Central Merry in the first round of the district, winning 10-1. CCHS had two goals each by Piper Davis, Baylie Pruett, and Beka Heaston, and single tallies by Brook Flowers, Miskelly, Hart, and Taylor Fortune. Assisting on goals were Miskelly, Hart, and Pruett. Weeks was named to the All-District first team, and Pruett to the second team.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Darby Miskelly, right, battles with a Lexington defender in a Region 8 A-AA soccer tournament game Thursday in Lexington. CCHS lost a heartbreaker in overtime to see their season come to a conclusion.

Season ends in region Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

The volleyball season came to a crashing halt Oct. 19 for the Chester County Eaglettes. CCHS, the District 12-AA champions, fell in the first round of the regional to Crockett County 16-25, 27-25, 17-25, and 21-25, in the match played at Eagle Gym. Above, from left, Eaglettes Emily Humphry, Annsley Poston, Bailey Gately, and Sarah Cox defend against a spike during the third game of the match. In photo at right, Kirsten Henry goes on the offensive to score for CCHS, while head coach Susan Humphry and teammates, background, look on.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

Lion soccer wins fourth straight The Freed-Hardeman Lions avoided what could have been a letdown match, getting a 4-1 win over Brescia University in a non-conference match on Saturday night. The win improves FHU to 11-3 on the season, leaving the Lions just two wins away from tying the school record for wins. Simbarashe Zvaita opened scoring early off a well-placed pass from Kenniel Hyde from the left side, finding Zvaita on his run toward the right post. Zvaita easily beat the keeper to the far post to give FHU an early lead. The Lions finally got a little bit of breathing room in the 51st minute thanks to a Brescia own goal. Hyde ripped a shot from left of the goal that ricocheted off of Nordine Amlaiky, hitting the post and going across the line. Brescia narrowed the gap in the 77th minute when Eurodger Bargblor took a short through ball in the box and slipped a shot past FHU keeper Alexandre Girodo, breaking the Lions’ three-match scoreless streak.

FHU, however, wasted little time and struck back in the 79th minute when Pasun Zarif sent a through ball to Ryan Engineer who touched it past a defender and struck a hard shot to the right post. The Lions added a final score in the 88th minute when Joshua Mankey was fouled in the box. His penalty kick was stopped by Brescia keeper Gilbert Camacho, but Mankey collected the rebound and sent it to the left post for the goal. Brescia outshot FHU 22-14 and held a slight 109 edge in shots on goal. Freed-Hardeman also clinched a spot in the conference tournament due to Cumberland (Tenn.) University’s loss to MidContinent (Ky.) University earlier in the day. FHU hosts MidContinent at 7 p.m. Saturday.

Lions roll Lyon The Freed-Hardeman Lion soccer team kept on rolling, picking up another big win on Oct. 19 by defeating Lyon College, 30.

The match was evenlyplayed for much of the first half, with each team taking five shots. But it was the Lions that broke through first, opening the scoring in the 42nd minute on a header by Hyde that the freshman placed perfectly into the upper right corner of the net. Hyde’s goal was set up by a header from Zvaita following a corner kick by Dorigo from the left corner. Dorigo sent it to the far post where Zvaita headed it forward to Hyde. The Scots responded by controlling the run of play for the first 25 minutes of the second half, outshooting FHU 10-0 during that stretch of time. But Girodo had an answer every time Lyon had a good opportunity, making four diving saves to help the Lions hang onto their one-goal lead. Lyon outshot FHU for the match, 17-11, but the Lions held a 9-8 edge in shots on goal. Girodo saved seven shots for Freed-Hardeman in posting his fourth clean sheet of the season and third in a row.

Hyde receives TSAC men’s soccer honor Freed-Hardeman’s Kenniel Hyde has been named the TranSouth Conference Men’s Soccer Offensive Player of the Week for the week ending Oct. 17. Hyde, a freshman forward from Kingston, Jamaica, scored two goals and had two assists in a 7-0 win over Trevecca Nazarene. The margin of victory was the largest ever for the Lions in a conference game. Hyde, who missed the first three matches of the season, now has six goals and six assists for the year. He has four goals and two assists in four conference matches thus far.

Youth Football slates Homecoming Saturday The Chester County Youth Football League has scheduled its annual Homecoming games and season-ending fundraiser for 10 a.m. Saturday at Eagle Stadium. The first games begin at 10 a.m., with

the festivities to follow at approximately 11:15 a.m., with the tackle games immediately thereafter. Admission is $2 per person, and this is the only fundraiser of the year for the Youth Football League.

FHU Baseball holds annual Alumni and Family Day The Freed-Hardeman University baseball team hosted its annual Alumni and Family Day on Saturday, Oct. 16, and welcomed back 21 former players for the alumni home run derby and alumni scrimmage. “It was a great weekend,” Estes said. “We couldn’t have asked for better weather. We had a good turnout of potential future players at our high school showcase.” Josh Bost (2001-2002) was the star of the day, as Estes put it, hitting 10 home runs to win the derby and adding a grand slam in the alumni game to help his team to a 7-4 win. Trae Luttrell, who just wrapped up his career in the spring, earned the win while current FHU assistant coach J.D. Flowers showed his versatility by picking up the save. Flowers played shortstop for the Lions from 20022005 and ranks eighth in career batting average. The day also featured a

high school showcase and intersquad scrimmage as well as a fish fry. “We had a huge turnout, and everyone had a great time. It was great

to see future, past and current Lions together with their families,” said Estes. “We have already started planning for next year to make it even better.”

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Freed-Hardeman’s Whitney Newby, left, and Julie Bracknell battle for control of the ball with Lyon’s Kristin Maas, Oct. 19 at the Josh Riley Soccer Complex on the FHU campus. The teams battled to a 0-0 tie.

Lady Lion soccer ties wins record It took a few tries, but the Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions finally picked up their school-record tying ninth win on Saturday evening, 1-0. Whitney Newby’s penalty kick in the 68th minute proved to be the difference as FHU improved to 9-4-3 on the season. The win tied the school record for wins in a season set in 2008. It also improved on the record for most shutouts in a season with the team’s 10th this year. Shelby Murray was fouled in the box after dribbling around three defenders to set up Newby’s kick, which beat Brescia keeper Kelsey Cromwell to the upper left corner. Though it was FHU’s only goal, the Lady Lions had plenty of chances throughout the match. A Newby goal in fifth minute disallowed on an offsides penalty. Murray’s shot from left of

the goal was deflected by Cromwell and Newby put it in on the rebound, but the celebration was cut short on the offsides call. Newby had solid strike inside box to left post in 53rd minute but Brescia keeper made a leaping save to keep the ball out of the net. Murray was again fouled just outside the box in 77th minute, but her free kick sailed just over the crossbar. FHU had another quality chance in the 71st minute as Morgan Walls sent a well-placed cross from the right side where Brittny Johnson onetouched it toward toward the far post, but the shot missed just wide. For the match, the Lady Lions outshot Brescia 247 with a 14-5 advantage in shots on goal. Freed-Hardeman gets a long break before finishing out its regular season by hosting Cumberland University at 5 p.m. Nov.

2.

Scoreless with Lyon The frame hasn’t been too kind to the FreedHardeman Lady Lion soccer team recently. Nikki Ceeney’s longrange shot in the 88th minute ricocheted off the crossbar, keeping the match scoreless. That’s how it ended up as FHU and Lyon College played to a 0-0 tie on Tuesday night at the Josh Riley Soccer Complex. It was the second straight scoreless tie for the Lady Lions, who drew with Trevecca Nazarene University on the previous Friday night in a match that saw FHU hit the frame twice late. Ceeney’s shot was only one of four taken by Freed-Hardeman, which was outshot 13-4 by the Scots. Senior goalkeeper Tiffany Harris was outstanding once again, stopping all 10 shots on frame to help FHU post its ninth shutout of the season.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010 Page 3B

Chester County Junior High 2010-11 Basketball Schedule Date Opponent Nov. 4 Decatur County Nov. 8 Selmer Nov. 11Lexington Nov. 15Selmer Nov. 18Hardin County Nov. 22U. Sch. Jackson Dec. 6-10 Tournament Dec. 9 U. Sch. Jackson Dec. 13 Adamsville Jan. 6 Decatur County Jan. 10 Adamsville Jan. 13 Hardin County Jan. 17 Lexington Jan. 24-27 Best of West

Place Parsons Henderson Henderson Selmer Henderson Henderson TBA Jackson Adamsville Henderson Henderson Savannah Lexington TBA

Time 6:00 6:30 6:30 6:00 6:30 6:30 TBA 6:00 6:30 6:30 6:30 6:00 6:00 TBA

Chester County High School Football Schedule Date Opponent Oct. 29 Liberty Tech

Location Henderson

Time 7:00

Freed-Hardeman University Men’s Soccer Schedule Date Opponent Oct. 30 Mid-Continent Nov. 2 Cumberland

Location Mayfield, Ky. Henderson

Time 7:00 7:00

Freed-Hardeman University Women’s Soccer Schedule Date Opponent Nov. 2 Cumberland

Location Henderson

Time 5:00

Freed-Hardeman University Volleyball Schedule Date Opponent Oct. 29 Indiana Wesleyan SCAD Oct. 30 Olivet Naz. Georgetown Nov. 2 Lyon

Location Georgetown, Ky. ! Georgetown, Ky. ! Georgetown, Ky. ! Georgetown, Ky. ! Batesville, Ark.

Time TBA TBA TBA TBA 7:00

! Boneyard Brawl

Freed-Hardeman University Women’s Basketball Schedule Date Opponent Location Oct. 30 Asbury College Henderson Nov. 6 Cumberland Henderson Nov. 11Concordia-Selma Henderson Nov. 13Milligan * Henderson Nov. 18Vanguard # Jackson Nov. 19Azusa Pacific # Jackson Nov. 20Okla. Baptist # Jackson Dec. 3 Auburn Montg. Montgomery, Ala. Dec. 4 Faulkner Montgomery, Ala. Dec. 11 Harris-Stowe St. Henderson Dec. 20 Lindsey Wilson ^ Daytona B., Fla. Dec. 21 Saint Xavier ^ Daytona B., Fla. Jan. 4 Tenn. Temple Henderson Jan. 6 Blue Mtn. Blut Mtn., Miss. Jan. 8 Cumberland Henderson Jan. 15 Union Jackson Jan. 17 Trevecca Naz. Henderson Jan. 20 Martin Meth. Henderson Jan. 22 Mid-Continent Mayfield, Ky. Jan. 27 Lyon Henderson Jan. 31 Bethel McKenzie Feb. 3 Blue Mtn. Henderson Feb. 5 Cumberland Lebanon Feb. 12 Union Henderson Feb. 14 Martin Meth. Pulaski Feb. 17 Trevecca Naz. Nashville Feb. 19 Mid-Continent Henderson Feb. 24 Lyon Batesville, Ark. Feb. 26 Bethel Henderson

Time 2:00 2:00 5:00 1:00 TBA TBA TBA 6:00 5:30 2:00 3:00 11:00 5:00 6:00 2:00 2:00 6:00 6:00 2:00 2:00 6:00 6:00 2:00 2:00 6:00 6:00 2:00 6:00 2:00

* Homecoming; # Rotary Classic at Union

Freed-Hardeman University Men’s Basketball Schedule Date Opponent Nov. 6 Cumberland Nov. 9 Murray State Nov. 13Lee * Nov. 18William Carey Nov. 23Lindsey Wilson Nov. 26Tougaloo # Nov. 27McKendree # Dec. 3 Auburn Montg. Dec. 4 Faulkner Dec. 7 Lee Dec. 10 Crichton Dec. 11 Faulkner Dec. 17 Tougaloo Dec. 31 Tougaloo Jan. 3 Bryon Jan. 6 Blue Mtn. Jan. 8 Cumberland Jan. 15 Union Jan. 17 Trevecca Naz. Jan. 20 Martin Meth. Jan. 22 Mid-Continent Jan. 27 Lyon Jan. 29 Bethel Feb. 3 Blue Mtn. Feb. 5 Cumberland Feb. 12 Union Feb. 14 Martin Meth. Feb. 17 Trevecca Naz. Feb. 19 Mid-Continent Feb. 24 Lyon Feb. 26 Bethel

Location Bryan Murray, Ky. Henderson Hattiesburg, Miss. Columbia, Ky. Jackson Jackson Montgomery, Ala. Montgomery, Ala. Cleveland Henderson Henderson Jackson, Miss. Henderson Dayton Blut Mtn., Miss. Henderson Jackson Henderson Henderson Mayfield, Ky. Henderson McKenzie Henderson Lebanon Henderson Pulaski Nashville Henderson Batesville, Ark. Henderson

Time 4:00 TBA 3:00 6:00 7:00 5:00 2:00 7:00 7:30 6:00 8:00 4:00 6:30 7:00 6:30 8:00 4:00 4:00 8:00 8:00 4:00 8:00 4:00 8:00 4:00 4:00 8:00 8:00 4:00 8:00 4:00

* Homecoming; # Union Thanksgiving Classic

Walker 5K race promotes exercise and fitness The inaugural Walker 5-K Run is set for 9 a.m. Nov. 6 at Gene Record Park in Henderson. All proceeds from the Walker Run go to the development of a walking/running track at the Park. Registration is from 88:45 am., with live music from 8-10 a.m. The Walker Clinic, 385 S. Highland in Jackson, is committed to the prevention of cardiovascular disease and has started this event to benefit the promotion of exercise and fitness in the community. Cardiovascular disease is still the number one killer of both men and women in America. The number one prescription for the prevention of heart attacks and strokes is proper eating and exercise, this is a crucial part of staying healthy. There will be medals for the usual age groups. Pre-registration by Oct. 23 is $20, and $25 day of the race, which includes a race T-shirt. Preferred runner registration is $25 which includes a longsleeve “dri-fit” shirt, or $30 for preferred registration on race day. Registration online is at walkerclinic.com. Runners can redeem their race bib for a free ultrasound with a wellness visit to Walker Clinic. For information, call 731-506-4242 for details.

Fourth degree DAN instructs at Bass club

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Sensei J.D. Swanson, right, Fourth Degree DAN and originally from New Zealand, was a guest instructor Saturday at the Bob Bass Karate School. Swanson, now an assistant professor of biology at the University of Central Arkansas, has trained and instructed on several continents and emphasized that karate is the same all over the world. He hopes to influence his students to travel and train in other parts of the world, then return and use the knowledge gained to make their homes better places to live.

Montoya named Volleyball Player of the Week Sandra Montoya of Freed-Hardeman University has been named the TranSouth Athletic Conference Volleyball Player of the Week for the week ending Oct. 17. Montoya, a 5-foot-8 middle hitter from Antioquia, Columbia, helped lead the Lady Lions to a road win over confer-

ence-leading Union University in four sets, handing the Lady Bulldogs their first conference loss in the process. The junior transfer from Miami-Dade Community College had a solid allaround effort with 14 kills and a .452 hitting percentage, 16 digs, five aces and five total blocks.

Ferreira leads FHU volleyball over Martin The Freed-Hardeman Lady Lion volleyball team stayed hot, knocking off Martin Methodist College in four sets (25-16, 25-21, 21-25, 25-20) on Thursday night in the FHU Sports Center. FHU (9-7, 8-3) has now won three straight conference matches to move into sole possession of second place in the

TranSouth. It was also senior night for FHU’s lone senior, Claire Pennington, who had three kills and eight digs.

FHU sweeps Vecca On Oct. 19, the Lady Lions avenged an earlier loss to Trevecca Nazarene University by sweeping the Trojans on the road (25-21, 25-20, 25-20) at

the FHU Sports Center. Ferreira and Rice led the attack with 14 kills apiece while Sandra Montoya had seven. Montoya also recorded two aces. Setter Amber Turner continued her solid play with 41 assists. The trio of Ferreira, Rice and Montoya also did damage on defense, combining for 15 total blocks.

Men’s women’s golf programs return to Freed-Hardeman One year after bringing back cross country, FreedHardeman University will reinstate another sport to its athletic offerings men’s and women’s golf. Both programs were suspended following the 2004 season. The men’s program originally began in 1989; the women’s program started in 2000. “We are excited about the return of intercollegiate golf to FHU. By

adding men’s and women’s golf, we will be able to offer more opportunities for current students to participate in intercollegiate athletics,” said Athletic Director Mike McCutchen. “We will also be able to draw additional student-athletes who have a desire to participate in golf while attending FHU. We look forward to getting started this spring.”

Chickasaw Golf Club in Henderson will be the team’s home course. The teams will be led by John Armstrong, who is also the school’s sports information director. He was a member of the golf team for two years and was part of the team that shot a then-school record 310 in the spring of 1993. “I’m definitely thankful for the opportunity to help bring back our golf pro-

grams,” he said. “This will give us a chance to reach out to a group of studentathletes we haven’t necessarily been able to go after in the last several years. We’re looking forward to begin building a quality program.” The plan is for the teams to begin competing in the spring and to be eligible for post-season play beginning in the fall of 2011.

From Page 1-B

force the missed field goal try. Bolivar took the game’s opening kickoff and used almost seven minutes to go up 7-0 on Calvin Woods’ three-yard run, and Howell’s point after boot, pounding out 13 plays in the process. CCHS tried to counter on its first possession, but gave the ball up on downs at the Bolivar 10-yard line. But three plays later Ryan Turner returned a Tiger punt 53-yards for the Eagles’ first score. Brandon Rodriguez kicked the first of his three point-after tries, then pinned the Tigers at their own five-yard line with a very high kickoff. It paid dividends minutes later when Eagle Michael Pearson forced a fumbled punt attempt, and Tranard Cobb easily scooped up the ball and scooted nineyards for Chester County’s second score. In the third quarter, it appeared CCHS might take a two-touchdown

lead. Starting at their own 40-yard line they put together two first downs, reaching Bolivar’s 22-yard line when a fumble stopped the drive. Three plays later the visitors knotted the score. The Eagles next possession was their only scoring drive of the game, 75-yards in length culminated by a 23-yard touch-

down run by Toneal Bumpass. Rodriguez’ extra point was good again for a 21-14 lead. But right back came the Tigers, 75yards in less than four minutes including a fourth down and five conversion. However, the fateful extra point was wide left, not once but twice after the Eagles were caught with 12 defenders on the field.

CCHS so happy I was there to make that tackle. I commend the whole team for playing hard.” However, Platt admitted the Eagles were not expecting to be in the type of fight they had with the Tigers. Bolivar’s offense moved the ball at will at times against the CCHS defense before they came up with one final stop. “I told them, now’s the time. You’ve got to hold them right now,” CCHS head coach Jeff Cupples said about the final seconds. “The playoffs, the community, the senior class, all those things, and we made three good plays.” On Bolivar’s last four downs, Cupples changed gap assignments and told everyone to shoot the gaps in an attempt to reach the backfield and “blow up” Bolivar’s plays. It worked just enough to

From Page 1-B

FHU earning all-freshman honors after proving herself as a solid rebounder despite being an undersized post. Waggoner saw limited action as a freshman but her role is expected to grow this season. Neal is hoping for

immediate contributions from several newcomers including Karissa Dyer (63; Fr.), Katie Pate (6-2; Fr.), Shelby Taylor (5-3; Fr.) and Cynthia Woodward (5-7; Fr.). The Lady Lions’ schedule will, as always, be filled with nationallyranked opponents. Seven of their 14 non-conference opponents were in the top 25 in last season’s final national rating.

High School Football Oct. 2 at Eagle Stadium Bolivar Central Chester County

7 – 0 – 7 – 6 = 20 0 – 14 – 7 – 0 = 21

Unofficial Statistics: First Downs Rushing (atts., yds.) Passing

BC 19 49-301

CC 9 30-170

(comp., atts., int., yds.)

1-5-1=14

0-1-0=0

Penalties, yards Fumbles, lost Punts, average

2-11 1-1 1-35.0

3-20 1-1 1-25.0

Unofficial Individual Statistical leaders: Rushing: B – Fredrel Cross 23-159; B.J. Neely 12-69; Onterrio Cross 8-36. CC – Matthew Butler 9-73; Toneal Bumpass 7-54; Ryan Turner 5-41. Scoring Summary: First quarter: (5:13) B – Calvin Woods 3 run (Collin Howell kick), [7-0]. Second quarter: (9:24) CC – Ryan Turner 53 punt return (Brandon Rodriguez kick), [7-7]. (5:14) CC – Tranard Cobb 9 fumble return (Rodriguez kick), [714]. Third quarter: (6:23) B – Fabian Sain 38 run (Howell kick), [14-14]. (3:23) CC – Toneal Bumpass 23 run (Rodriguez kick), [14-21]. Fourth quarter: (11:51) B – Fredrel Cross 14 run (kick fails), [20-21].


EEdduuccaattiioonn

Page 4-B

Inside CCHS by Meghan Black This past Friday, the Chester County Eagles played the Bolivar Tigers. The Eagles defeated the Tigers 21-20. This Friday will be their last home game of the season. They will be playing Liberty. Come out and support the team! This coming Friday there will be a career MEGHAN and college fair for the BLACK juniors and seniors at the high school. Students will receive information about various colleges and careers they may want to pursue. This past Saturday students at the high school had the option of taking the ACT. The next opportunity will be in December. See Ms. Goff for further details. This past Friday the Chester County Internal Thespian Society troop entered a one-act play in a one-act festival in Cookeville. Their one-act was called What Did You Say What for? and starred Becca Schucker and Zakkeus Bonds. The play came in third overall out of the 10 schools that competed. Becca Schucker won best actress out of all the plays and Zakkeus Bonds won All-Star Cast. This was the first time that Chester County has entered a one-act festival. Congratulations to Becca, Zakkeus, the Chester County ITS troop, Mr. Ricky Mitchell, and all those who contributed to the show!

By Ally Rogers Oct. 25-29 is Red Ribbon Week. This is a week to focus on drug and alcohol prevention. To encourage the students at the junior high, Celinda Davidson, our School Resource Officer came and spoke to the eighth-graders. Sgt. Renfroe also came and showed the drug trailer. Seventh-graders went through counseling classes as well. Thank you to all who helped our students realize the importance of making good choices and staying away from

By Amber Murley Students and teachers are enjoying Red Ribbon Week. Tomorrow (Friday) is “Character Day.” Thanks to PSO for the popcorn and Coke party. Joy McKinnon’s kindergarteners had fun counting the popcorn. Kindergarteners also started a unit on pumpkins this week. Students had fun counting, baking and eating pumpkin seeds. They also labeled the parts of the pumpkin. Third-graders are

drugs and alcohol. Seventh- and eighthgraders enjoyed 4-H lessons with Mr. Brian and Ms. Amy this week. They learned about the responsibility of finances and credit cards. Students always enjoy the times they spend during 4-H lessons. The Eagles and Eaglettes played in a basketball tournament Monday night. The next game will be Nov. 4 in Decatur County. I encourage you all to come and support our junior high basketball teams! Yearbooks can still be purchased online (www.smart-pay.com), by phone (1-800-8531337), or by mail. Please do not send any money to school for these. For any other information, contact Mrs. Davis. reading “The Gardener” this week. They are also working hard on adding and subtracting three-digit numbers. Amber Murley’s class estimated the weight of a pumpkin and how many seeds were in it. Then, Mrs. Amber cut the pumpkin open and students counted the seeds. They also put the seeds into groups and multiplied them. Everyone is invited to our fall festival on Saturday. We will have our annual turkey dressing and hot dog meal. There will be several new games this year including a Ferris wheel and a hayride. Come join us for some fun! Carry-out meals start at 4:30 p.m. with games at 5. We hope everyone has a very safe and happy Halloween!

By Brandi Welch We have had a very busy and exciting week at East Chester! Each year, we celebrate Red Ribbon Week during the month of October. This is a celebration of our students and their decisions to remain drug free. Throughout the year, our students have lessons in Guidance class that help them learn how to make good decisions. One of those areas of decision making is the area of personal health and protecting our bodies from harmful substances such as drugs, alcohol and tobacco. This week, our students have learned about the harmful effects of these substances and the various problems they can create. We learned various ways to avoid these substances and how to make good choices for ourselves, as well as ways to positively influence others to make safe and healthy decisions as well. We would like to give a very special thank you to Officer Tim Crowe. He was kind enough to take time out of his busy schedule to come speak to our students on Monday about staying drug free and making good decisions. We are very blessed in Chester County to have local officers, firefighters, and other community resources who are always willing to come share information with our children to help keep them safe and to encourage them to do the right thing! East Chester has two great simple ways to earn money for education. We collect Box Tops for Education and we recycle empty printer ink cartridges and old cell phones. If you have these items, you may drop them by the school office or send them to school with your students to give to their teachers. Teachers and office staff will be sure to get them to the right place to earn money for our students. Our gifted program, taught by Dr. Belinda Anderson, has been very busy and hard at work lately. The students in this program have been doing an in-depth study of L. Frank Baum’s book, The Wizard of Oz. The culminating activity for this study will be a mock trial of The People vs. Dorothy Gale with all of the students in the gifted program in participation. Students are currently doing character studies, discussing arguments for and against Dorothy, and brainstorming about marketing ideas for this exciting event. Professor Jason Shockley from FreedHardeman University assisted Dr. Anderson in preparing students for this event this week by speaking to some of the students about the criminal justice system. The trial will take place at 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 7, at the courthouse. Judge Larry McKenzie has been kind enough to agree to be the judge for the trial. FreedHardeman students, Caley Ward and Trevor Tyson, also came to teach first- through third-grade students in the Gifted

Program how to tie dye shirts as a fun project. We would like to give a special thank you to all of these people for taking the time out of their busy schedules to invest in our students here at East Chester. This week our kindergarten classes finished their units on farm by learning about pumpkins. They are also learning about night and nocturnal animals such as bats. Fall parties will be held on Friday with Halloween and Fall themed centers. Our first-graders had lots of fun on their field trip Thursday at Circle Y in Corinth, Miss. Students had the opportunity to play putt putt golf, visit a petting zoo, go on a hayride, visit a pumpkin patch to pick a pumpkin and much more. Firstgrade teachers would like to thank all those parents who went along to help with the trip. Carrie Sells’ secondgrade class just completed a unit on plants. They made terrariums this week to culminate their study. Mrs. Sells’ class would like to say a very special thank you to Madelyn Wilson and her family for donating all of the plants for this activity. Third-grade teachers and parents would like to thank Sarah Hibbett for her presentation at Parent Involvement. She had students demonstrate many hands-on activities that parents can do with their children at home to show how math is used in the real world. Rosemary McKnight’s third-grade class is getting responses from places they mailed Flat Stanley. Jon and Jennifer Hardin sent pictures of Flat Stanley with their children in China. Flat Stanley rode a bus, ate with chopsticks, and found a McDonald’s in China. LeighAnne Dugger

Thursday, October 28, 2010 received pictures of Flat Stanley with her newborn twin cousins along with brochures he got at Disney World. Tyler Blackwood took Flat Stanley on a trip during Fall Break. Flat Stanley had his picture made at the U.S. Capitol, the Lincoln Memorial, Arlington Cemetery, the Smithsonian Institute, Gettysburg, and several other places near Washington, D.C. The class is marking Flat Stanley’s adventures on a U.S. map and a world map outside their classroom. In physical education this week, Janice Brown and Coach Chad Hanna’s classes have been working on jumping and landing. Students have been working on the high jump, long jump and hurdles. Next week, they will be learning to play different types of tag games. Due to the dropping temperatures this time of year, please remember to send your child to school with some type of jacket or pullover for playing outside. Mrs. Brown’s classes go outside for PE on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and Coach Chad’s classes go outside on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Please also remember that students need tennis shoes for PE every day! In order to better meet the differing needs of our students, Chester County teachers are now participating in weekly training sessions after students are dismissed for the day. These sessions are designed to provide teachers with the latest in teaching techniques and strategies, interpretation and application of student data, classroom management, and use of technology to better prepare our students for the future. We are all very excited about our upcoming Fall Festival on Nov. 6. There

are many ways that parents, local businesses, and other members of our community can help us raise money with this event for our students. We have a silent auction each year and are currently accepting donations of items to be auctioned. If you wish to donate any items, bring them to the school by Thursday, Nov. 4. We will also have a live auction where we will be auctioning off themed baskets of all kinds as well as special keepsake items made by each class. During our festival, Chrysler will make a $10 cash donation for every test drive around our school parking lot. Drivers must be over 18 and must have a valid driver’s license. We will have tons of games and activities for children of all ages including a hayride, fish pond, face painting, plinko, football throw, cakewalk, lollipop tree, and many more! We would also love for you to come enjoy delicious turkey dressing or hot dog plates with us. Advanced tickets for turkey dressing plates are $7 and hot dog plates are $4. Tickets will also be available at the door for $1 more. The schedule for our Fall Festival is as follows: 4 p.m. – Take out meal plates will be ready for pick-up. 4 p.m.-sundown – Test Drive with Chrysler. 4:30 – Students will sing in the gym, followed immediately by Live Auction and games. 5 p.m. – Sit down meals will be ready. 5-7 p.m. - Bidding open for Silent Auction. 7:30 p.m. – Silent Auction winners may begin picking up items. Hope to see you on Nov. 6! Thank you for your interest, support, and contributions to our students’ futures.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010 Page 5-B

First in Class

Submitted photos

The CCHS Color guard was first in class and division. Members include, front row from left: Hailey Mathis, and Beca Heaston; and back row: Morgan Williams, Cassie Allen, Makayla Smith, and Brittany Tomlin. Not pictured, Katlyn and Lindsey Elkins.

The Chester County Marching Eagles, under the direction of field commander Grace Lowery, above, placed first in its class and third in its division Oct. 2 at the Wolf River Marching Invitational. The band also won the award for being the most spirited, while Lowery placed first in class and division. Band director Tom Hay said the awards are the result of hard work and dedication. The band will participate in its final event at the Colt Classic in Nashville.

Fire Dept. visits Jacks Creek Submitted photo

The Chester County Fire Department, Jacks Creek Station, visited Jacks Creek Elementary School on Oct. 6 for Fire Prevention Week. County Chief Jim Vest, as well as firemen Al McKinnon and Jamie Miller from Jacks Creek Station, showed the students the fire trucks, talked to them about fire safety and presented all students with fire safety “goodie bags.”

Left: Senior members of the CCHS Marching Eagles include, front row from left: Katie England and Miranda Preece; and in back: Zack Holder, Trey Sable, Nick Moody, Walker Weinman, Josh Moore, and J.C. Cary.

HOSA supports CF Walk Submitted photo

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools Monday, Nov. 1 Chicken patty on bun Corndog Tater Pals Baked beans Mandarin oranges Milk choice Tuesday, Nov. 2 Baked chicken Hotdog on bun Mashed potatoes Green peas Hot rolls Peaches Milk choice Wednesday, Nov. 3 Santa Fe pasta Ham and cheese sandwich Baked sweet potato casserole Green beans Hot rolls Pineapple chunks Milk choice Thursday, Nov. 4 Chili with crackers Hamburger on bun Corn Glazed carrot coins Grilled cheese Strawberries Milk choice Friday, Nov. 5 Sack lunch Manager’s choice Milk choice

Chester County Middle School Monday, Nov. 1 Chicken rings Fish sandwich Mashed potatoes Green beans Hot rolls Peaches Milk choice Tuesday, Nov. 2 Lasagna with meat sauce Ham and cheese sandwich Sweet potatoes

Purple hull peas Salad Texas toast Mandarin orange slices Milk choice Wednesday, Nov. 3 Breaded chicken sandwich Chili cheese Maxwrap Batter bites Corn Baked beans Pudding Fruit mix Milk choice Thursday, Nov. 4 Chicken noodle soup/crackers Hotdog on bun Mixed vegetables Carrots Pickle spears Grilled cheese Fresh fruit choice Milk choice Friday, Nov. 5 Pizza or Barbecue sandwich Baked potato California blend Pineapple Milk choice

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal offered daily Monday, Nov. 1 Chicken rings Warm Philly steak and cheese sub Mashed potatoes Green peas Hot rolls Tuesday, Nov. 2 Spaghetti/meat sauce Ham and cheese sandwich Glazed sweet potatoes Green beans Salad Texas toast Wednesday, Nov. 3 Cheeseburger/bun Hotdog/bun Tater pals Baked beans Chocolate chip cookie Thursday, Nov. 4 Chicken noodle soup/crackers Roast turkey/gravy Masked potatoes Purple hull peas

Hot roll or grilled cheese sandwich Friday, Nov. 5 Pizza Tuna salad plates Lima beans Savory wedges Corn Salad

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice or fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Monday, Nov. 1 Chicken rings Salad bar Pizza Baked batter bites Mashed potatoes/gravy Black eyed peas Steamed cabbage Hot rolls Tuesday, Nov. 2 Spaghetti/meat sauce Clux deluxe Fries Salad bar Tiny whole potatoes Green beans Corn Cole slaw Hot breadsticks Wednesday, Nov. 3 Cheeseburger/bon Pizza bar Fries Chili dog Salad bar Baked beans Apple sticks Thursday, Nov. 4 Chicken fajita/tortilla Pizza choice Salad bar Fiesta rice Refried beans/cheese Sweet potato casserole Friday, Nov. 5 Fish scroodles Pizza Batter bites Chicken noodle soup/crackers Pimento cheese sandwich Salad bar Macaroni and cheese White beans Cole slaw Turnip greens Cornbread

HOSA (Health Occupation Students of America) students participated in the Cystic Fibrosis Walk held at Freed-Hardeman University Saturday. HOSA students from CCHS raised more than $1,300, and they offer their thanks for the community for supporting them in this worthy cause. The advisors are Ginger McPherson and Joan Chamberlain.


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

FOR SALE FOR SALE – Acres and lots—$100 down—-$100 / month. No restrictions and NO CREDIT CHECK. Chester County 731989-4859. (TFC) MOVING SALE – Everything Must Go! Household items, some new and furniture. For more info call 212-4934. (25P) FOR SALE – Bedroom suite, oak china cabinet – matching oak table / leaf with 6 chairs. Washer / dryer. 989-3937. (25P) CLAYTON HOMES Super Center Corinth, MS. Before you buy bring us your best price. Closeout specials & factory incentives now available. Hwy. 72 West 1/4 mile past hospital. Call 662287-4600. (TFC) FOR SALE – 1 Washer, 4 Dryers, 1 Stove. 90 Day Warranty. Also do in-home repairs. 394-2490. (25P) FOR SALE – Housing in Chester County. Move in ready. Reduced from $34,900 to $29,000. Call 731-608-2799. (TFC) HAPPY JACK MANGE MEDICINE promotes healing and hairgrowth to any mange, hot spot, or dandruff on dogs and horses without steroids! HENDERSONCHESTER COOP (731-9894621). www.happyjackinc.com. (26P)

Month. $500 Deposit. 731-9885760 or 731-571-8170. (TFC) FOR RENT – 1257 sq. ft. office with CHA on Highway 45. $500 / Month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 327 W. Main St. Henderson, TN. 2 BR House. $400 / Month. Call 615-7081229. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom brick house, carport, new CHA. 927 Woodland. $625 / month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 2 BA Mobile Home near Chickasaw. $350 / Month. $150 Deposit. No Pets. References Required. 983-5707. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom brick home. 11755 Hwy 100 East. $395 / month. United Country Real Estate. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR Apartment, Woodland Dr., W/D Hookup, CHA, 1 Year Lease, $400 / Month, $250 Deposit. 1 BR, $325 / Month, $250 Deposit. 931-315-9589 or 731-554-2838. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home, CHA, appliances, 3 acres. 580 Loop Road (Deanburg). $550 / Month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC)

FOR SALE – Lot with city utilities only 2 miles to Henderson. Reduced from $8,900 to $4,900. Call 731-608-2799. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom brick house near Chickasaw. New paint, carpet, tile. Storage shed. 3280 Pleasant Springs. $495 / month. 989-7488. (TFC)

CLAYTON HOMES Super Center Corinth, MS – Factory direct pricing. 4-bedrooms starting at $39,950. Hwy. 72 West 1/4 mile past hospital. Call 662-2874600. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq ft, basement. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

HOUSE FOR SALE – By Owner. Selmer Area. 731-4348656. (25P)

FOR RENT NOW LEASING – Hillview Manor Apartments. 1, 2, 3 and 4 BR apartments available. NEW HEAT/AIR CONDITION UNIT. Call 731-989-5203, Mon.Fri., 8-4:30. Equal Housing Opportunity. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1992 sq. ft., living – family – dining rooms. 1160 Roby Road. $700 / month. United Country Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Duplex apartment, Fawn Dr. $550 / Month. References, deposit, application. 731-422-2284 or 731-431-1755. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom house, CHA, appliances, carport, storage building, 380 Patterson. $595 / month. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex. No Pets. 1 year lease. Yard maintained. Excellent condition. 983-2766. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Fully furnished with utilities, 1 BR, $150 / week, $150 deposit. 608-0447 or 6080763. (25P)

HOUSE FOR RENT – 2 / 3 BR, 2 BA, brick, central H/A, 1 quarter mile from Walmart South, good condition, well-maintained, good neighborhood. $600 /

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, CHA, oak cabinets, appliances. $400 / month. 367 University. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA Mobile Home, $450 / Month. 2 BR, 1 BA Mobile Home $350 / Month. Call 439-7437 for more info. (26P)

marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198 or www.CourtDivorceService.com (TnScan)

HELP WANTED

ALL CASH VENDING ROUTE Be Your Own Boss. 25 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. Call Toll Free Now 1-877-915-8222 (TnScan)

DRIVERS! No Experience? No problem! 14-day local training in Jackson, TN. To earn great pay, benefits, job security. Placement assistance & student tuition loans available. Call 1-800-423-8820 or go to www.drive-train.org for training opportunity with DRIVETRAIN, 119 E.L. Morgan Drive in Jackson. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS FOUND – Young male black dog with white chest. Possibly pit bull mix. Has black collar. Found in Chickasaw State Park area. 731989-2850. (25P) WANTED LAND OR STANDING TIMBER on 10 acre tracts and larger. Pine & hardwood. Carter Timber & Land. Since 1993. Ted Carter 731-607-0777. (TFC) FOR ALL YOUR Home Remodeling Needs Call Kerry’s Home Remodeling Services Today! 731-989-3326 or 731-6084012. (27P) WILL PAY CASH – By the piece or house full, antiques, collectibles, anything of value. 695-7196. (TFC) HOME IMPROVEMENTS: Drywall, painting, roofing, siding. All your interior and exterior work, from your beautiful decks to your fabulous barns for your hay, tractors and cars. Get your estimates today! Call Timmy at 731-206-0643 or 731-733-6937. (26P) CHILD’S PET MISSING – Brownish Tan, Yorkie / Shih Tzu mix. Left from home on Rabbit Ranch Rd. / Trice Rd. area on Sunday, September 19 around noon. His name is Jake. Please call if you have any information. 731-608-7917 or 731-608-0810. (TFC)

STATEWIDES DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N (TnScan) CASH NOW! GET CASH for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (TnScan) HERNIA REPAIR? DID YOU Receive a Composix Kugel Mesh Patch Between 1999-2007? If patch was removed due to complications of bowel perforation, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Be A Citizen Soldier Contact A Recruiter 18 0 0 - G O - G U A R D w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) INSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED. MOST earn $50K-$100K or more. Call our branch office at 901-624-5900. Ask for Joey Hayden or e-mail joey.hayden@insphereis.com. Visit www.insphereismemphis.com (TnScan)

FEDEX GROUND CONTRACTOR SEEKING Class A Drivers - Teams Welcome! • Great Pay Package • Excellent Hometime • No Touch Freight • All Drop & Hook. Call 901-490-4857 or email robinsonpbg@aol.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- COMPANY $1000 SIGN On Bonus FFE seeks Class A CDL & 1 yr. exp for OTR. Also hiring O/O’s. Students Welcome. Call 800-569-9232 or recruit@ffex.net (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS 100% Employee Owned OTR Solo Drivers Home Most Weekends, 1yr w/Class A-CDL, Low Cost Insurance, Free PrePass/EZ Pass, APU’s in all trucks 1-800-6849140 ext2 www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) ASAP! NEW PAY INCREASE! 37-43 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL- A & 3 mos recent OTR. 877-258-8782 www.meltontruck.com (TnScan) DRIVER- GREAT MILES! NO Touch Freight! No forced NE/NYC! 6 months OTR experience. No felony/DUI last 5 yrs. Solos wanted. New Team Pay Packages! 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com (TnScan) CALL NOW! BIH TRUCKING Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS! HOME EVERY Week! *Modern equipment *Average weekly pay $1,000+ *Paid vacation and holidays. CDL-A with 1yr T/T experience required 1-888-WORK-4US. www.averittcareers.com EOE (TnScan) REEFER AND FLATBED DRIVERS Needed! Experienced drivers & Class A commercial students welcome! Incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! Call Prime today: 1-800-2770212 www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER- CDL/A TOP HOMETIME! Solos & Teams Highest Team Pay CDL/A with 1 yr. recent OTR req’d. 800-942-2104 ext 238 or 243 www.totalms.com

(TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL/A $2,000 SIGN-ON Bonus! Start up to .42 CPM. Good Home Time and Benefits. OTR Experience Required. No Felonies. Lease Purchase Available. 800-4414271 x TN-100 (TnScan) CDL-A DRIVERS: DRIVE IN Style! New 2011 Freightliner Cascadias Plus The Best Miles, Pay & Performance Bonus. $500 Sign-On for Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. Western Express. 888801-5295 (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 91 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 19 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198 or www.CourtDivorceService.com (TnScan) ALL CASH VENDING ROUTE Be Your Own Boss. 25 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. Call Toll Free Now 1-877-915-8222 (TnScan) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010 PAGE 7-B CASH NOW! GET CASH for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (TnScan) HERNIA REPAIR? DID YOU Receive a Composix Kugel Mesh Patch Between 1999-2007? If patch was removed due to complications of bowel perforation, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Be A Citizen Soldier Contact A Recruiter 18 0 0 - G O - G U A R D w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) INSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED. MOST earn $50K-$100K or more. Call our branch office at 901-624-5900. Ask for Joey Hayden or e-mail joey.hayden@insphereis.com. Visit www.insphereismemphis.com (TnScan) FEDEX GROUND CONTRACTOR SEEKING Class A Drivers - Teams Welcome! • Great Pay Package • Excellent Hometime • No Touch Freight • All Drop & Hook. Call 901-490-4857 or email robinsonpbg@aol.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- COMPANY $1000 SIGN On Bonus FFE seeks Class A CDL & 1 yr. exp for OTR. Also hiring O/O’s. Students Welcome. Call 800-569-9232 or recruit@ffex.net (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS 100% Employee Owned OTR Solo Drivers Home Most Weekends, 1yr w/Class A-CDL, Low Cost Insurance, Free PrePass/EZ Pass, APU’s in all trucks 1-800-6849140 ext2 www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) ASAP! NEW PAY INCREASE! 37-43 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL- A & 3 mos recent OTR. 877-258-8782 www.meltontruck.com (TnScan) DRIVER- GREAT MILES! NO Touch Freight! No forced NE/NYC! 6 months OTR experi-

ence. No felony/DUI last 5 yrs. Solos wanted. New Team Pay Packages! 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com (TnScan) CALL NOW! BIH TRUCKING Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS! HOME EVERY Week! *Modern equipment *Average weekly pay $1,000+ *Paid vacation and holidays. CDL-A with 1yr T/T experience required 1-888-WORK-4US. www.averittcareers.com EOE (TnScan) REEFER AND FLATBED DRIVERS Needed! Experienced drivers & Class A commercial students welcome! Incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! Call Prime today: 1-800-2770212 www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER- CDL/A TOP HOMETIME! Solos & Teams Highest Team Pay CDL/A with 1 yr. recent OTR req’d. 800-942-2104 ext 238 or 243 www.totalms.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL/A $2,000 SIGN-ON Bonus! Start up to .42 CPM. Good Home Time and Benefits. OTR Experience Required. No Felonies. Lease Purchase Available. 800-4414271 x TN-100 (TnScan) CDL-A DRIVERS: DRIVE IN Style! New 2011 Freightliner Cascadias Plus The Best Miles, Pay & Performance Bonus. $500 Sign-On for Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. Western Express. 888801-5295 (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 91 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 19 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198 or www.CourtDivorceService.com (TnScan) ALL CASH VENDING ROUTE Be Your Own Boss. 25 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. Call Toll Free Now 1-877-915-8222 (TnScan) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical

*Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan)

GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Be A Citizen Soldier Contact A Recruiter 18 0 0 - G O - G U A R D w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan)

NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N (TnScan)

NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)

CASH NOW! GET CASH for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (TnScan) HERNIA REPAIR? DID YOU Receive a Composix Kugel Mesh Patch Between 1999-2007? If patch was removed due to complications of bowel perforation, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) TENNESSEE

NATIONAL

INSURANCE REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED. MOST earn $50K-$100K or more. Call our branch office at 901-624-5900. Ask for Joey Hayden or e-mail joey.hayden@insphereis.com. Visit www.insphereismemphis.com (TnScan) FEDEX GROUND CONTRACTOR SEEKING Class A Drivers - Teams Welcome! • Great Pay Package • Excellent Hometime • No Touch Freight • All Drop & Hook. Call 901-490-4857 or email robinsonpbg@aol.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- COMPANY $1000 SIGN On Bonus FFE seeks Class A CDL & 1 yr. exp for OTR. Also hiring O/O’s. Students Welcome. Call 800-569-9232 or

recruit@ffex.net (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS 100% Employee Owned OTR Solo Drivers Home Most Weekends, 1yr w/Class A-CDL, Low Cost Insurance, Free PrePass/EZ Pass, APU’s in all trucks 1-800-6849140 ext2 www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) ASAP! NEW PAY INCREASE! 37-43 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL- A & 3 mos recent OTR. 877-258-8782 www.meltontruck.com (TnScan)

DRIVER- GREAT MILES! NO Touch Freight! No forced NE/NYC! 6 months OTR experience. No felony/DUI last 5 yrs. Solos wanted. New Team Pay Packages! 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com (TnScan) CALL NOW! BIH TRUCKING Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan)


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 28, 2010

Public Notices FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made by failure to comply with the terms and conditions of a certain Deed of Trust dated August 2, 1995, executed by Brent T. Durrance and Angelia C. Durrance, recorded in Book 139, Page 413, Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, and wherein the said Brent T. Durrance and Angelia C. Durrance conveyed the property therein described to William C. Ford, Trustee, to secure the indebtedness therein described, and the entire indebtedness having been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust and note, and payment not having been made as demanded; and the undersigned, Joel E. Jordan, of 3326 Aspen Grove Drive #604, Franklin, Tennessee 37067, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee in the place and stead of William C. Ford, Trustee, said appointment being set forth in the Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, notice is hereby given that I, Joel E. Jordan, Substitute Trustee, having been requested so to do by the lawful owner of said indebtedness, will on Friday, November 5, 2010, at 12:15 p.m. at the Front door of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, free from equity of redemption, homestead and dower, and all other exemptions of every kind, all of which are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, the following described real estate in Chester County, Tennessee: BEGINNING at a stake in the margin of the Montezuma Road this being the southwest corner of the property conveyed to Joe Caraway, et ux., in Deed Book 75, page 206 and also the southwest corner of the property herein conveyed, thence in a northerly direction 330 feet to a stake, thence in an easterly direction 30 feet to a stake, thence in a southerly direction 330 feet to a stake in the margin of Montezuma Road, thence in a westerly direction 330 feet with the margin of said road to the point of beginning. Being the same property conveyed to Brent T. Durrance and wife, Angelia C. Durrance, by Quit-Claim Deed from Joe Caraway and wife, Donna Caraway, dated May 4, 1995 and recorded in Record Book 137, Page 323, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Included in this conveyance is a 1996 So. Ridge mobile home, Serial #SRP9766ABAL. This is improved property known as 1050 Silerton Montezuma Rd, Henderson, Tennessee. The 2009 taxes are currently due and payable. The 2008, 2007 and 2006 taxes are currently past due and delinquent. The following person(s) or entity(ies) hold a Deed of Trust, lien or other encumbrance on the above described property: Creditrust, Assignee of MBNA America Bank, Judgment Lien, Record Book 268, Page 387. Joe Caraway and wife, Donna Caraway, Right of First Refusal, Record Book 137, Page 323 (QuitClaim Deed). Said sale is subject to any and all unpaid taxes and any other prior claims, liens, easements, set back lines and restrictions. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY, TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE. IN THE EVENT THE HIGHEST BIDDER DOES NOT HONOR THE HIGHEST BID WITHIN 24 HOURS, THE NEXT BIDDER AT THE NEXT HIGHEST BID WILL BE DEEMED THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER. THE NOTICE OF RIGHT TO FORECLOSE HAS BEEN SENT AS REQUIRED BY T.C.A. §35-5-117. JOEL E. JORDAN Substitute Trustee STELTEMEIER & WESTBROOK, PLLC 3326 Aspen Grove Drive, #604 Franklin, Tennessee 37067

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated December 31, 2004, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded January 13, 2005, at Book 262, Page 527 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by William C. Barham and Annette J. Barham, conveying certain property therein described to General American Corporation as Trustee for Centex Home Equity Company, L.L.C.; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on November 18, 2010 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free

from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: All of the following tract or parcel of Real estate located in the fourth Civil District, Chester County, Tennessee, more particularly bounded and described as follows, to wit: Beginning on an iron rod in the North right of way line of the Henderson-Jacks Creek black topped road, this point being located North 74 degrees and 8 minutes East 23 feet from the southwest corner of Barnes 2.15 acre tract of land; runs thence on the east side of Barnes Driveway, North 9 degrees West 249.34 feet to an iron pin in edge of curve in Barnes Driveway; runs thence leaving Driveway and running North 87 degrees and 36 minutes East 210 feet to a stake; runs thence South 3 degrees and 22 minutes East 203.47 feet to an iron rod in the North right of way line of said black topped road; runs thence with the North right of way line of said black topped road, South 74 degrees and 8 minutes West 190 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1 acres, more or less, this being a part and parcel of a tract of land conveyed to us by deed of General Warranty from Henry Bishop, et ux of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in deed Book 62, Page 356. ALSO KNOWN AS: 2345 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: William C. Barham; Annette J. Barham; Midland Credit Management, Inc. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 931153133 DATED October 18, 2010. WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM And WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE TENNESSEE, CHESTER COUNTY DEFAULT having been made in the terms, conditions and payments provided in certain Deed of Trust executed by Melissa D. Melton to Arnold M. Weiss, Trustee dated May 13, 2004 in the amount of $77,600.00, and recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Deed Book 252, Page 345, (“Deed of Trust”); and, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust having been last transferred to The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RASC 2004KS11 by assignment; and, The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RASC 2004KS11, as the current owner and holder of said Deed of Trust (the “Owner and Holder”), has appointed as Substitute Trustee the undersigned, , any of whom may act, by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; therefore, NOTICE is hereby given that the entire amount of said indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Owner and Holder, and the undersigned as Substitute Trustee, or a duly appointed attorney or agents by virtue of the power and authority vested by the Appointment of Substitute Trustee, will on Thursday, November 11, 2010 commencing at 12:00 PM at the Main entrance of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee; sell to the highest bidder for cash, immediately at the close of sale, the following property to-wit: Beginning at a iron pin on the North side of Benson Road at the Northwest corner of the Gorded Millner tract recorded in Deed Book 50, Page 454; and the Northeast corner of the Johnny Benson tract of which this is a part of, runs thence with the West line of Millner South 19 degrees 00 minutes East 52.90 feet to a iron pin; thence South 7 degrees 53 minutes 05 seconds East 317.45 feet to an iron pin; thence south 75 degrees 21 minutes 54 seconds West 200.00 feet to a iron pin; thence North 18 degrees 17 minutes 34 seconds West 437.36 feet to a iron pin in the South

line of the Don Childers tract; thence South 89 degrees 56 minutes 40 seconds East 270.00 feet to the point of beginning containing 2.17 acres as surveyed by Richard Dodds RLS #352 on April 6, 1999. Subject to the County Road right of ways and utility easements of record. Being the same property conveyed to grantors herein by Deed of record in Deed Book 172, Page 706, Registers Office for Chester County, Tennessee. Map & Parcel No.: 39-30.01 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 320 Benson Road, Reagan, Tennessee 38368 CURRENT OWNER(S): Melissa Darlene Maness Miller SUBORDINATE LEINHOLDERS: N/A OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: N/A All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, however, the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The sale will be held subject to any unpaid taxes, assessments, rights-of-way, easements, protective covenants or restrictions, liens, and other superior matters of record which may affect said property; as well as any prior liens or encumbrances as well as priority created by a fixture filing; and/or any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. If the U.S. Department of Treasury/IRS, the State of Tennessee Department of Revenue, or the State of Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development are listed as Interested Parties in the advertisement, then the Notice of this foreclosure is being given to them and the sale will be subject to the applicable governmental entities` right to redeem the property, as required by 26 U.S.C § 7425 and T.C.A. § 67-1-1433. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the holder of the Deed of Trust. Substitute Trustee reserves the right to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. THIS LAW FIRM IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Ad #6593 MCC TN, LCC 3525 Piedmont Road NE, Six Piedmont Center, Suite 700 Atlanta, GA 30305 McCurdy & Candler, L.L.C. (404) 373-1612 www.mccurdycandler.com File No. 07-12623 /CONV

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated October 26, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded November 5, 2007, at Book 308, Page 196 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Michelle Deming, conveying certain property therein described to Cary R. Califf as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Countrywide Bank, F.S.B. and Countrywide Bank, F.S.B.’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on November 18, 2010 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning on a p.k. nail set in the centerline of Vida Road, which point is the most eastern northeast corner of Susan Tumpag as recorded in Record Book 157, page 678, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence from the point of beginning and with the lines of Tumpag, the following calls: south 84 degrees 00minutes 44 seconds west 180.1-9 feet to an iron pin set at the southwest corner of lot 2; thence with the south line of lot 2, north 85 degrees 24 minutes 46 seconds east 532.42 feet to a p.k. nail set in the centerline of Vida Road; thence with the centerline of Vida Road, the following calls: south 20 degrees 10 minutes 28 seconds east 20.07 feet; following a curve having a radius of 400.00 feet for a distance of 156.86 feet cd=south 24degrees 52minutes 48seconds east, cd=155.86 feet) to the point of beginning, containing 2.2 acres. Being Lot 1 of North Pines as shown on an unrecorded plat. ALSO KNOWN AS: 315 Vida Road, Beech Bluff, Tennessee 38313 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to

the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Michelle Deming The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726160011 DATED October 22, 2010. WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of: Ricky Allen Jarmon Notice is hereby given that on the 15th day of October, 2010, Letters Testamentary in respect of the Estate of Ricky Allen Jarmon who died July 4, 2010, were issued to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk and of the above named court within the earlier of four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or of the posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from the decedent’s date of death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This 15th day of October, 2010. Brice Jarmon Executor Estate of Ricky Allen Jarmon

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the terms, conditions, and payments provided in a certain Deed of Trust dated MAY 30, 2006, executed by LINDSAY BROOKE ARNOLD (A/K/A LINDSAY PEARSON, A/K/A LINDSAY BROOKE PEARSON, A/K/A LINDSAY ARNOLD, A/K/A LINDSAY THOMAS), SINGLE WOMAN, to JOHN CLARK, Trustee, of record in RECORD BOOK 285, PAGE 157, in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee and to J. PHILLIP JONES, appointed as Substitute Trustee in an instrument of record in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee, to secure the indebtedness described, the entire indebtedness having been declared due and payable by TENNESSEE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AGENCY BY AND THROUGH ITS SERVICER AND AUTHORIZED AGENT, U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, being the present owner/holder or authorized agent, designee or servicer of the holder/owner of said indebtedness, has requested foreclosure proceedings to be instituted; and as provided in said Deed of Trust, I, J. PHILLIP JONES, will by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as Substitute Trustee, on MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2010 AT 12:00 P.M. (NOON), AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE CHESTER COUNTY COURTHOUSE IN HENDERSON, CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, sell to the highest bidder for cash, free from the equity of redemption, homestead, and dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived, and subject to any unpaid taxes, if any, the following described property in CHESTER County, Tennessee, to wit: PROPERTY LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF CHESTER, TENNESSEE: BEGINNING AT A SET ROD IN THE WEST MARGIN OF MONTEZUMA ROAD AT DEAN MORGAN’S SOUTHEAST CORNER; THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30’ WEST WITH THE MARGIN OF SAID ROAD 115 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIPE AT TROY FRYE’S NORTHEAST CORNER; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37’ 41’’ WEST WITH FRYE FOR 299.60 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 19’ 55’’ EAST WITH FRYE 113.30 FEET TO A FOUND IRON PIPE IN MORGAN’S SOUTH LINE; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 57’ 01’’ EAST WITH MORGAN 300 FEET TO THE BEGINNING. SAID LEGAL DESCRIPTION IS THE SAME DESCRIPTION AS CONTAINED IN THE PREVIOUS DEED. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO LINDSEY BROOKE ARNOLD, HER HEIRS AND ASSIGNS FOREVER, BY DEED DATED MAY 30, 2006 OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 285, PAGE 155, IN THE REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 730 OLD MONTEZU-

MA ROAD, HENDERSON, TENNESSEE 38340. MAP 046 PARCEL 074.00 THE SALE OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, AND IS FURTHER SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF ANY TENANT(S) OR OTHER PARTIES OR ENTITIES IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY. THIS SALE IS SUBJECT TO ANY UNPAID TAXES, IF ANY, ANY PRIOR LIENS OR ENCUMBRANCES LEASES, EASEMENTS AND ALL OTHER MATTERS OF RECORD INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE PRIORITY OF ANY FIXTURE FILING. IF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY/ INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, OR THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT ARE LISTED AS INTERESTED PARTIES IN THE ADVERTISEMENT, THEN THE NOTICE OF THIS FORECLOSURE IS BEING GIVEN TO THEM, AND THE SALE WILL BE SUBJECT TO THE APPLICABLE GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY, ALL AS REQUIRED BY 26 U.S.C. 7425 AND T.C.A. 67-1-1433. IF APPLICABLE, THE NOTICE REQUIREMENTS OF T.C.A. 35-5117 HAVE BEEN MET. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY, TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE IN THE EVENT THE HIGHEST BIDDER DOES NOT HONOR THE HIGHEST BID WITHIN 24 HOURS, THE NEXT HIGHEST BIDDER AT THE NEXT HIGHEST BID WILL BE DEEMED THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER. OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: NONE OF RECORD THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. This day, October 24, 2010. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 730 OLD MONTEZUMA ROAD, HENDERSON, TENNESSEE 38340. J. PHILLIP JONES SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SUITE C-205, NASHVILLE HOUSE ONE VANTAGE WAY NASHVILLE, TN 37228 (615) 254-4430

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated May 13, 2005, executed by Jerry M. Hammonds and Myrtle B. Hammonds, conveying certain real property therein described to Holmes, Rich & Sigler, P.C., as Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee recorded May 25, 2005, in Deed Book 269, Page 64-79; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose, if required pursuant to

T.C.A. § 35-5-117, was given in accordance with Tennessee law; and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Rubin Lublin Suarez Serrano TN LLC, having been appointed by as Substitute Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin Lublin Suarez Serrano TN LLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on November 18, 2010 at 11:00 AM at the CHESTER County courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held at the CHESTER Courthouse, located in Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEING LOT NO. 4, OAK HILL ESTATES, A PLAT OF WHICH APPEARS OF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES 14 AND 14A, B & C, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, REFERENCE TO WHICH PLAT IS MADE FOR A MORE PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION OF SAID LOT. THIS IS THE SAME REAL ESTATE CONVEYED TO GRANTORS HEREIN BY DEED OF RECORD IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, IN DEED BOOK 269, PAGE 62. PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 847 Walnut Cove, Henderson, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): Jerry M. Hammonds and Myrtle B. Hammonds OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: MERS/Countrywide Homes Loans The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular us or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Rubin Lublin Suarez Serrano TN LLC, Substitute Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38103 www.rubinlublin.com/property-listings.php Tel: (888) 890-5309 Fax: (404) 601-5846 Ad #6684:


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