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Chester County Take Us With You, Page 1-B B Thursday

OCTOBER 20, 2011 147th YEAR - NO. 24

chestercountyindependent.com

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Blackburn to be in town on Saturday morning

City approves plans to expand parking capacity in City Park

Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn will be in Henderson at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22. She will hold an open meeting upstairs at Henderson City Hall. Everyone is invited to attend and meet the Congresswoman.

the established budget. The Staff Writer City of During the Henderson Thursday, Oct. received a 13, meeting of grant of the Henderson $100,000 to Board of Mayor begin work on and Aldermen the project, and the board disoriginally cussed plans to planned to expand and match the repave the grant; however, parking lot at the total projGene Record ect cost has Memorial Park. been estimated R a n d y at $220,000, McKinnon of which is T M L RANDY MCKINNON $20,000 over Associates budget. addressed the Although board to Mayor Bobby announce the King was out of result of the town for the bids, which meeting, he were opened a d v i s e d earlier in the Chairman Pro day. Martin Tem Keith P a v i n g Smith to proCompany from ceed with the M e d i n a project. Once received the work on the contract, havparking lot is ing bid complete, it $176,359 to will include 130 complete the paved parking paving project. RANDY NELSON places. The remaining The City currently has phases of the project include added drainage, clearing under- $12,000 in the city park fund brush, and work to prevent ero- that has not been earmarked for anything in the 2011-2012 budgsion. According to McKinnon, et, and board members have Martin Paving was well within See CITY, Page 3-A

Christmas Parade set for Dec. 1 The annual Henderson Christmas Parade, sponsored by the Henderson/Chester County Chamber of Commerce, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1. For further information, or to enter a float in the parade, call the Chamber office at 9895222.

Crime Stoppers offers reward in B&B burglary Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for a recent theft at B&B Outdoors, 713 Hwy 45 S. All callers remain anonymous. If you have information, call 989-2449 or 9895404.

UMW host Chocolate Fantasy United Methodist Women will host Chocolate Fantasy at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, in the First United Methodist Church gymnasium. This program is to support Gleaners House. There will be finger foods and chocolate desserts of all kinds. Donations are requested in lieu of selling tickets. The Dirt Pilgrims band is providing entertainment. The Gleaner’s House is an outreach ministry of the FUMC that provides help with groceries, utility bills, and holiday boxes to members of the community who are in need.

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion Right to Know Obituaries What’s Happening Take Us With You Sports Education Classifieds

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TODAY’S WEATHER

By Mary Mount Dunbar

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

City Recorder Jim Garland (left) and Alderman Tim Faulkner study the plans for the expansion and repaving of the parking lot at Gene Record Park. The expansion will increase the parking lot capacity to 130 paved parking places.

EMA hosts storm spotter class Thursday By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Chester County Emergency Management Agency will hold a SKYWARN Advanced Weather Spotter Class at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20 (today), at Fire Station No. 1 on Sanford St. The public is encouraged to attend this important class. According to EMA Director Johny Farris, “It is really important to the community to have as many trained spotters as possible. We would like to see as many people as can attend [this class].” A press release from SKYWARN states: “The effects of severe weather are felt every year by many Americans. To obtain critical weather information, NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with nearly 290,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service.” Farris believes that a welltrained and enthusiastic group of storm spotters is imperative for the county. “They’re the early warning system,” he said. “A spotter might be out in an area where a storm is gaining power in the county, and they might be able to warn people ahead of time.” He emphasizes that storm spotters are not to be confused with storm chasers. The purpose of a spotter is to recognize the warning signs of severe weather and spread the word that a storm is approaching.

They should always seek shelter when a storm is becoming severe. Farris hopes to eventually have enough storm spotters to organize a group and qualify Chester County as “Storm Ready.” About SKYWARN®: Although SKYWARN® spotters provide essential information for all types of weather haz-

ards, the main responsibility of a SKYWARN® spotter is to identify and describe severe local storms. In the average year, 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 5,000 floods and more than 1,000 tornadoes occur across the United States. These events threatened lives and property. Since the program started in the 1970s, the information provided by SKYWARN® spotters,

coupled with Doppler radar technology, improved satellite and other data, has enabled NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings for tornadoes, severe thunderstorms and flash floods. Who is Eligible? NWS encourages anyone with an interest in public service and See EMA, Page 3-A

RAM clinic opens at 6 a.m. Oct. 22 Doors for the Remote Area Medical (RAM) free clinic at Chester County Junior High School will open at 6 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, and again on Sunday, Oct. 23. Those needing medical care should arrive early because numbers will begin being handed out at 3:30 a.m. each morning. No patients will be seen without a number. Services are free regardless of insurance status or county or state of residence. There are no eligibility requirements. The clinic will provide dental services such as cleanings, fillings and extractions; vision services including an eye exam and free prescription glasses made on site; and also general medical consultations. No medication will be dispensed during the clinic. If patients need medication or follow up care, they will be referred to local doctors. This event is intended for those without medical insurance or those who are under-insured, unemployed, under-employed, and/or cannot afford to pay. Chester County School Health

Coordinator Heather Griffin anticipates that the clinic could treat somewhere around 800 patients during the twod a y clinic. Because of the volunteer nature of the clinic, monetary donations are being accepted to offset the cost of providing the service. Griffin has estimated that biohazard pickup alone could cost $600, and the clinic has already encountered numerous other expenses. The Remote Area Medical Volunteer Corps is a non-profit, volunteer, airborne relief corps dedicated to serving mankind by providing free health care, dental care, eye care, veterinary services, and technical and educational assistance to people in remote areas of the United States and the world. Founded in 1985, Remote Area Medical® (RAM) is a publicly supported all-volunteer charitable organization. Volunteer doctors, nurses, pilots, veterinarians, and support workers participate in expeditions (at their own

expense) in some of the world’s most exciting places. Medical supplies, medicines, facilities, and vehicles are donated. For more information about the Remote Area Medical® Henderson Clinic, go to www.ramusa.org or call Health Coordinator Heather Griffin at 989-5148 to find out how to volunteer or make a donation. To see how a clinic operates, click the link on the RAM website to watch the 60 Minutes segment filmed at a 2008 RAM clinic.

A brief history of RAM The vision for Remote Area Medical® developed in the Amazon rainforest where founder Stan Brock spent 15 years with the Wapishana Indians. He lived with the pain and suffering created by isolation from medical care. He witnessed the near devastation of whole tribes by what would have been simple or minor illnesses to more advanced cultures. When he left South America to co-star in the television series “Wild Kingdom,” he vowed to find a way to deliver basic medical aid to people in the world’s See RAM, Page 2-A


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Truck spills load on by-pass

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar

The St. Rt. 100 By-pass was the site of yet another overturned semi-truck on the afternoon of Monday, Oct. 17. According to an accident report from the Henderson Police Department, an 18-wheeler was traveling east near the Stewart Street intersection when the driver, William C. Carrington, 52, of Princeton, Ky., ran off the right-hand side of the road while negotiating a curve. The 2011 Peterbilt overturned and skidded on its side for several yards, spilling much of its load of wood chips along the embankment. Sergeant Ricky Hardy investigated the accident and found no violations, which would have contributed to the situation. The truck was owned by Chad Howton Trucking from Princeton, Ky. Carrington was not seriously injured in the accident.

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RAM inaccessible regions. The organization was founded in 1985, and years of research and planning yielded a vast, carefully developed network of men and women who have come together to make RAM a highly mobile, remarkably efficient relief force. Volunteers are doctors, nurses, and technicians who go on expeditions at their own expense and treat hundreds of patients a day under some of the

worst conditions imaginable. Volunteers have provided general medical, surgical, eye, and dental

care to tens of thousands of people with 60 percent of the expeditions serving rural America.

“A Field of Flags” to fly As a celebration of Veteran’s Day, American “A Field of Flags” will fly on the Courthouse lawn Nov. 1-14. Each flag represents the life of a veteran or community leader. All honored will be recognized at a ceremony on Veteran’s Day, Nov. 11, at City Hall. Cost for each flag is $25, and on Nov. 14, each

flag will become the property of the donor. For more information or to request a flag, contact Kim Hearn at Jones Lumber Co. at 989-2363, Monica Lowe at Simmons Lumber Co. at 989-2991, or Janeane Moore at 9897222. All proceeds are earmarked for the Carl Perkins Center. Deadline for ordering flags is Nov. 7.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

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City elected to put that money toward the amount the project will come in over budget. Alderman Johny Farris motioned to move forward with the paving project, and the board voted unanimously to continue. Grant underwriter Randy Nelson also approached the board with an announcement about a grant opportunity with which the City had recently been presented. He stated that the Energy

Efficiency Conservation Block grant, which is part of the American Recovery Act, was offering a third round of funds to local governments. Nelson stated that the City of Henderson could apply for up to $100,000 with no match required to make energy efficient improvement to some part of its operations. He proposed that the city move forward with its remote read water meters, which the Utility Department has already started as a self-funded program. Utility Director Mark Elkins stated that the city has $30,000 budgeted for

the remote read water meters, and Nelson added that such a project could be used as leverage for the grant. While a 10 percent fee must be paid to begin the grant process, Farris stated, referring to the grant, “We can find that 10 percent for that kind of money.” With money the City has already allocated for the installation of the meters, if approved the project value will be $130,000, and it must be completed by May 31, 2012. In other business, the board voted to approve R.

Haunted Happenings Trunk or Treat Enville Baptist Church will be having a Trunk or Treat event in their parking lot at 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct.16. There will be games, food and fellowship. Everyone is invited. Old Friendship Baptist Church invites everyone to their Trunk or Treat event in their church parking lot, at 6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy the food, fun and fellowship. No scary costumes please. First Baptist Church in Finger will have a Trunk or Treat from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. Everyone is invited.

Strikes for Tykes: Monster Boo-ling Bash Join us for a frighteningly fun time at Strikes for Tikes: Monster Mash Boo-ling Bash from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Bowling and Skating Family Fun Center in Jackson. It’s sure to be a scream! Strikes for Tikes, sponsored by BancorpSouth, is the largest annual fundraiser for the Therapy & Learning Center. A team consists of four individual members who raise funds prior to the event and present them on event day when teams will enjoy free bowling. There will be food, games and activities for children, and lots of prizes. Each team member who raises $100 or more will receive a free shirt. For more information, or to register your team, contact Beth Koffman at 731-984-2144 or visit www.strikesfortikes.org.

Community Halloween Parties Montezuma Center Halloween Party will begin at 6 p.m., Friday, Oct. 28. There will be a cakewalk, costume contest, hot dogs and trimmings. Remember it is Friday night and not Saturday night, when West Chester is having their Fall Festival.

Haunted Hollows and Houses Deanburg’s 25th Haunted Hollow will be Oct. 20-22, 27-29, and 31. Cost is $6 a person, and concession will be available. On Thursday and Monday nights, ticket sales will stop at 10 p.m. and on Friday and Saturday nights at midnight. Come and have a spooky good time. The Haunted Hills will open at 7 p.m. Oct 21 and 22, for ages 10 and up. It is located on Hwy 45 south of Selmer, just past Pappy Johns BBQ, follow signs. Admission is $5, come if you dare!

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EMA access to communication, such HAM radio, to join the SKYWARN® program. Volunteers include police and fire personnel, dispatchers, EMS workers, public utility workers and other concerned private citizens. Individuals affiliated with hospitals, schools, churches, nursing homes or who have a responsibility for protecting others are also encouraged to become a spotter. How Can I Get Involved? NWS has 122 local Weather Forecast Offices, each with a Warning C o o r d i n a t i o n Meteorologist, who is responsible for administering the SKYWARN® program in their local area. Training is conducted at these local offices and covers: • Basics of thunderstorm development • Fundamentals of storm structure • Identifying potential severe weather features • Information to report • How to report information • Basic severe weather safety Classes are free and typically are about two hours long. To find out when a SKYWARN® class will be conducted in local your area, contact your local Warning C o o r d i n a t i o n Meteorologist at: http://www.stormready.no aa.gov/contact.htm SKYWARN is not a club or organization, however,

in some areas where Emergency Management programs do not perform the function, people have organized SKYWARN groups that work independent of a parent government agency and feed valuable information to the National Weather Service. While this provides the radar meteorologist with much needed input, the circuit is not complete if the information does not reach those who can activate sirens or local broadcast systems. SKYWARN spotters are not by definition “Storm Chasers.” While their functions and methods are similar, the spotter stays close to home and usually has ties to a local agency. Storm chasers often cover

hundreds of miles a day. The term Storm Chaser covers a wide variety of people. Some are meteorologists doing specific research or are gathering basic information (like video) for training and comparison to radar data. Others chase storms to provide live information for the media, and others simply do it for the thrill. Storm Spotting and Storm Chasing is dangerous and should not be done without proper training, experience and equipment. The National Weather Service conducts spotter training classes across the United States, and your local National Weather Service office should be consulted as to when the next class will be held.

Jones Underground as the low bidder for the water main rehabilitation on North Ave. between Third and Fourth Streets. According to estimates, the rehabilitation of the water mains will come in well under the expected $120,000 budget, and the workers were expected to begin right away after approval. Alderman Bobby Barnes abstained from voting on the bid, citing a family connection, but the board reached unanimous approval to accept the bid and begin work. Henderson Fire Station No. 1 will soon be receiving a facelift. After several months of discussion, the board accepted the bid of Richard West Painting,

LLC, to paint the interior of the fire station, which has sustained water damage. The board also approved Utility Director Elkins’ request to hire two temporary workers to help install gas lines. He stated that he is currently shorthanded and has numerous customers who are ready to be hooked up to the gas line. “What we’re faced with right now as a result of expanding our gas system is a number of customers that are looking to have this service,” Elkins said. “We’re looking at 75 applications [for gas service], and I have one crew leader who is out with an injury. I don’t believe I have

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enough staff to install all of these services. If we can get two a day, we’re looking at 40 days, which is putting us well into winter.” The board determined that the temporary workers could be hired through a temporary placement service and would provide the City with approximately 90 days of work. In the ongoing discussion about portable outdoor storage containers, known as PODS, the board decided to have the committee assigned to study the situation reevaluate the City’s plans on the issue, and the board will hold a public hearing in December regarding PODS.

East Jackson medical center to offer free clinical breast exams Don’t be tricked; treat yourself to a free clinical breast exam that might help save your life! The East Jackson Family Medical Center invites all women to take advantage of this free breast exam from 8 a.m. until noon on Saturday, Oct. 29. The Tennessee Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program representatives will be on site to enroll qualified patients. Schedule an appoint-

ment now by calling the East Jackson Family

Medical Center at 5416864.


Life & Style

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Thursday, October 20, 2011

Jacks Creek Community Club News By Shelley Pusser Plans are being made for our annual Fall Festival for Friday, Nov. 4. We will once again be serving turkey and dressing as our meal. Take outs will be available beginning at 4 p.m. Tickets will be on sale through Oct. 28. There will be prizes for students who sell the most meal tickets. Please support Jacks Creek Elementary students in

this effort. Second and third grade students will be able to hear the Standards on Thursday. Kindergarten and first-graders look forward to a field trip to the Circle Y ranch on Thursday. Thanks to all of the parents and guardians that attended Parent-Teacher conferences. We appreciate the support of our parents and community.

Happy Belated Birthday wishes go to Wesley Roland on Oct. 15; Robert Edward Smith, Debbie Bishop, and Tessa Hart on Oct. 16; Jimmy Jones, Mattie O’Neal, and Aiden Riley Culpepper on Oct. 17. Happy Birthday wishes to Debbie Finley on Oct. 20; Billy Canaday on Oct. 22; Kasey Martin and Wes Hutcherson on Oct. 23; Jill Keen on Oct. 25; Noah Keen and Larry Gilbert on

Oct. 26. Happy Belated Anniversary to Kelley and April Collins on Oct. 14. Happy Anniversary to Joe and Gilda Norman on Oct. 26. The Enville Baptist Church will have a Halloween “Trunk or Treat” in their parking lot at 5:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 30. All children are invited. The Enville Community Center will have their Halloween “Trick or Treat” at 6 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 31. All children are invited. Anyone who wishes to hand out candy, is welcome to come and setup before 6 p.m. Mark your calendars for the Thanksgiving meal for our Veteran’s and Elderly

Zachary Thomas Bowman Celebrates 3rd Birthday Zachary Thomas Bowman, son of Tracy and Ashley McCorkle Bowman, celebrated his third birthday on Oct. 2 with an Under Construction birthday party with family and friends. Zachary’s grandparents are Jerry and Anita McCorkle, Leonna Bowman and the late A. L. Bowman. Great-grandparents are Georgia Beene and the late B. W. Beene, and the late Tom and Maurine McCorkle.

The breakfast went well; everyone loves to come to the big country breakfast. Thanks to those who helped with this very important event. The Center’s big mop bucket has disappeared. If someone knows what has happened, please return the mop bucket to the Center, we need it. I made a mistake in the date for the Montezuma Halloween Party; it will be on Friday night, Oct. 28, not Saturday night, Oct. 29, when West Chester is having their Fall Festival. Please remember this important change. The party will begin at 6 p.m. with hot dogs and trimmings, a costume party and a cakewalk. Members we need your help with the cakewalk and cakes. Old Friendship Church will have a Trunk and Treat Halloween Night from 6-8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31, with free hot dogs and trimmings. Little ones are welcome. No scary cos-

tumes. Dues are now due and payable to the Center. Betty Cooper has pears; if anyone wants them give her a call at 989-7834. Virginia and David Morrison Class of 1945 gathered at Jacks Restaurant for lunch. Fourteen members attended, with Illinois being the furthest anyone came from. David and Virginia married out of this class, and are still married. Sunday afternoon a beautiful Wedding Tea honoring Miss Anna Whitman was held at First Baptist Church. Anna will be married to Chad Turner in November. A good number of family and friends attended. Fall break was a pleasant break for my family. We were in the mountains and attended Dollywood. A good time was had, and the trees were just beginning to turn. On our prayer list are Dorothy Sue Hearn, Wayne Rinks, Summa Herring, Buster Beshires, Larry Lard, Dobber Dyer, Don Ellis family, Winna Knipper family and Kim Knipper Ross. Call Wanda Cook (9893724) or Celia Murley (989-5300) with your news.

There will be a ham and bean dinner at Hickory Corner Community Center on Saturday, Oct. 22. The plate will cost $5 and includes white beans and pinto beans cooked with ham, slaw, onion, Mexican cornbread and regular cornbread, tea and dessert. Around 1 p.m., there will be a cakewalk. Everyone is invited. There will be a meeting at the Center at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20, to finalize the plans for the bean dinner. If you have presold meal tickets and cannot attend this meeting, call Linda (989-5987) or me (989-3315) with the

number of tickets you have sold, we need a count of sold tickets. Return all tickets you have not sold. Members, we need cakes for the dessert table and for the cakewalk. Your support is appreciated. Those celebrating birthdays are Ilain Davidson on Oct. 17; Terry Smith on Oct. 19; Libby King on Oct. 22; Charles Whittman, Josephine Smith and Sonny Gray on Oct. 23; Dave Shores on Oct. 24; Amber Clayton on Oct. 30; and Chad Smith on Oct. 31. Happy anniversary to Jerry and Teresa Weaver on Oct. 31. I need to correct an error in last week’s column, our grandson Josh is from Crownpoint, Ind., not Crownpoint, Tenn. As always, pray for the sick, our military and our country. Have a great week!

News from the City

By Gloria Holiday Hello to everyone! This is a new day and a new week. The chill of the fall is in the air. I hope you had a wonderful week. My family and I had a great one. My girls took me shopping; I can remember when I used to take them to the mall. To all parents: enjoy your children, love them, and take of them. Remember the Free Medical Care, Oct. 22-23 at Chester County Junior High. This is a great opportunity for any who do not have insurance, but the service is available for anyone. So get up on Saturday morning early

and be there by 3:30 a.m. This is your chance to receive free medical, dental and vision care. Starting on Tuesday, Oct. 18, at 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m., and every Tuesday and Thursday, there will be tutoring for math, reading, science, and social studies at North Chester School, 186 Luray Ave. This is designed to help children that are struggling in any of those subjects. If you would like for your child to attend any of these sessions and need a ride please call Shirley Wilson (989-8031 or 6087572). Mark your calendar for 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. The Chester County Democrats will have a BBQ fund-raiser dinner, Mike McWherter, is the keynoter speaker, at Chester County High School cafeteria. There will be live music and door prizes. The dinner is $6

Izaiah Christopher Armstrong Celebrates First Birthday Izaiah Christopher Armstrong, son of Tanisha and Christopher Armstrong, celebrated his first birthday on Monday, Sept. 26, with an Incredible Hulk theme party. His brothers are Antaveon Swift, Christian Swift, and his sister is Alexis Armstrong. The grandparents are Ricki and Gladys Armstrong and Willette Wilson and Rodney Walker. The great-grandparents are Memphis and the late Jack Barham and Maragret and William Trice. at the Enville Community Center at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 1. Everyone is invited to attend. Enville Volunteer Fire Department would like to say “Thank You” to everyone who came out in support of their fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 8; everyone who brought cakes for the

cake walk; and to Wanda Finley for helping out in the kitchen. Thought for the week: Ability is of little use, without opportunity to use it. Have a great week and remember if you have something to share, call me at 989-0212.

per person. You can pay at the door or you can call 608-6132 for tickets. Chester County Head Start is still accepting applications for 3- and 4year-olds. For more information, call 989-2561 or 989-5111. On Oct. 10, Columbus Day, the Brown family, Henry and Jackie, had a wonderful dinner for their son Ellis Brown who was home on leave for a few days. Ellis is in the Army, his duty station is in Fort Knox, Ky., and is deployed in Afghanistan. The best news of all is there were wedding bells in the air while he was here. My little nephew Ellis had asked Gabrielle DeHart for her hand in marriage. Gabrielle had said, “Yes.” And on Oct. 8, 2011, they were married. Gabrielle is stationed in Mannheim, Germany, and will be deployed to Iraq. The City would like to say congratulations to this young couple who is serving our Country, and may the Lord protect you and keep you

safe. Happy 22nd anniversary to Marles and Sylvia Flowers. They celebrated it on Oct. 10. On the birthday list this week: Any one that had a birthday and did not let me know. Let’s keep in our prayers our loved ones in the hospitals, the sick in their homes, our children, teachers, family, and the men and women that are serving our country. Remember to pray for our United States of America. Do not forget to patronize our local businesses here in town. Let’s support our own as much as we can. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City I need to hear from you, call me at 989-1907 and leave your message, or you may email me gloria__holiday@msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

CCHS Class of 1950 Reunion

The 1950 Chester County High School Class Reunion was held Oct. 1 at Whiskers Restaurant. Those attending included, front row from left: Joy Caraway Koffman, Sue Canada Poff, Bernice Cox Maness, Earlene Tucker Higgins, Patsy Stewart Steed, Mary Doris Frye Dugas, and Mary Lee Farris Frye; second row: Lee Nell Stanfill King, Betty Pusser Martin, Virginia Mitchell Cary, and Doris Barton Maness; third row: Billie Hooper Mollyhorn, Clara Vickers Wheatly, Carmen Faye Deming Hatch, JoAnn McAdams Wagner, and Mary Tull Weaver; fourth row: Wayne Cooper, Lynn Grooms, Jeff Hutcherson, Lindsey Patterson, and Betty Parrish Haggard; and back row: Nick Powers, J. C. Butler, Jim Steed, and Bobby Ingraham.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

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Treat yourself - Don’t wait for Christmas to enjoy gingerbread If you’re like me, when you think of gingerbread, your thoughts race forward to Christmas and gingerbread houses. Those holiday beauties are great decorations, but most of the time they don’t taste very good. Either the paste used to hold them together is inedible or they sit out on the table until they are hard and stale. Sometimes gingerbread men accompany a tray of Christmas cookies, but why save this fragrant treat for the holidays only? The warm spices that flavor the gingerbread are perfect for anytime during autumn, and you could even serve gingerbread during Halloween or at Thanksgiving. Since this week’s recipe is perfect for muffins, I reject the concept of serving gingerbread only during Christmas. These muffins are perfect for any time of year, but they are especially tasty during the fall

when we crave the heady combinations of cinnamon, ginger and molasses. The accompanying glaze is delicious, but if you’re looking to save a few calories, it’s easy to eliminate the last step and serve the muffins on their own. They are full of flavor and sweet enough to eat for dessert without the need of any glaze or frosting. However, a light glaze and a piece of crystallized ginger make a beautiful presentation, so it doesn’t hurt to indulge from time to time. Make these for dessert, snacks or any party this fall. You’ll be glad that you didn’t wait until December to enjoy a taste of the holidays. As a matter of fact, I may include a few mini-gingerbread

muffins in my holiday treat tins that I share with family and friends, in addition to making a few more batches just to celebrate the season. It’s almost time for holiday parties to get into full swing, and this is the time to start planning. The Independent is looking for readers’ favorite holiday recipes to include in our “Best of – Holiday Recipes” section, which will be published at Thanksgiving. We need our readers’ participation, so start sending them in now. Email your favorite or best holiday recipes to mdunbar@chestercountyindependent.com or mail them to Chester County Independent c/o Mary Dunbar, P.O. Box 306, Henderson, TN 38340.

Gingerbread muffins

Hello everyone. I hope you all have had a great week. I am still enjoying this weather and not having to run the central unit after the big bills this summer. I know it is just a matter of days until we’ll have to start the heat though. Get well wishes to: Sylvia (Deming) Heard, Nella Rush, Joyce Stockton, Tommy Landers, Marjorie Hopper, Maedith Hopper, Tom Hooper, Winna Knipper, Larry Privett, Kaylie Knipper, Brenda King, and Kim Ross. Please call me if you know of someone that needs our prayers. Our friend Bud Futrell that has been on my list

passed away Oct. 15. Please pray for his wife Nancy and family. They have two daughters and several grandchildren. He was a wonderful man and faithful Christian that loved his family and friends. Many people will miss him. He was a member of Malesus Baptist Church. We lived next door to Bud and Nancy in the mid ‘80s in Watlington Woods Subdivision in south Jackson. He was a great neighbor and friend and was always helping if he saw something that needed to be done like mowing the yard. He would just come on over when he mowed his and got ours too. He always had chewing gum in his pocket for the kids. I was told they called him the chewing gum man at church. Haunted Hollow will be Oct. 20-22, 27-29 and 31. Cost is $6 a person, and concession will be available. Come and have a spooky good time.

Come join us at Bethel Baptist Church (125 St. Rt. 125) at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, for gospel music. Bobby Bowen and family will be there from Madison. There will be no admission charge but a love offering will be taken. Don’t miss a good night of gospel music and worshiping the Lord. The birthdays this week are Curtis Lynch on Oct. 21; Cora Talbot on Oct. 22; and Mike Mays and Britney Goff on Oct. 23. I hope you all have a very happy day. Count your life by smiles, not tears. Count your age by friends, not years. Quote of the week: “When guilt rears its ugly head confront it, discuss it and let it go. The past is over. It is time to ask what can we do right, not what did we do wrong. Forgive yourself and move on.” Bernie S. Siegel The average movie ticket price in 1975 was $2.05; by 2008, the aver-

age ticket cost was $7.18. - Provided by The World Almanac 2011 Always laugh when you can. It is cheap medicine. Call me at 879-9777 with birthdays, anniversaries, deaths, weddings, or any event you want to announce.

This area has had a lot of sorrow these last few days, and we want to express our deepest sympathy to the families and friends of Jane Huff, Mary Ann Faulkner, Willa Mae Haskins, Charles Cearley, Vickie Johnson and Roy Allen “Pete” Williams. On our prayer list this week are Mary Faye Brewer, LaVerne Lott, Charles and Loretta Haggard, Joanne Sells, Frenzola Morris,

Josephine Hinson, Phil Butler, Shirley Gaddy, Faye Tucker, Gathel Latham, John Kent Sells, Jean Latham, Dianne Wells, Bobbie Nell Wells, Lisa Peddy, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Shirley Rietl, Pam Priddy, Joanne Altier, Rachel and Gayle Ellington, Allen Miller Jr., Randy Miller, Sharon Dailey, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. May God bless you all. Happy anniversary to Jamie and Dana Berry on Oct. 23. Birthday greetings to Desireé Brown, Dianne Wells and Kevin Hooper on Oct. 23; Sue Connor, Ruth Reddin and Brian Duck on Oct. 24; Lee Nell King, Mary Taylor, Bobbie Turner and Betty Haggard

on Oct. 26; and Amber Reddin Carter and Richard Lee McIntyre on Oct. 27. The Bain reunion was held at the New Friendship Community Center Oct. 9 with 51 attending, all relatives of Pharo and Margaret Bain. A potluck meal was served at noon and the afternoon was spent visiting and talking, especially with the new ones we haven’t seen in a while. It was a very enjoyable day. Those attending were Allen A. Arnold, Charles and Clessie Stovall, Lloyd and Lee Nell King, Earl and Leandra Martin, Donnie Bain, Bennie Bain, Charles and Loretta Haggard, Frances Arnold Young, Art and Gail Bain, Owen and Doris McKinney, Curt, Paula,

Meghan and Mallory McKinney, Darla Gaugh, Bailee Stewart, Neil and Lori Gaugh, Lee and Tiffany Gaugh, Kenneth Simpson, Thomas Kendrick, Conard Jeter, Frances Cooksey, Bessie Sadler, Clara Matthews, Ashley, Brandon, Zackery, Kisha, Kelsey and Kendall Longmire, Dan Bain, Penny and Pamela Bates, Dorothy Young, Bobby and Shirley Brien, Wendell and Syble Holder, Terry and Holly Holder, Joyce Hart, and Brandie and Aleigha Jones. Our quote for the week – “You don’t have to look far to see a miracle. What could be more supernatural than a caterpillar turning in to a butterfly, an egg yolk into a chicken and an acorn into a mighty oak?”

Ingredients: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 ½ teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 ½ teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt ½ cups (1 stick) unsalted butter 1 cup molasses ¾ dark brown sugar 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger, peeled (can substitute 2 teaspoons ground ginger) ¾ cup milk 2 large eggs Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray muffin pans with baking spray or insert approximately 18 muffin cup liners into pans. Mix flour, cinnamon, ground ginger, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl. In a medium saucepan, melt butter

over medium heat. Add molasses, brown sugar and ginger root (or ground ginger). Cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and whisk in milk and eggs. Slowly whisk in flour mixture until batter is smooth. Pour batter into muffin cups, filling evenly about two-thirds full. Bake 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into centers comes out clean. Do not over bake. Cool muffins in pan for 20 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to finish cooling. Ginger glaze (optional) In a small bowl, whisk together until smooth 1 ¼ cups confectioners’ sugar, 2 tablespoons lemon juice and ½ teaspoon lemon zest. Spoon glaze over tops of warm – not hot – muffins. Top with crystallized ginger to taste. Allow glaze to set before serving.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Only Yesterday From the files of the Chester County Independent October 23, 1941 “Chester County Sends 73 To Army First Year” With the first anniversary of the Selective Service Act just passed, Chester County Selective Service Board announces that 73 men had been sent to Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., for induction during the first year's operation of the Act. … However, records of the board revealed that 64 of this 73 had been accepted for military training with nine receiving rejection slips upon arrival at the induction center. The local board also announced that 19 Chester county youths had volunteered for Army service during the past year. “County Farmers Will Gather Here Oct. 24” The nation-wide effort to enlist farmers in the food for defense program will be presented to farmers of Chester County soon, according to County Agent N. S. Martin. The Chester County Defense Board has called a meeting of representatives of all agricultural agencies ... to be held in the courthouse ... Oct. 24, for the purpose of discussing the quotas that Chester County has been asked to meet. Every farmer in Tennessee will be given the opportunity to enroll in the “Food For Freedom” drive between now and Dec. 1 by making a farm plan to increase production of foods to meet the defense needs of this country and others resisting aggression. “Local Groups Sew On Red Cross Work” Mrs. Leonard Cherry, chairman of the sewing committee, of the Chester County Red Cross, makes the following statement: The Red Cross materials have been received and have been cut and most of the garments have been placed in homes in town and the surrounding county to be made. Many of them have been returned ready to ship. We have cut 50 hospital bed shirts, 20 operating gowns, 40 boys shirts, 12 ladies dresses, 60 girls dresses, and most of the items for 50 layettes. The Garden Club has placed sewing machines in the City Hall and will sew there each Friday until work is finished. Any club or community that would like to sew there, can do so by making appointment with the chairman. The Sew and So Circle met on Thursday in the home of Mrs. Leonard Cherry and sewed until 1 o'clock then went to the home of Mrs. J. W. Garland for fried chicken dinner, sewing again through the afternoon. Mrs. Moffitt, chairman of the knitting, is anxious for all ladies who will knit to get in touch with her, as we are very much behind with the knitting, and we feel that everyone should be glad to do their part at this time. “Independent Circulation Sets Record” Without aid of premiums, contests or cut prices, the circulation of the Chester County Independent has established a new high record for its 20 years existence. The paper has been doubled in size – where four pages were formerly printed, we now publish eight – and our news coverage of the county has been greatly extended by increasing the number of reporters in rural districts three-fold. Thousands of families in the Henderson territory have been mailed sample copies the past two weeks and their appreciation of a county paper of the type now being published is reflected by the quick response in adding several hundred new subscribers to our subscription list. Advertisers and business leaders of the City of Henderson and Chester County have shown their appreciation of the new, larger and improved paper by according it the best volume of advertising support in its history. A newspaper is the mirror of life for the community it serves. The standard of the community is universally judged by the standard of its newspaper. It is the aim of the publisher to produce the very best newspaper possible each week, consistent with cost and revenues from advertising, circulation and job printing. All we ask is that the citizens and business interests give proper financial support and we in turn will continue to produce an ever larger and better publication each week.

Chester County Independent archives, Oct. 19, 1951

Chester County Independent archives, Oct. 19, 1951

We all are justly proud of our town and county. Cooperate with us to produce a newspaper worthy of the town and county it serves. October 19, 1951 “Cotton Ginning Report Is Given” Census report shows that 3,483 bales of cotton were ginned in Chester County from the crop of 1951 prior to Oct. 1 as compared with 513 bales for the crop of 1950, according to Hubert L. Seaton, special agent for the U. S. Department of Commerce. “Births” Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie Lee Melton of Enville are the proud parents of a daughter born Oct. 6 at Webb-Williamson Hospital. She has been given the name, Lesa Dianne. Dr. H. D. Farthing Mr. and Mrs. Owen Wells of Pinson, announce the birth of a daughter, Betty Jo, on Oct. 10. “Freed-Hardeman Activities” By Dean Rhodes On Friday of last week, the students and faculty of Freed-Hardeman College took a holiday trip to Shiloh National Park. Several places of interest were visited consisting of the National Cemetery, Shiloh Church, Bloody Pond, Sunken Road, and the Hornet's Nest where Albert Sidney Johnson was wounded and later died. At noon, the group ate lunch at Ed Shaw's restaurant near the park area and visited Pickwick Dam in the afternoon. October 20, 1961 “Todd-Mason Evangelistic Team Sets Services Here” The Todd-Mason Evangelistic team of Clayton, Okla., is slated to conduct a oneweek revival crusade at the Christian Church, beginning ... Oct.23, announced Lewis P. Mason, Minister of the congregation. The team will feature the song directing and baritone solos of Lowell Mason, noted as the “World's Smallest Gospel Singer.” Cecil Todd, nationally known Evangelist will be the speaker each evening for the campaign. Mr. Todd is the Director of the Christian Evangelizers Assn. Tent Revival Crusades. A huge Gospel Tent Cathedral with a 2,000 seating capacity has been overflowed on many occasions. Some of the sermon subjects to be delivered by Evangelist Cecil Todd will include, “Four Things Hell Has – Henderson Needs!”; “What Happens Five Minutes After Death?”; “Henderson's Most Horrible Sin!”; etc. A Youth Round-up Program will be directed by the team each evening at 6:45 for all youth ages 5 through high school. “13 Leaders Enroll In Second 4-H Leadership In-Depth Course” Thirteen volunteer leaders from Chester County have enrolled in the second basic course of leadership training in-depth weekly meetings held on Tuesday nights at the Skylark Restaurant. Those enrolled are: Janice Bingham, Larry Bingham, Mrs. Ray Bingham, Janice Coady, Newton Hodges, Nancy Wells and May Wheatley from the Jacks Creek 4-H Club, Travis and Jean Jones from Old Friendship club, Gerald and Geraldine Stanfill from Mifflin Club and Kenneth Stumph from Phillips Club. After attending the basic course, the leaders will have a better understanding of 4-H club work in the county and will be better equipped to assist with the 4-H club program. Graduation will be held on ... Nov. 14. This event will be held at Coatney's Restaurant on Hwy. 100 past Jacks Creek. At this time, there will be a reunion with the graduates of last years first basic course. October 21, 1971 “Continental Southern Seeks To Discontinue Henderson Bus Service” Continental Southern Bus Lines has filed a petition with the Tennessee Public Service Commission seeking to abandon bus routes linking Henderson with Memphis and Parsons. The petition specifically states the bus company has petitioned the PSC “to discontinue service and relinquish its operating rights as follows: Over Tennessee Highway 100, via Henderson and Decaturville, and extending from the intersection of Highway 18 and 100 northeast of Bolivar to Parsons.” Mrs. Frank VanDyke, bus station manager here said discontinuing the bus service would work a real handicap on travelers as well as shippers. She said at the present time approximately $1,000 in bus fares are collected here as well as untold express shipments to and from the city. The petition will be heard in Nashville on

See Only, Page 7-A

By Russell Epperson Columnist

Have you heard the recent news story about Mr. Fauja Singh? This man recently completed his eighth marathon. That is remarkable in and of itself, but when you take into account that he did not run his first marathon until his 89th birthday, you begin to see the enormity of his accomplishments. Now, brace yourself for this--he recently ran his eighth marathon at the young age of 100! Wow. That was my first reaction when I read this news story. Mr. Singh contributes his health and longevity to a life free of tobacco and alcohol, as well as a vegetarian diet combined with an active lifestyle. He walks or runs around 10 miles a day and sees no reason to slow down. I love reading stories like Mr. Singh’s. It gives me a reason to get out of bed on a nice cold winter day and strap on my running shoes to hit the road

if I’m feeling brave, or the treadmill if the weather is too severe. It’s stories like these that motivate people to do things they once thought impossible. How many of our grandparents would even think it remotely possible to get out and run one mile today, much less 26.2? I believe our society is slowly beginning to see that just because we age does not mean we have to stop being active. In previous generations, the work on the farm meant that you were active whether you wanted to be or not. You worked or you didn’t eat. Today we live in a different culture and many times must find ways to stay active that have nothing to do with our jobs. Is it time you decided to get off the couch and begin an exercise/running program? My guess is that Mr. Singh did not just decide one day to run a marathon and hit the road

RUSSELL EPPERSON

“Bus line seeks to abandon route through Henderson”

Living Well

for a quick 19-mile training run. He started out by walking. Walking is one of the best exercises for the general population. It’s fairly easy on the joints and actually helps lubricate them. It’s tough for me to want to be lazy and sit on the couch at the ripe old age of 36 when I know in the back of my mind that a 100-year-old is out running marathons! Thanks, Mr. Singh, for making me feel guilty enough to get me moving! Hopefully, he will have several more opportunities to enjoy running before he runs into the sunset. Let’s take this motivational story to heart and get busy living well!

Attention all ladies: Save the date, Nov. 19 Chester County Coordinated School Health and the Chester County High School Drama Department are preparing for the second annual “Ladies Day Out”! The day will begin at 8:30 a.m. with workshops geared towards women’s issues and will conclude after the 3 p.m. production

Our community has increased by two. Congratulations to Chris and Tiffany (Tedford) Dickey on the birth of their first child, Caitlin Faith, who was born Oct. 10. She weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces and was 20 inches long. Congratulations also to Todd Terry and Nicole Parker who welcomed a daughter, Emma Tay, born Oct. 11. She weighed 9 pounds 2 ounces, and was 19 inches long. Brittany Carson and the Kevin Faulkner family were among a group of approximately 18 families from the surrounding area who recently returned from a Disney Cruise. The comments I hear are that the trip was great and awesome. While Brittany was on the cruise her sister, Hannah, bagged a doe at the Kentucky Juvenile Hunt with her cousin Scotty. Remember to get your recipes for the Faith, Hope and Love cookbook mailed to Susan Blatchford, 330 Rinks Lane, Enville, TN 38332. Proceeds will go to the food ministry. The Mossberg 12gauge pump shotgun, model 88, will be given away Nov. 12. For a $1 donation, you will have a chance to win. If you wish to see the gun, it is at Robertson Pawn and Jewelry. You may get tickets there or from Neal Kinchen, Starla Peddy, JoAnn Greer, Sherri Fletcher. Proceeds will go to the food ministry. Photos to be included in the Sweetlips DVD are due by Saturday, Oct. 29.

of “Annie”. Reserve tickets now, cost is $15 each. Each ticket includes workshops, lunch with the “Cancer Queens,” a women’s expo featuring products and services by and for the ladies, and the presentation of “Annie.” Keep an eye on the Chester County

Independent for more detailed information such as session topics and a fun game you may be interested in playing. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to celebrate YOU! To reserve tickets, contact Chester County High School at 989-8125 or Heather Griffin at 9895148.

The three categories are: Yesteryear, Kids in the Country, and Today. For more information, call JoAnn Greer at 989-7523. A very special thanks to all those who worked so tirelessly at the food handout in Magic Valley on Oct. 8. Without all the volunteers with servant’s hearts, these events would be impossible to pull off. Happy birthday to Pamela McCord and Megan Lewis on Oct. 23; Nicole Parker, Maggie Grace Huckaby on Oct. 24; Noah Keen on Oct. 26; and Caleb Russell, Doug Dunn, Bryan Keen and Sheila Lyles on Oct. 27. Happy anniversary to Benji and Jessica Huckaby,

Oct. 21; Jimmy and Teresa Tedford, Oct. 24; and Randy and Sandy Morris, Oct. 27. On our prayer list are Betty Stout, Bill Kinchen, Ora Lea Barham, Billy Connor, Summer Maples, Cindy Lewis, Ernie Merriman, Loretta Picket, Danny Parker, Dianne Williams, Chrissy Busby, Molly Russell, Ann Bishop, Beverly Tedford, Samantha Pierson and our military and their families. Our heartfelt sympathy is extended to the family and friends of Don Ellis. If you have news to share, call me at 989-7523. Thought for the week: “God’s grace keeps pace with whatever we face.” Have a great week.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011 Page 7-A

The Miss Henderson pageant will begin at 7 p.m. tonight, Oct. 20, and will feature 33 of Henderson’s young ladies. The pageant will be held at Chester County Middle School Williams Auditorium. Admission is $5 for schoolage children and $3 for adults and children under 5.

Miss Henderson 2011 to be crowned tonight

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

2011 Miss Henderson contestants are Deatra Jones, Allison Gladish, Iesha Sims, Hailey Hopper, Kaelin Yarbrough, Miriah Denton, Bethany Blackstock, Sarah Grace McNeil, Madison Hurst, Paisley Emison, Daela Whited, Jana Frye, Taylor Fortune, Kirsten Henry, Taylor Clayton, Sunny Lloyd, Caitlin Hill, Kelsey Geary, Brittany Rouse, Ashtyn Walker, Adreyana Amos, Courtney Caraway, Elizabeth Bunetta, Morgan Williams, Megan Lewis, Courtney Newsom, Ariel Campbell, Presley Robinson, Katie Hatch, Macee Payne, Peyton Jenkins, and Reneshia Boyd.

West Tennessee wearing blue jeans For stronger, healthier babies People all over West Tennessee will be wearing their favorite pair of blue jeans to support the March of Dimes® mission to improve the health of babies. Blue Jeans for Babies Day is Friday, Nov. 4, and what better way to start off our weekend than wearing your blue jeans to work and helping save babies and prevent birth defects at the same time. It is easy, just contact the March of Dimes office in Jackson to find out how to get your compa-

ny signed up to participate. Information will follow on how to order shirts and buttons for your employees. Once your order is received, the volunteers and staff of the March of Dimes will deliver your order to your office or work place. Then, you will be ready to participate in this area-wide event. “We are inviting everyone to be a part of Blue Jeans for Babies®,” said March of Dimes volunteer, Lisa Dill, Blue Jeans for Babies

Chair for 2011. “This is a great way to spend the day in the comfort of your favorite jeans while working together for stronger, healthier babies.” Funds raised through Blue Jeans for Babies support March of Dimes research and programs that help all moms have full-term pregnancies and healthy babies. For more information about Blue Jeans for Babies, contact the March of Dimes Tennessee Chapter at 668-1023 or visit

www.marchofdimes.com/tennessee. The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide, and its premier event, March of Babies, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com or nacersano.org.

Puppy Personals There are dogs of all sizes and breeds currently awaiting homes at Henderson City Animal Control, and all these would-be pets need to find a new forever home. These dogs each have a limited time to find a home due to the city’s animal control euthanasia policy. Three of the dogs are getting their last chance in the “Puppy

Personals” this week. If you would like a gentle yellow lab or beagle mix, stop by Animal Control as soon as possible. Many of the puppies and adult dogs featured in recent weeks have already been adopted or returned to their owners, so if you see one that you’d like to be your new best friend, don’t wait to drop by and pick

him or her up. The adoption fee is $36, $25 of which is refundable upon confirmation of having your pet spayed or neutered following adoption. The other $11 covers vaccinations at Henderson Animal Clinic. If you would like more information regarding any of these pets, call 989-4628.

Last Chance From Page 6-A

Only Dec.7. “Jaycettes To Sponsor Christmas Pageant” The Chester County Jaycettes will sponsor a “Little Mr. and Miss Christmas Belle” contest here on Dec. 4, a spokesman for the Jaycettes said today. Children aged 3 through 6 will be eligible to enter the contest, the spokesman said, with the winner riding the Christmas float in the annual Christmas parade.

“Many Enter Exhibits In Arts Festival” The Second Annual Chester County Arts and Crafts Festival will be held here Oct. 23. These are some of the displays that will be shown: rock collections, Stanley Smith and Matt Bolton; taxidermy, Odell Hatch; decoupage and dried flower arrangements, Edna Lackie; needlecraft, Mrs. M. Cherry and Miss Martha Evelyn Tomlinson; oil painting, Lloyd Tatum, Linda Essary, Liz Webster, Martha Williams, Delores Ballard and Juanita Young; and photography, Mike Austin.

I might be bug-eyed, but I’m very friendly and lovable. I’d like nothing better than to go home again. All I want is family to love.

Male lab, very well behaved. He loves to be petted and loved on, and would be devoted to the family that included him in their lives. You may be his last chance.

Adult male, very friendly and lovable. He will stick by you to run, play and have a great time or rest on the couch. You could be his last chance.

A Dog’s Last Chance This medium size female looks like she could be a beagle/something mix. She is very sweet and calm, and has a love of belly rubs. She would be a very devoted dog in exchange for love and attention. She is waiting on her new best friend to rescue her. Sponsored by:

Simply Canine Grooming 989-4094 or 608-0312

Sponsor a dog, help save a life

Chester County Independent archives, Oct. 20, 1961

We at the Chester County Independent are committed to running “Puppy Personals” on a weekly basis. However, due to the limited amount of space in each week’s edition, we are often unable to feature each dog in need of a new home. Dogs featured in “Puppy Personals” are waiting at Henderson Animal Control for a loving person to adopt them and offer them a new lease on life. If you would like to sponsor a dog to be featured on this page, contact Trish or Marvin at the Independent at 731989-4624. For the cost of $5 per week (for a minimum of four weeks), sponsors will have their name, name of family members, business, or community organization featured below the picture of a dog that needs a forever home.


Opinion

Page 8-A

Thursday, October 20, 2011

I’m not a crazy cat lady, but my pets are my “fur-kids” I know a lot of people aren’t “pet people,” but I don’t know what I would do without “fur-kids.” When I was little, we had dogs and barn cats. Somehow, the standoffish cats at the barn appealed more to me than the excitable dogs that barked and growled at strangers. As soon as I found out there was a new litter of kittens, I slipped under pallets, between hay bales and even under a bush hog to cuddle the newborn balls of fur. They didn’t always appreciate my dragging them out of their nest, but playing with the kittens was one of my favorite things. One day when my grandfather and I went on a walk, two grey tabbies followed us home. We put out a bowl of food, and they stayed. The two sisters were identical except for their eyes: Mew had brown eyes, while Purr’s were green. They started out as carport cats until some feline spat drove Purr down the road to live in my grandparent’s garage. I lost track of how many litters they each produced, and later, their children produced their own kittens. I’m sure we helped populate half the county with free kittens. When more than one mother had kittens in close proximity, I took it upon myself to try to keep the kittens divvied up between the correct mothers. Whether it was a case of curious kittens or jealous mothers, it never ceased to disturb me to return home and find the kittens with the wrong mothers. Perhaps I was a bit obsessive as a child, but I had to be sure the kittens were properly sorted before I could sleep at night. Eventually, we got the kitten population under control through generous donations of mousers to stables, barns and anyone who wanted a kitten, and instead of spending my time dividing the kittens into their original litters, we were free from cats for awhile, except for Mew and Purr and a few of their children, who were particularly nice or pretty. We had some cuddly indoor lap dogs, but cats have always been my favorites. When I was in college, someone I worked with found a black kitten coated in sap or tar and asked me if I wanted to take him. After getting him cleaned up, which included having his back shaved, I took the motley kitty home with me. He looked so ragged that I named him Andy, after Raggedy Ann’s brother. He nestled in my hair and slept under the covers with me, and when I had to go back to school, he listened while I talked to him on the phone. We also had an understanding that if I told him, I’d “be home Wednesday” he would start looking for me

at the windows a day or two before I came home, even if I wasn’t on Wednesday. By some genetic fluke Mew and Purr, who were both long-tailed mousers, both had Manx kittens. The Manx breed is known for cats with round heads, rabbit-like back legs, and tails that are either short and stumpy or missing altogether. Ever since meeting my first Manx kitten, I’ve had a fondness for them, and when our last Manx cat succumbed to old age, my mother found me a new Manx kitten to keep Andy company. Christabelle has been my constant companion ever since. When my friend Laurel mentioned that no cat she has ever adopted would sleep in bed with her, it surprised me because almost all of my indoor kitties have been cuddlers – sometimes even bed hogs! When Christabelle gets cold, she sometimes will burrow under the cover with me, and if she can’t get under the cover, she curls up in a tight ball on my pillow, right above my head. Something is wrong if a cat or two doesn’t walk on me during the night or cuddle with me while I sleep. Now that Andy is gone, Stryker is my only boy cat, and for some reason, he is the most loving when he knows that I’m upset. If I’m crying, he’ll walk across me and will lie on the bed or couch near me, purring, just to let me know that he’s there. I’ve never understood how people can’t love an animal. Even if it’s not cats or dogs, horses, guinea pigs, rabbits, etc. can all be loving pets. When people don’t make sense, or I’ve had a bad day, my fur-kids are always there. They may demand food and plenty of attention, but they never yell, lie, complain or judge. They never get angry that you didn’t do things their way, and their only deadlines are making sure they have full bowls, clean litter boxes or a walk, and cuddle time. Whether I’ve been gone for an hour, a day, or a whole vacation, my furkids are happy to see me. My favorite time of day is when Christabelle and Spike greet me at the door and Snowbird pokes her furry nose through the stair rail for me to pet her. So what that I have cat hair on my furniture and a few claw snags on the bedspread? Those things can be vacuumed or replaced, but the unconditional love of a pet is irreplaceable. If we had room for a welltrained dog, I’m sure I’d feel the same way. I know I have the same feelings about my mom’s dogs when I “borrow” them for cuddles and puppy kisses. It may not be true for everyone, but for me, life without pets would simply be too cold.

Rise of energy-environment censors in America

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Cal.) wants the Department of Energy to educate the American public about climate change. He thinks too many of us are buffoons when it comes to global warming, the dangers of fossil fuels and the magical benefits of renewable energy. Some people are even downright skeptical. This must be changed – and fast, according to Waxman. “There are powerful vested interests in the oil and coal industries successfully fanning disbelief in the science of climate change,” Waxman wrote in a letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu. “In a recent article, former Vice President Al Gore likened their actions to the efforts of the tobacco companies to sow doubt about the dangers of smoking. We urgently need champions in the [Obama] Administration to tell the American public the truth about the risks we face.” Waxman, who with Congressman Edward Markey (D-Mass.) authored the ill-fated carbon-dioxide cap-and-trade bill of 2008, pointed out survey data that shows a

precipitous decline in the number of Americans who believe climate change is occurring. Many Americans also don’t believe man is the root cause of climate change, and they reject the so-called “scientific consensus” touted in media reports. “I ask you to investigate the disconnection which appears to be growing between the scientific and the public understanding of climate change,” Waxman added in his letter. “I hope you will then decide to lead a national effort to ensure the public is fully and accurately informed about the science of climate change and its implications for human health and welfare.” Taking Waxman’s complaint to the next logical level, what he wants is for Americans who disagree with the theory of manmade climate change to be re-educated so they won’t question, debate, speak against or write in opposition to his opinion or government policy (as he would like to see it established.) The California congressman’s epistle is startling and disturbing. I am

surprised the print media is not having a field day over it. Government education espousing a particular political viewpoint is publicly funded propaganda. The media has long railed against this type of inculcation. Who has the power to decide what “theory” we should believe? The freedoms we are guaranteed under the First Amendment prevent Mr. Waxman, Mr. Chu or any government agency from forcing beliefs on the doubtful, skeptical or merely undecided. What teeth gnashing and furor would result if Mr. Waxman and the DOE had to include disclaimers with all their materials to the effect that manmade climate change is still only a theory being hotly argued by many in the scientific community? This is the only fact we have right now, despite billions of dollars having been thrown into public relations and advocacy campaigns by Al Gore, major environmental nonprofits and NGOs. Whether the critics,

doubters and skeptics are right or wrong, the First Amendment guarantees they can’t be muzzled and censored. But they might be outspent. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s recent pledge of $50 million for a campaign to convince Americans of the reality and danger of global warming is an example of the lengths to which wellheeled true believers will go. Bloomberg also would like to outlaw gun ownership and other rights he sees as unsavory and dangerous to the body politic, despite what you and I think or believe. So when rates for wholesale electricity increase 30-50 percent and we are forced to plug in our cars instead of filling up the gas tanks – those who can afford electricity in the first place – we will look back and realize that a large part of the strategy was to demonize the skeptics, isolate the doubters and brain wash the uncertain. It sounds suspiciously like Nazi Germany or Stalin’s Russia to me.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Bat program scheduled Oct. 27 at Shiloh Shiloh National Military Park will host a program on bats the last Thursday of October, Superintendent Woody Harrell announced. “Bats are a common icon of Halloween, and this time of year would be an opportune time to learn more about them,” Harrell said. The evening program, which will take place on Thursday, Oct. 27, will offer park visitors the opportunity to learn more about these flying mammals. The hour-long program will take place at the

Shiloh Visitor Center and begin at 6 p.m. The program will present the biology and life cycle of these animals, and also discuss common misconceptions that many people have about bats. Participants are encouraged to arrive at least 10 minutes prior to the start of the program. There will be no fee charged to attend the program. Those interested in participating are invited to contact the Shiloh Battlefield Visitor Center at 731-689-5696, or e-mail Shiloh Resource

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT October 3, 2011 A gold 2000 Jeep Cherokee was reportedly stolen from a property on Harmon St. The vehicle has a black luggage rack. October 6, 2011 A cell phone was reported missing from a staff desk at Chester County High School. It was described as a silver and black Verizon LG flip phone valued at $100. October 7, 2011 A diamond ring was reported missing from an apartment on Woodland Dr. The ring was described as a 2.5 carat valued at $5,500. A break-in was reported at a Sanford St. Apartment. According to the report, a witness stated a black male drove up in a Chevrolet Blazer and entered an apartment with a credit card. He was described as tall with a slender build. The resident reported finding nothing missing or damaged at the time of the report. October 9, 2011 A paper prescription slip for 90 Soma was reportedly taken from a N Church, Home Sweet Home Apartment, during the night. A Turner CD player and approximately 300 CDs were reported stolen from an unlocked vehicle on Pinehurst Dr. It was described as black with orange LED lights valued at $150. The CDs were valued at $20 each. A 1990 White Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck was reported missing after having been lent to a friend and never returned. October 10, 2011 A purse was allegedly stolen from a residence on Second St., during a time when several (some unknown) people were present. The purse was black and contained a red and black wallet valued at $10, a Case knife valued at $15, nine dollars cash, 30 Keflex pills valued at $20, 5 Clariton pills valued at $1, 2 Singulair pills valued at $10, and personal identification. October 12, 2011 Two vehicles were reportedly vandalized at Freed-Hardeman University. According to the report, a Jeep Wrangler was seen by FHU security on the street beside the vehicles at the same time a loud nise was heard. The driver’s door mirrors were found broken on each vehicle, with an estimated damage of $100 each. A theft was reported at B&B Outdoors, 713 Hwy 45 S. Damage and a list of missing items is unavailable during investigation.

October 15, 2011 Darryl Alexis Howard, 45, Enville, was arrested and charged with assault. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Samuel Barham, 51, 410 Baughn St., was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester Count jail after posting a $250 bond. Raymond A. Neisler, 33, 342 N Church Ave., was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $250 bond. James Jason Stubblefield, 33, 326 N Church Ave., was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $250 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT October 11, 2011 2:25 p.m. – 144 Hamlet Ave., Freed-Hardeman University, Farrow Hall, tripped smoke alarm. October 12, 2011 8:45 a.m. – 156 E Main St., Freed-Hardeman University, Burks Student Center, false alarm. October 13, 2011 9:07 p.m. – 348 Laura St., car fire. 11:22 p.m. – 358 Laura St., car fire. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT October 10, 2011 A commercial license plate was reported stolen from a truck. A chain link fence on Pump Station Lane was reportedly cut. Vandalism was reported at Mifflin Baptist Church, 8870 Hwy 200. According to the report, witnesses allegedly saw a black vehicle, possibly an older model Trans-Am parked behind the building. They stated they heard glass break, then saw a blonde female in approximately her 20’s break a window. When she realized she had been seen, she allegedly got into the vehicle and drove toward Jackson. Responding deputies reported the presence of beer bottles which had allegedly been thrown through three windows into the building, resulting in $450 in damage. The window on the front door was also damaged, $300 in damage, and gutters were torn down, $100 in damage. Mammie Louise Swafford, 42, Jacks Creek, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdemeanor. She is serving time in the Chester County jail. October 11, 2011

Courtesy photo

Shiloh National Military Park will host a program about bats on Oct. 27. Management Specialist Marcus Johnson at

Marcus_Johnson@nps.go v, to register in advance.

Marcus Samuel Ballard, 55, 618 Luray Ave., was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdemeanor. He was released from the Chester County jail on probation. Josh Moody, 25, Reagan, was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000 to $9,999. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. October 12, 2011 A wallet was reportedly stolen from a vehicle on Jones Lane. According to the report, the wallet contained personal identification, credit cards and $400 in cash. A report was taken concerning a vehicle on Memory Lane, which appeared to have been in a wreck, but according to the owner, he did not know who would have taken the truck. October 13, 2011 Anthony Mosier, 45, 1275 Hurst Road, was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000 to $9,999, vandalism and criminal trespassing. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. October 14, 2011 James Douglas Williams, 48, 597 Sanford Ave., Apt. 201, was arrested and charged with failure to appear and resisting arrest. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,500 bond. October 15, 2011 A dog complaint call was answered in the Hughes Road area. An unoccupied residence on St. Rt. 22A was allegedly burglarized. According to the report, the owner stated someone had unlawfully entered the residence by kicking open the front door, causing $400 in damage to the door and frame. Several items were taken including a brown leather couch valued at $3,000 and a green metal and wood bed with mattress and box springs, with a combined valued of $800. A central unit was also stolen from the side of the home. October 16, 2011 Several items were reportedly stolen from a residence on Inca Road. Missing items included a wooden gun case valued at $150; a Marlin 30-30 rifle valued at $300; three single shot 12 gauge shotguns valued at $450; two 410 shotguns valued at $325; a radial hand saw and mini band saw valued at $100; and several pieces of jewelry valued at approximately $2,500 including an estimated five necklaces and several gold rings. Jeffrey Allen Gatlin, 41, Jackson, was arrested and

charged with possession of a schedule II controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is held in the Chester County jail waiting to see the judge. Gatlin also has a hold from Tipton County. Justin Wayne Hays, 20, 1425 Memory Lane, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdemeanor, contributing to the delinquency of a minor, possession of a counterfeit controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $15,000 bond. Reggie Glenn Turner, 45, 620 Sweetlips Road, was arrested and charged with vandalism. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,000 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Dustin Cecil Rinks, 28, Savannah, was found guilty of four counts of burglary, theft of property $500-$1,000 and two counts of vandalism $500$1000. He was sentenced to serve four years in a TDOC facility at a 35 percent release eligibility, receiving credit for time served pretrial. He was also found guilty of two counts of vandalism under $500. He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, receiving credit for time served. All counts are to be served concurrently. He was ordered to pay court costs as well as restitution in the amount of $1,104.96 to Jacks Creek Post Office and $402 to Enville Methodist Church. Edgar M. Stansell, 76, 9600 St. Rt. 100 W, was found guilty of assault. He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, receiving credit for time served, all suspended, and supervised by Community Corrections. He was ordered to pay court costs. Serena Shaw, 25, Jackson, was found guilty of theft of property $500$1,000. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, receiving credit for time served, all suspended and supervised. She was ordered to pay court costs plus $1,000 in restitution, unless property is returned, plus $400 restitution.

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Obituary/Religion

Obituaries Kurt Edward Shanks Date of Death – Oct. 14, 2011 Kurt Edward Shanks, 48, passed away Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, at his home in Henderson. Funeral services were Saturday, Oct. 15, at Shackelford – Casey Chapel with Rick Smith officiating. Burial followed in Chester County Memory Gardens. Memorials may be made to Easter Seal of Lexington or American Heart Association. He was born in Memphis, the son of John Charles Shanks and the late Florence Alie Pruitt Boone. Kurt graduated in special education in the Chester County Schools and attended Easter Seal in Lexington. Kurt loved his CB Friends and was known by Tennessee Cowboy. He was a member of the First Baptist Church in Henderson. He is survived by his father and stepmother, John Charles and Margaret Ellen Covington Shanks of Henderson; a brother, Steve Shanks (Bobbie) of Millington; and a sister, Cheryl Lynn Edmonds (David) of Cordova. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct 20, 2011

Charles Everette Cearley Date of Death – Oct. 14, 2011 Charles Everette Cearley, 78, passed away Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. There will be a private family memorial service and committal service. Memorials may be made to St. Jude Hospital or West Tennessee Animal Rescue, P. O. Box 1042, Huntington, TN 38344. Shackelford Johnson Chapel was in charge of arrangements. He was born in Madison County, the son of the late Everette and Roxie Froman Cearley. He graduated from Pinson High School and served in Germany after World War II during the Occupation. After service, he married Peggy Copeland on July 20, 1957. They made their home in Pinson for many years, and later in Mifflin. He was a member of the V.F.W. Post 6496, where he served as the Post Commander. He owned and operated C & C Plumbing. He was a member of the Pinson Baptist Church and a member of NRA. He was an avid shooter, fisherman and enjoyed farming and his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Peggy Copeland Cearley; three daughters, Pam Warren (Billy), Penny James (Bart), all of Henderson, and Rose Mary Latham (Andrew) of Pinson; three sons, Paul Cearley (Laura), Randal Cearley of Pinson, and Barry Cearley of Murfresboro; six grandchildren, Jill Bland, Jonathan Kee, Lauren Cearley, Peyton James, Jordan Warren and Colt James; and three great-grandchildren, Riley Bland, Matthew Ayers and Levi Silvers.

Everett Lee Weaver Date of Death – Oct. 11, 2011 Everett Lee Weaver, died Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011, at the home of his niece Cyndi Weaver Kilzer near Henderson. Services were on Oct. 13, 2011, at Shackelford Funeral Directors-Johnson Chapel in Henderson, with Rev. Anthony Rowland officiating. Burial followed in the Cave Springs Cemetery at Chester County. He was born in Chester County, in the Hickory Corner Community, son of the late Leonard and Dewey Crouse Weaver. He attended School in Chester County. Mr. Weaver was employed as a Crane Operator for Dement Construction Company for many years and later worked for the Chester County Highway Dept. He was a member of the Second Baptist Church in Selmer and enjoyed riding and owning horses and mules, raising beagle hounds and bird hunting. He is survived by his wife, Kay Rhodes Thomas Weaver of Henderson; one daughter, Angela Harris of Henderson; one son, Reggie Weaver of Jackson; a sister Ann Whitman of Bethel Springs; a special niece, Cyndi Weaver Kilzer of Henderson; a special nephew, Blair Weaver of Henderson; eight grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren; and his best friend, Buck Burkhead and his wife Shirley. He was preceded in death by his sisters, Doris Faye Weaver, Lavinia Stansell, Ruby Heflin, Martha Cox and Louise Riley; brothers, Charles Weaver, Johnnie Weaver and Noah Weaver. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct 20, 2011

Marianne Jackson Faulkner Date of Death – Oct. 11, 2011 Marianne Jackson Faulkner, 81, passed away Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011, at the Chester County Healthcare. Funeral services were Friday, Oct. 14, 2011, at Shackelford – Casey Chapel with Rev. Ronnie Sells officiating and burial followed in New Friendship Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the New Friendship Cemetery Fund. She was born and reared in Rutherford, the daughter of the late Alvin and Ellar Webb Jackson. She went to school at Rutherford. She made her home in Henderson. She married Robert Faulkner in 1970 and they made their home in Jackson and Henderson. She worked at Dollar General Stores in Selmer, Henderson, Jackson and Somerville for 24 years. She later worked for General Electric in Selmer. She was a member of the New Friendship Baptist Church. She is survived by her husband, Robert Earl Faulkner of Henderson; two sons, Gentry Green (Janie) of Henderson and Greg Green (Bonnie) of Newnan, Ga.; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren; a sister, Rebecca Ramsey (Brooks) of Washington, D.C. She was preceded in death by her sister, Margaret Hall. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct 20, 2011

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct 20, 2011

Faye Daveree McIntyre Talbott Date of Death – Oct. 16, 2011 Faye Daveree McIntyre Talbott, 87, passed away Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011, at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were 11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.19, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel, with Randy Smith officiating. Burial followed at Finger Cemetery. She was born and reared in Finger, the daughter of the late John Robert and Ollie Pearl McCann McIntyre. She attended school in Finger. She married L.E. “Junior” Talbott in 1944. They made their home in Finger all their married life where they owned and operated L. E. Talbott Grocery from 1946 until they sold it to their son, Ronald, in 1978. They enjoyed traveling after they sold the store. She was a member of the Finger Church of Christ. She is survived by a son, Ronald Talbott (Diane) of Henderson; a daughter, Deborah Harrington (Paul) of Versailles, Ky.; six grandchildren, Tonya Mason, John E. Talbott, Bryan L. Talbott, Paul Harrington IV, Nicholas D. Harrington and James B. Harrington; 10 great-grandchildren, Ava Jewell Talbott, Claire E. Talbott, Eric Talbott, Rachel Talbott, Lauren Talbott and Eli Talbott, Gavin Harrington, Mindy Harrington, Emma Harrington and Paul Harrington V; three step greatgrandchildren, Michael Gavin, Cody Gavin and Zena Gavin; and a brother J.R. McIntyre of Adamsville. She was preceded in death by her husband, L.E. “Junior” Talbott in 2007; a son, Michael Edward Talbott in 1947; a brother, Roy McIntyre; and three sisters, Helen, Lessie and Vivian McIntyre. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct 20, 2011

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Willa Mae Haskins May 23, 1925 – Oct. 14, 2011 Willa Mae Melton Haskins, 86, departed this life on Friday, Oct. 14, 2011. Services were held on Oct. 16, 2011, at Mifflin Baptist Church in Mifflin, with Bro. Mike Melton officiating. Burial followed in the Mifflin Cemetery at Mifflin. Shackelford - Johnson Chapel was in charge of arrangements. She was born in Benton County, the daughter of the late Algie and Susie Bond Melton. She was a charter member of the Mifflin Baptist Church. She married R. G. Haskins in 1946. She was employed at Oakley Fashions for 26 years as a supervisor, and from 1983 until her retirement in 2005 at the Chester County Nursing Home in Housekeeping. She is survived by a son, Steve Haskins (Beth) of Henderson; two sisters, Margaret Watson of Bruceton and Mary Jo Holland of Camden; a brother, O'Neal Melton of Camden, TN; a daughter-in-law, Jan Haskins of Mifflin; five grandchildren, Justin Haskins, Jaron Haskins, Jade Haskins, Jennifer Gatley and Jason Haskins; and five great grandchildren, Jannah Brittain, Jacelyn Haskins, Camden Haskins, Jayla Gatley and Jesslyn Gatley. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1968; her parents; a son, Bobby Haskins; a sister, Thelma Furr; and a brother, John William Melton. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct 20, 2011

Great Day for Family and Friends Sanford Hill Baptist Church Great Day for Family and Friends will be Sunday, Oct. 23. Wear casual attire. Services will begin at 11 a.m. with evangelist Dr. Don Whitt, featuring special music guest, Andrew and Callie Smith. At noon there will be a free lunch of grilled hotdogs and hamburgers. There will be jumpers for the children and a mechanical bull. At 3 p.m. saul2paul will perform in concert, followed by the evening service. All guests must be registered by 11 a.m. for the drawing to win an Apple iPad2, and must be present to win. All are welcome to attend.

Revival at Old Path Baptist Church Old Path Baptist Church, Hwy 22A S., Enville, is having revival services at 7 p.m. Oct. 20, 22-23, and from 11 a.m. until noon Sunday, Oct. 24, with a fellowship meal afterward. The preacher will be Evangelist Bro. Tim Horton from Mississippi. All are welcome to attend.

Middlefork Annual Stew Sale Middlefork Road Baptist Church, 3955 Middlefork Rd. in Luray, will have their Annual Stew Sale Saturday, Oct. 22. The stew will be ready to sell by 11 a.m. and costs $15 a gallon. Bring your own container. Everyone is invited.

Bowen Concert at Bethel Baptist Recording artist Bobby Bowen will be in concert at Bethel Baptist Church, 125 Hwy 125, at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, as part of Southern and Christian Country Gospel event. An offering will be taken. For more information, call 989-3325.

“Invasion: Shattering Your Sense of Security” First Baptist Church, 310 W. Court Ave., Selmer, presents Judgment House – “Invasion: Shattering Your Sense of Security” on Oct. 26, and Oct. 29 through 31. Judgment House is a dramatic multi-scene, walkthrough presentation about the truth of people’s choices and their consequences in both this life and the next. Walk-ins are welcome, reservations are preferred. Church groups are encouraged to attend.

Ladies Day at Henderson Church You are invited to Ladies Day, Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Henderson Church of Christ, 240 White Street. The speaker will be Becky Gates. Registration is at 8:30 a.m. and from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the program will be presented. Brunch will be served. All are welcome to attend.

Beech Spring to honor pastor, wife The members of the Beech Spring Baptist Church will be having their tenth annual banquet celebration honoring their pastor, Robert Wooden, and his wife, at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Chester County High School. The keynote speaker will be Pastor Terry Popular from Ebenezer Baptist Church in Toone.


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Church of Christ at Church Street N. Church Street


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News from UT Extension: Lead Poisoning Prevention Week By Michele Sides UT Extension Agent

Miss Henderson Pageant The Miss Henderson Pageant will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 20, at Chester County Middle School Williams Auditorium. To attend the cost is $5 for school age children and $3 for adults and children under five years of age.

“Schoolhouse Rock LIVE” to be performed in Jackson The Jackson Teen Theatre will present “Schoolhouse Rock LIVE”, at the Ned R. McWherter West Tenn. Cultural Center at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 21, and at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22. Tickets are available at The Ned. The prices are $5 for the 9 a.m. school performance, and $10 in advance or $11 at the door for the 7 p.m. show. The Saturday matinee at 2 p.m. price is $8 in advance or $9 at the door. Get ready for a rocking good time. For more information, call 425-8396 or 4258397.

Senior Centers Planned Trips The McNairy County Senior Center is planning a trip to the Amish community, in Lawrenceburg, Thursday, Oct. 20. The transportation cost is $5. The plan is to stop for lunch at Davy Crockett State Park. For full details, contact Cindy Thrasher at 6320302 or 439-1846. The McNairy County Senior Center is planning a trip to Chaffin’s Barn Theater and Loveless Café, in Nashville on Thursday, Nov. 10. The $45 cost includes transportation, ticket to the play and a family style meal. For full details, contact Cindy Thrasher at 632-0302 or 439-1846. The McNairy County Senior Center is planning a fun-filled five-day, four-night, Branson Show Extravaganza trip on Monday, Nov. 28 through Friday, Dec. 2. The trip will include motor coach transportation, four nights lodging, eight meals and admission to seven fabulous Branson shows including The Jim Stafford Show, The Osmond Brothers Show, The Red Hot and Blue Shoe, the Brett Family Show, the Twelve Irish Tenors, and the Baldknobbers Jamboree Show, plus the Showboat Branson Belle and much more. The cost is $474 per person and includes all of the above. Space is limited. If interested call Cindy Thrasher at the Adamsville Senior Center, 632-0302.

Woofstock 2011 Rally to Rescue Loving Paws Rescue of Chester County and KEG Rescue of Madison County are hosting Woofstock 2011, a Rally to Rescue event. Woofstock 2011 will be at Conger Park on N. Highland in Jackson (just south of Skyline) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22. We will have vendors, live music, pet contests, games, food and much more for the whole family to enjoy. Come out, bring your pet, have fun and help support pet rescue!

Finger First Baptist Fall Festival Finger First Baptist Church will be having their Fall Festival from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22. There will even be a hayride. Everyone is invited.

Remote Area Medical coming to CC Remote Area Medical is coming to the Chester County Junior High School on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 22-23, offering free medical, dental and vision care. Medical and general volunteers are needed. You can register by going to the ramusa.org website or by contacting Janeane Moore at 989-7222. This event is intended for those without medical insurance, or those who are underinsured, unemployed, underemployed, and/or cannot afford to pay. The clinic will open at 6 a.m. each day. Services are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Patients do not need to pre-register, but arriving by 3:30 a.m. on the clinic days is recommended.

Bean Dinner at Hickory Corner Community Center Hickory Corner Community Center will have a bean dinner on Saturday, Oct. 22. The cost of the meal is $5, begins at 11 a.m., and includes white beans and pinto beans cooked with ham, slaw, onion, Mexican cornbread, regular cornbread, tea and dessert. In addition, around 1 p.m. there will be a cakewalk. All proceeds go to the Center. Tickets are being pre-sold for the meal, and we invite everyone to come and enjoy the day.

Second Annual Chocolate Fantasy Scheduled The United Methodist Women of First United Methodist Church will host their second annual Chocolate Fantasy at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23. The event will be held in the foyer of the Christian Life Center and will feature delectable chocolate concoctions as well as sandwiches and finger foods. Dirt Pilgrims, a band that has performed several times at Arts in the Alley, will provide music. The public is invited to attend. No tickets will be sold, but donations are most welcome. Proceeds from the occasion will be directed to Gleaner’s House, an outreach of FUMC/Trinity Methodist Churches, serving as both a thrift store and a place to receive help toward utilities and groceries for the less fortunate in our community in these troubled economic times.

Stroke Support Group Meeting

The Stroke Support Group will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, and the fourth Monday of each month, at the Chester County Senior Citizens building. For more information, contact Steve Simmons from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Extendicare Home Health at 989-1912.

Family Community Education Club forming A new Family Community Education Club is forming in Chester County. This club is open to all members of the county. The club will be a network of women and men who are taking a stand for families, who are determined to change their communities for the better, who are enriching their own lives and who are empowering others to reach for the same dreams. The first meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 24 in the UT Extension Office (old Public Safety building, 126 Crook Ave.). If you have ever been interested in joining a FCE club, or if you would like more information, you should attend this meeting! The meeting is open to all who are interested. UT provides equal opportunities programs. If you have more questions, please contact Michele Sides at 989-2103.

CCHS Quarterback Meeting The Chester County High School Quarterback meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, at the high school cafeteria. All parents are encouraged to attend. Special information concerning the high school playoffs will be discussed.

Unity Baptist Free Fall Fun Unity Baptist Church, 2475 State Route 22A North, Jacks Creek, will be having their Free Fall Fun at 6:30 p.m. on Oct. 28. There will be games, cakewalks, and more. All ages are welcome and wear non-scary costumes.

Henderson Masonic Lodge to hold Annual Scholarship Breakfast Benefit Join us at the Lodge from 7 until 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, for the Henderson Masonic Lodge #485 Annual Scholarship Breakfast Benefit. We will have pancakes, sausage, eggs, gravy and biscuits. Breakfasts cost $5 and children 10 and under eat free.

Ladies Day at Henderson Church of Christ You are invited to Ladies Day, Sunday, Oct. 29, at the Henderson Church of Christ, 240 White Ave. The speaker will be Becky Gates. Registration is at 8:30 a.m. From 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the program will be presented, then brunch will be served. All are welcome.

Haunted Hollows and Houses Slow down while you drive through downtown Hickory Corner. It’s looking scary at the home Kenneth and Teresa Burkhead. A huge spider is on the roof. Horrible looking zombies, ghouls and ghosts are in the yard. Every few days something new is added. Teresa has spent hours in her yard and inside her home decorating. By the time Halloween is over and everything is put away, Teresa will start on Christmas, which is a sight to see. She is so creative and we appreciate all that she does so that others may enjoy her display. Haunted Hollow will be Oct. 20-22, 27-29, and 31. Cost is $6 a person, and concession will be available. Come and have a spooky good time.

Exploring your Medicare Options A dedicated team of BlueCross Medicare Advocates will be holding a community meeting in Henderson at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1, at City Hall. The purpose of the meeting is to help beneficiaries and their loved ones find out more about Medicare options available to them. A sales person will be present with applications and information about our Medicare Advantage, Medicare Part D, and Medicare Supplement plans. For more information about Medicare Advantage and drug coverage or to reserve a spot at the meeting, please contact a BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee representative at 1-866-902-0684 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 7 days a week. Persons with special needs should request accommodations in advance.

McNairy County Hog Food Festival McNairy County Fall Hog Food Festival will be Saturday, Nov. 5 at the historic Dixie Cafe Park in Selmer. There will be Cooking Competition for BBQ, Ribs, Chili, Wings & Cobblers, and there will be entertainment. For more information, call the McNairy Regional Alliance 645-6360. A Car Show, open to all makes and models, will give Top 75 and Best of Show Awards. For more information, call 6979149.

McKenzie Hometown Christmas Pageant The pageant for age’s newborn up to 21 years of age begins at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Dickey Fine Arts Building, Bethel University, McKenzie. Registration for the first age group starts at 10 a.m. Trophies will be awarded to Queens, Kings and Royalties for each age category. Supreme Queens will be awarded from age infant to age 6, and age 7 to 21. A photographer will be available for individual and royalty pictures.

Oct. 23-29 is Lead Poisoning Prevention Week in the United States. Lead poisoning is a medical condition caused by increased levels of the heavy metal lead in the body. Lead is a naturally occurring metal used in everything from construction materials to batteries. Homes built prior to 1970 are at greatest risk of containing some form of lead. Lead is toxic to everyone but unborn babies and young children are at greatest risk for health problems as a result of lead poisoning – their bodies are smaller and more susceptible to absorbing and retaining lead. According to the CDC, 72,032 children (ages 6 and under) in Tennessee were screened for lead poisoning in 2010. Of those screened, 120 were confirmed with dangerous levels in their system. When the body is exposed to lead – by being inhaled, swallowed or perhaps absorbed by the skin, it can act as a poison. When it enters the body, it can be distributed through the bloodstream. Lead interferes with a variety of body processes and is toxic to many organs and tissues. It interferes with the development of the nervous system and is therefore

particularly toxic to children, causing potentially permanent learning and behavior disorders. Most lead ends up in the bone. Once in the bone, it can cause even more problems by interfering with the production of blood cells and absorption of calcium. The good news is that you can protect your family from lead poisoning. Most cases are preventable; the way to prevent poisoning is to prevent exposure. Ask your local health department about having your home evaluated for lead sources, and have your kids tested for lead exposure, particularly if they are between 6 months and 3 years old. Kids at this age spend a lot of time on the floor, and they have their hands and toys in their mouths. This is one way that lead is introduced into the system. These tips can help you reduce the risk of lead exposure: Be wary of old plumbing. Old pipes may be made of lead and as they breakdown the lead can be

found in drinking water. If you have old plumbing, you may want to have your water tested. Your local health department or water department can assist you finding a test site. Keep your home and family clean. Wash your hands and your child’s hands frequently. Wash toys to remove any lead residue. Vacuum floors and wash dusty surfaces with a damp cloth. Ensure iron and calcium are a part of your daily diet. Good nutrition can reduce the amount of lead that’s absorbed by your body. Also, eating at regular times is helpful because lead is absorbed more during times of fasting. If you suspect you might have lead-based paint on your walls, use a wet cloth to wipe the windowsills and walls. For more information about lead poisoning, you can visit www.cdc.gov and search for lead poisoning, or you can call your local UT Extension office at 989-2103 and speak to Michele Sides.

USJ Holiday Mart scheduled Nov. 18-20 The University School of Jackson is once again hosting its annual Holiday Mart, Nov. 18-20 at the Carl Perkins Civic Center in downtown Jackson. The Mart, sponsored by the University School of Jackson’s Mothers’ Club and Bancorp South, features thousands of unique gift and decorating ideas in a festive, holiday setting. The Holiday Mart will open Friday, Nov. 18, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 19, 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Sunday, Nov. 20, noon to 5 p.m. More than 100 merchants from Tennessee and throughout the Southeast will fill the Carl Perkins Civic Center with

clothing, jewelry, toys, home accessories, holiday trim and many other gift ideas for sale. The Mart is the perfect place to look for gift items for friends, teachers and the hard-tobuy-for person on your list. Admission tickets are $5 in advance for adults and $2 for students. Children under 6 are admitted free. Advance tickets, which go on sale Oct. 24, are available at USJ’s Lower School Campus on McClellan Road, or at one of the following BancorpSouth locations in Jackson: Downtown, Greystone, and Union University Drive as well as at branches in Alamo, Bemis,

Humboldt, Trenton, Milan and Selmer. Tickets are $8 at the door for adults. Each ticket gives the owner unlimited readmission during all three days of the Mart. For more information on Holiday Mart special events and vendors, visit www.usjholidaymart.com


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011 Page 13-A


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Red Ribbon Week is Oct. 23-31 Chester County students will be learning about and participating in Red Ribbon Week next week, Oct. 23 through Oct. 31. Red Ribbon Week, drug awareness and prevention week, originated in the mid-1980’s when a DEA Agent was tortured and killed by drug traffickers in Mexico City. The tradition of displaying

red ribbons as a symbol of intolerance towards the use of drugs continues today. Chester County Sheriff ’s Department School Resource Officer Celinda Davidson urges all of Chester County to participate in this year’s event, to show support in the local fight against sub-

stance abuse. Participation is simple and only requires wearing or displaying red during the week. “I would like businesses to display red bows on their business,” said Davidson, “I would like for citizens to wear red or a red ribbon or tie a red ribbon to their car antennas.” Elementary students will bring home a flier with a red ribbon attached, explaining about Red Ribbon Week. Davidson

A delightful interruption of festival performance By Holly Roeder Staff Writer

A scream of surprise and delight and a mother’s relief briefly took the spotlight during a recent performance of “Steel Magnolias” at the Chester County Barbecue Festival. Heads turned from the stage to the crowd to see a woman stand and hug a young man fiercely. It was warming and emotional to those witnessing the event, but to know the story behind the scene adds a special touch. The woman was Heather Bullman and the young man Jeff Sears, her son, who had returned from ASchool unbeknownst to his mother for a quick weekend visit. Sears, a 2011 Chester County High School Graduate, began his military career at Great Lakes RTC on June 6. He graduated as an E2, and headed to Pensacola, Fla., for ASchool. Bullman said she had seen him earlier in the summer, but did not know when she would see her son next. To say she was thrilled with the surprise visit, would be an tremendous understatement. Sears is the son of James and Heather Bullman of Henderson and Sam Sears of Arkansas.

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Jeff Sears surprised his mother, Heather Bullman, while she was watching a performance of “Steel Magnolias” at the Chester County Barbecue Festival Saturday, Oct. 1. She had not known he would be able to visit during a break from A-School in Pensacola, Fla.

will visit some schools with a drug awareness presentation and drug-free pledge banner. A balloon release is scheduled for 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27. Davidson explained the more red students see during that week, the more credibility they will give to the intolerance of substance abuse in their hometown. If you would like to participate in other ways, you can do so by locking up all

medications, talk to your children about drugs and alcohol, monitor children’s Internet activity, stay informed, build self-esteem, set a good example, keep lines of communication open and create strong family bonds. For more information about Red Ribbon Week and drug awareness, go online to nfp.org


Page 1-B The Chester County Independent’s annual Take Us With You photo promotion continues this year with several interesting entries. Readers took trips to the far corners of the world, and to the heights and depths of the planet. The only requirement for entry in the promotion was that photos be taken over the last year, and that a copy of the Independent be visible in the photo. Winner of the award for taking the Independent the farthest from Henderson goes to the FreedHardeman University

Take Take Us Us With With You! You! Chorale, under the direction of Gary McKnight, who traveled 8,394 miles on their mission trip to Cape Town, South Africa. Most original or unique photo goes to Dwayne Burnett who carried the newspaper to a height of 14,411 feet to the summit of Mt. Rainer’s Summit Crater in Washington State. (See separate story.) Samantha Davidson is also a winner with her photo taken in Venice, Italy last June. The staff of the Independent chose Davidson’s photo as best in the category of best beach or outdoor scene.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

These three winners each receive a one-year subscription to the Independent, and Burnett and Davidson also receive a red, white, and blue CCI umbrella. We appreciate each of those who entered, and we present each of them over the next three pages. So whether your next voyage is to Montezuma, Tenn., or the Halls of Montezuma in Mexico, when you go on your next vacation or trip to far away or nearby places, remember the Chester County Independent and Take Us With You. Dwayne Burnett carried the newspaper to a height of 14,411 feet at the summit of Mt. Rainer’s Summit Crater in Washington State.

The Highest …

Burnett takes governor to the top!

The most distant … The Freed-Hardeman University Chorale, under the direction of Gary McKnight, took a break from their mission trip to Cape Town, South Africa to read the Independent, with Table Mountain in the background.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam made the cover of the Chester County Independent following his trip to Henderson last June. Dwayne Burnett then carried Haslam and the CCI to the top of Mt. Rainer, 14,411 feet to Washington’s Summit Crater. The Aug. 14-16 journey is just one of many adventures enjoyed over the years by Burnett who advises everyone to enjoy the great outdoors at an early age while you are able. “There’s a lot to do right here in this country,” says Burnett who helps others recover from injuries while at Sports Plus Rehab Center. “I’m a big believer in doing what I can do when can I do it. I see lots of people who say ‘When I retire I’ll do this or that,’ but when they retire they are not physically able.” For his trip to Mt. Rainer, Burnett spent nine months training on a stair master while wearing a 50-lb. pack. When climbing Rainer, he carried a 40-lb. pack and counted every ounce, including the weight of the CCI. “It was a great experience. We started

with a group of eight, but by the third day, four dropped out saying they had had enough,” said Burnett. The vertical climb was for two miles on a volcanic mountain, which is the most glaciated mountain in the lower 48 states. There are 26 active glaciers on the mountain, and the climbers could have no exposed skin when crossing the glacier, while carrying equipment such as an ice axe, helmet, and other protective gear. Burnett likes to take at least one very adventurous vacation each year. He has hiked across the Grand Canyon, and climbed the Grand Tetons, Devils Tower in Wyoming, and Mt. Leconte in the Great Smokies. “Any kind of trail and I’m game for it,” he said. “My ultimate goal is Mt. McKinley (Denali), but that’s a threeweek minimum trip.” Also on his “been there, done that list,” are the Narrows slot canyon in Zion National Park, mountain biking in Moab, kayaking Lake Powell, hiking in Yellowstone, and some short trips on the Appalachian Trail.

The Lowest … Don and Frances Willis journeyed 282 feet below sea level to experience the salt flats of Badwater Basin in Death Valley.

Best outdoor scene ... The canals of Venice, Italy make a stunning back drop for Samantha Davidson as she reads the Chester County Independent last June.

Timothy Berry, left, read the Independent while serving his country in Afghanistan.

“From the halls of Montezuma …” It will be a few years before Heath Stewart, in front of sign, will be ready to march to that tune, but his Uncle Trey Knolton is ready now after graduating from Marine Recruit Training in Paris Island, S.C.

While on a Mediterranean cruise, this group toured Dubrovnik, Croatia. They include Allen and Karen Walker, Becky and Ken Cargile, and Billy and Joan Smith. Their cruise began at Barcelona, Spain with stops in Nice, France, and Rome, Florence, and Venice, Italy, before landing in Seniors from Chester County traveled across the “pond” last June to enjoy the sites in England, Wales, and Ireland. Here they are at Anne Hathaway Home in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. Croatia which they described as “incredibly beautiful.”


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Orange Beach goers ….

Cameron Vales, 7, took a special ‘dream vacation’ for his dad, who has ALS, to Orange Beach, Ala., last August. Vales is in the second grade at Jacks Creek Elementary School.

This group from Henderson Church of Christ took a mission trip to Oregon and took the opportunity to hike near Mt. Hood. Members of the expedition included Wayne Scott, Melanie Johnson, Daniel Scott, Kacy Burns, Mary Beth Morris, Angie Cole Burns, Leah Beaver, Joyce Morris, and Shay Pelley Wade. Mt. Hood is the highest point in Oregon, and is also known by its Multnomah tribal name of Wy’east.

Madelyn, Blakely, and Gunner Shane Wilson enjoyed the warm waters of Orange Beach, Ala., in May. They helped their dad make this sand sculpture of an alligator. They also made a giant turtle and several sand castles. They are the children of Chris and Crystal Wilson.

Judah Nathanael Swartzentruber, left, of Hutchinson, Kan., visited Bass Pro Shops in Springfield, Mo., and saw his grandparents, T. Mark and Lisa Peter, right, for the first time. Also seeing the iconic outdoor outfitter store were Swartzentruber’s mother Marisa and two-year-old brother Israel Jacob.

SHARK ATTACK! Braelyn Ellis reads the Independent while her shark brother, Braxton, prepares to attack while on vacation in July to Orange, Beach, Ala.

Another of our favorite photos comes from Junior and Brenda Smith, standing at the equator at Marco Zero de Ecuado in Macapa, Brazil. Junior is in the southern hemisphere and Brenda in the northern.

After a long, cold winter, C.J. Payne, Macee Payne, and Morgan Fisher enjoy a Spring Break visit to the balmy beaches of Gulf Shores, Ala.

René Webb visited Tybee Island Light Station and Museum just south of Savannah, Ga., last June. Built in 1732, Tybee is one of America’s most intact light houses, with all its original buildings. It has 178 steps leading to a nine-foot tall Fresnel lens.

The “City of Savannah,” a B-17 Flying Fortress is being restored at the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum just north of Savannah, Ga. James A. Webb and his wife René visited the area last June.

Aloha. Hanging loose in Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii are Scott and Ally Rogers.

Mary Smith of Jackson, at left, was in Wabasha, Minn., on Labor Day Weekend where she visited the National Eagle Center. The center gives Smith and up close and personal look at our nation’s national symbol, the bald eagle.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Page 3-B

Kennedy Holman and Madison Hopper enjoyed the attractions at Kings Island, Cincinnati, Ohio. Jan Hatchett King carried a copy of the Independent on her trip last March to Cusco, Peru to visit her daughter and son-in-law, Carla and Matt Cook, and granddaughter Gabriela. They are missionaries in Peru and supported by Estes Church of Christ. Jan also visited the famed lost city of Machu Picchu. King also enjoyed much of the native cuisine, but could not resist the good ole American food at the local McDonald’s.

Austin and Addyson Warren toured the National Corvette Museum last July. The museum is located in Bowling Green, Ky.

Tommy and Mary Howell ventured to Colorado and made this photo Sept. 18 at Rocky Mountain National Park. Dot Patterson takes the Independent on a trip to the stars while visiting the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala.

America’s oldest city, St. Augustine, Fla., attracted a visit this summer from Sarah, Joanna, and Forrest Addington, all of Henderson. The occasion was a surprise Sarah’s father for his 70th birthday. Since both of his kids, their spouses and all the grandchildren were there, it was a very successful surprise party that ended with fireworks on the beach!

This group stayed at Circus-Circus while attending the National Cheerleader Competition in Las Vegas, Nev. Members of the group included Doris Etheridge, Jason Etheridge, Jamie and Daniel Carson, Bristin and Lee Rayburn, Brittany and Hannah Carson, Steven Burkeens, and Justin Alexander.

Norris and Shelia Frank and their family enjoyed a trip to the Great Smoky Mountains, staying at the Music Road Inn Resort in Pigeon Forge. They enjoyed many attractions including Dollywood’s Dixie Stampede Theater. Those on the excursion included Norris and Shelia, son and daughter-in-law Justin and Tiffany Frank and grandson Kade Frank, daughter and son-in-law Carla and Jon Visser, and granddaughters Brooke, Blaire, and Brynlee Visser.

Cousins Daryl, Garrett, and Brycen Morrison took their Independent with them on a recent trip to the Great Smoky Mountains. Daryl and Garrett live in Henderson and cousin Brycen is from Spring Hill.

Chester County Junior High eighth graders take an annual trip at the conclusion of the school year, and this past year they visited Six Flags just east of St. Louis, Mo.


SSppoorrttss Page 4-B

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Quarterback Club to meet Tuesday The Chester County High School Quarterback Club will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, at the high school cafeteria. The public is invited and urged to attend. Items on the agenda include information on the Eagles’ expected post-season playoff games, as well as other upcoming events.

CCHS hosting dist. soccer tournament The girls’ district soccer tournament began this week at Chester County High School’s facility behind North Chester School between Fourth Street and Trice Street. The Eaglettes play their first match today, Thursday, against the winner of a first-round match between Liberty Tech and South Side. Semifinals matches will be held at 2 and 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, and the finals are at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25. CCHS finished the regular season with a record of 7-7-1, 6-3-1 in the district. The Eaglettes scored a total of 42 team goals while only giving up 13. They beat their opponents by an average of five goals per game, while never losing by more than two goals. “We invite all to come support our ladies as we look to extend our season well into the post season,” urged CCHS head coach Jason Judd.

Poston powers Eaglettes to threepeat By James A. Webb Editor-in-Chief

Junior Annsley Poston scored Chester County’s final six points as the Eaglettes defeated Lexington three games to two Thursday to win the district volleyball championship. The victory at Jackson is Chester County’s third straight. CCHS, the number one seed in the tournament, rallied from a two games to one deficit, as well as nine to six point deficit in the final game. They also

Submitted photo

Kirsten Henry of Chester County was named the District 14-AA volleyball Player of the Year.

Walker Run to benefit Cub Scouts

Runners will meet at Henderson’s Gene Record Memorial Park at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5, for the Walker Run. Sponsored by Walker Clinic of Jackson, the run will benefit Henderson Cub Scouts Pack 25. Henderson resident Alex Walker, A.N.P., B.C., began hosting runs through his clinic to support local charities while educating people about wellness. The 5K route begins in the park, continues through Henderson streets and loops back to the park. Those who pre-register (by Oct. 22) are guaranteed a tech shirt. Short-sleeved, youth-sized t-shirts also will be available for children who would like to participate. Registration is available online by clicking on the Walker Run tab at walkerclinic.com. Registration is $25 on or before Oct. 22 and $30 on Oct. 23 or later. Weather permitting, a bonfire will be held in the park, also. This event will be the second annual Walker Run hosted by the Walker Clinic. Last year’s run raised more than $1,000 to help fund a walking track at Henderson’s Gene Record Park. The clinic also sponsored the Walker Run or Fly in Jackson in May 2011 to benefit the American Heart Association.

survived a championship point by the Lady Tigers who were up 14-13 in the final game. The 25-27, 2522, 17-25, 25-16, and 1614 victory by the Eaglettes avenged a loss to Lexington in the regular season. “Lexington has a team full of seniors and they know how to win,” said CCHS head coach Susan Humphry. “But our girls played tough, and were determined not to lose. Our key was keeping the pressure on them, hit it hard and make them handle it. That’s what we had to do. “Annsley did everything it took to win,” concluded Humphry. “She was awesome.” Both teams advanced to the region tournament that was played Tuesday afternoon in Dyersburg. The top two teams in the region advance to the sectional games to be hosted tonight, Thursday, by the region winners. Lexington, the number two seed, led 17-9 and 2115 in the first game, but CCHS rallied partly on spikes by Presley Robinson to take a 22-21 lead. The game was tied

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Emily Humphry, left, gets a congratulatory hug following Chester County’s third consecutive district tournament championship.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Players, fellow Chester County students and fans rush the court to celebrate the Eaglettes' victory over Lexington in the district volleyball tournament championship game Thursday in Jackson. four times after that before the Lady Tigers got the victory. In game two, Kirsten Henry got her game together at the net to help the Eaglettes run off seven straight points and take a 13-8 lead. Lexington drew back within one before Henry ended it with another winner. Improved defensive play at the net enabled Lexington to draw away to a 14-5 lead in game three. A brief rally by Chester County disintegrated when Lexington scored the final five points of the game. Jana Frye took the ball to begin serving for CCHS beginning in game four, and she did not give it up until after the Eaglettes had scored the first nine points, the last on a “dink” by Logan McEarl. Poston began her hot streak near the end of that game, which ended on a service error by the “Tigerettes.” The Lexington serving miscues continued into game five giving CCHS the initial lead, and See THREE, Page 6-B

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Annsley Poston hits a winner for the Chester County Eaglettes in the district tournament finale Thursday at South Side. Poston was named the tournament’s Most Valuable Player.

Tech topples CCHS, drops Eagles to fourth By James A. Webb Editor-in-Chief

A game of field position went the way of Liberty Tech Thursday as the Crusaders defeated Chester County 19-17 in high school football at Eagle Stadium. Liberty scored the winning points with less than a minute to play in the contest, becoming the first team this season to score on the CCHS defense in the fourth quarter. The heart-breaking setback for CCHS dropped the Eagles to third in the district standings at 6-2 overall and seriously threatened Chester County’s hopes for a first-ever home playoff berth. Chester County scored both of its touchdowns in the first quarter after by taking over the ball each time deep in enemy territory, but was unable to sustain long drives later in the contest. However, in the second half, Tech had the short field, scoring a nine-yard drive in the third period, and the final score from near mid-field. Liberty also shut down Chester County’s vaunted rushing attack, limited the Eagles to only 133 yards, and CCHS had no alternative in the passing game. “Field position is

always big. I knew it would be, it always is when you have two evenly matched teams,” said Chester County head coach Michael Hodum. “When they put eight guys in the box it’s hard to block them with five or six. We had an off night throwing the ball. We had to put a hat on the ball, and

throw the ball well, and we didn’t do either one.” From the opening kickoff it looked like a normal game for the Eagles. After the Crusaders failed to cover the opening kickoff, Chester County recovered at the 11-yard line, and three plays later Cameron Phelps got the TD from two yards out.

However, it took Liberty less than two minutes to knot the score on a five-play 75-yard drive, capped by Codarius Owen’s 37-yard run. Ryan Turner broke loose on the ensuing kickoff, returning the ball from his own eight-yard line to Liberty’s 25. A 16-yard See CCHS, Page 6-B

District 14-AA Football Standings No. Team

Dist. All

1.

Lexington

5-0

8-0

2.

Bolivar

4-1

6-2

2.

Liberty

4-1

5-3

4.

Chester Co. 3-2

6-2

5.

South Side

2-3

4-4

6.

Jackson CM 1-4

2-6

7.

McNairy

1-4

1-7

8.

Fayette-W.

0-5

0-8

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Matthew Butler follows Eagle blockers for big yardage in Chester County’s district encounter with Liberty Tech last Friday at Eagle Stadium.


Page 5-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Jr. High begins season FHU sweeps Lyon, falls to No. 3 Columbia

Photos courtesy Tammy Lott

Chester County Junior High began its basketball season Monday in a Jamboree at Scotts Hill. Above, Jantzen Robinson battles for a loose ball, and below, Ryan Stanfill, rights, goes up for the opening tip. (See schedule, this page.)

The Freed-Hardeman Lady Lion volleyball team split a pair of matches on Saturday at Lyon College in Batesville, Ark., defeating the host Scots in straight sets before losing to No. 3 Columbia College in three sets in a non-conference match. The Lady Lions (13-6, 7-2) had little trouble with the Scots in the opener, winning by the scores of 25-21, 25-13 and 25-12. Sandra Montoya led the attack with 11 kills while

Nataly Gutierrez added nine and Fernanda Ferreira added eight. Gutierrez also had five block assists. In the second match, FHU hung in against the third-ranked team in the NAIA but fell short by the scores of 25-17, 25-18 and 25-20. Montoya and Sydney Rice had six kills each in the losing effort. Callie West paced the defense with 15 digs. (See schedule, on this page.)

Ferreira named Player of Week Fernanda Ferreira of Freed-Hardeman University has been named the TranSouth Athletic Conference Volleyball Player of the Week for the week ending Sunday, Oct. 9. Ferreira, a junior middle hitter from Minas Gerais, Brazil, averaged 3.6 kills per set with an attack percentage of .379 for the week. FHU opened the week with a pair of conference sweeps over Cumberland University and Union University and Ferreira was key in both wins with seven kills and five blocks against CU and 13 kills against UU. At the Faulkner University Invitational, where she was named to the all-tournament team, Ferreira had three matches with 14 kills as FHU went 2-2 in the event. Ferreira last received the honor on Oct. 25, 2010.

Early goal holds up, Lady Lion soccer beats Bryan Whitney Newby's goal in the ninth minute proved to be enough for the Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions as they picked up their third win of the season in a 1-0 shutout of Bryan College on Saturday

afternoon at the Josh Riley Soccer Complex. Newby opened the scoring early after taking a pass inside the box from Katie Hillis, separated from her defender and sent a left-footed strike to

the far post for what turned out to be the only goal of the match. FHU (3-6) controlled the run of play in the second half, out-shooting Bryan 11-1 but saw several good chances turned

away by excellent saves from Bryan keeper Stephanie Gagnon. Sophomore keeper Abbey Adkins recorded three saves in posting the first clean sheet of her career.

Late goals stop Freed-Hardeman Lions’ upset bid

Chester County Junior High 2011-12 Basketball Schedule Date Opponent Time Place Oct. 17 Scotts Hill Jamboree 4:30 Scotts Hill Oct. 22 Dyersburg Play Day TBA Dyersburg Oct. 24 Panther Classic 5:00 Parsons Oct. 25 Panther Classic TBA Parsons Nov. 3 Decatur County 6:00 Henderson Nov. 10 Northeast (g) 6:00 Jackson Nov. 14 Selmer (b) 6:00 Henderson Nov. 17 Hardin County (b) 6:00 Henderson Dec. 1 Univ. School Jackson (*) 6:00 Henderson Dec. 5 Lexington (g) 6:00 Lexington Dec. 6-10 Christmas Tourney TBA Lexington Dec. 8 Hardin County (g) 6:00 Savannah Dec. 12 Northeast (g) 6:00 Henderson Jan. 5 Decatur County (b) 6:00 Parsons Jan. 9 Univ. School Jackson (*) 6:00 Jackson Jan. 19 Lexington (b) 6:00 Henderson Jan. 23 Selmer (g) 6:00 Selmer Jan. 24-27 Best of the West TBA TBA g – girls b-game; b – boys b-game; * b-game both

Sports Schedules Chester County High School Football Date Opponent Oct. 21 South Side Oct. 28 Fayette-Ware All games at 7 p.m.

Location Jackson Eagle Stadium

Chester County High School Girls Soccer Date Opponent Oct. 20 District Tourney

Time 4:00

Location Henderson

Chester County High School Volleyball Date Opponent Location Oct. 18 Regional Tournament, In progress Oct. 20 Sectional Game Oct. 26-28 State Tournament

Time TBA TBA TBA

Freed-Hardeman University Golf Date Event Oct. 24 Lake Caroline Collegiate * Oct. 25 Lake Caroline Collegiate * Oct. 31 RedHawk Fall Classic Nov. 1 RedHawk Fall Classic * Men only

Location Madison, Miss. Madison, Miss. Lawrenceburg Lawrenceburg

Freed-Hardeman University Men’s Soccer Date Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Nov. 1

Opponent Trevecca Naz. Mid-Continent Cumberland

Location Nashville Mayfield, Ky. Lebanon

Time 7:00 2:00 3:00

Freed-Hardeman University Women’s Soccer Date Opponent Oct. 21 Trevecca Naz. Oct. 29 Benedictine * Nov. 1 Cumberland * Senior Night

Location Nashville Henderson Lebanon

Time 5:00 7:00 1:00

Freed-Hardeman University Volleyball Date Oct. 20 Oct. 22 Oct. 25 Oct. 27 Oct. 28

Opponent Trevecca Naz. 6:00 Faulkner 1:00 Martin Methodist 7:00 Cumberland 6:00 Georgetown ^ 2:00 Olivet Nazarene ^ 6:00 Oct. 29 Indiana Tech. ^ 11:30 Indiana Wesleyan ^ 3:30 Nov. 1 Mid-Continent 7:00 Nov. 7 TranSouth Tourney TBA ^ Bone Yard Brawl

Time

Location Nashville Henderson Henderson Lebanon Georgetown, Ky. Georgetown, Ky. Georgetown, Ky. Georgetown, Ky. Mayfield, Ky. Pulaski

Senior night was an emotional roller coaster for the Freed-Hardeman Lions on Saturday evening, and it unfortunately ended in a valley rather than a peak. No. 13 Bryan College scored the game-winner goal in the 87th minute to avoid an upset bid by Freed-Hardeman, 3-2. The match remained scoreless until the 73rd minute when Kenniel Hyde slipped a ball through the Bryan defense

to Simbarashe Zvaita near the right post. Zvaita, left one-on-one with the keeper, sent his shot into the back of the net to give FHU the lead. That lead, however, was short-lived as Bryan answered 22 seconds later when Tom Hemmings ripped a shot from the right side of the box that deflected off of Lion keeper Alexandre Girodo's hands and into the net. It didn't take long for the tide to turn back to

FHU's favor. A cross from the left side by Guilherme Dorigo was punched by Bryan keeper Joseph Courtright right to Kenniel Hyde, who dribbled free and converted his 19th goal of the season. Moments later, Hyde looked to be fouled in the box after being shoved from behind, but no call was made and Bryan made good on its counter-attack when a cross into the box was inadvertently handed

by Icaro Alves to set up a penalty kick. BC's Gustavo Angel beat Girodo to the left post to tie the match in the 84th minute. Three minutes later, Bryan scored the game winner on a cross into the box to Sebastian Fischer. Shots in the match were even at 13-13 while Bryan had one more shot on goal as a result of the penalty kick. (See schedule, on this page.)

Fish and Wildlife Service seeks comment on proposed critical habitat designation for fish The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate approximately 224 river miles and 22 acres of critical habitat for the Cumberland darter, rush darter, yellowcheek darter, chucky madtom, and laurel dace. All five of these fishes were listed as endangered on Aug. 9. The ranges and abundance of these five fishes have seriously declined due to changes in their stream habitats resulting from mining, agriculture, reservoir construction, channelization, urban sprawl, pollution, sedimentation, and incompatible forestry practices. Critical habitat is a term defined in the Endangered Species Act (ESA). It refers to specific geographic areas containing features essential to the conservation of a threatened or endangered species and which may require special management considerations or protection. Designation of critical habitat does not affect land ownership, establish a refuge or preserve, and has no impact on private landowners taking actions on their land that do not require federal funding or permits. It does not allow government or public access to private land. At the time of listing, the Service assessed whether critical habitat would be prudent for these species, and found that it was; therefore, the Service is proposing critical habitat, as required by the Endangered Species Act. Federal agencies that undertake, fund or permit activities that may affect critical habitat are required to consult with the Service to ensure such actions do not adversely modify or destroy designated critical habitat. The proposed critical habitat for the Cumberland darter is

located in McCreary and Whitley counties, Kentucky, as well as Campbell and Scott counties in Tennessee. Fifteen critical habitat units are proposed and include roughly 53 river miles. For the rush darter, proposed critical habitat is located in Etowah, Jefferson, and Winston counties in Alabama. Eight critical habitat units are proposed and include approximately 27 river miles and 22 acres of land. The proposed critical habitat for the yellowcheek darter is located in Cleburne, Searcy, Stone, and Van Buren counties in Arkansas. Four critical habitat units are proposed and include approximately 98 river miles. Proposed critical habitat for the chucky madtom is located in Greene County where one unit is proposed and includes approximately 20 river miles. The proposed critical habitat for the laurel dace is located in Bledsoe, Rhea, and Sequatchie counties in Tennessee. Six critical habitat units are proposed and include roughly 26 river miles. Public comments on the proposed rule will be accepted until Dec. 12,

2011. Written comments on the proposal should be submitted on the Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.go v or to Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWSR4-ES-2011-0074; Division of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax

Drive, MS 2042-PDM; Arlington, VA 22203. All comments will be posted on http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Written requests for a public hearing will be accepted until Nov. 28, 2011. The complete proposal appears in the Federal Register Oct. 12.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Youth Football to celebrate Homecoming

Page 6-B

South Side could “make” its season Chester County travels to Jackson at 7 p.m. Friday to face the Hawks of South Side in a District 14-AA football game. The Hawks, 4-4 on the season, still have an outside chance at the state playoffs, but must beat the Eagles to get that post-season berth. Chester County is reeling, having lost consecu-

tive games to top-seeded Lexington, as well as last Friday at home to Liberty Tech. The Hawks are coming off a 37-0 win over winless Fayette-Ware. A victory by South Side would make their season in many ways, so expect a fired-up bunch in Madison County Friday night. The surprise team of the moment may be

Bolivar Central. Since Chester County spanked the Tigers 55-14, Bolivar has run off three victories in succession to improve to 4-1 in the district. However, they now face Lexington and Liberty Tech to close the season and may need a victory over each to stay ahead of Chester County in the standings.

High School Football Oct. 14 at Eagle Stadium Liberty Tech Chester County The Chester County Youth Football league will celebrate its Homecoming Saturday at Eagle Stadium. The flag football cheerleaders are preparing a dance program for the event.

7 – 0 – 6 – 6 = 19 14 – 3 – 0 – 0 = 17

Unofficial Statistics: LT First Downs Rushing (atts., yds.) Passing (comp. Atts., int., yds.) Penalties, yards Fumbles, lost Punts, average

CC

10 27-160

13 52-133

9-19-2=139 7-65 1-0 2-36.0

8-18-1=83 5-44 1-0 5-33.0

Scoring Summary: First quarter: (9:53) CC – Cameron Phelps 2 run (Will Taylor kick), [0-7]. (7:55) LT – Cordarius Owen 37 run (Denzel Tolbert kick), [7-7]. (6:00) CC – Phelps 3 run (Taylor kick), [7-14]. Second quarter: (0:10) CC – Taylor 34 field goal [7-17]. Third quarter: (9:33) LT – Owen 7 run (kick blocked), [13-17]. Fourth quarter: (0:53) LT – Stevie Bush 7 run (kick blocked), [19-17].

Unofficial Individual statistics:

Tyiee Watkins runs for a touchdown against Petty Construction in a recent game.

Eleventh generation of Whooping cranes departs on ultralight-led migration to Florida winter home In the early morning of Oct. 9, three of the 10 young Whooping cranes in the “Class of 2011” began their ultralight-led migration from their summer training site at the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Green Lake County, Wis. This is the 11th generation of cranes to take part in a landmark project conducted by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private groups working to reintroduce the endangered species in eastern North America, part of its historic range. The remaining seven colts were reluctant fliers and ended up having to be returned to their White River Marsh pensite. The Operation Migration team will again attempt to get the seven hesitant fliers to follow their ultralights, morning-weather permitting. Guided by Operation Migration's (OM) three ultralight aircraft, the

juvenile cranes will journey 1,285 air miles, traveling through Wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia and Florida before reaching their wintering grounds at the St. Marks and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuges on Florida's Gulf coast. "Although this will be our eleventh ultralight-led migration with Whooping cranes, each year inevitably presents new challenges," said Joe Duff, senior pilot and CEO of Operation Migration. "It took the combined efforts of many people to bring this conservation project to this stage. We have done everything we can to prepare the young cranes, now what we need are favorable winds and a little luck." The Whooping cranes that take part in the ultralight-led reintroduction are hatched at the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in

Laurel, Md. from their captive flock and eggs shipped there by five captive propagation centers across the continent. The chicks are raised under a strict isolation protocol. To ensure the birds remain wild, handlers adhere to a no-talking rule and wear costumes designed to mask the human form. In 2001, Operation Migration's pilots led the first Whooping crane chicks conditioned to follow their ultralight aircraft, south from Wisconsin to Florida. Each subsequent year, WCEP biologists and OM pilots have conditioned and guided additional groups of juvenile cranes to Florida. After being led south once, in subsequent years the cranes migrate on their own between their summering and wintering grounds. Individuals interested in following the journey can watch live via Operation Migration's CraneCam.

From Page 4-B

Frye hit a winner and Poston blasted two spikes for a 13-10 Chester County advantage, but four straight by Lexington gave them a 14-13 lead and the chance to win the championship. Forget it, Poston blasted three straight winners and the final victory for CCHS. “It was intense and really scary,” said Poston. “We wanted to win so badly. We just put it

together, and played so hard.” McEarl, Emily Humphry, Poston, and Henry were named to the All-District regular season team, with Henry named the Player of the Year. CCHS coach Susan Humphry was named CoCoach of the Year. Emily Humphry, and Frye, along with Poston, were named to the All-Tournament team.

Three McEarl’s block eventually pushed the margin to 5-0 Eaglettes. Back came Lexington to knot the score and the teams battled back and forth until Emily Humphry’s “dink” gave CCHS the lead again at 10-9.

Rushing – LT – Owen 11-79; CC – Phelps 31-118; Matthew Butler 11-43. Passing – LT – Bush 9-19-2=139; CC – Austin Cavaness 8-18-1=83. Receiving – LT – Matt Smith 2-44; Harris-Davis 3-27; CC – Jake Melaro 5-52; Phelps 1-18.

From Page 4-B

CCHS third-down gallop by Matthew Butler set up Phelps for another TD pushing the score to 14-7 CCHS. Then Liberty’s effort to tie the game stalled at the Eagles’ 13yard line on a tackle by Butler and Zach Malone. Chester County got the ball for the final time in the first half at their own 23-yard line, gambling on fourth down and making it with 3:30 to play in the half. They eventually got to Liberty’s 17-yard line where Will Taylor booted a 34-yard field goal with only seconds left in the first half, and Chester County felt comfortable retiring at half-time with a 17-7 lead. Liberty had other ideas, however, dropping

CCHS for losses on three straight plays to begin the second half, and when penalties piled on more misery to the Eagles, the Techsters had to ball at the Eagles’ nine-yard line. Owen covered the final seven yards for Liberty, cutting their deficit to only four points. With the game on the line, Chester County came up with three big stops on defense. An interception by Turner thwarted the Crusaders’ next drive, and a takeaway by Darian Robinson did the same with 8:17 to play in the fourth quarter. A thundering hit by Dillon Williams broke up a Liberty fourth-down pass in CCHS territory with 4:30 to play, but the Eagle offense was nowhere to be seen, and Liberty took over at its own 40 with 2:21 left. Chester County’s

defense was now back on its heels and the Crusaders were playing down hill. With 1:07 to play they had a wide open receiver to fall down in the end zone, forcing a third down at the seven-yard line. Bush then scored the game-winner with an audience of stunned Chester County followers. “We’ll pick it up. These are good kids,” Hodum said of his team. “These are the things that make these kids grow up. A loss is not a total loss. Our kids will learn a lot from this and it will pay off in the playoffs.” Unofficially, Chester County had 216 yards total offense, its lowest total of the season. Liberty had 299. Phelps once again eclipsed the century mark in rushing, but did not have the signature long run that has marked his season in 2011.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Will Taylor, right, gets congratulations on his second field goal of the season, a 34yarder, in the final seconds of the first half of Chester County’s home game against Liberty Tech.


EEdduuccaattiioonn

Page 7-B

Thursday, October 20, 2011

It’s a bird, it’s a plane … By Michelle Hopkins

Courtesy photos

On Thursday, Oct. 6, pilot Scott Summars and his crew brought the AirEvac helicopter for students at East Chester Elementary School to see. The AirEvac crew landed on the field beside the school playground, and they talked to the students and let them look at the helicopter and equipment. Summars brought the helicopter as a reward for the hard work the students did during the first nine weeks of school. Summars has a daughter in third grade at East Chester.

By Ally Rogers The Junior High will be rocking Friday morning as “The Standards” come to perform for our students! This group performs hit songs, as well as oldies and has a NO-Bullying campaign to go along with the entertainment. This will be a fun event for all involved! A huge thanks goes to the supporters of the Eagles Nest! We now have two giant screen

TVs installed in the cafeteria. Coach Eads plans to run important announcements and information during breakfast and lunch times. This will be a great way to help the students “see” what all is going on! The basketball teams played in a Jamboree held in Scotts Hill on Monday. They will also be playing in the Panther Classic the next week. The first home game is Nov. 3 against Decatur County. Please check the website or the newspaper for the schedule and plan to attend and cheer on our Eagle and Eaglette basketball teams! Red Ribbon Week, which celebrates being drug free, will be next week. Students will have lessons dealing with the

dangers of drug, alcohol and tobacco use. They will also be encouraged to sign a pledge banner stating that they will not be involved with drugs and alcohol. Our school has joined the “My Coke Rewards for Schools” program. By drinking Coca-Cola products and entering codes found in various places on the products, you will help to reward our school. It’s easy to donate: just purchase your favorite CocaCola products to get codes (they’re on hundreds of different packages, in a variety of sizes and flavors). Then, Go to mycokerewards.com/school and sign in (register if you aren’t a member). Next, enter your codes to collect points and then search for

our school to donate points. Enter the amount of points you’d like to give, and then click “Donate”. We would certainly appreciate your efforts in helping us find extra ways to help our students. All eighth-grade students will take the Explore Test next Tuesday. This test is similar to the ACT and produced by the makers of the ACT test. It measures knowledge in academic content areas but also has a portion which is similar to an interest inventory. This will be helpful in showing students areas of possible career choices. The results should be back in 4-6 weeks. Enjoy your week and the rest of our nice fall weather!

And the band played on!

East Chester’s faculty, staff, and students returned to school this week with stories of good times spent with family at Disney World, the mountains, ballgames, the beach, and cruises. Fall Break couldn’t have come at a better time. Everyone at East Chester has been working so hard; it was good to be rewarded with a break. The first nine weeks of this school year is over. Report cards came home on Thursday, Oct. 6. Our students worked very hard on our new STAR assessments that tell us how much the children have progressed in reading and math. We Courtesy photo also gave nine weeks An East Chester student practices readassessments ing, which is one of the most important in reading. skills to help students become successful Our third- in school. graders even practiced with a con- Christmas, and movie structed response item. night baskets as well as This means that they had several others. We will to answer a question by also have a book fair set writing a response instead up during Fall Festival. of choosing from multipleMrs. Kim went over choice items. Third- two handouts “Help Your graders will be taking a Child Become a Better constructed response test Reader” and “How Can I in reading and math the Help My Child Be first week in December. Successful in School.” We want to give them as Mrs. Kim discussed the much practice as possible data walls that are between now and then so throughout our building that they will do well. Our and what they mean. She students have learned also went over the STAR “It’s okay to not know, but assessment reports and it’s not okay to not try.” emphasized that our chilTeachers were able to dren need to spend time share the results from the reading, at school and at various assessments home. Tips for helping our we’ve done at parent- children from preschool teacher conferences. We through third grade were were thrilled with the also discussed and handturnout Thursday and outs were sent home. Friday. We had 70 children Once again, our sturepresented in kinder- dents will be treated to a garten; 64 children repre- preview of Fall Festival on sented in first grade; 67 Friday, Nov. 4. Students children represented in can earn tickets to second grade; and 65 chil- “spend” on Friday by havdren represented in third ing good behavior grade. This means that between now and Nov. 4. our teachers were able to We will be rewarding stumeet with 65 percent of dents with prizes and our students’ parents in books at Fun Friday. these two days. If you Be sure that you save were unable to meet with the date – Nov. 5! It will your child’s teacher, be a great day of fun at please feel free to contact East Chester, and all the the office at 989-8145 and money raised will be used we will do our best to for the children of our schedule an appointment school. for you during planning In honor of our Fall time. We have to work Break trips … Walt together to help all our Disney said, “There is children be successful. more treasure in books East Chester’s PTO than in all the pirate’s loot met on Tuesday night. on Treasure Island.”

Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Jacob Robertson makes big music in celebration of a Chester County touchdown in the first quarter Friday at Eagle Stadium.

Travis Roberts of the Marching Eagles leads the cadence as they entertained the big crowd at Chester County football game Friday at Eagle Stadium.

High school seniors can sample college life during University of Memphis Campus Day on November 5 High school seniors will find answers to their questions about college life when the University of Memphis holds Campus Day from 11 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5. Campus Day is free, but registration is necessary; the deadline for reservations is Oct. 28. Online registration is available at http://recruit-

ment.memphis.edu. Campus Day, which is also open to parents, will begin with lunch and entertainment by the University’s pop music group, Sound Fuzion. U of M administrators will welcome visitors. Guests will hear from current University students, parents, and U of M representatives as they talk

about the admissions process, scholarships and financial aid, academic programs, residence life, and student services. Guests will also have an opportunity to visit academic departments of their choice, talk with faculty, and tour the University campus. For more information, call 901678-2169 or 800-669-2678.

Plans for Fall Festival are well under way. Our Fall Festival will be Saturday, Nov. 5. Meal ticket forms were sent home on Monday. We will once again be serving turkey and dressing plates as well as hotdog plates. Our students will be entertaining everyone with a musical program. We have several wonderful items already for our auction: four Parkhopper tickets to Walt Disney World, a silver sponsorship to FHU’s Benefit Dinner featuring Bob Newhart, a $20 Dick’s Card, a Grizzlies Prize Package as well as class projects and baskets. You don’t want to miss bidding on the scrapbook, ice cream sundae, spa, movie, family fun, chocolate, arts and crafts, winter car care, pet care,

By Amy Wooley Plans are being made for our annual Fall Festival for Friday, Nov. 4. We will once again be serving turkey and dressing as our meal. Take outs will be available beginning at 4

p.m. Tickets will be on sale Oct. 17-28. There will be prizes for students who sell the most meal tickets. Please support Jacks Creek Elementary students in this effort. Second and third-grade students will be able to hear the Standards on Thursday. Kindergarten and first graders look forward to a field trip to the Circle Y ranch on Thursday. Thanks to all of the parents and guardians that attended Parent-Teacher conferences. We appreciate the support of our parents and community.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Page 8-B

CHESTER COUNTY SCHOOLS FUND RAISERS For School Year 2011-2012 Approved by Principals and Director of Schools JACKS CREEK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Computers for Education School Partner Cards PTO – Membership Drive

Aug. 19-26 Aug. 19-Sept. 2 Sept. 6-23

Fall School Pictures PTO – Fall Festival Spring School Pictures

Sept. 25 Nov. 4 April 2012

WEST CHESTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PTO - Membership Drive Fall School Pictures PTO - Fall Festival Computers for Education Catalog Sales Spring School Pictures Yearbook

Aug. 15-26 September Oct. 29 Feb. 7-11 Feb. 27 March Jan. 30- Feb. 3

EAST CHESTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PTO – Membership Drive Aug. 26 – Sept. 1 PTO – T-shirt Sales Sept. 20-Oct. 6 PTO- Fall Festival Nov. 5 PTO-Yankee Candle Sales Feb. 15 – March 10 PTO-Animal Land Feb. 4 School Pictures, Fall, Spring, Cap & Gown Sept., Jan., March Computers for Education Feb. 6 - 10 Yearbook Jan. 9 - May CHESTER COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL PTS - Membership Drive PTO -Pancake Breakfast Ticket Sales Library - Bookfair PTO -Pageant

Aug. 22-Sept. 7 Oct. 26 – Nov. 12 Jan. 23 – Feb. 3 February

CHESTER COUNTY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL Football - T-shirt Sales Membership Drive Student Council –Junior Miss Henderson Pageant Student Council – Banquet Courtesy Club – Walkathon Student Health Council – Parent/Student Basketball/Volleyball Games CHESTER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL Spikers Club (Volleyball) – Sponsor banner Spikers Club (Volleyball) – Chicken Junior Class- Spaghetti Supper Junior Class - Carwash Junior Class – Carwash Band – Football game concessions Band - Car Wash Band – Christmas Wrapping paper Yearbook - Fall Pictures Freshman Class - Homecoming T-shirt sales Senior Class – Magazine sales Yearbook - Baby pictures Yearbook - Ad Sales Academic Decathlon-Sponsorships Academic Decathlon – BBQ chicken sales Yearbook - Yearbook Sales FCCLA - Catalog sales Sophomore Class – Yard Sale Sophomore Class – T-shirt sales Student Council –Spirit Chain & Homecoming Parade TCA – T-shirt sales HOSA – Candle Sales

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools Monday, Oct. 24 Chicken tenders Corn, purple hull peas Turnip greens Whole grain roll Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #5 Tuesday, Oct. 25 Steak and gravy Mashed potatoes/gravy Green peas, roll Tiny tri potatoes Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #6 Wednesday, Oct. 26 Hamburger Fries, baked beans Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #7 Thursday, Oct. 27 Lasagna/meat sauce Green beans Glazed baby carrots breadstick Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #1 Friday, Oct. 28

Pepperoni pizza wedge Baked potato Broccoli/cheese Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #2

Chester County Middle School Monday, Oct. 24 Chicken nuggets Mashed potatoes Green beans, rolls Salad bar Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #5 Tuesday, Oct. 25 Spaghetti/meat sauce Sweet potatoes Purple hull peas Salad bar, Texas toast Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #6 Wednesday, Oct. 26 Breaded chicken sandwich Sweet potato puffs Baked beans, salad bar Trimmings Pudding/white top hat/cherry Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #7 Thursday, Oct. 27 Country fried steak Mashed potatoes, roll Pinto beans, salad bar Baked apples

Aug. – Sept. Aug. – Sept. December March April May

July 18-Aug. 1 July 30 Oct. 6 Oct. 20 Oct. 27 Aug. – Oct. Aug. 27 Aug. 23-25 Aug. – Sept. August Sept. – Oct. Aug. – Oct. Aug. – Oct. Aug. – Nov. Aug. 27 Aug. – Dec. Aug. 10 – Aug. 24 September Aug. – Sept. Fall Fall September

Fruit, milk choice Or Schoolable #1 Friday, Oct. 28 Pizza Baked potato, salad bar California blend Fruit choice, milk choice Or Schoolable #2

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, Oct. 24 Chicken rings or Philly steak/cheese with Peppers/onions Mashed potatoes, rolls Green peas, salad bar Tuesday, Oct. 25 Spaghetti/meat sauce Or ham/cheese sandwich Glazed sweet potatoes Green beans Salad bar, slaw Texas toast Wednesday, Oct. 26 Cheeseburger or fish/bun Tater pals, slaw Baked beans Salad bar/trimmings Chocolate chip cookie Thursday, Oct. 27 Country fried steak or Chicken/dumplings Seasoned diced potatoes

Girls Soccer – Pork Chop Sale CCHS Choir - Gold Party Girls Basketball – Sponsor Board Student Council – Miss Henderson Pageant FBLA - Catalog Sales FCCLA – Cookbook Sales, Magnetic whiteboards FFA – Fruit sales Softball - Chicken sale FFA - BBQ Chicken sale FCCLA - Cookbooks & Cards Softball/Golf - Golf Tournament FTA – Sales - Sausage & Biscuits Softball - Sign Sales Student Council - Basketball Homecoming T-shirts Student Council - Valentine’s Day Sales Mu Alpha Theta - Compatibility Match Girls Basketball - Strawberry Sales CCHS Yearbook – Spring Pictures FTA - Sales – Sausage & Biscuits Boys Soccer – Pork Chop Sale CCHS Choir - Car Wash FBLA - Car Wash

New arrivals are: DVDs: Something Borrowed; X-Men: First Class; Prom; Jane Eyre; Jumping the Broom; Rio; The Other Side of Heaven; Hoodwinked Too!; Your Ticket to Outdoors, Season 2; Wonderous Oblivion; Talkin’ Turkey With the Pros; Sci-Fi Collectors Set; and Yogaworks for Everybody JUVENILE LITERATURE: Thirst; Boyfriend Season; Succubus Revealed; Supernaturally; Bloodlines; Never Have I Ever; Extraordinary; Ten Little Caterpillars; Amelia Bedelia’s First Day of School; Amelia Bedelia’s First Field Trip; Meet Marie Grace; Dinosaur Dig; Llama Llama Home With Mama; A Smart Kid’s Guide to Playing Online Games; I’m Here; Shelfter; Game Over; Bear’s Loose Tooth; A Smart Kid’s Guide to Internet Privacy; The 39 Clues: The Medusa Plot; Otis and the Tornado; Troubles for Cecile; Meet Cecile; Cecile’s Gift; MarieGrace Makes A Difference;

Purple hull peas Turnip greens Salad bar, cornbread Friday, Oct. 28 Pizza or tuna salad plates Lima beans, corn Sweet potato waves Salad bar

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Monday, Oct. 24 Chicken nuggets (2 lines) Salad bar, pizza, batter bites Seasoned diced potatoes Black-eyed peas Steamed cabbage, rolls Tuesday, Oct. 25 Spaghetti/meat sauce or Clux Delux/bun/fries Salad bar/crackers Tiny whole potatoes Green beans, corn Coleslaw, breadsticks Wednesday, Oct. 26 Cheeseburger, hotdog Pizza bar/fries Salad bar/crackers Fries, baked beans Steamed broccoli Apple sticks

Oct. 7 Open ended Oct. 1-30 October 20 Sept. 26 – Oct. 17 Oct. 5-19 Oct. 24 – Nov. 18 Nov. or Jan. Nov. 12 Nov. 11-30 Spring 2012 November Jan. – March January February Feb. 1 – 15 February March March March 23 Spring March or April

Marie-Grace and the Orphans; First Facts; Ariana Leaves San Francisco; Judy Moody: Girl Detective and 11 Experiments That Failed ADULT NON-FICTION: Autism Tomorrow: The Complete Guide to Helping Your Child Thrive In the Real World; Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness; Do I Get My Allowance Before Or After I’m Grounded?; In My Time by Dick Cheney; Code Talker; What It Is Like to Go to War; Guinness World Records 2012; Life is Not A Stage: From Broadway Baby to Lovely Lady by Florence Henderson; Reelfoot Lake Images; Leonardo’s Legacy; Look for the Moon In the Morning; I Love Lucy: A Celebration of All Things Lucy; The Lazy Couponer: How to Save $25,000.00 Per Year in Just 45 Minutes; The Rogue: Searching for the Real Sarah Palin by Joe McGinniss; American Pickers Guide to Picking; Almost Christian: What the

Faith of Our Teenagers Says About the American Church; The Art of Painting Animals On Rocks; Brushwork Essentials; and Artist’s Photo Reference ADULT FICTION: Only Time Will Tell by Jeffrey Archer; Second Nature by Jacqueline Mitchard; The Most Dangerous Thing by Laura Lippman; Prey by Linda Howard; The Race by Clive Cussler; The Sixes by Kate White; Dark Predator by Christine Feehan; Kill Me If You Can by James Patterson; Remember Tuesday Morning by Karen Kingsbury; I Don’t Know How She Does It by Allison Pearson; Son of Stone by Stuart Woods; Wife-InLaw by Haywood Smith; New York to Dallas by JD Robb; Feast Day of Fools by James Lee Burke; The Affair by Lee Child; The Leftovers by Tom Perrotta; and Love Finds You in Poetry, Texas by Janice Hanna. See you at the library!

Thursday, Oct. 27 Baked lemon pepper chicken Pizza/baked sweet potato waves Salad bar Mashed potatoes Green beans Glazed carrots

Friday, Oct. 28 Fish scroodles/hushpuppies Pizza/batter bites Meatball subs Salad bar/crackers Macaroni/cheese White beans, coleslaw Turnip greens


Page 9-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

FOR SALE FOR SALE – 1 Acre —- $6,000 —- $100 Down —- $100 / Month. 2 Acres —- $10,000 —- $100 Down —- $100 / Month. 3 Acres —- $15,000 —- $150 Down —$150 / Month. 5 Acres —$18,000 —- $200 Down —- $200 / Month. 10 Acres —- $35,000 — - $350 Down —- $350 / Month. 15 Acres —- $48,000 —- $500 Down —- $500 / Month. Nice big lots, sowed with hay and winter grass seed. Has driveways, dozer work done, electricity. Chester County, some close to Jackson, Henderson, Jacks Creek, Mifflin. No restrictions and NO CREDIT CHECK (will also take cash). 731-989-4859 —- 7 days a week —- Attorney does the paperwork. (TFC) FOR SALE – School Uniform Pants, Girls Size 12. Five Pairs of Khaki, One Pair Navy, $25. Call 608-2915. (24P) FOR SALE – Girls Pageant / Prom Dresses. Size 7-8 Turquoise, $65. Size 7-8 Gold, $65. Size 10 Fuschia, $80. Size 12 White, $65. Size 14 Turquoise, $65. Wedding Dress, New with Tags, Size 10-12, $295. Rhonda Frye 731-989-3340 or 731-983-0049. (24C) FOR SALE – Best Buy in Chester Co. 914 W. Main. 1600 Sq. Ft., Brick, 3 BR, 2 BA, Large Den with Fireplace, Sunroom, In Ground Pool, Pool House with Full Bath, New Roof, New Heat & Air, New Windows 2 Years Ago, Over 1 Acre Lot. $139,000 Value —- Sale for $109,000. Payments about $550 / Month. Call 608-2225. (TFC) FOR SALE – 2 Campers, Washer & Dryer, Love Seat, Home Interior Pictures, Antique China Cabinet, and Miscellaneous. Call 731-803-3053. (24P) FOR SALE – 1996 Mobile Home. 16 x 60, 2 BR, 2 BA. Stove, Refrigerator, Front & Back Porches, Underpinning. Must be moved. Call 343-0626 or 4350164. (24P) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – New 4 BR, 2 Bath Homes, Delivery & Setup. $44,500. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER of Corinth, MS. 1/4 Mile Past Hospital on Hwy. 72 West. 662-287-4600. (35C) FOR SALE – Oak Sofa Table, Excellent Condition. 989-7336 or 608-3999. (24C) FOR SALE – Green recliner, $150. Medical lift chair, mauve, $350. Good condition. Call 6087141 or 989-2249. (24P) FOR SALE – Washer & Dryer, Good Condition. $125 for both. Call 731-989-3126 or 608-0723. (24P) FREE PUPPIES to good home. Pom-Poo mix, cute and furry. First shots and wormed. 2 left. Call 731-608-0763 or 731-6080447. (24P) FOR SALE – 1999 Chevy Blazer, 2 Door, Automatic, V6, 2WD. $2,200. Call 608-2437. (24P) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – New 3 BR, 2 Bath Homes,

Delivery & Setup. $29,950. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER of Corinth, MS. 1/4 Mile Past Hospital on Hwy. 72 West. 662-287-4600. (35C) FOR SALE – Commercial, 2.5 Acres, Chester County, Hwy. 45 S, Good Frontage. $34,900. 17 Acres, Mostly Wetland. $5,900. Owner Financing on Both. Call 731-608-0763 or 731-608-0447. (24P) SELLING Due to Health – 1998 Cherokee Classic, runs great, looks great, loaded, clean motor – uses no oil, electric windows, CD player, clean inside, no tears or rust, wheelchair on back. Heritage Towers. Call 731-9899778. (24P) FOR SALE – Clearance Sale on Display Homes. Save $$ on your New Home. Double & Singlewides available. Large Selection. WINDHAM HOMES, Corinth, MS. 1-888-287-6996. (TFC) FOR SALE – Cocker Spaniel Puppies, CKC Registered, Shots and Wormed. Call 453-5051. (24P) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – New 2 BR Homes, Delivery & Setup. $25,950. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER of Corinth, MS. 1/4 Mile Past Hospital on Hwy. 72 West. 662287-4600. (35C) FOR SALE – Turnip and Mustard Greens. You pick $6. Sweet Potatoes, Apples, and Pumpkins. 988-5368 or 217-4951. (24P)

FOR RENT FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. $1,500. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT – 2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes in Lexington. Weekly With Utilities or Monthly Without. Call 731-968-9689. (31P) FOR RENT – 155 Tony Thomas Lane. 3 BR, 2 BA, CH/A, 1 CCP. $585. Call 989-4658. (24P) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 2 BA Mobile Home near Chickasaw. NO PETS. $350 / Month, $200 Deposit. Call 983-5707. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, garage, appliances, fenced yard, near Chickasaw. 180 Taylor Trail. $550 / Month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath house, 2 acres, carport. $500

/ Month. 847 US Highway 45N. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

Road, Middleton, TN. Call for Catalog (731) 376-0011. (TnScan)

APARTMENT FOR LEASE – 2 BR, 1 Bath w/ Garage. Application, References, Deposit Required. $575 / Month. Minimum 12-Month Lease. Fawn Dr. Call 731-422-2284 (Home), 431-1755 (Cell), or 234-2151 (Cell). (TFC)

DIVORCE with or without children $99.95. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (TnScan)

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, 3 acres. 765 Cemetery Road, Enville. $550. United Country Realty 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3-bedroom brick house, carport, appliances, fenced yard. 478 Woods. $625 month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 2 bath house, fenced yard. 1145 Maness. $625 / Month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 4 bedroom, 3 bath, double garage, 4.61 acres. 3185 Needmore. $1050 / Month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Renovated 3 bedroom, 2 bath, living room, den, double garage, storm shelter. 1100 Stewart (Sweetlips). $950 / Month. Call 989-7488. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS BRANSON, MO – 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Cabins at Green Mountain. Sleeps 6. 7 Nights $600. Call 731424-7677 or 731-267-1854. (24P) WANT TO KEEP Your Independence, but need a little help at home? Experienced Caregiver with References. Call Pauline at 731-439-2458. (25P) HUNTING LEASE – 100 Acres, 5 Minutes from Town in Chester County. $650 / Year. Call 731989-8380. (24P) WANTED LAND OR STANDING TIMBER on 10 acre tracts and larger. Pine & hardwood. Carter Timber & Land. Since 1993. Ted Carter 731-607-0777. (TFC)

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ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com (TnScan) 30’ PERMANENT LIVING TRAVEL TRAILERS, Refrigerator, Table, Couch, Bunk beds & Queen bed. Restored by RV Service Department. Delivery and set up available. $4500. 901475-7555. Rvboatworld.com (TnScan) DID YOU USE THE Osteoporosis Drug Fosamax (Alendronate)? If you experienced femur fracture (upper leg), you may be entitled compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR PRE-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Tuition Assistance, Medical Benefits, Monthly Paycheck - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan)

ARE YOU PREGNANT? A successful, financially secure, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be full-time mom & devoted dad. Expenses paid. Call Mindy & Rich. (ask for michelle/adam). 1800-790-5260. (TnScan)

NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)

2 - GROCERY STORE & Food Service Equipment Auctions, Nov 5th Lexington, KY & Nov 12th Nashville, TN. Complete sale bill & Terms. www.taylorauction.net or Auctionzip.com, ID1680. Mark Taylor Auctioneer: KY N6138, TN 5525/TN FIRM 4640, 618889-6899. (TnScan)

HIRING DRIVERS, INCREASED PAY SCALE, Flatbed $0.36 - Dry Van $0.35 Reefer $0.36 - Flatbed & Reefer $0.365 Available Incentive $0.035. Late Model Equipment, Lots of miles. Health, Vision, Life, Dental, Vacation, Holidays, 401K. Jerry Barber 800-826-9460 Ext.5, www.johnrreed.net (TnScan)

100 HEAD SELL Black Angus Female Production Sale. Noon, Saturday, October 29. Lone Oaks Farm, 10000 Lake Hardeman

FedEx GROUND CONTRACTOR NEEDS Teams or Solos willing to team. Must have ClassA CDL, Clean MVR, Up to 44¢ split, Weekly Hometime. Call Joe 901-485-3248 or 662-890-9666 (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan) FedEx GROUND CONTRACTOR NEEDS Team Drivers with Class-A CDL * Weekly Hometime * * Weekly Pay * * Medical Benefits * Qualifications: minimum 1yr OTR, Clean MVR. Call 901-2678670, 731-335-3445, 731-4468123 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC Currently hiring OTR Drivers. Good equipment, home most weekends Option to run the weekends, good benefits, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-684-9140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com. (TnScan) VAN/ FLATBED. GREAT HOMETIME- $.40 loaded/ .27 empty+ Fees, Premiums & Pd Vacation. CDL-A 23yoa & 1yr. Recent T/T or Flatbed exp. 877261-2101 flatbedjobs.info schillispecialized.info (TnScan) TRUCK DRIVER WANTED. MUST have CDL and Hazmat. 901-476-2684. (TnScan) FEDEX GROUND CONTRACTOR NOW Hiring for over the road truck drivers, located in or near Olive Branch, MS. Please contact Steven Johnson 601-3830439 or johnson202962@bellsouth.net (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A OTR DRIVERS Start up to 44¢ per mile!! • Lease Purchase Available! • Great Hometime • Experience Req’d. Call Today! 800-441-4271 X TN100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan) DRIVERS REGIONAL RUNS, 40¢/Mile - .45¢/Mile, All Miles! Home Weekends! Class A CDL +1 Year OTR Exp. New Lease Purchase Program No Money Down! 1-866-269-2119 www.landair.com (TnScan) DRIVER $2000 SIGN ON Bonus! Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST Expedited 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877)

369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! We Have The Miles! OTR positions available! Teams Needed!! Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d 800-942-2104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.totalms.com (TnScan) GET BACK TO BASICS. Solid Miles + Good Pay + New Equipment = Your Success! Great Benefits & Hometime. Dry Van & Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888801-5295 (TnScan) DRIVERS- REGIONAL DRIVERS EARN 37 cpm w/1+ years experience (top pay .425 cpm.) Only 4-12 Months Experience? Paid Refresher Course Available. Call 888-362-8608, or visit AVERITTcareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer. (TnScan) DRIVER- CDL-A EXPERIENCED OTR Drivers Up to $3000 Bonus Up to .39¢ Per Mile 888-378-7137, 6 mo. OTR exp. & CDL Req’d www.usatruck.jobs (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997- Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & D V D : www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) GUN SHOW. OCT. 22-23 Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-4. Knoxville, Chilhowee Park (3301 Magnolia Ave) Exit 392 A Off 1-40. Info: (563) 927-8176 (TnScan) CASH FOR TENNESSEE STATE Shaped License Plates (most yellow on black, no year) with names such as: Bristol, Tenn.; Copper Basin; Dayton Monkey Town; Petros, Tenn.; Smoky Mountains; White House; Grand Ole Opry; Enjoy our State Parks; etc. Call Sam 423-2828232 (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 94 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 22 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) ARE YOU PREGNANT? A successful, financially secure, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be full-time mom & devoted dad. Expenses paid. Call Mindy & Rich. (ask for michelle/adam). 1800-790-5260. (TnScan) 2 - GROCERY STORE & Food Service Equipment Auctions, Nov 5th Lexington, KY & Nov 12th Nashville, TN. Complete sale bill & Terms. www.taylorauction.net or Auctionzip.com, ID1680. Mark Taylor Auctioneer: KY N6138, TN 5525/TN FIRM 4640, 618889-6899. (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011 PAGE 10-B 100 HEAD SELL Black Angus Female Production Sale. Noon, Saturday, October 29. Lone Oaks Farm, 10000 Lake Hardeman Road, Middleton, TN. Call for Catalog (731) 376-0011. (TnScan) DIVORCE with or without children $99.95. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (TnScan) ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com (TnScan) 30’ PERMANENT LIVING TRAVEL TRAILERS, Refrigerator, Table, Couch, Bunk beds & Queen bed. Restored by RV Service Department. Delivery and set up available. $4500. 901475-7555. Rvboatworld.com (TnScan) DID YOU USE THE Osteoporosis Drug Fosamax (Alendronate)? If you experienced femur fracture (upper leg), you may be entitled compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR PRE-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Tuition Assistance, Medical Benefits, Monthly Paycheck - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) HIRING DRIVERS, INCREASED PAY SCALE, Flatbed $0.36 - Dry Van $0.35 Reefer $0.36 - Flatbed & Reefer $0.365 Available Incentive $0.035. Late Model Equipment,

Lots of miles. Health, Vision, Life, Dental, Vacation, Holidays, 401K. Jerry Barber 800-826-9460 Ext.5, www.johnrreed.net (TnScan) FedEx GROUND CONTRACTOR NEEDS Teams or Solos willing to team. Must have ClassA CDL, Clean MVR, Up to 44¢ split, Weekly Hometime. Call Joe 901-485-3248 or 662-890-9666 (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan) FedEx GROUND CONTRACTOR NEEDS Team Drivers with Class-A CDL * Weekly Hometime * * Weekly Pay * * Medical Benefits * Qualifications: minimum 1yr OTR, Clean MVR. Call 901-2678670, 731-335-3445, 731-4468123 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC Currently hiring OTR Drivers. Good equipment, home most weekends Option to run the weekends, good benefits, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-684-9140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com. (TnScan) VAN/ FLATBED. GREAT HOMETIME- $.40 loaded/ .27 empty+ Fees, Premiums & Pd Vacation. CDL-A 23yoa & 1yr. Recent T/T or Flatbed exp. 877261-2101 flatbedjobs.info schillispecialized.info (TnScan) TRUCK DRIVER WANTED. MUST have CDL and Hazmat. 901-476-2684. (TnScan) FEDEX GROUND CONTRACTOR NOW Hiring for over the road truck drivers, located in or near Olive Branch, MS. Please contact Steven Johnson 601-3830439 or johnson202962@bellsouth.net (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A OTR DRIVERS Start up to 44¢ per mile!! • Lease Purchase Available! • Great Hometime • Experience Req’d. Call Today! 800-441-4271 X TN100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan) DRIVERS REGIONAL RUNS, 40¢/Mile - .45¢/Mile, All Miles! Home Weekends! Class A CDL +1 Year OTR Exp. New Lease Purchase Program No Money Down! 1-866-269-2119 www.landair.com (TnScan) DRIVER $2000 SIGN ON Bonus! Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST Expedited 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money

Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! We Have The Miles! OTR positions available! Teams Needed!! Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d 800-942-2104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.totalms.com (TnScan) GET BACK TO BASICS. Solid Miles + Good Pay + New Equipment = Your Success! Great Benefits & Hometime. Dry Van & Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888801-5295 (TnScan) DRIVERS- REGIONAL DRIVERS EARN 37 cpm w/1+ years experience (top pay .425 cpm.) Only 4-12 Months Experience? Paid Refresher Course Available. Call 888-362-8608, or visit AVERITTcareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer. (TnScan) DRIVER- CDL-A EXPERIENCED OTR Drivers Up to $3000 Bonus Up to .39¢ Per Mile 888-378-7137, 6 mo. OTR exp. & CDL Req’d www.usatruck.jobs (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997- Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & D V D : www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) GUN SHOW. OCT. 22-23 Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-4. Knoxville, Chilhowee Park (3301 Magnolia Ave) Exit 392 A Off 1-40. Info:

(563) 927-8176 (TnScan) CASH FOR TENNESSEE STATE Shaped License Plates (most yellow on black, no year) with names such as: Bristol, Tenn.; Copper Basin; Dayton Monkey Town; Petros, Tenn.; Smoky Mountains; White House; Grand Ole Opry; Enjoy our State Parks; etc. Call Sam 423-2828232 (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 94 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 22 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) ARE YOU PREGNANT? A successful, financially secure, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be full-time mom & devoted dad. Expenses paid. Call Mindy & Rich. (ask for michelle/adam). 1800-790-5260. (TnScan) 2 - GROCERY STORE & Food Service Equipment Auctions, Nov 5th Lexington, KY & Nov 12th Nashville, TN. Complete sale bill & Terms. www.taylorauction.net or Auctionzip.com, ID1680. Mark Taylor Auctioneer: KY N6138, TN 5525/TN FIRM 4640, 618889-6899. (TnScan) 100 HEAD SELL Black Angus Female Production Sale. Noon, Saturday, October 29. Lone Oaks Farm, 10000 Lake Hardeman Road, Middleton, TN. Call for Catalog (731) 376-0011. (TnScan) DIVORCE with or without children $99.95. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. FREE information.

Public Notices NOTICE TO CREDITORS As Required by Chapter No. 426 Public Acts of Tennessee 1997 TCA §30-306 Case Number 2011-PR In the Matter of the Estate of Everett Lee Weaver, Deceased Notice is hereby given that on October 11, 2011, Letters Testamentary, in respect to the Estate of Everett Lee Weaver, who died testate on October 11, 2011, were issued to the undersigned by the Chancery Court Clerk of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-residents, having claims, matured or unma-

tured, against his/her Estate are required to file the same with the Clerk of the above-named Court within four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting, as the case may be) of this notice, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. All persons indebted to the above Estate must come forward and make proper settlement with the undersigned at once. This 11th day of October, 2011. Cyndi Kilzer, Executor John E. Talbott, Attorney Cornelia Hall, Clerk and Master

SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-789-0198 24/7. (TnScan) ALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-4819409 www.CenturaOnline.com (TnScan) 30’ PERMANENT LIVING TRAVEL TRAILERS, Refrigerator, Table, Couch, Bunk beds & Queen bed. Restored by RV Service Department. Delivery and set up available. $4500. 901475-7555. Rvboatworld.com (TnScan) DID YOU USE THE Osteoporosis Drug Fosamax (Alendronate)? If you experienced femur fracture (upper leg), you may be entitled compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR PRE-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK.

*Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Tuition Assistance, Medical Benefits, Monthly Paycheck - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)


Page 11-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011

Public Notices NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE`S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated December 21, 2006, executed by MELONY PHELPS, STEVEN PHELPS, conveying certain real property therein described to CARTER STANFILL AND KIRK PLLC, as Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee recorded December 29, 2006, in Deed Book 294, Page 478-491; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to US BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO LASALLE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE MERRILL LYNCH FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-FF2 who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose, if required pursuant to T.C.A. § 35-5117, was given in accordance with Tennessee law; and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Rubin Lublin Suarez Serrano TN LLC, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin Lublin Suarez Serrano TN LLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on October 27, 2011 at 11:00 AM at the Main Entrance steps of the Chester County Courthouse , located in Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: TRACT ONE: BEGINNING AT A STAKE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WILLIAM DANCY LOT AND THE WEST EDGE OF A 20 FOOT ROAD EASEMENT; RUNS THENCE WITH THE WEST MARGAIN OF SAID EASEMENT S 15 DEGREES 02 MINUTES E 87 FEET TO A STAKE AT THE NORTHEASET CORNER OF THE W.C. JONES LOT; THENCE WITH THE NORTH LINE OF JONES WEST 100 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE, BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF JONES; THENCE N 15 DEGREES 02 MINUTES W 70 FEET TO A STAKE; THENCE WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE WILLIAM DANCY LOT N 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES E 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.17 ACRE, MORE OR LESS, AS SURVEYED BY RICHARD CLARENCE DODD, ON MARCH 23, 1990. THIS BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO STEVEN PHELPS AND WIFE, MELONEE PHELPS BY DEED DATED MAY 23, 2003, AND OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 234, PAGE 69, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. TRACT TWO: BEGINNING AT A STAKE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THIS TRACT OF LAND IN THE NORTHERN SEVERANCE LINE OF ETHEL TUCKER IN THE VICINITY OF THE FIELD ROAD HERINAFTER MENTIONED: RUNS THENCE NORTH WITH THE SEVERANCE LINE OF TUCKER 60 FEET TO A STAKE; RUNS THENCE WEST WITH THE SEVERANCE LINE OF TUCKER 100 FEET TO A STAKE; RUNS THENCE SOUTH WITH THE SEVERANCE LINE OF TUCKER 50 FEET TO A STAKE; RUN THENCE EAST 100 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. INCLUDED IN THIS CONVEYANCE IS A RIGHT OF WAY FOR ROAD PURPOSES 20 FEET IN WIDTH OVER LAND OWNED BY THE SAID ETHEL TUCKER FROM THE EASTERN PORTION OF HER LAND TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE TRACT OF LAND HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED AND CONVEYED HEREUNDER, THE SAME TO BE 20 FEET IN WIDTH AND WHICH THE SAID ETHEL TUCKER COVENANTS AND AGREES THAT SHE WILL HAVE GRADED AND OPENED UP TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE MEANS OF INGRESS AND EGRESS TO THE LOT ABOVE DESCRIBED AND CONVEYED HEREUNDER. THIS BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO STEVEN PHELPS AND WIFE, MELONEE PHELPS BY DEED DATED MAY 23, 2003, AND OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 234, PAGE 69, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. PARCEL ID: 033-012.03 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 1145 TUCKER COVE, HENDERSON, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): MELONY PHELPS, STEVEN PHELPS OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES, LLC ASSIGNEE OF HSBC BANK NEVADA, N.A. The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Rubin Lublin Suarez Serrano TN

LLC, Substitute Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38103 www.rubinlublin.com/property-listings.php Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on April 22, 2005, BRENDA SMITH (DECEASED), by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 267, at Page 398, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Sixty Three Thousand Six Hundred Nine and 70/100 Dollars ($63,609.70), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointment executed on September 22, 2011, and recorded in Record Book 354, at Page 277, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MIDAMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Monday, October 31, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situate in the 3rd Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, bounded as described in a Quitclaim Deed from David E. Boggs and wife, Amanda G. Boggs, to Brenda Smith, dated March 28, 2005, and of record in Deed Book 266, page 40, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Brenda Smith died on December 14, 2010, apparently intestate as no estate opened and no will presented for probate, and if such is the case then the property owned by her would, under the laws of descent and distribution, pass to and become the property of her heirs at law. Map 010, Parcel 031.03 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 105 Max Lott Lane, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 6th day of October, 2011. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default having been made in the payment of the debts and obligations secured to be paid by that certain Deed of Trust executed on August 20, 1999, by David W. Wadlington and Carla A. Wadlington to TIM, INC, Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, under Book No. 176, Page 767, (“Deed of Trust”); and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of

Trust was last transferred and assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; and WHEREAS, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., the current owner and holder of said Deed of Trust, (the “Owner and Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117 (i), not less than sixty (60) days prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose was properly sent, if so required; and NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Owner and Holder, and that the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee, or its duly appointed attorneys or agents, by virtue of the power and authority vested in it, will on Thursday, October 27, 2011, commencing at 12:00 PM at the Main entrance of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: Beginning at an iron pin on the east margin of North Avenue (19 feet at right angles from centerline) at the southwest corner of David Woods as recorded in Deed Book 124, page 482, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence with Woods south line north 83 degrees 43 minutes east a distance of 198.41 feet to an iron pin at the northwest corner of Linda Patterson; thence with Patterson’s west line south 8 degrees 23 minutes east a distance of 87.58 feet to an iron pin at the northeast corner of James Whittle; thence with Whittle’s north line south 80 degrees 22 minutes west a distance of 183.34 feet to an iron pin on the east margin of north Avenue; thence with the east margin of North Avenue north 17 degrees 00 minutes west a distance of 100 feet to the point beginning. Containing 0.41 acre, surveyed by David Hall Land Surveying Company, R.L.S. # 943, on May 2, 1997. Being the same property conveyed to David Wadlington and wife, Carla A. Wadlington by deed of record in Book 176 page 765 in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 620 North Avenue, Henderson, TN 38340 CURRENT OWNER(S): David W. Wadlington and Carla A. Wadlington The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDERS: London Financial Group, Discover Bank, Target National Bank/Target Visa OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: N/A All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee c/o RMW Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 File No.: 432.1002324TN Web Site: www.jflegal.com

FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made by failure to comply with the terms and conditions of a certain Deed of Trust dated January 16, 1998, executed by Shannon M. Rapoza and Jeffrey A. McKee, recorded in Book 159, Page 136, Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, and wherein the said Shannon M. Rapoza and Jeffrey A. McKee conveyed the property therein described to Commonwealth Insurance, Trustee, to secure the indebtedness therein described, and the entire indebtedness having been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust and note, and payment not having been made as demanded; and the undersigned, Joel E. Jordan, of 3326 Aspen Grove Drive #604, Franklin, Tennessee 37067, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee in the place and stead of Commonwealth Insurance, Trustee, said appointment being set forth in the Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, notice is hereby given that I, Joel E. Jordan, Substitute Trustee, having been requested so to do by the lawful owner of said indebtedness, will on Friday, October 28, 2011, at 12:00 Noon at the Front door of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, free from equity of redemption, homestead and dower, and all other exemptions of every kind, all of which are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, the following described real estate in Chester County, Tennessee: BEGINNING at a cotton picker

spindle in the center of Hughes Road, being the southeast corner of Troy Wilson’s property, runs thence with the center of said road these calls, south 34° west 75 feet, south 50° west 50 feet, south 60° west 50 feet, south 72° west 70 feet, south 84° west 63 feet, north 80° 30’ west, 65 feet and north 70° west 25 feet to a cotton picker spindle, thence north 6° 40’ east 223.91 feet to an iron pin in the south boundary line of Troy Wilson’s property, thence south 73° 80’ east 385.1 feet with said south boundary line of Troy Wilson’s property to the point of beginning, containing 1.21 acres, as surveyed by L.W. Yates, R.L.S. No. 486, on November 12, 1997. Being the same property conveyed to Jeffrey A. McKee and Shannon M. Rapoza, by Warranty Deed from Wesley Jenkins dated January 16, 1998 and recorded in Record Book 159, Page 134, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Included in this conveyance is a 1998 Fleetwood mobile home, Serial #MSFLW25AB010130C12. This is improved property known as Hughes Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340. The 2010 taxes are currently due and payable. The 2009 and 2008 taxes are currently past due and delinquent. Said sale is subject to any and all unpaid taxes and any other prior claims, liens, easements, set back lines and restrictions. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY, TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE. IN THE EVENT THE HIGHEST BIDDER DOES NOT HONOR THE HIGHEST BID WITHIN 24 HOURS, THE NEXT BIDDER AT THE NEXT HIGHEST BID WILL BE DEEMED THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER. THE NOTICE OF RIGHT TO FORECLOSE HAS BEEN SENT AS REQUIRED BY T.C.A. §35-5-117. JOEL E. JORDAN Substitute Trustee STELTEMEIER & WESTBROOK, PLLC 3326 Aspen Grove Drive, #604 Franklin, Tennessee 37067

Notice to Creditors As Required by Chapter No. 426 Public Acts of Tennessee 1997 TCA § 30-306 Estate of Brodie Jack Johnson Notice is given that on of the 3rd day of October, 2011, Letters Testamentary (or of Administration as the case may be) in respect to the estate of Brodie Jack Johnson,, who died September 15, 2011, were issued to the undersigned by the by the Chancery Court of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and nonresident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk and of the above named court within the earlier of four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from the decedent’s date of

death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This the 3rd day of October, 2011 Dennis Jack Johnson, Executor Attorney for Estate: Larry McKenzie Cornelia Hall, Clerk and Master

Notice to Creditors As Required by Chapter No. 426 Public Acts of Tennessee 1997 TCA § 30-306 Estate of Marvin E. Weaver Notice is given that on of the 30th day of September, 2011, Letters Testamentary (or of Administration as the case may be) in respect to the estate of Marvin E. Weaver, who

died September 15, 2011, were issued to the undersigned by the by the Chancery Court of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and nonresident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk and of the above named court within the earlier of four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from the decedent’s date of death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This the 30th day of September, 2011 Ruth J. Weaver, Personal Representative Attorney for Estate: Larry McKenzie Cornelia Hall, Clerk and Master


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 20, 2011 Page 12-B

Chester County Independent 10-20-11  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 10-20-11

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