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Chester County Manufacturing Day, 2-A A

Thursday

OCTOBER 11, 2012

Independent

148th YEAR - NO. 23

chestercountyindependent.com

Your newspaper will be there for you! By Ron Dzwonkowski Associate Editor Detroit Free Press

Your newspaper will be there for you. A simple statement, but let’s break it down a bit. Your newspaper … That’s right, all yours, assembled just for you, tailored to where you live, emphasizing the things that affect you, keeping track of the people and players in your community. Your newspaper is put together by people in a newsroom that was built for you, where people work to supply information that matters to you, from the details of that crash you passed by on Tuesday to biographies of the candidates for your school board to notices of what’s on sale at your local supermarket. … Will be there for you. Be where? On your porch, in your mail, at your convenience store and, yeah, sometimes in your bushes. But also at your township hall, inside your local police department, attending your city council meeting, watching your elections. It will be where you can’t, paying attention, keeping watch, asking questions, making the record public. And you can take it wherever you’re going without worrying about battery life or Wi-Fi connections. Some say newspapers are dying, that people get their news today from the Internet, TV and radio. But where do the Internet, TV and radio get their news? From the newsrooms of America’s newspapers, large and small, which still encompass the nation’s largest newsgathering force. Other information providers may add opinion, pictures or sound, but most of the time, the facts begin in the newsrooms of newspapers, where journalists are there for you, cultivating sources, combing through records, asking tough questions. A few generations back, TV and radio were supposed to be the death of newspapers. Instead, they were catalysts for newspapers to dig further, to offer context, analysis, perspective and storytelling that the electronic media couldn’t deliver. TV and radio See FOR YOU, Page 3-A

$1.00

Stewart gets life for Cagle murder Ricky Lee Stewart, 51, of Smyrna, was sentenced last Thursday to life plus 10 years in federal prison for charges stemming from the murder of Henderson Police Captain Dennis Cagle during an attempted robbery on Dec. 10, 2009. Stewart pled guilty to a four-count indictment charging him with obstructing interstate commerce in attempting to rob the Henderson SaveA-Lot grocery store (Count 1), using and discharging a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence (Count 2), committing the first degree murder of Cagle in the perpetration of the attempted robbery through the use of a firearm (Count 3), and being a previously convicted felon in possession of a firearm (Count 4). United States District Judge J. Daniel Breen sentenced Stewart to 20 years to be served concurrent for Count 1, 10 years to be served consecutive for Count 2, life in prison for Count 3, and 10 years to be served concurrent for Count 4. He also ordered four years of supervised release, and a special assessment of $400. There is no parole in the federal system. Stewart showed little emotion as his sentence was read by Breen, and when given the opportunity, he made no statement before the court. Cagle’s widow, Judy Cagle, was too overcome with emotion to speak, but had a written statement read by a victim’s advocate. Married to Dennis Cagle for 27 years, she called him “a beloved husband and best friend, and much-loved father. He was a friend to everyone,” she said. She stated she understood the repeated delays in the judicial process, but said they had increased her pain and suffering. “There is no closure in matters like this,” she said, but that with the sentencing she and other family members would now

RICKY STEWART be able to begin the process of rebuilding their lives. “We have endorsed the plea as reasonable and practical ... but he deserves death as a penalty,” stressed Cagle. “We support it because it brings this to a conclusion.” She emphasized that Stewart made a choice when he “chose to murder my husband.” Many other members of the Cagle family were present for the sentencing, as well as numerous members of the Henderson Police Department, Chester County Sheriff’s Department, Henderson city officials, and other law enforcement agencies. Stewart’s attorney requested that his client be sent to the Federal prison at Terra Haute, Ind., a See STEWART, Page 3-A

Queen for life

Henderson Board of Mayor and Aldermen will meet in regular session at 7 p.m. on Oct. 11 in the council chamber of Henderson City Hall. On the agenda is discussion and consideration of a Junior Firefighter Program, discussion of the recently awarded LPRF Grant for improvements to Gene Record Park, and discussion and consideration of hiring a part-time water plant operator to cover the leave time of other operators. According to the agenda, this would lower the cost of paid overtime. The board will also approve a list of surplus vehicles and equipment to be sold via GovDeals Internet auction service. The meeting is open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend.

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

City board to discuss possible junior firefighter program

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C.C. Schools Parent - Teacher conferences set

TODAY’S WEATHER

Parent-Teacher conferences are set from 5-8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11 and from 811 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 12, for all Chester County Schools, Pre-K Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

The title of Homecoming Queen lasts a lifetime, and Kaelin Yarbrough was crowned queen of the 2012 Chester County High School Homecoming Friday. Her escort, Colton Hearn, placed the crown on Yarbrough during ceremonies at Eagle Stadium. (See additional photos, page 2-B.)

through

12th

grade.

Teachers, principals, and counselors will be available each day. Take advantage of this opportunity to visit your child’s school and teacher(s).


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Manufacturing Day highlights new skillsets needed in the work force By James A. Webb Editor in Chief

National Manufacturing Day has been designed to expand knowledge about and improve general public perception of manufacturing careers and manufacturing’s value to the U.S. economy. Manufacturing Day is for students, parents, educators, media, customers, suppliers and the community at large. As part of Manufacturing Day, Chamber of Commerce officials and community leaders, as well as educators from the Chester County School system and Henderson/Chester County vocational center were escorted in a tour of the facilities at both Arvin Sango and Henderson Stamping and Production on Oct. 3. Also part of the tour were Tracey Exum and Clay Banks with the Tennessee Department of Economic and C o m m u n i t y Development. The focus of the tour in Henderson was on career opportunities, training, and resources, as well as the skill sets needed for a modern manufacturing facility. Bryan Imhoff, plant manager at Arvin Sango, illustrated the new mindset in manufacturing by noting that all employees, including management and office staff, are trained and able to step in and assist in the manufacturing process when needed.

That is highly stressed in environments like Arvin Sango which are “just-intime” manufacturers. Arvin Sango, which builds exhaust systems for the Toyota plant near Tupelo, Miss., opened last year, and recently underwent an expansion. Imhoff said the right attitude is the most important attribute necessary for the success of their employees. They recently won the Toyota Excellence Launch Performance Award. Donna Butler, human resource manager at Arvin Sango, looks for potential employees with skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, communications, and a take-charge attitude. Butler, who has been involved in human resources for more than 30 years, said organizations today are leaner today than in years past with fewer levels of man-

agement. “Employees today need to be able to multi-task, and have a big-picture mentality.” Butler remembers when high school graduates not on a college path thought they would “just go to work at a factory,” but with the highlevel of quality needed to compete in today’s global economy, that much more is needed. All employees at Arvin Sango must be drug-free, pass a criminal background check, have clean references, and must have flexibility in their work schedule. The spotless facility is maintained and cleaned by employees, not an outside company, which builds pride in the workforce. Henderson Stamping and Production, Inc., in business since 1981, employs both skilled and non-skilled individuals in the tool and die and manu-

Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Plant Manager Philip Broyles shows one of the finished products manufactured by Henderson Stamping and Production. The tour for community leaders and educators on Oct. 3 was part of National Manufacturing Day. facturing processes. Accounting and Human Resource Manager Vicki Dickson says the company has little turnover in employees, but that many of those they do hire just

simply don’t work out. Henderson Stamping goes through a “temp” agency for its unskilled workers. They go through a 90-day probationary period before becoming permanent

The quality and timeliness of manufacturing, demonstrated by plant manager Bryan Imhoff, make working at Arvin Sango not just another “factory job.”

employees, but Dickson stated that few complete the 90-day period simply because they just don’t want to work. Plant Manager Philip Broyles echoed those same comments. Broyles stated that he could not tell a difference in the current eight percent unemployment and the previous four percent as far as getting unskilled workers is concerned. “We still need good employees, those that want to be here every day,” said Broyles. He called it “sad” that Henderson Stamping is still getting some employees from outside of Chester County because so many cannot pass drug tests or other screenings, or do not have basic reading and math skills.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

From Page 1-A

Stewart request Breen accepted but indicated he could not guarantee. Stewart also waived his right to appeal the sentencing. He left quietly, escorted by U.S. Marshalls. Stewart's wife, Cheryl Freeman Steward, age 52, of Henderson, pled guilty last month to charges arising from the same incident. Steward pled guilty to two counts of attempted robbery affecting commerce, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1951, and being a convicted felon that was prohibited from

possessing a firearm, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 922(a)(6) and 924(a)(2) of the superseding indictment. Cheryl Steward will be sentenced by Judge Breen at 1:30 p.m. on Nov. 30. “Today’s sentence of life plus 10 years, without the possibility of parole, brings justice to the family and friends of Captain Dennis Cagle, and hopefully provides them with a measure of relief,” said U.S. Attorney Edward L. Stanton. “Any loss of life is tragic, but the fact that Mr. Stewart would senselessly and brazenly take the life of a law-enforcement official underscores the

extreme danger he posed to the greater community.” “No sentence, regardless of the severity, can ever minimize the profound sense of loss we feel as a department and a community,” said Henderson Police Chief Tommy Davis. “I am relieved to know that Ricky Lee Stewart will never see the light of day as a free man. Now that this case has been closed, we await the sentencing of his wife for her role in the crime. Hopefully then, Captain Cagle’s family and everyone who knew him, can begin to heal.”

The case was investigated by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Henderson Police Department and the Chester County Sheriff’s Office. District Attorney General Jerry Woodall and Assistant District Attorney Jody Pickens served as special counsel in this case. Assistant United States Attorney Victor L. Ivy prosecuted the case on behalf of the United States.

Personal awareness lessens risk of West Nile virus As the hot, humid days of summer slowly fade into fall, one family of very small insects is causing quite a commotion. In recent weeks, West Nile virus has made a resurgence in many parts of the U.S. and has been the focus of much media attention. At the center of this frenzy is a variety of mosquitoes that carry and transmit the virus to humans. As of Tuesday, Sept. 25, 48 states have reported West Nile virus infections in people, birds or mosquitoes, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC). Nearly 3,545 cases in people, including 147 deaths, have been reported to the CDC this year, which is the highest number of cases reported through this time period since 2003. One case has also been reported in Chester County. Although West Nile virus does not generally cause a fatal illness, it is one that concerns many

From Page 1-A

For You didn’t kill newspapers; they made them deeper, smarter and more thoughtful. For about a generation now, the Internet has supposedly been driving newspapers into extinction. Nope. It’s just given their newsrooms another platform to deliver journalism that now includes videos, interactive graphics and access to informational archives built for years by … Guess which medium? Unlike websites and bloggers, newspapers are fixtures in their communities. Most of them were around long before personal computers and smart-phone apps, chronicling life, dissecting

communities. Disease ecologist James English said recent weather patterns have likely led to this year’s increased West Nile virus presence. “This time of year is the typical West Nile virus season,” said English, associate professor and academic director for Lipscomb University’s Institute for Sustainable Practice. “In the winter, the mosquito population usually decreases because of the cold weather. But, when you experience a mild winter as much of the country did earlier this year, the mosquito levels start out the season higher because they survived the winter at greater rates. Plus, if rain events allow standing water to occur at the right times of the year, and if temperatures are high during the summer, mosquitoes will breed in even greater numbers than usual. Weather events this year seem to have been just right for this outbreak.”

trends and exposing things that needed some air. And unlike less-established media, their newsrooms operate with standards and ethics intended to assure the credibility of the information they deliver. They don’t just make the record; they protect it, too. It’s a responsibility, a trust, a duty. And while newspapers and their newsrooms have always broken stories, the Internet has now enabled them to cover breaking news, too, with reporting that goes directly up online — just as soon as it meets those newsroom standards. So the evolution continues. But the mission remains the same: To be there. For you. Because it’s your newspaper.

Increased outbreaks of the disease could persist as weather patterns continue to change throughout the country. Mosquitoes need just a small amount of standing water to breed and can find ideal breeding areas in places such as clogged gutters, flower pots and children’s pools. Mosquitoes typically live for about a month but may breed several times during their lifespans, he said. English has studied West Nile virus since he developed and directed the United States Navy’s West Nile Virus Program in 2001-2002. After studying the ecology of West Nile virus, English developed a response plan for decreasing the risk of contracting the disease. He worked with military personnel as well as county and state-level public health officials to design and implement response plans. English said the best way to control the spread of the disease is for individuals to reduce the risk

factors around them and to be proactive in protecting themselves. He encourages people to reduce the amount of standing water around their yards by emptying flower pots, buckets, pools, gutters or other common items where water collects, thus reducing the number of breeding options for mosquitoes. “If you are getting attacked by mosquitoes, their breeding place is probably nearby. Look for standing water and get rid of it,” he said. “If you’re getting eaten up by mosquitoes in your yard, you or your neighbor probably have something in the yard that is a good breeding ground. Mosquitoes only travel about a mile or so from where they are born. They don’t usually travel that far.” English also suggests limiting outside activity at dusk and dawn, key times for mosquito activity, and wearing long sleeves, pants and insect repellant to reduce the risk of being bitten by mosquitoes.

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USJ Holiday Mart is Nov. 16-18 The University School of Jackson invites you to the Holiday Mart, the most fabulous gathering of merchants in West Tennessee. This year’s Mart will be held Nov. 1618 at the Carl Perkins Civic Center in downtown Jackson. The Mart, sponsored by the University School of Jackson’s Mothers’ Club and Bancorp South, features thousands of unique gift and decorating ideas in a festive, holiday setting. The Holiday Mart will be open: 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16, 17; and noon to 5 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 18. More than 100 merchants from Tennessee and throughout the Southeast will fill the Carl Perkins Civic Center with clothing, jewelry, toys, home accessories, holiday decorations and many other gift ideas for sale. The Mart is the perfect place to start your holiday shopping. Admission tickets in advance are $5 for adults

and $2 for students. Children under 6 are admitted free. Advance tickets, which go on sale Oct. 24, are available at USJ’s Lower School Campus on McClellan Road, or at one of the following BancorpSouth locations in Jackson: Downtown, Greystone, Old Hickory Boulevard and Union University Drive, as well as at branches in Alamo, Bemis, Humboldt, Trenton, Milan and Selmer. Tickets are $8 at the door for adults. Each ticket gives the owner unlimited re-admission during all three days of the Mart. For more information on Holiday Mart special events and vendors, visit website www.usjholidaymart.com.


Life & Style

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Thursday, October 11, 2012

Ingleside-Pentagon Club news

MALEY JEAN MILLER DUSTIN LEVI MCCOLLUM

Miller – McCollum marriage Henry and Teresa Miller are proud to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Maley Jean Miller, to Dustin Levi McCollum. Dustin is the son of Gail Murchison and the late Harold McCollum. The wedding will be at 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012, at the Alexanders’ home, 1830 McCollum Road, Reagan, TN. All family and friends are invited to attend.

Lifestyle Pricing The Chester County Independent charges the following prices for lifestyle articles: • Engagement announcements with photo — $35 • Wedding announcements with photo — $35 • Anniversary announcements with photo — $35 (Second photo $10 extra) • Birth announcements without photo – No Charge • Birth announcements with photo — $28 • Birth announcements with color photo — $38 • Birthday announcements with photo — $28 • Birthday announcements with color photo — $38 • Class reunion photos - $35. In color - $45. • Miscellaneous lifestyle photos — $35 • Hunting/fishing photos — $30 For more information, contact our office at 731-989-4624, or email to news@chestercountyindependent.com

Jack Frost is searching for pumpkins to rest upon during a cold Monday night. He’ll likely sit down on flowers, making them bow their heads and perhaps stems will be bent with “Jack-itis!” There will be no rising early to water the flowers, unless one chooses to rinse frost off fast with a predicted mid-30s temperature. Good hot stew will warm us at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20 at Jacks Creek Fire Department. Fifteen dollars for a gallon to eat, and perhaps a gallon for your freezer might come in handy this winter. We had Ruby Wright to guide Tasha to season stew. We will miss her presence. Prayers have been requested for Lavon Jones (Kenneth’s widow) and the Sanders who live in the former James Crowe brick home on Hwy 100 E. Also Ed Pitts is out of the hospital. Hope to see him at healthcare. Cody Hopper will walk his mother down the isle Friday. Lisa Bell will see her brother marry Lisa Davis Hopper. Cody says that’s two Lisa Bells. Abbie Brooks (poodle) welcomed a new brother, Foxie, into her home; they are sharing toys, perhaps a fox-trot, and Mike’s lap. Also, I spotted a pink ribbon on Terry and Sharon

Boothe’s mailbox. More next week or gossip might get started. Call 989-7485 to satisfy inquiring minds. White as snow are fields of cotton. Lily Thomas Weaver knows it is time for the field across from her home to be picked clean. Cotton patches await “TN Pickers” to enter their fields. They want to show off long rectangular bales! For those prior to the mid-60 there are no more rides to the cotton field. Wagons have been sold or they fell apart in a deserted shed. Scales or sacks were put in the loft waiting for rats or rust to claim them. There will be no more packed lunches, or no need to carry a tablet to record pounds picked. Stops at the store to treat oneself with an RC and Moon Pie would now cost nearly two bucks instead of 15 cents. At the end of the day sitting on top of a packed wagon heading to the gin was relaxing. There was pride at work done among friends and family. Effort and hard work meant food on the table and new clothes on our backs, but those wagon rides to the gin are gone forever. The gins are in ruin with history gone to the wind. Also gone are gentlemen who knew all county ginners, farmers, and gin vocabulary. Do your kids or grandkids know the names of those men who vacuumed wagons clean of cotton, and do they know the different stages of ginning cotton, and who the men were doing that job? Does anyone have pictures showing that era of our lives? We have none to show. If only pictures cards and nice cameras

Members of the Ingleside-Pentagon Club were welcomed at the home of Regina East for their October meeting. President East conducted the business meeting. The nominating committee for next year will report in April. A new calendar was handed out by East. Our next meeting will be Nov. 1, at Sweetly Ever After Cupcakery. Becky Cyr and Janice Kent reported that the Christmas party will be at 5:30 p.m. Dec.1, at the Henderson Church of Christ. Officers for this year are: President Regina East, VicePresident - Glenda Wiley, Secretary - Ann Woods, and Treasurer - Regina East. The bylaws were amended to read that officers will serve a two-year term instead of one year. Currently we have 16 members. The treasurer’s report was given by Regina East. The current balance is $324.82. East read the club creeds. Ike Roland presented the program titled “A Lasting Legacy of A.G. Freed” and also included who the original occupants were of some of the homes in Henderson. He obtained some of his information from a book, “The Biography of a Gentleman: A.G. Freed” by Ancil Jenkins. Mr. Freed was educated in Indiana receiving his BS, MA and two years post graduate work, and attended a preacher training school in Ellettsville. He was asked by David Nelms to come from the North, and he established the Southern Tennessee

Normal College in 1889 in Essary Springs. Ike Roland stated that his grandparents were in the graduating class of 1892. On June 1, 1895, Freed married Cora Belle Baynam. Ike Roland’s grandmother had been her roommate in college. In 1895, the school in Essary Springs merged with West Tennessee Christian College and moved to Henderson under Mr. Freed’s leadership. The name was changed to Georgie Robertson Christian College in 1897. Mr. Freed departed from the college in 1905 and the school closed two years later. He worked at a college in Texas for about a year and a half, and then was asked to return to Henderson. Mr. Freed and Mr. Hardeman established the National Teachers Normal and Business College in 1908, and later the name was changed to Freed-Hardeman College. Mr. Freed left the college in 1923 and worked at David Lipscomb College until his death in 1931. Henderson, Chester County and countless families have been rewarded by Mr. Freed coming to Henderson. Following Mr. Roland’s presentation, a delicious apple cake with apple and cinnamon butter cream frosting was enjoyed. Members present were Joan Brown, Becky Cyr, Regina East, Glenda Gardner, Junie Gilliam, Beverly Hardin, Janice Kent, June Roland, Laurel Sewell, Carolyn Swift, Joan Swift and Beth Tatom.

had been invented earlier! The “if only” thought makes me sad. It also makes me sad to see the gin slowly being tormented by nature. To all the good cotton-pickers I picked beside and hindered – I’m sorry for pointing out every old crow that flew over us. All I wanted was just enough cotton for a pillow; I really enjoyed shady high cotton. Harold James rounded up helpers for Marie Thompson’s estate sale. Mike Gordon, Don Holland, Keith McEarl and Brent Kernodle were dependable and knowledgeable, but it was ole Pat’s cookies that gave them the strength to last two days. Pat enjoyed welcoming folks to Marie’s kitchen. Harold James, Freddie Rainey and I had a group picture made. We were the same age, but one looks younger! Guess right and you’ll get a fresh cookie, and not an antique!!! Charlotte Joyner attended McCall School. This is her history lesson shared. “Christopher Columbus sailed the seas of blue in 1492.” Friday you need to call Charlotte to express appreciation for this shared knowledge. This discovery was 520 years ago Friday! Gee, Char has a very good and long memory! Friends and I attended the 171st Mississippi River Association of Primitive Baptist at Robins Street in Jackson. The three-day meeting was Oct. 5-7 with members coming from various churches including Mount Tamor members. Eleven members were present through the gospel meet-

ing. From Tennessee were elders Paul Scott, Allen Broughton, Davis Parr, Millard Johnson, Gary Walker and Jimmy Anthony. From Mississippi came elders Clinton Barnett, Steve Leggett and Cecil Woodruff. Coming from Alabama were elders Gary Cordes and Claude McKee. Good preaching, strong members, and delicious cooking went together for a successful gospel meeting. Our community expresses sympathy to those losing a loved one this past week. Frances Lorraine Runnion Hayes (5-13-38 to 10-2-2012) was buried in Ohio. Her family, Annette Bickings and LeRoy Denbow are from Henderson. Minnie Mae Naylor Plunk (9-2513 to 10-3-2012) had almost 100 years n this earth to enjoy family and share great stories. Her brother Raymond Naylor from Henderson can finish those stories. She was buried at Cave Springs. Inez Robinson Roland (726-41 to 10-3-2012) was buried at Cave Springs. Eugene Hibbett (7-17-32 to 10-6-2012) was the best science teacher I ever had at Freed-Hardeman University – learning was fun. He was buried at Estes Cemetery. Steve Sewell (9-1-63 to 10-72012) had incomplete services at this writing. And Ruby Nobles Wright (8-24-27 to 10-2-2012) has joined her parents, siblings and others for a Nobles reunion. I’d like to share tidbits concerning Ruby Wright. Nathan obviously had the strength from God to speak tenderly at his

Brianna Roark Celebrated third Birthday Brianna Roark celebrated her third birthday Sept. 28 with her family with a Barbie Party at Gene Record Park. She is the daughter of Billy Roark. Her grandparents are Sherry Roark, the late W.M. Roark Jr., and “Poppa” Okley Henry.

Happy birthday wishes go to Debbie Bishop and Robert Edward Smith on Oct. 16, and Aiden Culpepper and Mattie O'Neal on Oct. 17. Happy Anniversary to Kelly and April Collins on Oct. 14, and Bill and Tammy Raynor on Oct. 15. The Town Board meeting is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16 at the Enville City

Hall building. These meetings are always open to the public. So if you want to know what's going on or have something you would like to bring forward, the board members meet at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday each month. Are you looking for a Bob Tailed Dotson or Jack Russell puppies? Someone in the neighborhood has one male and one female of each. They are beautiful, black and tan. The number to call is 6083499 for more information. “Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” - Roger Caras. Have a great week and call 989-0212 if you have anything to share.

mother’s “party” – a final celebration of her life on this earth. He expressed memories about his family that made us nod in agreement, chuckle at the memory, or wipe a tear away. Wouldn’t Worth, MaMaw, PaPaw, Lila, Glen and Raford be appreciative of Nathan’s expressions of love and respect toward his mother? Ruby would be teary and humble. She was quick-humored, friendly – a talker without using a comma, a social butterfly never meeting a stranger or missing a trip. As a young teenager Ruby, siblings and friends like Geralene Thompson and Mary Louise Newsom would get in “Old Henry” and share coins for gas to ride downtown. She was a good cook well known for peanut butter cookies, teacakes, and angel food cakes. For sure she wanted everyone to have a “bait” in her home or at school where she cooked with Emma Ross. Ruby was a seamstress with jars of buttons. She loved bright fabric cloth that her aunt Travis Maness at Hancock’s helped select. She cut patterns out of freezer paper. She sewed for family and even made doll clothes. How many rips or tears she repaired – even square-dancing clothes at Coatney’s Store! Ruby wore two cars out driving to the factory. Her fellow workers rode with her. She could leave home at 7:30, pick up riders, and by 8 still get to Scotts Hill. Her husband, Worth, said she needed a pilots license instead of a drivers license. Ask Geralene Thompson who wore out her right shoe trying to drag it in as Ruby

took off for work, Marie McEarl, Faye Henson, Bea Stone, Cat Grisson, Anise Lindsey, Betty Richardson, Mattie Wright, Lavon Jones and Sue Connor. Ruby loved “blue light” specials! Being generous Auntie wanted to share her “blue light” specials. Upon one occasion I was the lucky recipient of a beautiful pair of black house shoes. It’s just like she said, “It doesn’t matter that they are men house shoes, just find a pair that fit you.” So, I made a selection and kept them at junior high for those days high heels were just too much. This memory is for women only. I saw Auntie pour a name-brand buttermilk into an empty used Sealtest milk carton. She had the perfect explanation. She said there was just a limit to how much you can teach a man. Worth wanted Sealtest buttermilk, so she was a good wife and wanted him happy. She simply kept rinsing the carton out and refilling it each week with a brand of buttermilk easier to find at the time. Memories continue a lifetime with family and friends. Ruby was a good daughter to her parents; she kept her mother from 1983 to 1993 in her home. Ruby’s daughter followed in her mothers footsteps for five years. Charlene Dietrich and Debbie Young became dependable family. We were blessed to know Ruby. She was tenderhearted; she loved God, family and Jacks Creek. She is with her heavenly family. Right time and right place for Ruby Nobles Wright.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

The descendants of the late Richard Pharo and Margaret Harrison Bain will meet at the New Friendship Community Center on New Friendship Road at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14, for a pot luck lunch. Come and enjoy good food and family fellowship. Please call and tell your family members about this event. The New Friendship Community had a very enjoyable day on Saturday

for a neighbor get together. They had stew for everyone and indoor games for the youth and adults. Several drawings were made for door prizes. On our prayer list this week are Don McLemore, Bill Priddy, Pam Priddy, Laverne Lott, Clara Busby, Teresa Wright, Donald Jones, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry, and Minnie Austin, Wilma and Charles Cupples, Carroll Williams, Jean Latham, Joanne Sells, John Kent Sells, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Shirley Gaddy, Carolyn Potter, Gathel Latham, Randy Miller, Joanne Altier, Phillip Ross, Lisa Peddy, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl, Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Randy Sells, Teresa

Seaton, Clarence Cooper, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Happy Anniversary to Glenn and Teresa McCaskill and Glenn and Bertha Jones on Oct. 14; and Amos and LaVelle Page on Oct. 18. Birthday greetings to Rick Zahra, Jonathan Ray and Paul Hinson on Oct. 12; Elizabeth Morris and David Jones on Oct. 13; Matthew Jones, Bruce Wright, and Walter Willis Jr. on Oct. 14; Richard Depriest, Delphia Wyatt, Joanne Sells and Jack Butler on Oct. 15; Gwen Connor on Oct. 16; Larry Bray, Davis Swafford and Teresa Holder on Oct. 17; and Charles Haggard and Carnell Tignor on Oct, 18. Enjoy the fall weather everyone.

Hello to everyone! Oh how great it is to be here with you this week. It is good to have loved ones and friends you can count on. To the parents in Chester County it is fall break time. I remember when my children were in school. I was so glad when we had fall break, spring break, just any kind of break that my children would be home with me. We had so much fun together. I can not understand why so many parents do not want to be with their children. This year the Chester County School fall break is Oct. 15-19. Most of you may remember my daughter, LaWanna who is now 25 and our oldest is 36. Oh how I can remember the fun times we had together while they was growing up, and we still enjoy being together now. Enjoy them while you can. Like my beloved late grandmother Zelma Bass said, “Enjoy them while they are on your lap, as the years go by they will be on your heart.” I understand now what it means. Last week there was a lot of moving and shaking going on at Southern Oaks. On Tuesday morning their Activity Director, Nancy Connell led the residents in their exercises adding something new, dancing. That is great because this is National Health Month. On Thursday afternoon Nancy’s parents, Roy and

Dolores came to play the piano and sing with the residents. There was more dancing. We didn’t know some of our residents were such great dancers; there was twirling and dipping going on all over the floor. It was wonderful to see the smiles on the residents’ faces - the ones dancing and the ones watching. We want to thank Marti Wilkins for her faithful services coming every week for Bible study, and Janice Haithcoat for coming each week for Janice Jingles. Virgil Hooks is always a favorite with his singing and guitar playing. Virgil also comes out to the Chester County Head Start once a week with his guitar to play and sing for the children. The staff and everyone enjoy when he visits! The Chester County Football Cheerleaders continue to come to Southern Oaks and give the residents beautiful manicures. Martha Goodwin’s son, Lynn brought fresh turnip greens and turnips for the staff to cook for the residents. To end this great week we want to wish resident Mrs. Peggy Zollner a very happy birthday, which she celebrated on Oct. 6. It is always good to hear from our loved ones at Southern Oaks. Donna, you and your staff are doing a noteworthy job there, keep up the great work! Now let’s see what news the churches have. At 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14 Pastor Melvin White and Frye's Point Christian Church will be having their Men's Day. Their guest speaker will be Rev. Robert Floyd of Prospect Church, Selmer. Dinner will be served between services. At 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 14, Pastor Robert

Wooden and the Beech Springs Baptist Church Family will be having their Annual Men’s and Women's Day Program. Everyone is invited to attend. Dinner will be served in between services. Cool Springs M.B. Church, 306 Harmon St., will be having their Annual Choir Day at 2 p.m. Sunday. Oct. 21. Various choirs have been invited. Host Pastor is Rev. James Vincent. Come and have a blessed time in the Lord. The Greater Evangelical Ministry, 1609 Airport Road, Selmer, will be celebrating the 13th anniversary of their Pastor, Pastor Frank Holiday Sr. at 3 p.m. on Oct. 21. Family and friends are invited. For more information, call 608-6132. On the birthday list this week are Jeanie Harville on Oct. 16 and Charles Lee Jr. on Oct. 14. May the Lord bless you with many more. Happy birthday to Janelle Cawthon who will celebrate on Saturday. Oct. 20. My favorite little sister ... "In the whole world," from your sister, Vivian. Let’s remember in our prayers our loved ones in the hospitals, sick in their homes, our children, teachers, family, the men and women that are serving our country, their families and country. Remember to patronize our local businesses, let’s support our own as much as we can. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City, I need to hear from you, call 989-1907 or you email gloria__holiday@msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

dinner which is at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. If you have pre-sold tickets for the dinner, please come by and give a count of how many tickets you have sold, and turn in the money collected. We need to know how much food to prepare. Everyone is invited to the spaghetti dinner at 6 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 20. If you don’t purchase a ticket before then, you can buy a ticket the night of the dinner. The Center will be

decorated with the theme of the 50’s and 60’s, and music from that era will be played. Come and enjoy the evening. All that would like to, please dress for that time period. Happy retirement to Mr. Phillip Cranford who retired Sept. 28 after 31 years of dedicated service as a welding instructor at the Tennessee Technology Center in Jackson. He hopes in the future to do some welding for himself. I know he is a good

cook, I suppose he’ll be a full time housekeeper for Judy, as she reports to her job every day. Their son, John and his son Andrew of Augusta, S.C., visited last week. There are only three birthdays this week: Nelson Weaver on Oct. 12; Sam Howell on Oct. 13; and Ilaine Davidson on Oct. 17. As always, remember in prayer the sick, our military, their families and our country. Have a good week, and God bless.

Seafood is great, even when you’re far from the shore I love seafood. I’ll eat almost any variety – shrimp, lobster, crab, clams, scallops, just about anything. It’s all delicious – well, except maybe octopus, but that’s another story. I recently returned from a vacation along the New England and southern Canada coast where I was fortunate to eat plenty to fresh, delicious seafood. There’s not much better than lobster or scallops fresh from the sea, and it’s wonderful to endulge in food from its natural environment prepared by cooks who specialize in those dishes. On my way home from the airport Sunday evening, I realized that I hadn’t prepared a recipe for this week, so I started thinking back over some of my recent kitchen cre-

ations that I haven’t written about yet. Of course my mind went to seafood. Even though we are hundreds of miles from the nearest ocean, we can still buy quality seafood in our grocery stores. It may not be fresh from the water, and it may have been on ice, but it’s as close to fresh as we can get. It can still satisfy the cravings that we landlubbers have. My husband Chris tends to be more creative with seafood than I am, so I have to credit him with this yummy dish. Short of having a seafood boil in your backyard, this is a pretty delicious meal. It’s hard to say if its soup, stew or a rice bowl, but

proper names won’t matter once you give this a try. This is an easy meal to stretch for additional people. The recipe makes three to four servings, but if you have more people to feed, simply add more clams and shrimp, or for several more, add an extra pepper and some additional water. Prepare your rice for the number of people that you’re feeding, and you will be set. Don’t forget to serve the seafood and veggies over rice with a hearty serving of broth as well. Pretend that you’re sitting on the beach watching the waves and enjoy.

Seafood and rice boil

Ingredients: At least 1 dozen small neck clams, or 4 clams per serving At least 1 dozen medium to large sized shrimp, or at least 4 shrimp per serving, deveined, shell off 1 red bell pepper thinly sliced 1 yellow bell pepper thinly sliced 1 medium onion sliced 1 clove of garlic, minced 2 tablespoons curry powder 16-ounce bottle of clam juice 1 regular size can of coconut milk 2 tablespoons butter 1 cup of rice per serving, or approximately 3 to 4 cups Salt and pepper to taste

Autumn is in the air, and on a couple of mornings we needed a little heat to warm up the house. The weather is beautiful; I challenge all who are able and health permits, to start a walking plan. If you can only find 15 minutes a day to walk and breathe fresh air, do it. Then maybe work up to 20 or 25 minutes of brisk walking three days a week, it will help to improve your health. The hardest part for many is getting started, so take the challenge. The first step is worth it. I have exercised by walking for more than 30 years; I usually average four or five miles a week.

Directions: Prepare rice according to directions in a saucepan or rice cooker. In a stockpot, melt butter and add peppers, garlic, and onion. Saute vegetables lightly in butter, maintaining firmness. Add curry powder, coconut milk, clam juice, and clams. Add approximately half a cup of water, to just cover ingredients. Bring to a boil. Add shrimp just as the clams open, so that the shrimp doesn’t over cook. Boil until shrimp turns pink. Serve over rice with plenty of broth in the bowl, being sure to distribute clams and shrimp evenly.

Now that fall is here, Ruger and Buddy and I will enjoy walking our trail through the woods. Hopefully the season is over for the snakes, ticks, and spiders. The community extends sympathy to the family of Inez Roland, the Arlie Harris Smith family, the Gene Hibbett family, and the family of Minnie Naylor Plunk (925-13 to 10-3-2012). I paid my last respects to Minnie at her funeral Oct. 6. As I sat there the song “Precious Memories” took me back to 1952, when Minnie and I worked at F.W. Woolworth in downtown Peoria, Ill. I thought about her hands – hands that made the pie dough, hands that used the rolling pin to roll the pie crust. I made the fillings for the coconut cream, chocolate and lemon meringue pies for the busy lunch counter downstairs. We were a team, and being older than me she

showed so much love and kindness to me, I visited her this past summer and took sugar cookies. We talked about old times, and her mind was sharp and clear. She was a wonderful Christian lady, and was an inspiration to all. It’s turning spooky in downtown Hickory Corner, at the home of Teresa Burkhead. Her yard is already creepy and scary with the walking dead carrying a coffin to the cemetery, and she adds to it every day or so. By Halloween it will be a sight to see. Not only do the kids enjoy it, but we adults do also. I actually stopped to look around. Thank you Teresa and Kenneth, for all your creative talent so that others may enjoy. If you want to celebrate Halloween, drive by her home in Hickory Corner. There will be a meeting at the Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, to go over the last minute details for the spaghettis

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Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Only Yesterday “Mrs. Cherry wins at Texas state fair” four table chairs and a metal storage cabinet. Reading tables will be available in the near future. This month the book WHERE “Chester Fails Its Bond Quota THE CHILDREN COME FIRST – For Third Time; Plenty of THE P.T.A. IDEA, was presented Money Here But Citizens Do by the Library Board to the Library Not Buy; October Quota Is and dedicated to Mrs. W.M. $15,700” McCallum, who has served for With the State of Tennessee many years in the service of the leading the Nation in War Bond P.T.A. Mrs. McCallum is now servsales, Chester County for the third ing as the first chairman of the consecutive month failed to meet Chester County Library Board. its quota. This situation has local Your library has many attractions leaders puzzled, as the three banks awaiting you; visit your library and in the county have largest deposits take advantage of the opportunities in their history. it offers you. War Bond sales during “Births” September were as follows: Jacks Dr. and Mrs. Charles Stephen Creek Bank, $1,293.75; Henderson Ellis of St. Louis, Mo., are the parPost Office, $2,043.75; First State ents of a son who was born Sept. Bank, $5,474.00; Bank of Enville, 22. He has been named Stephen $75.00; Series O, $1,100. Total Tarpley. Mrs. Ellis is the former sales, $9,987.50 – our quota was Billie Lou Tarpley, daughter of Mr. $15,700. and Mrs. Neil Tarpley of Captain Willard M. McCallum, Montezuma. bond committee chairman, states Drs. McCallum and Wilson the quota for Mr. and Mrs. Chester County William Buckley of this month is again H e n d e r s o n $15,700. announce the This is the most arrival of a daughexpensive war in ter on Sept. 27. all history and bilMr. and Mrs. lions of dollars are John Kaiser of being spent every Pinson are the parmonth for its prosents of a daughter ecution. Every citwho arrived Oct. 2. izen must help pay “Miller Grocery this cost, voluntarSets Grand ily if possible, but Opening” if that fails – taxes Announcing the so heavy as never grand opening of dreamed, will be Miller’s Grocery levied. For every and Market in their $3 put into a War new location, the Bond you get back Chester County Independent archives, October 5, 1962 Watkins building on $4. There never Mrs. Beulah Shults (left) President of the Henderson B & PW Club North Washington was a safer investand Mrs. Warren Griffin, Chairman of B & PW Week, witness the Street. ment – and should signing of the proclamation by Mayor Paul McAdams. The store moved the war be lost, we to the present localose everything! Think it over. Recorder. A campaign had been tion the first week in September Over the top in October! waged by friends of E. O. Parrish, after the business on Main Street “High School Notes” Students picked 94,721 pounds retiring mayor, to have him appoint- was destroyed by fire. Three big days are planned – ed City Recorder. However the City of cotton last week. Prof. T.H. Williams asked stu- Council, by almost unanimous Oct. 4, 5 and 6. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Miller, owndents to bring a key for the scrap action, named Homer Davis, popuharvest – he has received about lar proprietor of the City Cafe, to ers of the business, extend a cordial this position. Recorder Davis is invitation to the public to come in 1,000 already! Fine work! during the grand opening. Mrs. C.P. Roland was elected now on the job ... Those inducted into office “B&PW Club Plans Pancake president of the Band Mother’s Club; Mrs. E.W. McAdams, secre- Monday evening were: E.E. Moore Breakfast” The Henderson Business and as Mayor; Jere I Galbraith as City tary-treasurer. Mrs. E.E. Brigance is supplying Attorney, and Alex Lowrance, Earl Professional Women’s Club will Braden, Robert E. Phillips, Leonard hold their second annual Pancake as language teacher. A. Clifton Jones of this city has Cherry, Frank Hailey and Roy Breakfast, Saturday, Oct. 20, in the Henderson Elementary Cafeteria. been appointed agriculture teacher. Smith as Aldermen. Tickets will be $1 ... and may be October 10, 1952 Mr. Jones has been with the FSA at Franklin. His friends are glad to “Mrs. Cherry Wins At Texas obtained from any B&PW member or at the Electric Grill. Fair” have him back home. Proceeds from the breakfast will Mrs. Leonard Cherry of Miss Anna Belle Rawls has been borrowed from the Lexington Henderson has won two first and be used to buy milk for underprivischool to substitute for Miss two second place premiums in the leged children and to support the Imogene Underwood, who is ill at needlecraft division of the State Christmas party for underpriviher home in Hazel, Ky. Miss Fair of Texas Women’s Show, with leged children. October 5, 1972 Underwood expects to return to her tatting, lace and embroidery. More than 4,000 entries have “Little Liberty Grid Bowl duty next week. been received in the show, which Planned For Chester County” “Welcome Stranger” The Chester County Lions Club Mr. and Mrs. Guy McKinney are runs Oct. 4 through 19. the proud parents of a baby girl, “Freed-Hardeman Activities” ... announced this week plans for the “Little Liberty Bowl” to be by Nancy Greene born Oct. 8, weighing 7 pounds. The Alpha Taus were in charge played at Eagle Field in Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Morris of Pinson are the proud parents of a of the chapel program Thursday on ... Nov. 16. Richard England, baby boy, born Oct. 5, weighing 8 ½ and presented a hilarious satire of President of the Chester County the radio program, “Welcome Lions Club, in making the pounds. He is their first child. announcement, named Dr. R.L. Mr. and Mrs. Buford Blackstock Travelers.” A tea was given honoring the Wilson as chairman of the Steering of Beech Bluff are the proud parents of a baby girl, born Oct. 6. She freshmen girls in the home eco- Committee. Permission has been secured is their ninth child and has been nomics department on Thursday. All girls were invited and refresh- from the Tennessee Secondary named Doris Jean. School Athletic Association for the Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Brooks of ments were served. The Kentucky Club has met and game to be scheduled. Permission Mason Wells are the proud parents of a baby girl, born Oct. 2, weighing is planning a program of interest. has also been granted from the The Kentuckians may enjoy a pic- Liberty Bowl Classic in Memphis for the Chester County Lions to nic outing in the near future. The annual visit to Shiloh is name their planned post-season scheduled for some time this week. game “The Little Liberty Bowl.” Plans are being made for the Football games at Chester County High School have provided enter- selection of a Bowl Queen and two tainment for many of the students maids to reign during the activities. In keeping with the theme carried at Freed-Hardeman. The student body and faculty out by the Liberty Bowl Classic in enjoyed a wiener roast at the col- Memphis, the “Little Liberty lege last Saturday night. It was a Bowl” will also follow a patriotic very enjoyable occasion for those theme in the pre-game and halftime activities. students who did not go home. According to TSSA rules, any October 5, 1962 “Chester County Library Ends team considered for selection for a post-season game must win as Successful Year” The month of September ended many as seven games during the the first year of the Chester County regular season and not be schedLibrary in operation. During this uled for a play-off. The team selecmonth the library circulated 1,444 tion committee appointed by Dr. books, with 34 new borrowers. The Wilson will be carefully watching total circulation for the year was the high school teams of West Tennessee for possible participants. 15,893. The Chester County Lions plan New furniture that arrived last week for the library was a three to make the “Little Liberty Bowl” piece sectional sofa, a club chair, an annual event.

From the files of the Chester County Independent October 9, 1942

Chester County Independent archives, October 9,

9 pounds. She is their third child and has been named Vernell. Mr. and Mrs. E. Stewart are the proud parents of a baby boy, born Oct. 5. He is their third child and has been named James Mack. “Armour Is New Night Marshal, Davis Recorder” Esquire C. L. Parrish administered the oath of office to Henderson’s new city administration Monday evening and almost immediately things began to happen. In a surprise move the Mayor and Board of Aldermen failed to reappoint E.L. (Jack) Freeman as Night Marshal. J.P. Armour, manager of the county farm, was appointed to this post. Jack Freeman has been Night Marshal for 11 years and the council move for a change in this position came as a complete surprise. The most vexing problem confronting the new administration was the selection of a City

Burr! It’s really getting chilly in Deanburg. I hope you’ve had a good week. I’ve had an upper respiratory infection a couple weeks and I still don’t feel good, having a bad headache today. Get well wishes this week to Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Winna Knipper, Randie Snider, Edra and Benny Barnett, Carolyn Brasfield and Jeremy Howell. If you know anyone that needs our prayers please give me a call. Remember our shut-ins and military and their families. Happy birthday to Aleigh Brown, Elizabeth Hopper and Judy Concialdi on Oct. 10; Erin Enfinger on Oct. 13 and Tony Harris on Oct. 16. A birthday is just the first day of another 365-day journey around the sun. Enjoy the trip. Jodi and Rory Romero want to thank everyone that came to their baby shower, especially for the gifts and all the hard work put into it. Also, thanks to the Deanburg Community Center for the use of the building. Columbus Day was Monday and the banks and government offices were closed. Teachers probably brought it up to their students but I doubt if many people acknowledged the day. A U.S. national holiday since 1937, Columbus Day commemorates the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the New World on Oct. 12, 1492. The Italian-born explorer had set sail two months earlier, backed by the Spanish monarchs King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. He intended to chart a western sea route to China, India, and the fabled gold and spice islands of Asia; instead, he

landed in the Bahamas, becoming the first European to explore the Americas since the Vikings set up colonies in Greenland and Newfoundland during the 10th century. I, for one, am glad he found the Americas. Have you wondered about whom inhabited America before Columbus and others came here? More than 12,000 years ago, long before Christopher Columbus’ ships landed in the Bahamas, a different group of people who discovered America were the nomadic ancestors of modern Native Americans who hiked over a “land bridge” from Asia to what is now Alaska. In fact, by the time European adventurers arrived in the 15th century scholars estimate that more than 50 million people were already living in the Americas. Of these, some 10 million lived in the area that would become the United States. As time passed, these migrants and their descendants pushed south and east, adapting as they went. In order to keep track of these diverse groups, anthropologists and geographers have divided them into “culture areas,” or rough groupings of contiguous peoples who shared similar habitats and characteristics. Most scholars break North America - excluding present-day Mexico - into 10 separate culture areas: the Arctic, the Sub artic, the Northeast, the Southeast, the Plains, the Southwest, the Great Basin, California, the Northwest Coast and the Plateau. (From History.com) I was glad to find this information and hope you learned something too. Quote of the week. “For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.” - 1 Timothy 6:10. Haunted Hollow will be Oct. 26, 27, 29, 30 and 31. Make plans to be there for all the fun. I wish you all a very happy week. Call me with your news. I like hearing from you. 879-9777.

FHU School of Business to host corporate whistle blower Weston Smith, former chief financial officer of HealthSouth, will speak at Freed-Hardeman University Monday, Oct. 15, in conjunction with the School of Business Leadership Series. He will speak at 4:30 p.m. in Ayers Auditorium. Smith, who blew the whistle on a multi-year, multi-billion dollar financial statement fraud, speaks frequently on ethics and integrity in business. In what he calls “Crossing the Line - An Insider’s Perspective of the HealthSouth Fraud,” he describes the culture of the company, the mechanics of the fraud, and how detection was avoided. HealthSouth, once a Fortune 500 company, grew from one location to more than 2,000 in all 50 states over a dozen years. Underneath the “glimmering corporate office and the fleet of corporate jets,” lay a huge corporate fraud, Smith said. “When I speak,” he said, “I tell the story of the

‘former’ HealthSouth and its failed corporate culture, but more importantly, I focus on why this story is relevant in today’s business world. I talk about the fraud’s small beginnings, the deceptive rationalizations, and how and why it grew exponentially.” He also discusses his decision to ultimately blow the whistle. Smith challenges and motivates his listeners “to simply do the right thing.” “Academic excellence permeated with Christian values is at the core of Freed-Hardeman’s mission,” Mark Steiner, Dean of the FHU School of Business, said. “It is an honor having Mr. Smith on campus to speak to our students and community about the importance of good ethical character and how we might learn from his experiences.” A reception at 4 p.m. will precede Smith’s remarks. The public is invited to attend; admission is free.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Lions Club News The Lion’s Club “Servant of the Month” award recognizes those in our community who work hard to enhance our community and the lives of our citizens. We have two such servants that we want to recognize and honor this month as they certainly immolate that behavior. Both these men work hard behind the scenes to do their part to make events such as, Chester County Barbeque Festival, Carl Perkins Dinner and Auction, Chester County Quarterback Club, Chester County Relay for Life Celebrity Waiter Dinner, Chester County baseball team fundraisers, Project Graduation events and fundraisers, Methodist Men’s Church activities, and event fund raisers for the Civitan Club. In speaking with them – they are both a bit bashful about being recognized because they say it is just what they enjoy doing and don’t mind doing it all – and certainly don’t do it for any recognition. That just further demonstrates that they both have “hearts of a servant” “KIDSIGHT OUTREACH VISION SCREENING" This is a volunteer effort of Tennessee Lions’ Charities and the Lions Clubs of Tennessee to prevent blindness. The Lions Clubs of Tennessee accepted the challenge to "do something" about Amblyopia, a vision problem which affects many young children. That challenge was to be able to identify young children specifically preschoolers before it's too late. It is estimated that 80 percent of children under age 6 do not have eye exams.

However, one in 20 children in this age group has some degree of Amblyopia - but cannot tell you when they see poorly. The relationship between the Lions and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and the Tennessee Lions Eye Center was formed. Armed with the latest Vision Screener technology, the Lions have begun a massive screening effort in young children to identify Amblyopia. Volunteers conduct screenings for children 12 months to 72 months at no cost to the child or parent. Findings are sent to a reading center at the Tennessee Lions Eye Center for interpretation by professionals. Results are then returned to the parents for additional follow up as required. Our Vision Screening program identifies many young children across Tennessee with Amblyopia. Untreated eye conditions can worsen and often lead to a lifetime of low vision or blindness. The Chester County Club is currently pursuing training on this new equipment and will be contacting pre-schools, nursery schools, and head start administrators with further details for potential screenings here in Henderson. Jerry Lowe leads the effort for the KidSight Outreach Vision Project for the Chester County Lions. The team has tested at Noah’s Ark, East and West Chester Elementary schools, Jacks Creek Elementary, the Lora Laycook Preschool, Wee Care, and others. They have tested 278 children. They are doing an awesome job with the program – and truly demon-

Servants of the Month are Charles Cavaness and Dwight Bingham, and presenters are King Lion Tim Childers, Lion Donna Butler, and Lion Courtney Bingham. strating the Lion’s Motto – ‘WE SERVE.’ Additionally – Lion Ronald Johnson was a guest speaker at the Jackson Old Hickory Lions Club where he outlined the KidSight Outreach Vision Screening for that club. He took the time to explain the program and train them on using the testing equipment. The Old Hickory Lions Club will now take up the effort in their county. STUDENT OF THE MONTH Lion Ronald Johnson introduced the Student of the Month, Peyton Anderson. Peyton is the son of Tim and Belinda Anderson. He is a sixth grade student at Chester County Junior High where he is active in the art club and plays football. His plans are to attend FreedHardeman University. His favorite subject is science. He is very well thought of by his teachers – especially as it relates to his good

At center is new Lion Donna Signaigo, along with Lions Ben Flatt and King Lion Tim Childers. Signaigo is a welcomed addition to the club and will bring many strengths and a heart of service to club activities.

attitude and work ethic. He attends the Henderson Church of Christ and is active in the youth group. His hobbies are drawing, swimming, and hanging out with his friends. Lion Ben Flatt installed our newest addition to the Chester County Lion’s Club, Donna Signaigo, administrator of the Southern Oaks Assisted Living Facility. She was sponsored by Lion Donna Rouse-Butler.

Lions are hard at work with the KidSight Program. From left are Danny Tacker, Jerry Lowe, and Ronald Johnson.


Opinion

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Thursday, October 11, 2012

A bright future lies ahead for newspapers By Caroline H. Little Newspaper Association of America

There’s an excessive amount of gloom and doom being spread around these days when the talk turns to the future of newspapers. In fact, the mere mention of the future of newspapers suggests that there might not be one. There is no question that the newspaper business has been disrupted. And yet, what the doomsayers fail to see is that newspapers are well on their way to ensuring that a bright future lies ahead. It has been painful to bring costs in line with revenue and recast the product to reflect the realities of the new media world. But one thing that has not changed is our historic mission of informing and enlightening, agitating and entertaining, protecting and defending the public’s right to know. Without question, the newspaper of tomorrow will not be the newspaper of yesterday or even the newspaper of today. Change and innovation are pointing us toward a very different future, one that cements our unique role in the communities we serve. Just a few years ago, we were a print business with digital on the side. Today, we are bringing together print, web and mobile, and opening the possibilities for even greater advancements that now may be only dreams in a young innovator’s mind. Our digital products are growing fast, and our websites have taken the market lead. Indeed, newspapers are the Internet, or at least a vital and soughtafter part of it. Aggregators such as Google News rely on newspaper journalism as

their primary source for content. Search engines frequently refer people looking for content back to newspaper websites. Among adults 18-plus, our web audience exceeds those of Yahoo/ABC, MSNBC (now NBCNews.com), The Huffington Post, CNN and CBS. Newspapers reach more than 100 million adults – nearly six in 10 of the U.S. adult Internet population – during a typical month. Consumers age 25 and above still are the core audience for our print product, but newspapers also reach nearly 60 percent of the critical 18-to34 demographic in print and online during an average week. In an era where anyone can say anything and call it news, it is newspaper content that consistently gets it right and keeps it in context. And a critical part of the industry evolution is the recognition that if you want to separate the serious from the sludge, it might cost you a little money. Newspapers have proven they can function in print, on websites, in digital partnerships and as part of the social media scene. But they also can do what no one else can do. We are at the heart of our communities. We generate the information and track the local developments that are vital for an informed, engaged citizenry. We offer clarity and perspective, and we provide content that our readers can trust. Getting to the point we are at now has not been easy. Genuine change is never easy. But we are far closer to our future than our past, and that future is bright.

No excuse for animal abuse To the editor: “THERE IS NO EXCUSE FOR ANIMAL ABUSE.” Recently there has been an influx of animal abuse being reported. Public Service Announcements are going out through media outlets in our listening area. Facebook page, “Abused Animals of West TN,” has also been created to help increase awareness. “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter.” – Martin Luther King. Please, if you witness an animal being abused, do the following: First, if safe to do so, try to stop the abuse immediately. Second, take pictures or videos if possible. Third, report abuse to the local authorities and follow up. It is imperative to spay and neuter pets which will prevent the birth of

unwanted animals that could end up victims of abuse. Once here, we have the responsibility for their care. “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” - Mahatma Gandhi. Ask yourself this question: If a person has the mindset to abuse a helpless animal then what other crimes are they likely to commit? The link between animal abuse and domestic violence has been clearly shown by several studies. Therefore, reporting animal abuse does not only protect the animal, but other members of the family. This is a matter that should be taken seriously by all - whether or not you are an animal lover. Lisa Oatsvall West Tennessee Resident

Proposal to extend daylight saving time needs to be put to bed with the chickens

Author’s Note – This column was written seven years ago on the eve of federal action that resulted in an extension of daylight saving time. Today, multiple studies have confirmed that Americans use more energy, not less, because of the time-keeping adjustment, but Congress is too chicken to change it back. If you go to bed and get up with the chickens, you don’t need daylight saving time. Apparently, our elected leaders in Washington, D.C., don’t have rural connections because they want to tack on weeks to daylight saving time, the “spring-forward, fallback” clock adjustment of one hour twice a year that’s a pure headache for country folks. An effort is under way to add four weeks to daylight saving time (DST). If the measure passes, DST will start three weeks earlier, the second Sunday of March, and end one week later, the first Sunday of

November. A Democrat House member from Massachusetts, Rep. Edward Markey, proposed the DST extension, and it has been tacked on the 2005 Energy Bill. Markey is purported to have explained its need as a way to put more smiles on faces. This is a direct quote from Markey: “The beauty of daylight saving time is that it just makes everyone feel sunnier.” Will someone tell Rep. Markey that lower gasoline prices, less taxes, and more jobs are what really put smiles on people’s faces? It is obvious to me that Rep. Markey and the bill’s co-sponsor, Rep. Fred Upton (R-Michigan), are out of touch with rural America. Upton trumpeted the proposed DST extension by noting that children will “rejoice” at Halloween because they will have an extra hour of daylight to trick-or-treat.

Not worth the cost To the editor: I am very concerned about the possibility of making alcohol more available in our community. After 32 years as a physician in Tennessee, I am even more convinced that allowing any increase in availability of alcohol or drugs will be detrimental to the community and the citizens. When I was a teenager, my old, stuffy Bible thumping preacher grandfather said “Prohibition is the best law this country ever passed!” What an ignorant, narrow minded opinion! Anyone who has ever read history will tell you that Prohibition didn’t work and then cite the stories about the lawlessness of Chicago and Al Capone and the mobsters. (He made a lot of his money in illegal gambling and prostitution.) Many families in Tennessee

made their living running moonshine stills in the back woods. I live on a farm that was the site of a moonshine still in the 1920s. That still ceased production when one of the individuals was shot dead during an argument over the proceeds from that business. The head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas told of his tenure as chief resident of surgery at Harvard. His tally of all the surgical admissions at Massachusetts General Hospital revealed that a full one half of all surgical admissions were as a direct result of the consumption and abuse of alcohol. This included alcoholic liver disease, trauma, violence, child abuse, pancreatitis and See LETTER, Page 9-A

(I can’t believe he said it either, but he did.) I would like to invite the honorable Reps. Markey and Upton to my Appalachian farm to explain their DST extension proposal to the chickens. I will arrange folding chairs in the henhouse and set up a screen for the obligatory PowerPoint presentation. My fowl flock is predominantly Republican, but I can guarantee a captive audience that won’t cackle if the solons lay an egg … which I expect they will. They could add six weeks of DST to the calendar, and it wouldn’t make a whet of difference to my chickens. Their biology and behavior is based on diurnal rhythms of the real world. My roosters will crow and my hens start to cackle with no regard to daylight saving time. They are better than an alarm clock. Chickens don’t require winding; they don’t blink after a power outage. You don’t have to remember to spring them forward or kick them back. Chickens will ignore the “new and improved” daylight saving time, just like the flock does now. They will crow, cackle, and wake up when their internal biological clocks tell them. At mid-summer, the first crow occurs around 5 a.m. As the days become shorter after summer solstice, the roosters will gradually adjust dawn reveille in response to sunrise. Every animal on the farm knows what this means. The countryside

stirs: cattle bellow, horses whinny, dogs bark, wild turkeys gobble on the roost, and farm families get up to feed the stock and eat breakfast themselves. We don’t need more Congressional oversight of when to go to bed and when to get up. Rural folks are able to figure this out by listening to the chickens. The system has worked well for hundreds of years. Farmers might not have big bright smiles on their faces at 5:30 a.m. when they’re working in milking parlors or slopping hogs, but most of them are friendlier and more hospitable than, let’s say, folks in Boston at the same time of day. I don’t see a reason to change from what has been observed as “daylight chicken time” for generations. So, what’s really behind longer DST? Simple: It’s the desire to sell more stuff. If the days are longer, human activity will correspond. It means more time to spend in shopping malls, movie theaters, and restaurants. I’d like to see Reps. Markey and Upton try to convince the residents of my henhouse that daylight saving time is good for them on the basis of increasing restaurant receipts. They’d probably want to know how many more grilled chicken breast dinners and KFC buckets this change costs the feathered constituency. It’s hard to fool a chicken, but with people it’s easy.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Letter accidents and many other conditions. Despite the “lack of success” of the Prohibition law, alcohol consumption during prohibition was less than half of the consumption before the law was enacted. It was 10 years before the consumption of alcohol reached the pre-prohibition levels. In 1978 the consumption was over two and one-half times the prohibition level. Increased availability has always led to increased consumption. Henderson Mayor King has been quoted in the Jackson Sun as supporting the sale of liquor in Chester County to recapture the tax revenue that is currently lost by people buying liquor in neighboring areas. I agree, we are losing this revenue. Mr. King estimates that selling liquor here will gain 60-70 thousand dollars in tax revenue. This is prob-

ably a good estimate. Our county clerk, Johnny Garner told me last week that he had just received the checks for taxes from the beer distributors. Together these checks amounted to something over five thousand dollars for the month— $60,000 per year. That sounds like a lot of money, but $60,000 only pays the salary and expenses of one deputy or city policeman! Any time the alcohol consumption goes up, the cost of law enforcement goes up. I doubt that one extra deputy or city officer will be enough to make up the difference in increased calls for law enforcement. One only has to read the local and Jackson papers to see the drain on our law enforcement services already caused by driving under the influence and domestic violence and disturbances in bars and beer joints. How many “public nuisance” closures has the City of Jackson enacted in the last 12 months at bars after shootings and violence?

As medical examiner of Chester County, it is my responsibility to certify unattended deaths. Almost all suicides and homicides I have attended in the past several years have been alcohol or drug related. Several of the “accident” victims have had large numbers of beer and alcohol containers rolling around in the floor board or in the cup holder. Alcohol consumption while or before driving is estimated by the government to cause at least 50 percent of traffic deaths. I believe that is a very low estimate! Sixty or one-hundredtwenty thousand dollars is not nearly enough extra tax revenue for us to afford bringing home an increase in consumption of alcohol. Ten times that amount of revenue would not compensate for the loss of your child or grandchild killed by a drunk driver. Vote right or wrong, not tax revenue. Paul E. Schwartz MD Henderson

Thanks to local law enforcement To the editor: We all have heard it … “I’d rather be lucky than good any day.” Recently we had the opportunity to live out this phrase. So what happened? My wife’s family home was burglarized several weeks back. We discovered this sickening action one Saturday morning. We contacted the Chester County Sheriff’s Department and Officer Justin Denbow came out to the house and took our information. We gave him all the particulars we could think of right then and began cleaning up the mess. Over the weekend we shared this event with several individuals and each one indicated we would never see the stolen items. They also said words to the effect “The Sheriff’s Department won’t do anything.” Having experienced a couple of burglaries in the past, I knew it would be tough to recover anything without some sort of lead. Well those individuals stand to be corrected. The following Monday I was contacted by

Investigator Jason Crouse wanting to know if I could identify a couple of articles that he had recovered over the weekend. Investigator Crouse came by my house and indeed those were just two of the items that were taken. He said he had an arrest warrant out for an individual that had been identified as the individual who was trying to sell these particular items. Just so we would know, I asked Investigator Crouse to let me know when he arrested this individual. Within an hour Investigator Crouse called me to confirm that the Sheriff’s Department had indeed arrested this individual and that he had recovered some more items that were taken. We were lucky because a couple of individuals were just “good people.” One individual here in Chester County contacted the Sheriff’s Department regarding one item. Another individual from Corinth contacted the Sheriff’s Department regarding another item. Over the next week Investigator Course called

me several times to identify some more articles that he had recovered. From Corinth to Selmer to Henderson the Sheriff’s Department recovered articles. At this point in time the Sheriff’s Department has recovered almost everything of importance. Lucky or good? We were extremely lucky because of the two individuals who took the step to contact the Chester County Sheriff’s Department. The Sheriff’s Department was good at their job and followed the leads. We would like to thank Sheriff Blair Weaver and his Department, especially Investigator Crouse and Officer Denbow for an outstanding job. Even though the Police Department and Fire Department were not involved in this situation, we want to take time to thank them and let them know we appreciate the jobs they perform each and every day for the people of Henderson. Tom and Dianne Gipson Henderson

How do we make up the difference? Letter to the editor: Religion, politics, family and money. Often conversations involving these are fueled with emotions. Have you ever noticed how hard it is to make a good decision when emotions run high? The vote to bring liquor stores to Chester County sparks emotions on each one of these so much that I’m afraid good judgment is getting clouded. Now step back and think about this with me for a minute. The way I understand it there is a $600,000 to $700,000 budget deficit that is trying to be overcome here. The pitch is made that if the city and or county can get the votes to have a liquor store then it will bring in supposedly $60,000 to $70,000 dollars. Where is the rest coming from to make up the difference? I know once the vote goes through for the liquor stores the next vote will be for liquor by the drink which supposedly will

bring in restaurants and whatever else. So maybe another $30,000 so let’s say $100,000 total. Where is the rest coming from? Don’t be naive, your property taxes, car tags ??? will likely go up. Now you’re being

pitched kind of like the old Chicago strong arm way, “you give us this and we’ll make sure this bad consequence doesn’t happen to ya.” It’s really a shame that this is putting presSee LETTER, Page 14-A

Library offering knitting classes - Oct. 11 The Chester County Library is offering knitting classes from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11. The instructor is Amy Wake, Associate Professor of Nursing at Jackson State and knitting whiz. Refreshments will be served from 5 to 5:30 p.m. Classes are Thursdays, and are free, but there may be a very small charge for supplies. To sign up, contact the library at 989-4673.

Chester County Schools Parent Teacher Conferences 2012 Oct. 11 - 12 Parent-Teacher conferences are scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 11 from 5 until 8 p.m., and Friday, Oct. 12 from 8 until 11 a.m. for all Chester County Schools, Pre-K through 12th grade. Teachers, principals and counselors will be available each day. Please take advantage of this opportunity to visit your child’s school and teacher(s).

Project Graduation fundraiser is Friday, Oct. 12 Project Graduation at Chester County High School is having a pork chop lunch fundraiser Friday, Oct. 12 at First United Methodist Church. Most of the tickets were pre-sold, however organizers stressed that some lunches would still be available on site for any that did not by tickets in advance. Lunches are $8 and include pork chop, beans, slaw, and bread. Lunches may be picked up between 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., and businesses expecting delivery should expect them during this time. However, if you do not receive your delivery, call Gaye Phillips at 695-9555, or Angie Knipper at 435-0482.

Hunter Safety Course, Oct. 12-13 The Hunter Safety Course will be taught Oct. 12-13 at the UT Extension Service Office in the Public Safety Building behind the Chester County Courthouse. Start time is 6 p.m. Oct. 12, and 8:30 a.m. Oct. 13. Participants are asked to bring their Social Security number and a pencil.

City Fire Dept. to host annual open house - Oct. 13 The City of Henderson will host their third annual open house from 9 a.m. until noon, Saturday Oct. 13.

CCHS Class of ‘67 class reunion - Oct. 13 The CCHS class of 1967 will have its 45th reunion Oct. 13 at the Brown Koppel building on FHU’s campus. Doors open at 2 p.m., pictures will be made at 5 p.m., and at 6 p.m. dinner will be served. The cost is $20 per person payable to Judy Holmes Cranford at the Chester County Court House, or mail a check made out to CCHS Class of 1967 to 205 Holmes Rd., Bethel Springs, TN 38315.

Finger School Reunion – Oct. 13 A day of remembrance will be held Saturday, Oct. 13 at the Finger Community Center, Old Gymnasium. Visit with old friends or make new ones. Come early and stay late. At noon there will be a pot luck meal. For more information, call 934-4856 or 632-3433.

Bain Reunion - Oct. 14 The Bain reunion will begin at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14 at the New Friendship Community Center on New Friendship Road. It will be a pot luck lunch. Come and enjoy the good food and family fellowship.

Headhugger Hat Group to meet Oct. 15 The Headhugger Hat Group will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15 in the Studio 412 Building behind Henderson Assembly of God Church. We pack the hats that have been made for cancer patients in baggies to deliver to area hospitals and clinics. If you would like to participate in making, packing, donating yarn/baggies for this ministry, call 989-3305.

Ham radio club to meet Monday, Oct. 15 The Chester County Amateur Radio Club will hold its quarterly meeting at 7 p.m. Oct. 15 at the Henderson Fire Station. There will be a presentation on EchoLink with a live demonstration. The meeting is open to the public, and you do not have to be licensed amateur radio operator to attend.

Deposit due for Discover Scotland trip Oct. 15 The Chester County Senior Center has put together a Discover Scotland tour, departing April 15, 2013 and returning April 24, 2013. See the Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace, St. Andrews Dunrobin Castle, Orkney Islands, Loch Ness, Isle of Skye and Armadale Castle. Cost is $3,349 each for a double room. Call Joanne for more information at 989-7434. Depost for this trip is due Monday, October 15.

FHU Associates Rummage Sale - Oct. 17-20 The Freed-Hardeman University Associates will have a rummage sale at the National Guard Armory Wednesday through Saturday, Oct. 17 - 20. The times Wednesday through Friday are 7:30 a.m. through 5 p.m., and from 7:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

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On Friday, everything is hald price. On Saturday, come and fill a shopping bag with clothes for $2 and all other items will be half price. All proceeds from the sale go toward scholarships.

COPE personal empowerment group Resumes Thursdays at Senior Center – Oct. 18 The Chester Senior Center will again sponsor a therapeutic group session called C.O.P.E., meaning “circle of personal empowerment,” began Thursday, Oct. 4, and continues from 9-9:45 a.m. on Oct. 18; Nov. 1, 15; and Dec. 6, 20. The facilitator of the group is Al Price. Anyone from the community is welcome to attend. For more information, call the center at 989-7434.

“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” Oct. 18 - 19 “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” will be presented by the Jackson Teen Theater at 7 p.m. on Oct. 18 and 19 at the Ned R. McWherter West TN Cultural Arts Center, 314 E. Main St., Jackson. Tickets are $8 in advance and $9 day of show. For more information, call 4258397.

Finger Fire Department BBQ and Picnic - Oct 19-20 The Finger Fire Department’s barbeque and picnic will be held starting at noon, Friday Oct. 19 and all day Saturday, Oct. 20. There will be whole hog BBQ and chicken, homemade ice cream, and baked goods. There will be a parade at 10 a.m. Saturday and live music. All proceeds go to the Finger Volunteer Fire Department. Everyone is invited to attend this event!

Spaghetti dinner at Hickory Corner Center - Oct. 20 There will be a spaghetti dinner at the Hickory Corner Community Center at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. The meal is $7.50 and includes spaghetti, salad, Texas toast, tea and dessert. A great evening has been planned, with a 50’s 60’s theme, including the music. Everyone is welcome to attend and enjoy the food, fun, and fellowship.

Jacks Creek Fire Department annual stew sale Oct. - 20 The Jacks Creek Fire Department annual stew sale will be Saturday, Oct. 20, at Jacks Creek Fire Station, Hwy 100 East and Hwy 22A. Please bring your own container. The stew will be ready by 11 a.m. and costs $15 a gallon. All are welcome to stop by and support this fire department.

Glow Fast 5K and 1 Mile fun run/walk – pre-register by Oct. 22 “Glow-in-the-dark” 5k and 1 mile fun run/walk will be Friday, Nov. 2, 2012 at No Xcuse Fitness, 123 Front St. Henderson, TN 38340. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m., the 5K begins at 7:30 p.m., and at 7:35 p.m. the 1 mile begins. Preregistration entry fees are $17 for the 5K and $12 for the 1 Mile. Preregistration closes on Mon, Oct 22. After Oct 22 and on race day, entry fees will be an additional $3. Age categories for the 5K are 12-and-under, 13-15, 16-19, 20-29, 30-39, 4049, 50-59, and 60 and up. Wear anything bright or reflective such as glow sticks, paint, tape, etc. Anything to be seen! Limited glow sticks will be provided. Shirts are only guaranteed to those who preregister. The course can be viewed at www.usatf.org/routes/view.asp?rID=496301 . All proceeds benefiting Relay for Life. Register online at goseries.org or pick up

an entry form at Clayton Bank & Trust.

Girl Talk four week program starts Oct. 25 Girl Talk is a four-week program offered by Chester County UT Extension office. This program is designed for girls ages 9-12 and their mothers to come together in a classroom setting to discuss sexuality and their changing bodies. Goals of the class include promoting open communication within the family, create a lasting bond between mothers and daughters, increasing a girl’s positive self-esteem and providing factual information about sexuality. This class is a four-week class, taught in two-hour increments. The classes are 6 - 8 p.m. on Oct. 25, Nov. 1, 8, and 15 at the UT Extension office. The cost for each mother/daughter pair is $40. This includes all supplies, refreshments, door prizes, etc. that are provided to make each session fun and enjoyable! Reservations are required and space is limited! Scholarships may be available upon request and approval of scholarship application. For more information, call 989-2103.

Little Eagles Pre-Season Basketball Clinic Oct. 27 The Little Eagles Pre-Season Basketball Clinic will be from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 27 in the CCHS gym. The clinic is open to boys and girls Kindergarten through fifthgrade. Campers will be instructed on basic basketball fundamentals. The cost is $25, and includes a T-shirt. All proceeds benefit CCHS boys’ basketball team. For more information contact Coach Tony Lambert at 9898125 or email lamberta@tennk12.net.


Obituary/Religion Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Obituaries Inez Robinson Roland July 26, 1941 - Oct. 3, 2012 Inez Robinson Roland, 71, of Bethel Springs, passed away Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012. Services were held Saturday, Oct. 6, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel. Burial followed at Cave Springs Cemetery in Chester County. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 11, 2012

Frances Lorraine Hayes May 13, 1938 - Oct. 2, 2012 Frances Lorraine Hayes, 74, passed away Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at her home. Funeral services were held Saturday, Oct 6, 2012 at the Michael Pawlak Funeral Home in Temperance, Mich. Burial followed in the Ottawa Hills Memorial Gardens in Toledo, Ohio. Shackelford Funeral Directors – Johnson Chapel was in charge of local arrangements. She was born and reared in Elkhart, Ind., the daughter of the late Robert LeRoy and Mable Bowman Runnion. She married Dennis Denbow in 1956 and sometime later they moved to Henderson. She later married Charles Hayes. She was a member of the VFW and was a Baptist in belief. She enjoyed her grandchildren. She is survived by a daughter, Annette Bickings (Charlie) of Henderson; a son, LeRoy Denbow of Henderson; two brothers, Robert Runnion and Ed Runnion both of South Bend, Ind.; eight grandchildren, Michael Matthews (Angela), Jerry Matthews (Amanda), Barbara Carroll (Shane), Terry Bickings (Jennifer), Cindy Robertson (Rick), Corey Bickings, John Ryan Bickings and Nicole King; and eight great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Dennis Denbow; her second husband, Charles Hayes; two grandchildren, Cassie Denbow and Danny Matthews; two sisters, Betty Roberts and Doris Bailey; two brothers, Mike Runnion and Donnie Runnion; and stepmother, Dorothy Runnion. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 11, 2012

Ruby Nobles Wright Aug. 24, 1927 - Oct. 2, 2012 Ruby Eunice Nobles Wright, age 85, passed away Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at the Henderson Health & Rehabilitation Center. Funeral services were Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Bill Evans and Nathan Wright officiating. Burial followed in Unity Cemetery. Pallbearers were Danny Ross, Damon Ross, Nick Phillips, Nathan Wright, Ben Wright, and Debbie Wright. She was born and reared at Jacks Creek, the daughter of the late Henry Luke and Beulah Mae Holmes Nobles. She graduated from Chester County High School in 1946. She married Worth Wright in 1949 and they made their home at Jacks Creek. She worked in the garment industry at Salant & Salant Mfg., Garan at Adamsville, and I Appeal at Scotts Hill; and then at Jacks Creek Elementary School as cafeteria manager from 1978 until she retired in 2001. She loved sewing, gardening and cooking. Along with other ladies from Jacks Creek, she helped make the graduation gowns for Jacks Creek Kindergarten. She was a member of the Holly Springs United Methodist Church. She is survived by a daughter, LaTasha Phillips (Dennis) of Jacks Creek; a son Nathan Wright (Becky) of Henderson; five grandchildren, Jennifer Scott, Ben Wright, Heather Wright, Teisha (Carl) Nichols, and Nick Phillips; and two great-grandchildren, Mason Scott, and Logan Wright. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1983; her parents; a sister, Lila Sue Ross (1978); and two brothers, Glenn Nobles (1988) and Raford Nobles (2011). Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 11, 2012

Minnie Naylor Plunk

Gene Hibbett

Sept. 25, 1913 - Oct. 3, 2012 Minnie Mae Naylor Plunk, 99, departed this life Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012 at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel. Burial followed at Cave Springs Cemetery. She was born Sept. 25, 1913 to the late Harmon Joshua and Willie Edna Young Naylor. The oldest of eight children, she grew up in McNairy County and attended McNairy County Schools. She married Dossie Blaine Plunk on Oct. 13, 1932. She retired from Salant & Salant Factory after 25 years of service. She was a member of the Cave Springs Baptist Church for 71 years where she had served as Treasurer for many years. She was a faithful supporter of St. Jude Children’s Hospital. She is survived by a daughter, Emma Blankenship; four grandchildren, Annette Springer (Ted) of Talladega, Ala., Sherry Davis (Tommy) of Henderson, Vicki Holcomb (Rocky) of Morton, Ill., and Kim Watters (Ronnie) of Creve Coure, Ill.; a daughter-in-law, Vena Plunk of Creve Coure, Ill.; 10 great-grandchildren; 14 great-great-grandchildren; and two brothers, Raymond Naylor of Henderson and Buford Naylor of Bethel Springs. She was predeceased in death by her husband in 1966; a son, Jimmie Blaine (J.B.) Plunk; one son-in-law, J.E. Blankenship in 2011; four brothers, Floyd Naylor, Arthur Naylor, Johnnie Naylor and A.J. Naylor; and a sister, Marie White. Memorials may be made to St. Jude Children’s Hospital or the Cave Springs Baptist Church.

July 17, 1932 - Oct. 6, 2012 Eugene P. Hibbett, 80, died early Saturday morning, Oct. 6, 2012 at Select Specialty Hospital at St. Frances in Memphis. Funeral services were at the Estes Church of Christ with Milton Tucker, Jesse Robertson, Mark Blackwelder and Roy Sharp officiating. Burial followed in the Estes Cemetery. Nephews served as pallbearers. Honorary pallbearers were the elders of the Estes Church of Christ along with Howard Trull, Hoyt Kirk, Bill Threet, Allen Dixon, Willard Alls and Robert Shelton. Shackelford Funeral Directors - Casey Chapel was in charge of services. He was born and reared in Florence, Ala., the son of the late Rufus Gleason Hibbett Sr. and Annie Lee Lester Hibbett. He graduated from Coffee High School in Florence, Ala. in 1950. He received a Bachelor of Science from Lipscomb University, a Masters of Education from the University of Alabama, a Masters of Physical Science from the University of Mississippi and a PhD in Medicinal Chemistry from the University of Mississippi. He served six years in the U. S. Navy Reserve. He married Jacqueline Graben in 1958. He taught high school in Tuscumbia, Ala., and came to Freed-Hardeman as a chemistry teacher in 1958, and retired as Professor of Chemistry and Department Chair in 1997. He served eight years on the Chester County School Board. He was a very active member of the Chester County Lions Club, having served as president, and was always the leading pancake ticket salesperson for the Lions annual pancake breakfast fundraiser. He and his son Lee operated a lawn mowing business while Lee was a teenager. He preached at congregations for the Churches of Christ in West Tennessee and North Mississippi. He was a member of the Estes Church of Christ and had served as an elder for 18 years. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Jacqueline “Jackie” Graben Hibbett; a son, Lee Hibbett (Sarah); a daughter, Lynne Moore (Kevin) of Henderson; four granddaughters, Elisabeth and Rachel Grace Hibbett, and Loren and Kaitlyn Moore; and three brothers, George Hibbett of Florence, Ala., Ike Hibbett of Montgomery, Ala., and James Hibbett of Riverton, Ill. He was preceded in death by three brothers, Rufus Hibbett Jr., Lester Hibbett and Barry Hibbett. Memorials may be made to the Hibbett-Trull Scholarship fund at Freed-Hardeman University, 158 East Main St., Henderson, TN 38340. Chester County Independent

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 11, 2012

Steve Sewell Aug. 1, 1963 - Oct. 7, 2012 Steve Allen Sewell, 49, died early Sunday morning, Oct. 07, 2012 at his home in Henderson. Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012 at the Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel. Burial will follow in the Chester County Memory Gardens. He was born and reared in Henderson, the son of Christine McClain Sewell and the late Allen Sewell. He went to school in Chester County and graduated from Chester County High School in 1981, where he played baseball and was an outstanding pitcher. After school he worked for general contractors as a roofer. He loved to fish and be outdoors. He is survived by two sons, Derrick Sewell and Matthew Walker; a daughter, Amanda Sewell all of Henderson; his mother, Christine McClain Sewell of Henderson; four sisters, Sandra Scarbrough of Henderson, Doris Smith of Parsons, Joy Wyrick of Alabama and Tina Latimer of Virginia; and four grandchildren, Mamiya Sewell, Layla Riley, Branden Walker and Jaylen Walker. He was preceded in death by his father, Allen Sewell in 2000, and a brother, Randy Sewell in 2008. The family received friends at Shackelford Casey Chapel from 5 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 11, 2012

Singing at Cave Springs Baptist Church - Oct. 13 The Masters Quartet from Mississippi will be singing at Cave Springs Baptist Church at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13. Everyone is invited to attend.

Church of God to celebrate Homecoming Oct. 14 Henderson Church of God, located at 931 U.S. Hwy 45 North, Henderson, will host its Homecoming on Oct. 14. Preaching is at 11 a.m. with Rev. James Taylor Sr. A meal is scheduled for around noon, and there will be singing at 1:30 p.m. with Ann Cupples and The Gospel Prayer Warriors. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Ruby Nobles Wright’s children, nieces, nephews (Grandchildren of Henry Luke Nobles and Beulah Mae Holmes Nobles) Ruby Nobles Wright’s children, nieces and nephews are, front row from left: Glenda N. Parchman, Patsy N. Jones, Carolyn N. Ross, and LaTasha W. Phillips. Back row: Damon Ross, Danny Ross, and Nathan Wright. Not present – Larry Nobles.

(Henderson, Tenn.) Oct. 11, 2012

Homecoming at New Beginning Oct. 14 A New Beginning Church, located at 938 Sol Colston Road, Finger, is having Homecoming and Pastor Appreciation day Sunday, Oct. 14. For more information, call Pastor Ken Kitchen at 6951878.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Oak Grove Church of Christ 120 Lott Road 989-7513

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT October 1, 2012 A wallet was reported stolen from the Miller’s Big Star parking lot. A blue Buick allegedly pulled up and picked up the wallet after it was dropped accidently by owner. A home was vandalized on Hearn Street when a window was broken causing $150 in damage. October 3, 2012 Tanairo Dantrez Bond, 19, 114 Newsome Ave., was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $200 bond. Tommy Neal Miller, 49, of Bethel Springs, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence and driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $3,750 bond. October 4, 2012 A possible scam was reported to the Henderson Police Department regarding a woman who received checks with directions to cash them and send a portion of the money to an address in Atlanta, Ga. A theft reportedly occurred from a house on Sanford Street. Items taken include a silver watch with big numbers, square in shape valued at $30; a silver rope necklace valued at approximately $30; and a tri-gold family ring with six stones and six names which include “Tracey, Donald, Jimmy, Michael, Mae and Travis” valued at approximately $600. October 5, 2012 A stop sign and its metal post were stolen from the entrance to the parking lot of Sewell Hall. The sign and post are valued at approximately $150. Bradley Edward Terry, 25, 364 Kitchen Drive, was arrested and charged with violation of parole. He is being held in the Chester County Jail. October 6, 2012 Shawanna Patrece Pearson, 21, Hillview Manor Apt. 808, was arrested and charged with assault. She is being held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $500 bond. October 7, 2012 Terry Wayne Crutchfield, 48, of Brownsville was arrested

and charged with driving under the influence, driving on canceled/revoked/suspended license, and violation of the implied consent law. He is being held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $1,550 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT October 3, 2012 3:50 p.m. — 45 N. and Woods Drive., tractor trailer fire reported. No fire. October 5, 2012 7:05 p.m. — 1495 White Ave., dumpster fire. October 6, 2012 4:11 p.m. — 203 University, food on the stove. 6:20 p.m. — 35 E. University, elevator rescue. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT October 2, 2012 David Wayne Deckard, 27, of Jackson, was arrested and charged with violation of community corrections-misdemeanor. He is being held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $1650 bond. A commercial license plate was stolen off of a 1992 Ford box truck, white in color, belonging to Industrial Paint and Cleaning Services. The tag no. is H402271, was good through March 2013 and was valued at approximately $477.75. Officers took a report concerning a possible assault and then were called to a home on State Route Highway 125 to investigate a possible vandalism of a mailbox. The alleged victim was advised as to the procedures for filing an arrest warrant. October 3, 2012 Officer took a report on a possible vandalism on Hwy 200. According to the report, various ATVs, dirt bikes and go carts were being driven through neighbors’ yards without their permission. Roger Lee Lawrence, 36, 596 Sanford Apt. 606, was arrested and charged with failure to pay child support. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $750 cash only bond. Jason Errol McLinn, 35, of Enville, was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail on

probation. Vince Edward Reynolds, 41, of Trenton, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He is being held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $500 bond. October 4, 2012 Chickasaw Golf Course reported that an unknown person had driven onto several greens areas and caused about $1,500 in damage. Jerry D. Childress, 34, 365 Hopper Lane, was arrested and charged with assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $10,000 bond. Kimberly Nicole Childress, 29, 365 Hopper Lane, was arrested and charged with assault. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,000 bond. Jeremy Ray Henley, 29, 519 Anderson Circle, was arrested and charged with driving on a revoked/suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $300 bond. Teresa Carole Jones, 44, 95 Memory Lane, was arrested and charged with violation of community corrections-felony, introduction of drugs into county institution, and possession of schedule IV. She is being held in the Chester County Jail. Shelly Ann Lee, 35, of Waynesboro, was arrested and is being held for Carroll County. Steve Allen Sewell, 49, 486 Crook Ave., was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released on his own recognizance to pay $1,000 by Nov. 19. Jared Roland Shelby, 25, 405 Mayfield Road, was arrested and charged with coercion of witness, and two charges of vandalism. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $25,000 bond. October 5, 2012 Christopher Junior Simpson, 36, 364 Kitchen Drive, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from Chester County Jail after posting a $2500 bond. October 6, 2012 Victor A. Eanes, 51, of Bethel Springs, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from Chester County Jail after posting a

$300 bond. Derrick Huddleston, 31, 651 Sanford, was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. He was released from Chester County Jail after posting a $10,000 bond. A theft allegedly occurred on Talley Store Road. A man reported that a white male in a blue SUV pulled into his driveway, exited his vehicle, and removed a bottle containing 35 7.5 mg Loratab from his unlocked car. A woman reported a possible scam to the Sheriff ’s Department. Allegedly the woman had made contact with the seller through Craigslist to purchase a 2004 Nissan Maxima but after sending the seller the money, the woman did not receive the car. A couple reported that a transaction in the amount of $56.38 had been made with the wife’s debit card at Fred’s. The couple reported that they did not make the transaction and had cancelled the debit card. October 7, 2012 A theft was reported on Hutchison Road. A man reported that two deep cycle batteries were stolen off his excavator. In the process of stealing the batteries the battery cables were cut. A fire extinguisher was also allegedly stolen. The batteries are valued at approximately $200 for both, the battery cables were valued at approximately $100 and the fire extinguisher was valued at approximately $20. October 8, 2012 Jerry Matthews, 33, 960 Tar Creek Road, was arrested and is serving time in jail. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT September 27, 2012 4:37 p.m. 10786 Hw. 100 E. — rescue by Jacks Creek Fire Department. September 28, 2012 1:35 p.m. 4540 Laurel Hill Road — combine fire. Masseyville Fire Department responded. October 3, 2012 11:26 a.m. 20 Chisom Lane — order handled by Hilltop Fire Department. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports.

Medical Center EMS – Everyday Heroes Go Pink! Medical Center EMS has partnered with West Tennessee Women’s Center, Signs First and Mitchell’s Automotive to place pink ribbons on each of their ambulances during the month of October. The ribbons will help to call attention to breast cancer awareness, early detection and prevention. “We respond to emergencies every day; it’s what we do. But as a part of this community where we live, work and raise our families, we are affected by the impact of cancer like everyone else. We all know someone affected by cancer and as healthcare professionals, we would love to see an end to it,”

says Mark Walker, Shift Manager / Outreach Coordinator, Medical Center EMS. In addition to pink ribbons on the ambulances, the EMS education unit, affectionately known as “Hope,” will have pink striping and pink stars of life. There will be numerous community events during the month of October in which Hope will be present. Each day of the month, if not at a scheduled event, Hope will be displayed at various locations around Jackson. Medical Center EMS would like to thank the Women’s Center for allowing them to be an

integral part of this year’s breast cancer awareness education. They also extend a special thank you to Mitchell’s Automotive

and Signs First for the artwork on all the EMS units. For further information, call Tammy Hardee at 512-1548.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

The Chester County Library’s book sale is now over, so anything left on the book sale is free for the taking. September’s book sale garnered over $400 for our building fund. Thanks to everyone who donated, shopped, and shopped some more. Some folks even returned the books they purchased so that the library can sell them again. We appreciate everyone’s support! The library knitting class is off to a great start with a lot of enthusiastic participants. We are fortunate to have an equally enthusiastic instructor Amy Wake, who has only been knitting for a little over a year, but what a knitter she is! She is eager to pass on her newfound skills to others and she has been kind enough to take time out from her very busy schedule as a nursing professor at Jackson State to help other folks learn this

timely craft. Under the umbrella of the Friends of the Library, Amy has managed to get some corporate donations of beautiful yarn and knitting needles. Very special thanks go to the Knit Picks Company ( w w w. k n i t p i c k s . c o m ) , Karon Reinman, the Friends of the Library, Neighborhood Network, and Gary and Amy Wake. Our New Year’s resolution this past year was to offer more adult programming and we have met that goal with workshops on landscaping, gardening, a crochet class, and now a knitting class. If you can think of some other activity that your library can offer, contact us at 9894673 or e-mail us at chester_librar y@bellsouth.net. We are always open to suggestions. Look for the Career Coach from the Tennessee Department of Labor from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 17 in the

Newspapers: Legal documents that protect citizens “beyond the shadow of doubt” By Mike MacLaren Executive Director Michigan Press Association in Lansing.

Paying for baseball umpires is more important than protecting your property from foreclosure. That is in essence what elected officials across the country are saying as they push for “cost saving” legislation to allow government to post notices of legal actions on government-run websites. “Baseball umpires? ... You can’t be serious,” you say. I am serious; I’m also worried. You should be too. Here’s why: Government officials say such legislation saves money that could be spent on police and fire fighters. But there are government programs that cost more than publishing these notices, such as umpires for city baseball leagues. It’s a fact: the City of Niles (Mich.) spends more each year for baseball umpires than for publishing legal notices in the local newspaper. But there’s a larger issue at stake. These public notices are legal documents. News-on-paper notices give citizens an independent, authentic and verifiable record of what their government has done. If questions arise regarding ordinances, actions or any other municipal decision, courts will not accept a copy — they want the original document as proof. This news-on-paper publication requirement was put in place to protect public and municipal officials so that there’s no question that a document had been doctored. Requiring legal notices to be published in a venue independent of government is a form of insurance for taxpayers. How can you get “beyond the shadow of doubt” proof of the contents of a legal document from a website that can be altered with a click of a mouse, or hacked? Heck, even the Pentagon’s computers have been hacked. When was the last time you visited your local government website? Is it something you do weekly? By contrast, according to American Opinion Research:

Newspapers are the number one source for local/community news. Seventy percent of Michigan adults read a print newspaper on an average Sunday. Eighty-seven percent of Michigan Adults (6.7 million) read a Michigan newspaper during an average seven-day period. Ninety-five percent of 18-29 year-olds read a newspaper each week in Michigan. Newspapers deliver an ongoing information stream, so that if one person misses a propertyrezoning announcement, others can alert them that a nearby wooded lot could become an adult video store. Let me be clear: Under the guise of saving money, such “pull public notices out of a newspapers and post them on a government web site” legislation will make it easier for municipalities to have special meetings, make assessments and other important decisions with nearly no knowledge or input from the community. Yes, newspapers charge to publish these notices. More often than not, they are done at cost. But without these notices, more than a few community newspapers face the specter of shutting down. So on top of posting these public notices where the public won’t notice, there may be no local paper to report on the results of the actions. And let me be clear about something else: government officials across the country have thankless jobs. Most of the ones I’ve worked with are industrious and wellintentioned people. I sincerely doubt that they realized how this legislation could cause a crack in the cornerstone of communities across the country. But the truth is that these bills will hurt you and every other citizen across this nation. So, government officials: Thank you for all the thankless work you do. It is a lot. And thank you for reconsidering your support of this legislation. Because the taxpayers you work for deserve better.

library parking lot. They will be on hand to conduct resume help for anyone who would like to come by. The Brown Bag Book Club will meet at noon Wednesday, Oct. 10, to discuss “Lost In ShangriLa: A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II” by Mitchell Zuckoff. November’s book will be the classic “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury. Join us! Our annual Storytime Halloween party will take place at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30. Children (and grown-ups) may come in costume if they wish. We will color Halloween pictures, hear Halloween stories, and have Halloween cookies. All ages are welcome. Recently, I met with groups at the Junior High and the High School about starting up the Teen Book Club for the year. The group voted to read “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak. Our meeting is scheduled for 3 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1. Everyone who is interested MUST sign up so we know how many books to order. The books will be sold to the book clubbers at the library’s cost, so they seldom cost more than $5. If you want to be in book club, please call, e-mail, or come by the library (our phone number and e-mail address are listed above) to put your name on the list. We will also need your parent’s name, your telephone number, and please indicate if you are in high school or junior high. There was such a large interest group at both schools that we may have to split them up. Pizza will also be involved. NEW ARRIVALS: DVDs: “The Avengers” and “Dark Shadows” JUVENILE LITERATURE: “Let’s Go For A

Drive”; “Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs”; “Mossy”; “My Brave Year of Firsts”; “Nothing Ever Happens At the South Pole”; “Seed by Seed”; “The Story and Legend of John ‘Appleseed’ Chapman”; “Llama, Llama, time to Share”; “The 39 Clues”; “Cahill Vs. Vespers”; “Shatterproof”; “The Heroes of Olympus”; “The Mark of Athena”; and “Dork Diaries: Tales From A Not-So-Smart Miss Know-It-All”. TEEN READING: “Confessions of A Murder Suspect” and “Maximum Ride”; “Nevermore” by James Patterson; “Raven Boys” by Maggie Stiefvater; “Tilt” by Ellen Hopkins; and “Prized and Promised” by Carragh M. O’Brien. ADULT NON-FICTION: “Don’t Know Much About the American Presidents”; “Guinness World Records 2013”; “I’d Like to Apologize to Every Teacher I Ever Had”; “My Year As A Rookie Teacher At Northeast High” by Tony Danza; “Cast On, Bind Off”; “Mugged”; “Racial Demagoguery From the Seventies to

Obama” by Ann Coulter; “Running For My Life”; “One Lost Boy’s Journey From the Killing Fields of Sudan to the Olympics”; “No Easy Day”; “The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden”; “Killing Kennedy”; “The End of Camelot” by Bill O’Reilly; and “Principles of Knitting”. ADULT FICTION: “Low Pressure” by Sandra Brown; “As the Crow Flies”; “Junkyard Dogs”; “Kindness Goes Unpunished”; “Death Without Company”; “Hell Is Empty”; “Another Man’s Moccasins”; “Cold Dish” and “Dark Horse” all by Craig Johnson; “Red Rain” by R.L. Stine; “Severe Clear” by Stuart Woods; “Winter In the World” by Ken Follett; “Delusion In Death” by

Page 13-A

J.D. Robb; “A Wanted Man” by Lee Child; “The Time Keeper” by Mitch Albom; “Zoo” and “NYPD Red” by James Patterson; “The Casual Vacancy” by JK Rowling; “The Bridesmaid” by Beverly Lewis; “His Love Endures Forever” by Beth Wiseman; “Dark Storm” by Christine Feehan; “The Language of Flowers” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh; “Leader of the Pack” by David Rosenfelt; “Love Anthony” by Lisa Genova; “Mad River” by John Sanford; “Phantom” by Jo Nesbo; “Full Disclosure” by Dee Henderson; “Return to Willow Lake” by Susan Wiggs; “River of Mercy” by BJ Hoff; “A Season for Tending” by Cindy Woodsmall; and “When Love Comes My Way” by Lori Copeland. See you at the library!


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

UT Extension questions and answers: October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month By Michele Sides UT Extension Agent

October is considered National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Breast and cervical cancers are serious diseases, but both are treatable if detected early. In Tennessee, more than 3,800 new cases of breast cancer are found each year and an average of 400 new cases of cervical cancer. Some of these new cases are found early enough to treat successfully. However, Tennessee women continue to die unnecessarily every year. TEAM UP TN, a partnership of Tennessee organizations, encourages women to make an appointment for a mammogram and a Pap test at their local health center this month. The greatest risk factor for breast and cervical cancer is age. Other risk factors increase woman’s chance

and should also be discussed with her doctor. Some of these risk factors include: Family history of breast and/or cervical cancer; Smoking; Diet and exercise; Sexual history; Genital warts (HPV) or other STD history; Or any change in the size or shape of the breast or nipple discharge. The basics are: Get a mammogram every year if you are 40 years old or older. Get a Pap test every year if you are sexually active or 18 years old and older. By talking with your doctor and getting screened, you may save your life. Free screenings are available at the local health department for women who meet the following criteria: Free breast cancer screening – Mammograms available for women: 50-64 years old;

40-49 years old and have a mother, daughter, or sister with breast cancer; or a personal breast cancer history; or an abnormal clinical test result; 18-39 years old and have had abnormal symptoms, including breast lump(s), nipple discharge, skin changes, or nipple changes; Not insured, or insurance does not cover mammogram; Or meet income eligibility; Free cervical cancer screening – Pap test available for women: 40-64 years old; 18-39 years old and have an abnormal test result; Or meet income eligibility. Contact your local health department at 9897108 or your local Extension at 989-2103 office for more information.

Who “doesn’t pay” taxes explained Bo Bradshaw Tennessee News Service

Pundits and politicians are throwing around a lot of numbers these days. When it comes to taxes and who is or isn’t paying them, one group aims to separate the facts from fiction. Chuck Marr, director of federal tax policy for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, coauthored a report on taxpayers, released last week. He says one of the biggest misconceptions is that about half of Americans, 47 percent, do not pay taxes. “We’re talking here about federal income taxes. Working-class and middle-class people do pay federal payroll taxes for Social Security and Medicare. In fact, most people pay more in payroll taxes than in income taxes.” Marr says other taxes such as state, local and sales tax - are also a big part of the equation.

According to the Center report, when considering all forms of taxes, the bottom 20 percent of households pay an average of 16 to 17 percent of their income in taxes. The people who do not pay federal income tax or payroll tax generally are low-income seniors, people with serious disabilities, or students - most of whom become future taxpayers. In the case of seniors, they likely paid federal income taxes during their working years, he notes. The 47 percent and 57 percent figures that have been cited lately regarding people who do not pay federal income taxes were taken from reports that looked at taxpayer numbers during the recent recession, Marr adds, when people lost their jobs and therefore were paying much less tax than in previous years. “When a person’s income falls during a recession, they pay less

tax - it’s the same with a business - and that helps them to get back on their feet. You wouldn’t expect someone to pay the same amount of tax if they’re making half the money they used to make.” Prior to the recession, in 2007, the percentage of people not paying federal income tax was 40 percent, according to the report. Much of the rhetoric implying that people are “victims” or are somehow not paying their fair share in this country is misguided, Marr says. “They get up every day, they go to work, they work hard. They work in nursing homes and take care of elderly people; they are school aides; they work in all of our stores. They’re working hard and are very much contributing to society.” The report, “Misconceptions and Realities about Who Pays Taxes,” is available at www.cbpp.org.

Project Grad fundraiser is Friday Project Graduation at Chester County High School is having a pork chop lunch fundraiser Friday, Oct. 12 at First United Methodist Church. Most of the tickets were pre-sold, however organizers stressed that some

lunches would still be available on site for any that did not by tickets in advance. Lunches are $8 and include pork chop, beans, slaw, and bread. Lunches may be picked up between 10:30 a.m. and

1 p.m., and businesses expecting delivery should expect them during this time. However, if you do not receive your delivery, call Gaye Phillips at 695-9555, or Angie Knipper at 4350482.

From Page 9-A

Others are saying “we need to keep the liquor tax dollars in the county.” Well are these people spending all their other tax dollars on groceries, new cars etc. within the county? Or the best one yet “because we need to bring Henderson into the 21st century.” I think this is in the non-teenage way of saying “but everybody else is doing it why can’t I.” The bottom line is that your money has not been handled correctly by the county and rather than them making the right choices to fix it within the taxes they already receive the easiest thing for them to do is tax you more. Do you know that other counties are increasing their taxes because their citizens have cut back on spending and now their counties are low on tax dollars? So no matter how

thrifty you are with your money the politicians don’t have to be and can always tax you more. So what is the answer? Tell the politicians to fix the problem with what they have. Vote the people who want to tax you out of office. I don’t care if you are related to them. They are your public servants. They answer to you. If they push the taxes while everyone is against it, that’s taxation without representation. Have we forgotten that the Revolutionary War was fought over this very thing? Where’s our compass pointing? Ask yourself. Who is it that is really going to benefit the most by having liquor stores in Chester County? I’m sure some already have their liquor license form filled out.

Letter sure on the elderly to vote yes because of fear of additional property tax increases. You’re also being told you should vote yes because there are pious people sitting in churches who commit adultery and I guess say drinking is wrong so voting yes will show ‘um. Show ‘um what? Or maybe you’re a person of faith and believe there is nothing wrong with you having a drink. Hey that’s between you and the Lord. You say you’re going to vote yes to show everyone else that they’re wrong and that you have conviction. Good! While you’re at it, ask your kids to write down all the ways that your drinking alcohol has blessed their lives.

Patrick Malone Henderson


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Big tater!

Photos by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Linda, above, and J.C. Emerson used their “green thumb” skills to grow this 6-lb. sweet potato.

Skywarn Storm Spotter Class scheduled Oct. 18 A Skywarn Storm Spotter Class is scheduled for 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 in the upstairs classroom at Henderson City Hall. The class is being sponsored by the Henderson/Chester County Emergency management Agency. For more information or to register for the class, contact Johny Farris at 9895672 or 608-1222, or email at jrfarris667@msn.com. The effects of severe weather are felt every year by many Americans. To obtain critical weather information, NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS), part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, established SKYWARN® with partner organizations. SKYWARN® is a volunteer program with nearly 290,000 trained severe weather spotters. These volunteers help keep their local communities safe by providing timely and accurate reports of severe weather to the National Weather Service. Although SKYWARN® spotters provide essential information for all types of weather hazards, the main responsibility of a SKYWARN® spotter is to identify and describe severe local storms. In the average year, 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 5,000 floods and more than 1,000 tornadoes occur across the United

States. These events threaten lives and property. Since the program started in the 1970s, the information provided by SKYWARN® spotters, coupled with Doppler radar technology, improved satellite and other data, have enabled NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings for tornadoes, severe thunderstorms and flash floods. SKYWARN® storm spotters are part of the ranks of citizens who form the Nation’s first line of defense against severe weather. There can be no finer reward than to know that their efforts have given communities the precious gift of time—seconds and minutes that can help save lives. NWS encourages anyone with an interest in public service and access to communication, such HAM radio, to join the SKYWARN® program. Volunteers include police and fire personnel, dispatchers, EMS workers, public utility workers and other concerned private citizens. Individuals affiliated with hospitals, schools, churches, nursing homes or who have a responsibility for protecting others are also encouraged to become a spotter. NWS has 122 local Weather Forecast Offices, each with a Warning

FHU theatre to present play, “August Snow” Freed-Hardeman University Theatre will open its 2012-13 season with “August Snow” in the Black Box Theatre Oct. 11-13. “August Snow,” set in North Carolina in 1937, concerns Neal Avery, a man who finds his loyalty being pulled in various directions. He learns what it means to be a son to his overzealous mother, a husband to his newly married wife, Taw, and friend to Porter Farwell. Avery’s lack of growth and decisiveness has frustrated Taw into giving him an ultimatum. She tells him to recommit himself to her or continue to spend every night out drinking with Porter. Ryan Pickens, a senior

theatre performance major and Bible minor originally from Clemmons, N.C., is directing “August Snow.” Starring in this play are sophomore Kevin Record from Meridianville, Ala., as Neil Avery, and freshman Abby Lambert, from Milan, who portrays Taw Avery. Also appearing in the play are freshman Jackie Deming, from Parma, Ohio, senior Robby Robertson, from Atlanta, Mich., and freshman Maddie Alden, from College Grove. “August Snow” will be presented at 7 p.m. each evening with a matinee at 2 p.m., Oct. 13 as well. Tickets may be ordered at tickets@fhu.edu. General admission is $7.

C o o r d i n a t i o n Meteorologist, who is responsible for administering the SKYWARN® program in their local area. Training is conducted at these local offices and covers: Basics of thunderstorm development; Fundamentals of storm structure; Identifying potential severe weather features; Information to report; How to report information; and Basic severe weather safety. Classes are free and typically are about two hours long.

Page 15-A


Page 16-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Downtown Park officially opens

Local newspapers connect us with our communities By U.S. Rep. Mike Rogers Michigan’s Eighth Congressional District

We can get our national news on cable television, catch the weather on local broadcast stations, listen to talk radio on the AM or FM dial and follow our favorite blogs on the Internet, but where do we turn for local information that directly impacts our daily lives? More often than not it is community newspapers. Technology has transformed how we gather information in the 21st Century. News cycles run 24/7, tablets and laptops are becoming smaller and smart phones keep getting smarter. As a result most traditional large newspapers are struggling to stay alive – they are more and more frequently printing only two to three times a week, personnel and content are shrinking like never before, and more information is shifted to online editions. Yet local community newspapers are thriving because they have persistently weathered the storm year in and year out to remain a fixture in our everyday lives. As our societies become more complex and diverse with growing numbers of ways

to obtain information, the role of local newspapers in informing our communities becomes even more significant. We count on them to regularly check in with the courts and police stations. They print announcements on births, deaths, engagements, marriages, anniversaries, church news, job openings, school information and service club endeavors. They publish notices of local municipal meetings. They print tax increases, millage initiatives, notices of changes in laws and property rezoning – all issues that most directly affect our pocketbooks by determining how our hard-earned tax dollars are spent at the local level and how are local officials are representing us. They help run the local economic engine and provide a marketplace for the community. They offer local small businesses with an effective and affordable means of connecting with local consumers. They print sales at the supermarket, coupons for discounts at local stores, real estate listings, and classifieds for everything from a used car to a neighbor’s garage sale. It’s also personal.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

City officials, chamber members, city workers and others gathered last Friday for the official ribbon cutting to dedicate the new Downtown Park at the intersection of Main and Washington streets. Henderson Mayor Bobby King gave credit to Public Works Director Carter Scales and his crew for doing much of the work at the park. A $15,000 grant from Tennessee Downtowns, plus approximately $20,000 in city funds, were used for the construction. The park features free “Wi-Fi,” and King stated the city hopes the park with entice more people to come downtown. Future plans include improved downtown sidewalks and lighting. Members of the City of Henderson Parks Board include chairman Michael Phelps, Claudia Aleman, Michelle Cavaness, Heather Griffin, and Mark Barber. Communities feel a sense of ownership in their local newspaper, and the people that report the news are often our friends and neighbors down the street. News aggregating websites such as Drudge Report and the major news blogs are great at offering up major national and international news and analysis, but they simply do not provide the information on issues that impact us at the local level. It is especially true

for the elderly and those with low incomes who often have less access to computers and transportation. They normally only publish once a week, but community newspapers remain the one constant source of local information. In good times and in bad, they stay focused on us as a community. Now more than ever, community newspapers are an important binding thread of our cities and towns.


Sports Page 1-B

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Determination not enough as Lexington holds off CCHS Eagles With Homecoming as the back drop and a packed house of fans, Chester County entered its game last week all charged up and looking for an upset over district-leading Lexington. However, the visiting Tigers were too tough defensively and defeated the CCHS Eagles 429 Friday at Eagle Stadium. Chester County got off to a good start offensively, gaining 12 yards on a first down run by Tyler Seagraves. However, on the ensuing play, CC quarterback Sam Kesler fired a pass over the middle. The ball was tipped and intercepted on a circus catch at Lexington’s 31-yard line. Ten plays later, the Tigers

took a 7-0 lead on A.J. Gray’s one-yard plunge. The drive was aided by a 15-yard late hit penalty on the Eagles. Trannard Cobb brought CCHS back, sprinting for a school-record 99-yard kickoff return for touchdown. B r e n n a n Conaway’s point after knotted the score at 7-7. The Tigers were then stopped on fourth down deep in Eagle territory, but CCHS handed it right back on a fumble. After that, Gray rambled 19 yards for another Tiger score. CCHS then put together its best drive of the See CCHS, Page 3-B

On the playoff bubble! Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County quarterback Sam Kesler races past a Lexington defender in the CCHS Eagles’ homecoming tilt Friday at Eagle Stadium.

Eaglettes win 20th, first round bye Chester County concluded the high school volleyball regular season last week, winning three matches including avenging one of their few setbacks. Chester County, 20-7, is the top seed in District 14AA, and received a first round bye in the district tournament. They played their first match Tuesday against the Liberty Tech, a first round winner over McNairy Central. The finals are Thursday

with all matches being played at South Side High School in Jackson. Chester County is the defending district champions. On Oct. 1, a tough Corinth High School team came to Eagle Gym, with the Eaglettes eventually winning in four sets, 2426, 25-18, 26-24, and 2514. With several big hitters in their lineup, Corinth came out strong, but CCHS finished strong for the victory. The Eagettes travelled

Oct. 2 to McNairy for their final district match of the season, taking care of business to down the Lady Bobcats 25-23, 25-18, 2518. Last Thursday night was Senior Night for Chester County, and before the match, Coach Susan Humphry took time to honor this year's five seniors, Cynthia Beene, Jana Frye, Annsley Poston, Natalie Clayton, and Bre Lockett. Humphry said the five had

been extremely valuable to the success of this year's team. After honoring the seniors, the Eaglettes were ready to avenge their early season loss to Madison Academic. Chester County came ready to play winning the first two sets, 25-13, 25-19. Madison fought hard in the third set to win 22-25, but Chester County proved to be too much for the Mustangs winning the fourth set 2511 to win the match.

Deadline is Thursday for Little Eagles Camp

Bike Run at Barbeque Courtesy photo

Bicyclists leave the starting line in on a metric century rally Sept. 29 during the Chester County Barbeque Festival. The rally took part as a memorial to late Henderson Police Captain Dennis Cagle.

CCHS soccer Senior Day

Little Eagles Basketball Camp for grades K-5 is scheduled for 9 a.m. until noon Oct. 27 at Chester County High School. However, the deadline for applications is today, Thursday, Oct. 11. All forms should be turned in today, along with the participant’s shirt size. Cost for the camp is $25. For more information, call the school at 9898125.

Chester County (3-4) travels Friday to face Liberty Tech (3-4) in Jackson at 7 p.m. The Crusaders have played a tough schedule indeed, but so has Chester County. The Eagles’ loses have come to teams currently with a combined record of 24-5, and Liberty’s loses are to opponents now sporting a 17-6 record. Further, Liberty’s three victories are to teams with only two combined wins. But make no mistake, each team is at a crossroads in the season knowing they are on the playoff fence and will do all they can not to fall. CCHS head coach Michael Hodum said the Crusaders are similar to Jackson-Central Merry, a victor over CCHS in early September. “Liberty is always very athletic, and good at the skill positions,” Hodum said. “They just reload every year with good athletes. Their speed is a factor.” CCHS played one of its lesser games against JCM, and the Eagles are eager to show they can do much better against that type of team. “We have to play better in ‘space’,” concluded Hodum. In other District 14-AA games, district co-leaders Jackson-Central Merry and Lexington tangle in Lexington. South Side, tied with CCHS in the district, plays winless Fayette-Ware. And finally, McNairy Central, still winless takes on Bolivar Central who got their first win of the season last week, beating FayetteWare.

Quarterback Club meets Thurs. The Chester County High School Quarterback Club has scheduled a meeting for 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11 at the high school cafeteria. All parents are urged to attend.

FHU Athletics hosting Community Day Friday The Freed-Hardeman University athletic department is hosting a Community Day for both the FHU and Chester County communities on Friday, Oct. 12, on the lawn of the Brewer Sports Center. Local students and families are invited to work and interact with the FHU student-athletes and coaches. Each team will have a booth where participants can play games and get to know players and coaches. Food will be served from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. where the FHU community is encouraged to attend. It will continue from 3:30 - 6 p.m. for the Chester County community. Food will also be served during that time. WFHU 91.5 FM, the campus radio station, will host a live remote from the event. Submitted photos

The Chester County High School girls’ soccer program concluded its home schedule last week, and honored its senior players prior to the contest with Liberty Tech.

Leslie McCuiston and daughter Brook Katelyn Wooley, daughter of Mark and Amy Wooley, and broth- Darby Miskelly with parents Scott and Christy Miskelly. er Gregory. Flowers.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Chester County High School Homecoming

Chester County High School celebrated its homecoming last week with dress up days, a powderpuff football game, and a parade through d o w n t o w n Henderson, among other activities. It all concluded with the crowning of the queen and the football game at Eagle Stadium. Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Kaelin Yarbrough was crowned queen of the Homecoming. Her court and escorts included, from left, Annsley Poston, Skylar Sheffield, Yarbrough, Colton Hearn, Kaitlyn Colbert, and Jonathan Murley. Several students decorated their cars and trucks for the parade in support of the Eagle football team. Each class and several school clubs built floats for the parade.

The cheerleaders and marching band are always a big part of the homecoming festivities. Here they are riding in the parade.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Morris hat trick propels Bethel past Lady Lions Bethel University's Ariel Morris recorded a hat trick, scoring her team's first three goals as the Lady Wildcats defeated the Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions, 4-0, on Thursday at the Josh Riley Soccer Complex. All four of Bethel's goals came in the second half despite 13 of Bethel's 22 shots coming in the first half.

Morris opened the scoring in the 47th minute when she took a through ball into the box. FHU keeper Abbey Adkins tried to beat Morris to the ball but was not able to get there first as Morris touched it past Adkins and sent it into the goal. She completed her hat trick in the 59th and 61st minutes, with her final goal coming in a very sim-

ilar fashion to her first. Devin Lambert scored the final goal in the 88th minute. Despite the goal difference, the shot differential was not drastic as BU took 22 shots to 16 for FHU (36-2). Five of FreedHardeman's shots were on frame, but all were stopped by the goalkeeping combination of Cayla Avila and Nicoda Linton.

No. 11 ranked Bethel downs FHU Lions, 6-0 No. 11 Bethel University' scored three goals in each half, cruising to a 6-0 win over the Freed-Hardeman Lions on Thursday night at the Josh Riley Soccer Complex. The Wildcats got a pair of goals from Mohammed Dumbuya and Vinicuis Kerchner as they out-shot FHU, 25-7. It took Bethel (6-1-1) only four minutes to open the scoring when Errol Reid ripped a shot from the left side of the box to the far post. Dumbuya added goals in the

26th and 42nd minutes as Bethel took a 3-0 lead into halftime. Anthony Matekenya got Bethel's first goal of the second half in the 58th minute and Kerchner finished off the scoring with goals in the 59th and 77th minutes. Freed-Hardeman (4-8) had several scoring opportunities late in the match but saw them turned away by Christopher Baker. The Lions turn around and play Bethel again, this time on the road, on Oct. 13.

The Positive Coach’s Rulebook:

“Why and how to motivate your athletes,” If you’re a coach, this is the perfect time to remind yourself of what a powerful figure you are to young athletes, whether they’re 7 or 17. The fact is, you have a real chance to make a difference in their lives. But whether that difference is good or bad, says Todd Patkin, is up to you. “Every year, we all hear stories and read headlines about overly intense, aggressive, and even abusive coaches,” points out Todd Patkin, author of “Finding Happiness: One Man’s Quest to Beat Depression and Anxiety and - Finally - Let the Sunshine In”. “These men and women are so focused on winning at any cost that they bully, berate, embarrass, and insult their players, which can cause great damage to these young people’s self-esteem, confidence, and overall emotional well-being … on and off the field.” Patkin offers some tips that will help coaches examine their current coaching style and make sure that they’ll be remembered as a positive influence in their athletes’ lives. Realize that you’re doing damage. There’s no question that harsh coaching methods, such as calling players out, getting in their faces, and “motivating” them through fear, do more harm than good. In the short term, these tactics cause anxiety, shame, and low selfesteem. Over time, a bullied athlete’s weakened confidence and sense of self-worth can eradicate

motivation and love for the game. And worst of all, it can transfer to other areas of the young person’s life, making him or her less confident socially and academically. After all, it’s a short step from believing ‘I’m not good enough on the field’ to ‘I don’t have what it takes to succeed at all.’ Think about what a coach’s job really is. Chances are, you’re not the coach of a professional team. Your goal is not to make money; it’s to teach and guide young people who are in the midst of their mental, emotional, and physical development. Ideally, what you teach them during practice will also develop the skills they’ll need to succeed in many other areas for the rest of their lives. Coaching is as much about growing children through positive motivation and attitude as it is about imparting the mechanics of swinging a bat or kicking a ball. Watch a replay of your motivations. This topic has been alluded to already, but according to Patkin, it bears repeating: As a coach, what are your motivations? Are you in it for winning (and only winning), or do you want to make a difference in young people’s lives? While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to win, make sure you’re not coaching primarily to glorify yourself so that you can brag about your successful seasons and coaching record. Do some emotional intelligence warm-ups.

Chester County High Girls’ Volleyball Date Opponent District Tournament

Time TBA

Location South Side

Chester County Freshman/JV Football Date Opponent Oct. 15 McNairy (JV/Fr)

Location Henderson

Time 6:00

Chester County High Girls’ Soccer Date Opponent Region Tournament

Time TBA

Location TBA

Chester County High Football Date Opponent Oct. 12 Liberty Tech Oct. 19 South Side Oct. 26 Fayette-Ware All games begin at 7 p.m.

Location Jackson Eagle Stadium Somerville

Freed-Hardeman Volleyball Date Time Oct. 16 7:00 Oct. 18 7:00

Opponent Bethel Mid-Continent

Location McKenzie Henderson

Freed-Hardeman Women's Soccer Date Oct. 13 Oct. 16

Time Opponent 1:00 Bethel 5:00 Martin Methodist

Location McKenzie Henderson

Freed-Hardeman Mens’ Soccer Date Time Oct. 13 3:00 Oct. 16 7:00

Opponent Bethel Martin Methodist

Location McKenzie Henderson

Freed-Hardeman Fall Golf Schedule Date Oct. 29-30

Opponent Redhawk Fall Inv.

Location Lawrenceburg

Everyone knows that a coach should have a broad knowledge of his or her sport. But were you aware that coaches should also strive to possess a high level of emotional intelligence? If you aren’t familiar with the term, emotional intelligence is a quality that enables you to be empathetic, an effective communicator, to navigate conflict, etc. Score points through caring. It’s true: People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. And in sports, it’s crucial to make sure that your players know you care about them as people, not just as players. Get to know each child on an individual basis and incorporate that knowledge into your regular interactions. Don’t strike out through criticism. Criticism: It has to happen in order for improvement to take place. But there’s definitely a right way and a wrong way to go about it. Many famous coaches in sports history have chosen the wrong way: berating players and shaming them in front of the team, insulting them for making mistakes, and delivering advice in anger. Unfortunately, these approaches tend to only alienate players and make you an object of fear rather than respect. Scout each practice for all-stars. It’s practically impossible for anyone to hear too many good things about themselves. On the sports field, compliments act as confidence - and thus performance boosters, and they also improve motivation, team spirit, determination, and more. With that in mind, always start each practice with the intention of catching as many players as possible doing well. Then praise them in public and in private whenever the opportunity arises. And if you send out a team newsletter, include short write-ups of players who improve, who are team players, who give their all in practice, etc. Add “positive thinking.” All coaches have clipboards, whistles, and water bottles - and they should all have a positive attitude, too! With few exceptions, players will develop their attitudes, outlooks, and expectations based on yours. So be proactive about getting your team in a winning mindset. Make sure to say things like, “We’re going to have a great practice today,” or, “I know everyone will do their best during the game,” etc.

Lofton awards top Dixie Youth fundraisers Submitted photo

Lofton Chevrolet has awarded a Samsung 46-inch LED television and Blu-Ray disc player to Jennifer Paton and grandson Lane Paton the winners of the Chester County Dixie Youth fundraiser for 2012. Pictured giving the award are Kermit Lofton and Ronnie Geary.

From Page 1-B

CCHS night, marching from their own 20 to Lexington’s two-yard line. Along the way they converted on several third downs, and one fourth down, but they gave it up on downs at the Tigers’ two. However, one of six Lexington fumbles fell in the end zone, and the Tigers pounced on it for a safety, giving Chester County momentum. But a three-and-out returned the ball to Lexington, and Tanner Kizer ran 25 yards for another Lexington score. CCHS never mounted much offense after that. A rain storm halted play for nearly an hour in the third period, during which time most of the overflow crowd headed home. With a scant few

fans still remaining in the stands, Lexington totally dominated the fourth quarter, tacking on three more scores to account for the final 42-9 score. Unofficially, CCHS ran for 122 yards and passed for 54. The Tigers had 207 yards running and none throwing, however, their superior kicking game kept the Eagles pinned up most of the night. The only other highlight on the evening for Chester County came when Mason

Gray picked off the only Lexington pass of the night, but the Eagles quickly returned the favor, throwing an interception of their own. “Defensively, I was very impressed with Lexington. We could not find a weakness in their defense,” said CCHS head coach Michael Hodum. “Up front our kids fought well, on both sides. We had some stops, but offensively we had too many three and outs.”

District 14-AA Football Through Oct. 4 Team 1. Lexington 1. Jackson Cent. Merry 3. Liberty Tech 4. Chester County 4. South Side 6. Bolivar Central 7. Fayette-Ware 7. McNairy Central

Dist. 4-0 4-0 3-1 2-2 2-2 1-3 0-4 0-4

All 6-1 5-2 3-4 3-4 2-5 1-6 0-7 0-7

High School Football Oct. 5 at Eagle Stadium, Henderson Lexington Chester County

14 – 6 – 8 – 14 = 42 7–2–0- 0= 9

Unofficial Statistics: First Downs Rushing (atts., yds.) Passing (comp. Atts., int., yds.) Penalties, yards Fumbles, lost Punts, average

Lx

CC

11 40-207 0-1-1=0 3-25 6-0 3-31.3

10 36-122 3-17-2=54 3-35 1-1 6-26.3

Scoring Summary: First quarter: (6:16) Lx – A.J. Gray 1 run (Clint Anderson kick), [7-0]. (6:00) CC – Trannard Cobb 19 kickoff return (Brennan Conaway kick), [7-7]. (3:00) Lx – Gray 19 run (Anderson kick), [14-7]. Second quarter: (6:52) CC – Lx Dillon Smith tackled in end zone, [14-9]. (2:36) Lx – Tanner Kizer 25 run (kick failed), [20-9]. Third quarter: (7:30) Lx – Blake Smith 58 punt return (Smith run), [28-9]. Fourth quarter: (5:46) LX – Tanner Kizer 2 run (Anderson kick), [35-9]. (2:29) Lx – Josh Williams 5 run (Anderson kick), [42-9].

Unofficial Statistical Leaders: Rushing – Lx – Blake Smith 8-66; Tanner Kizer 6-54; A.J. Gray 11-39. CC – Tyler Seagraves 14-59, Sam Kesler 9-37; Matthew Butler 10-25.


Education

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Thursday, October 11, 2012

Ee i ee i oh!

By: Ally Rogers

Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Freed Hardeman’s Lora Laycook Preschool class enjoyed the day at Falcon Ridge Farm last Friday. They met various farm animals, navigated a corn maze, played in the cornbox and on the playgrounds, went for a hayride and each got their own pumpkin. What a great way to kick off Fall!

By: Melissa Kinard The PTS would like to thank everyone for making the support drive successful. The class in fourth- and fifth-grade with the most memberships was awarded a pizza party by PTS. In fourthgrade, the winning class was Mrs. Misty Thomas’ homeroom. In fifth-grade, the winning class was Mrs. Shonterria Barham’s homeroom. The PTS also provided popcorn for each classroom in appreciation

of their hard work. As an additional bonus, Mrs. Swope and Coach Lewis were “dunked” while the school cheered every throw! The School Partners coupon book sale will continue until Oct. 24. The books are $10 and can be used throughout Tennessee. The Henderson Health Center will be offering flu shots again for all students this year. They will be at CCMS Oct. 10. Dates to remember: Oct. 11-12 - Parent Teacher Conferences Oct. 15-19 - Fall Break Oct. 26 - Up N Jumpin for your school (Costume Party) Oct 23 Math Constructed Response Test Oct. 25 - Doctors coming to talk to each class about Tar Wars Poster

FHU student elected president of state organization Jackie Dukes, a senior music education major at Freed-Hardeman University has been elected president of the West Tennessee Collegiate Association for Music Educators. Dukes was elected by a group of 75 collegiate members representing West Tennessee schools at the National Association for Music Educators (NAfME) Tennessee State Collegiate workshop Saturday, Sept. 29. Dukes will represent NAfME during the 20122013 school year at all official functions in West Tennessee. She will also organize and supervise West Tennessee music education events and sub-

mit reports for publication in the “Tennessee Musician.” Dukes has been very involved with FHU’s C o l l e g i a t e Musicians/NAfME chapter, serving as treasurer, vice-president, and president of the chapter. She was secretary of the West Tennessee collegiate organization for the 20102011 school year. Dukes is an active participant in FHU’s music program, participating in University Singers and University Band. She has also participated in the orchestra for FHU’s productions of “Beauty and the Beast,” “Little Women,” and “Guys and Dolls.”

Report cards will be given out Thursday afternoon. Please ask your child to see their grades. You will have a chance to discuss any concerns about your child’s schoolwork with your child’s teachers during Parent Teacher Conferences. These will be held Thursday evening from 5 - 8 p.m. and on Friday morning from 8 - 11 a.m. You do not need to make an appointment. Just come to the Junior High at a time that is convenient to you during the hours listed. I hope that all of you will take advantage of this opportunity. The junior varsity and varsity teams played their last game of the season last Thursday night at Selmer Middle. Both teams won! Congratulations to the players and their coaches, Steve Robinson, Todd Lewis, Mike Showers and Jeff Cupples on winning seasons! On Oct. 23, all students will be taking the Math CRA (Constructed Response Assessment) in their Math classes. This is a new way of giv-

Easy, low-cost way to save for college Tennessee’s new program offers an easy, lowcost way to save for college, as State treasury department offers immediate incentives for Tennesseans to open accounts. Governor Bill Haslam and Tennessee Treasurer David H. Lillard, Jr. say Tennessee needs a highly-educated workforce to continue to attract businesses that bring new jobs to the state. So Sept. 18, they, along with Lt. Governor Ron Ramsey and House Speaker Beth Harwell, introduced the Tennessee Stars College Savings 529 Program, which is a tool that can help more Tennesseans get the college education they will need to succeed in a highly-competitive job market. The program offers family and friends a low-cost way to save for children’s college expenses with attractive investment options and

special tax advantages. “The Tennessee Stars College Savings 529 Program makes college savings cost effective, easy and relatively inexpensive, with a range of investment options,” said Treasurer Lillard. Governor Haslam said. “This program will help increase student accessibility to a college education as we work to grow and recruit businesses to Tennessee.” The Tennessee Stars College Savings 529 Program is a tax-advantaged college savings plan that is designed to help Tennessee parents, grandparents and friends support the educational needs of loved ones. The plan takes its name from Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Service Code, which authorized the creation of tax-advantaged plans in 1996. There are many benefits to investing with

Tennessee Stars College Savings 529 Program. The plan is available to everyone and the investment returns on savings are tax free as long as they are used for approved education-related expenses. The money saved may be applied to higher education, including public or private colleges and universities inside or outside the state of Tennessee as well as any other educational entities eligible to receive federal student loan funds, such as Tennessee technology centers. Participants have control over how they manage their investments with the Tennessee Stars College Savings 529 Program. The plan offers an age-based option in which investments are more aggressive when children are young and then become more conservative as the children

approach college age. The plan also offers individual investment options, including domestic and international equities, balanced fund options, fixed income options, and an FDIC-insured option. The underlying investments for the plan will be offered from more than one fund company. Anyone interested in opening an account with the Tennessee Stars College Savings 529 Program can learn more by visiting www.TNStars.com or by calling (855) 386-7827 toll-free. Businesses are also encouraged to make it easier for their employees to save by offering payroll deductions to the program. Any business interested in offering payroll deductions can learn more by visiting www.TNStars.com or by calling (855) 386-7827 toll-free.

FHU to host Bible research symposium Freed-Hardeman University’s Graduate Studies in Bible Program will host a graduate Bible research symposium Friday, Oct. 12, in Ayers Auditorium. The symposium will focus on the study of biblical manuscripts and textual criticism, according to Doug Burleson who is coordinating the event. Dr. Daniel B. Wallace will present information on the significance of Codex Sinaiticus, which dates to the Fourth Century and is known as the world’s oldest Bible, as well as other topics. Wallace, a noted

Greek scholar, is the senior New Testament editor of the NET Bible and coeditor of the NET-Nestle GreekEnglish diglot. He has been a consultant on four different Bible translations. “Dr. Wallace influences students across the country through his textbook on intermediate Greek grammar,” Burleson said. In addition, Wallace is the founder of The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (csntm.org), an institute devoted to preserving Scripture by taking digital photographs of all known

Greek New Testament manuscripts. Most recently his scholarship has begun to focus on the gospels of John and Mark and nascent Christology. A $10 fee allows attendees to attend a luncheon featuring a question and answer session and a book signing by Wallace. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Burleson at dburleson@fhu.edu or by visiting fhu.edu/gbrs. The symposium is funded as a part of the activities of the Gardner Chair. John and Rosemary Koppel

Brown, university benefactors, have contributed funds for academic development and research in honor of former FHU President E. Claude Gardner. In addition to funding the symposium, a portion of the monies has been used to provide a reading room for graduate students in Bible and to purchase facsimiles of Codex Sinaiticus and Codex Vaticanus. “We are so excited to make these available to our students,” Burleson said, noting that only 140 facsimiles of Codex Vaticanus exist.

By: Amy Tims East Chester Eagles are soaring high! East Chester students are working very hard this year! Parent teacher conferences are scheduled from 5 until 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, and from 8 until 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 12. Fall break is Oct. 15 - 19. East Chester students are planning for Red Ribbon week Oct. 22 – 26, with each day being a Drug Free Dress-Up Day. Monday is wear sunglasses day (I don’t see drugs in my future!). Tuesday is wear red, white, and blue or patriotic/ flag clothing day (Take a Stand for a Drug Free Land). Wednesday is wear bandanas day (Band together against Drugs) (Parade Day). Thursday is wear sweatshirts and sweatpants day (Being Drug Free is NO SWEAT for me). Friday is wear red day (Parade Day). Each class is preparing a banner to go along with our drug free theme. We are preparing for a Red Ribbon parade. We will make a drug free pledge and release red balloons after the parade. A special thank you goes to Mrs. Brandi Welch for working so hard on Red Ribbon week. East Chester students say NO to drugs! East Chester students are planning for Fall Festival on Nov. 3rd. Our guidance counselor is teaching East Chester students about fire safety and fire prevention. Kindergarten students

ing teachers information about student readiness related to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, and help deepen teachers’ understanding of the mathematical standards and practices which will support high quality instruction. Students that collected $10 or more for the Eagles Nest will have their Jeans Day Thursday. Certificates will be handed out Wednesday to the students who will need to bring the certificate Thursday morning, showing they are allowed to wear jeans. Yearbooks are now on sale and can be ordered by going to our Chester County Schools website, clicking the link for Junior High, and then the link for Yearbook. These are valued keepsakes, make sure you don’t miss out on it! If you have any questions, contact Mrs. Marilyn Davis. Mark your calendars for the following important dates: Oct. 11- Report Cards; Oct. 11, 5-8 p.m. P a r e n t -Te a c h e r Conferences; Oct. 12 - Students will not attend school on Friday, because of Parent-Teacher conferences. Oct. 12, 8-11 a.m. Parent Teacher Conferences; Oct. 15-19 - Fall Break. I hope you all have a safe and relaxing Fall Break. Oct. 22 - We will see students back at the Junior High on Monday. are decomposing numbers less than 10, and learning about the letters Ww and Zz. First grade students are working very hard. They are progressing through each unit in our Readwell program, predicting, making inferences and answering comprehension questions in each unit. They are introduced to sounds and tricky words, sounding out words and learning spelling patterns with each unit. First grade teachers are very proud of how well our students are responding to the Readwell program! They enjoy each unit that contains information related to Science or Social Studies. They love the Ticket to Read computer program that goes along with Readwell. They are writing sentences which include correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. First-graders are learning first grade sight words, learning about doubles and near doubles in math, and are also using a variety of strategies to add and subtract within twenty. Students are using manipulatives, number lines, drawing pictures, and using mental math to solve addition and subtraction problems, using a ten-frame to develop fluency with addition and subtraction facts of sums through ten, and counting and writing to 120. They are also creating picture and bar graphs. Second-graders are learning about turkeys and ants in Readwell. They are sounding out words. They are learning about mental addition. Third-graders are learning about figures of speech, similes, metaphors, and alliteration. They are also learning multiplication facts. East Chester Eagles continue to soar!!!!!!!


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

FHU student wins scholarship, trip to New York City “Definitely unreal” and “kind of like winning the sweepstakes.” That’s how a Freed-Hardeman University sophomore described his winning a scholarship totaling $125,000 over five years and a trip to New York City to appear on NBC’s Education Nation. Tommy Jones of Orange, Texas, has received a Buick Achievers Scholarship supported by the GM Foundation. Each year, Buick and the foundation award 1,100 undergraduate scholarships ranging from $2,000 to $25,000 to assist outstanding students interested in studying science, engineering, technology, design, marketing and other related fields. Awards are based on participation and leadership in community and school activities, interest in the automotive industry, academic achievement and financial need. Jones is a physical science, pre-engineering major at FHU. He is interested in a career in mechanical or electrical engineering. Since he was a kid, he said, he has

enjoyed taking things apart and putting them back together. When he visited his cousin, a mechanical engineer who builds surgical tools, his career goals solidified. Jones said his dream is to one day develop a battery for electric vehicles that would increase their range while decreasing recharge times. But, first he has a little trip to make. Jones will leave Sept. 22 for his first trip to New York City. He will be treated to the movie premier of “Won’t Back Down” at Ziegfeld Theatre. Set to open in theaters Sept. 28, the movie features two mothers, one a teacher, who try to transform their children’s failing school. It stars Viola Davis, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Holly Hunter. Jones will participate in a student town hall moderated by MSNBC’s Melissa Perry as a part of 2012 Education Nation. The student town hall will be aired on MSNBC Sunday morning from 10 a.m. to noon. He has been selected as one of five Buick Achievers to tell

what the scholarship means to them. The other four students are from Harvard, University of Florida, Pomona College/Caltech and University of California— Berkeley. As an FHU student, Jones has participated in an evangelistic campaign in New Zealand and worked as a member of the General Electric Challenge Team. He and four other students went to the GE factory in Selmer last year to help increase efficiency in the shipping yard. His major service project in his community has been a Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) toy drive. He, his brother John and his mother Kathy began the drive 10 years ago. Jones doesn’t know exactly how many toys they have collected, but they filled his parents’ garage twice last year, he said. Jones received notification of the award via email while in physics class. “Shock and awe” best describe his reaction to the news, he said. After checking his email

account to make sure it was real, he called his parents to tell them the news. “My dad (Barry) drove up here from Texas to make sure I had all the paperwork done correctly,” he said. “This was a big deal,” he said in something of an understatement. “He didn’t want me to mess it up.” Jones intends to stay at Freed-Hardeman for a third year before transferring to an engineering school to complete his degree. As a participant in FHU’s dual degree program, he will receive a bachelor’s degree in physical science from FHU and a degree in engineering from the school to which he transfers. As the son of a minister and a third-grade teacher, Jones said he learned at an early age to work hard for what he wanted. Just how well his work and initiative have paid off still seems somewhat unbelievable to him. “All of this still seems unreal,” Jones said. “It seems like someone more important should be doing this.”

FHU Students attend Global Missions experience A group of FreedHardeman University students recently attended the Global Missions Experience hosted by Harding University. The 52nd annual workshop was held on Sept. 27-30 at Camp Tahkodah

in Floral, Ark. Glen Hinton, Bible instructor, and twenty FHU students participated in the conference. The conference focused on hands-on experiential learning opportunities, allowing

students to gain practical knowledge for the mission field. The theme for this year was, “Paint My Life For Your Glory.” More than 750 students from across the nation attended.

The conference was formerly known as the World Mission Workshop. The name change represents the shift in focus of the conference, from a lecture-based format to a hands-on learning experience.

After-care options for dual-income families In a perfect world, school and work hours would run concurrently. But the average school day begins at 9:00 a.m. and continues until 3p.m., while the average work day lasts from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. As a result, parents must arrange for child care during those hours when school is out, but Mom and Dad are still at work. The two-income family is more common than ever before. Up until the 20th century, a dualincome family was rare. Today, however, roughly 80 percent of families in North America have both parents working, and many find it is impossible to live on one income. Dual-income families often have to make difficult choices about child care. If a mother returned to work shortly after giving birth, day care was probably arranged early on. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2010, 48 percent of children 0 to 4 with employed mothers were primarily cared for by a relative. Twenty-four percent spent the majority of their time in a center-based arrangement. As children grow and attend elementary school, traditional day care is usually not an option and parents have to make other arrangements. School-based care Many schools offer programs both before and after school, many of which are reasonably priced. This helps dual income families, but may not be practical during early-release days, during teacher planning days or holiday breaks. Programs that help parents before school typically allow working parents to drop off their children before the parents head to work. The stu-

dents are kept in the school’s gym or cafeteria until the regular school day begins. The same scenario applies to after school programs. At dismissal, after-care students will return to the designated location to work on homework or engage in some activities with other after-care participants until their parents arrive to take them home. Family and friends Parents who prefer a different situation than school-based care frequently turn to friends or family members to bridge the gap between school and work. Students who carpool may be dropped off early at the driver’s home and stay there after school until their parents get home. In addition, many families have welcomed older relatives back into their homes in light of the struggling economy. In such instances, grandpar-

ents or aunts and uncles can look after the kids once school has ended for the day. After-school programs Some children are enrolled in care centers that watch children before school, bus them to school and then return in the afternoon to pick up the children again. This is one of the more costly options in child care. However, it may be more educationally structured than the care programs provided at school. Students who participate in sports or academic clubs may have an arrangement to stay with a teacher, coach or club administrator until their parents are home from work. These programs vary depending on the region of the country and the particular school district. Personal finances also play a role in the type of care families can afford. When the decision is made, there are some

questions parents should ask before enrollment. • What is the ratio of caregivers to students? • What is the cost of the program? • How are delayed opening days and early dismissal days handled? Holidays and breaks? • What happens if I arrive late? • What activities will take place? • Is there ample time for homework? • Are the caregivers teachers or volunteers? • Are background checks conducted? • Is financial assistance available? • What is the turnover rate of staff? • Is there a nurse available? • Who oversees the program? • Is busing available? • How are emergencies handled? • How is poor behavior handled? • May I visit the program for a check-in? • With whom do I speak if I have a problem? • If my child is absent, do I receive a refund for that day? • How long is the waiting list? These are just some of the questions to ask, and parents are encouraged to come up with their own to find the best program for their children.

Page 5-B

Strikes for Tikes benefits Therapy and Learning Center Step back into the decade of VCR’s, MTV, Rubik’s cubes and ATARI. “Strikes for Tikes Invades the Awesome Eighties” will be held from noon until 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27 at the Bowling and Skating Family Fun Center. Strikes for Tikes, sponsored by Bancorp South, is the largest annual fundraiser for the Therapy and Learning Center. Last year, the Center served more than 2,500 individuals throughout West Tennessee with educational and therapeutic services. Become a team captain today and make a commit-

ment to help children and adults with special needs. A team consists of four individuals and may be friends, co-workers, family church or civic club members. Members raise funds prior to the event and present them on event day. On event day, teams will enjoy free bowling, food, games and activities for children and lots of prizes. Each team member who raises $100 will receive a free shirt. For more information or to register your team, contact Beth Koffman at 984-2144 or visit www.strikefortikes.org.

SWHRA Head Start now accepting applications The Southwest Human Resource Agency Head Start Program is now accepting applications for 4-year-olds to attend Head Start classes. Head Start serves children the year before they are eligible to attend Kindergarten. The Reagan Head Start center is located at 5820 Hwy 100, Reagan (next door to the post office). You may contact Family Case Manager, Sharla Franklin at 549-9413. Information needed at this time includes the child’s name, birth date (please bring child’s birth

certificate), child’s immunization form (shot record) to be obtained from the local Health Department or from the child’s physician, a copy of child’s TennCare card, Social Security number for all family members, Food Stamp case numbers and family income verification. Verification of income must be provided by individual Income Tax Form 1040, W-2 Forms, pay stubs, pay envelopes, written statements from employers, or A F D C / Fo o d s t a m p D e t e r m i n a t i o n Verification.

Special ed students, diversity and the benefits of inclusion Friendship, learning are a two-way street, says doctor. For orthopedic surgeon Sean Adelman – a father of three, including Dev, a high-school age daughter with Down syndrome – life lessons is not the exclusive province of the young. “As a dad, I have often been reminded of the poet William Wordsworth and his line, ‘The child is father of the man,’” says Adelman, author of “Sam’s Top Secret Journal” (www.raiseexpectations.com), the first in a Nancy Drew-style children’s book series featuring a protagonist with Down syndrome. “I think most parents have this experience that, while it’s our job to teach our children how to grow up and function in a society, we are constantly learning ourselves. They force us to rethink the basics as we help mold them into mature human beings.” Of course, much of a child’s development is out of the hands of parents, he says. School and other social functions provide many first worldly experiences that are so important to developing students. And that makes diversity so

important. Various studies have shown that not only do those with learning challenges benefit from “inclusive education” – a movement that integrates special-ed students with non-special-ed students – but also the rest of the student body. Adelman explores how inclusion benefits the entire student body: • Empathic development: Children learn that everyone needs help from time to time, and it’s as gratifying to provide it as to receive it. • Diversity and the real world: Children who attend inclusive schools, where all children are mainstreamed, are better able to navigate the complexities of our diverse adult society .• The meaning of friendship: Friends must learn to accept one another’s limitations and flaws, and to complement one another’s weaknesses by contributing their strengths. Friends also quickly learn that superficial differences are far less important than shared values, trust and humor.

Have a Safe and Fun Fall Break! ~From your friends at the Chester County Independent


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

FOR SALE FOR SALE – NO CREDIT CHECK and No Restrictions. Land and Lots in Chester County. 731-989-4859 or 901-826-8978. 7 Days a Week (30 Years in Business). (TFC) FOR SALE – 2006 Cadillac DTS, 100K Miles, Very Sharp, Showroom Condition. $11,800. Call 731-695-9834. (23P) WANTED – Junk Cars, Trucks. Best Prices Paid. Call 731-6078283. (25P) FOR SALE – Firewood, $75 / Pickup Truck Load, Can Deliver for a Fee. 1979 GMC Single Axle Dump Truck, Dump Works, Good Motor & Transmission, and Two Speed Axle Works Good, Very Ugly Cab, $2,500 OBO. 1996 Ford F250, High Miles, Runs Great, $3,000 OBO. Call 9895065. (23P) FOR SALE ~ Turnip / Mustard Greens. $6 / Bushel, You Pick or

$15 / Bushel, We Pick. Sweet Potatoes $14 / Bushel. Call 2174951. (23P) NISSAN’S COLLEGE GRADUATE Program!! Available to Recent and Upcoming Graduates Only. Special No-Haggle Pricing, Plus All Rebates! Call VPP Coordinator, Todd Hardin at 731-402-1604. (23P) LAND FOR SALE – 5 Acres in Mifflin Area. Call 983-2766. (TFC) FOR SALE – Seasoned, Red Oak Firewood. $100 / Cord. Can Deliver. Call 983-3319 or 6080885. (23P) FREE BLACK LAB PUPPIES – True Breed (No Papers). Ready

for New Home. Call Between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. 731-574-8399 or (cell) 530-300-8022. (23P)

HOMES FOR SALE ANNIVERSARY SALE Who said you couldn’t buy a new home in the 20’s anymore! New, 2 Bedroom Homes Starting at $25,950. New, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Homes Starting at $29,950. VOTED BEST OF SHOW —Spacious 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath $44,500. All Homes Delivered & Setup on your Lot with Central Air. Hurry! Limited number at these prices. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER OF CORINTH. Hwy 72 West —- ¼ Mile West of Hospital. (TFC) SUMMER SIZZLER – New 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Energy Star

Home, Vinyl Siding / Shingle Roof, 2” x 6” Wall Studs, Thermo Pane Windows, Heat Pump, Appliances, Underpinning, Delivered & Setup On Concrete Piers. ONLY $29,995! WINDHAM HOMES 1-888-287-6996. (TFC)

HOMES FOR RENT – 2 or 3 BR Houses & Mobile Homes, With or Without Utilities, Monthly or Weekly in Lexington. Call 731-968-9689. (28P)

FOR RENT

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom mobile home. $295 / month (includes water). 1825 Sand Mountain Road. United Country Action Realty 989-7488. (TFC)

WANTED ~ Large Tracts of Farmland to Rent for Row Crops. 731-571-7699 or 731-234-6097. (25P) HUNTING LEASE ~ Plainview Road. 69.5 Acres. $375 / Year. Call 989-8380 or 879-9900. (23P) SENIOR APARTMENTS ~ Cable, Meals, Housekeeping, and Utilities Included in Rent. Call 731-661-0095 for Free Lunch and Tour. (25C)

FOR RENT – 2 BR Mobile Home. No Pets. Call 676-8396. (24P)

FOR RENT – 2 BR Upstairs Apartment. No Pets. Call 9892173. (23C) FOR RENT – Efficiency Apartment. $100 / Week. Includes Electricity, Water, & Cable. Call 731-394-2232. (24C) FOR RENT – Retail / office space. 1950 sq. ft. $800; 1250 sq. ft. $500. United Country Realty office building. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR Duplex on Fawn Drive. $550 / Month. $300 Deposit. Call 731-608-8280. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $390 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,800 sq. ft. mobile home. 1405 Pleasant Springs. $595 / month. United Country Real Estate. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. $1,500. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 1 BR Apartment, Pleasant Area, No Pets. $345 / Month. $345 Deposit. Call 8799119. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex, Excellent Condition, 1 Year Lease, No Pets. 983-2766. (TFC)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012 FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, garage, appliances, fenced yard, near Chickasaw. 180 Taylor Trail. $550 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) HOUSE FOR RENT – Available Nov. 1st. 423 Barham. 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath. $300 Deposit. $550 Rent. Call 608-0865. (23P) FOR RENT – 1 bedroom duplex, covered patio, washer / dryer. 246B Iris. $325 / month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom mobile home. 1845 Sand Mountain (Jacks Creek). $425 / month includes water. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom cul-desac house in town. 380 Kitchen. $675 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 1 ½ bath house, carport, shed, appliances. $675 / month. 471 Woods. 989-7488. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS JIM’S TRASH SERVICE ~ $16 / Month. $13 / Month for Senior Citizens. Call 731-989-5732 or 731-879-0662. (25P)

STATEWIDES ADOPT: OUR OPEN ARMS and loving hearts are ready to welcome a baby into our warm and nurturing home. Expenses paid. Nancy & Charlie 1-866-953-6670 www.bighopesforalittleone.com (TnScan) ADOPT: A HAPPILY married couple seeks to adopt. We’ll provide your baby with love, laughter, education, security. Wonderful extended family nearby. Expenses P a i d . www.annieandnickadopt.info 888-964-4269 (TnScan) BECOME DIETARY MANAGER (average annual salary $45,423) in eight months in online program offered by Tennessee Technology Center at Elizabethton. Details www.ttcelizabethton.edu, 1-888986-2368 or email patricia.roark@ttcelizabethton.ed u. (TnScan) FARM EQUIPMENT - AUCTION - John Deere tractors, balers, etc. 2009 Dodge 3500 10k miles - Absolute Auction: Oct. 13th - 10am Centerville, TN Grays Bend Rd. HudginsAuctions.com (866) 483-4467 - FL5232 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $99.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) HAVING HARD TIMES? Financial Assistance Available Today! Contact The Angel Charity at 1-888-791-7798 or apply at w w w. T h e A n g e l C h a r i t y. c o m (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR pre-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available

*Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE - WORK - PARTY PLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 1824 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. 1866-251-0768 (TnScan) LOOKING FOR AREA REPRESENTATIVES familiar with local communities/schools. Place/monitor high school foreign exchange students. Part time supplemental income, incentive bonus, travel opportunities. We welcome families to call about hosting too! Call today to apply. (855) 704-3342 or email patlittrellstudentexchange@gmail.com (TnScan) DRIVERS REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available, Tuition Reimbursement 1-800-992-7863 ext. 158 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) OWNER OPERATORS DEDICATED RUNS Class-A CDL & 1yr experience. Greatcare plan options for: Major Medical, Retirement, Wellness & Business Svcs. Lease Purchase Program w/ Down Payment Assistance. 8665 6 6 - 2 1 3 3 DriveForGreatwide.com (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! 1-888-407-5172 (TnScan) JOIN THE SCHILLI COMPANIES New Pay Package!!! Van and Flatbed Positions Class A CDL 1yr rec. OTR Exp. Min. 23 yrs old 1-877-261-2101 www.schilli.com (TnScan) FedEx GROUND INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR hiring Qualified Class A CDL drivers. 1 year Experience with in the last 3 yrs, clean MVR, background, and drug screen. Contact Dwayne Wright @ 901-896-5239 (TnScan) AVERITT KEEPS YOUR WHEELS ROLLING! Hiring CDL-A Drivers and Recent Grads - Great Benefits. Weekly Hometime & Paid Training. Apply Now! 888-362-8608 AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) OTR/CDL CLASS A DRIVERS, Singles- Teams- Owners Ops, Multiple Locations at Ryder Facilities in TN. USA/Canada Routes. Good Home Time. Excellent Pay with Monthly Bonus and Good Benefits. www.catconcord.com Call 1-800869-2434 x16 Ron Hettrick

(TnScan) DRIVERS OTR DRIVERS Sign On Bonus $1,000 - $1,200 Up to 45 CPM Full-time Positions with Benefits! Pet Policy O/O’s Welcome! deBoer Transportation 8 0 0 - 8 2 5 - 8 5 1 1 www.deboertrans.com (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: CDL-A EXPERIENCE PAYS! Up to $5,000 SignOn Bonus, Tuition reimbursement up to $6000 New student pay And lease program Call or Apply Online! 877-521-5775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CLASS A FLATBED Get Home Weekends! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, 1-800-5725489 x227, Sunbelt Transport (TnScan) DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! 50¢ / mile for Hazmat Teams! Solos start @ 36¢/mile 1 yr. exp. req’d 800-942-2104 Ext. 7308 or 7307 www.Drive4Total.com (TnScan) DRIVER: CDL-A VAN & Flatbed *New Pay Package! *Very New Trucks *Benefits After 30 Days *Great Miles, Pay *Dependable Hometime *Start Immediately! CDL Graduates Needed! 877-917-2266 drivewithwestern.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan) GUN SHOW OCT. 13-14 Sat. 95 & Sun. 9-4 - Murfreesboro, Mid TN Expo Center (1209 Park Ave) Exit 81 Off I-24. Buy - Sell Trade. Info: (563) 927-8176 (TnScan) ADOPT: OUR OPEN ARMS and loving hearts are ready to welcome a baby into our warm and nurturing home. Expenses paid. Nancy & Charlie 1-866-953-6670

www.bighopesforalittleone.com (TnScan) ADOPT: A HAPPILY married couple seeks to adopt. We’ll provide your baby with love, laughter, education, security. Wonderful extended family nearby. Expenses P a i d . www.annieandnickadopt.info 888-964-4269 (TnScan) BECOME DIETARY MANAGER (average annual salary $45,423) in eight months in online program offered by Tennessee Technology Center at Elizabethton. Details www.ttcelizabethton.edu, 1-888986-2368 or email patricia.roark@ttcelizabethton.ed u. (TnScan) FARM EQUIPMENT - AUCTION - John Deere tractors, balers, etc. 2009 Dodge 3500 10k miles - Absolute Auction: Oct. 13th - 10am Centerville, TN Grays Bend Rd. HudginsAuctions.com (866) 483-4467 - FL5232 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $99.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) HAVING HARD TIMES? Financial Assistance Available Today! Contact The Angel Charity at 1-888-791-7798 or apply at w w w. T h e A n g e l C h a r i t y. c o m (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR pre-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE - WORK - PARTY -

PAGE 7-B

PLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 1824 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. 1866-251-0768 (TnScan)

- Great Benefits. Weekly Hometime & Paid Training. Apply Now! 888-362-8608 AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan)

LOOKING FOR AREA REPRESENTATIVES familiar with local communities/schools. Place/monitor high school foreign exchange students. Part time supplemental income, incentive bonus, travel opportunities. We welcome families to call about hosting too! Call today to apply. (855) 704-3342 or email patlittrellstudentexchange@gmail.com (TnScan)

OTR/CDL CLASS A DRIVERS, Singles- Teams- Owners Ops, Multiple Locations at Ryder Facilities in TN. USA/Canada Routes. Good Home Time. Excellent Pay with Monthly Bonus and Good Benefits. www.catconcord.com Call 1-800869-2434 x16 Ron Hettrick (TnScan)

DRIVERS REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available, Tuition Reimbursement 1-800-992-7863 ext. 158 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) OWNER OPERATORS DEDICATED RUNS Class-A CDL & 1yr experience. Greatcare plan options for: Major Medical, Retirement, Wellness & Business Svcs. Lease Purchase Program w/ Down Payment Assistance. 8665 6 6 - 2 1 3 3 DriveForGreatwide.com (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! 1-888-407-5172 (TnScan) JOIN THE SCHILLI COMPANIES New Pay Package!!! Van and Flatbed Positions Class A CDL 1yr rec. OTR Exp. Min. 23 yrs old 1-877-261-2101 www.schilli.com (TnScan) FedEx GROUND INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR hiring Qualified Class A CDL drivers. 1 year Experience with in the last 3 yrs, clean MVR, background, and drug screen. Contact Dwayne Wright @ 901-896-5239 (TnScan) AVERITT KEEPS YOUR WHEELS ROLLING! Hiring CDL-A Drivers and Recent Grads

DRIVERS OTR DRIVERS Sign On Bonus $1,000 - $1,200 Up to 45 CPM Full-time Positions with Benefits! Pet Policy O/O’s Welcome! deBoer Transportation 8 0 0 - 8 2 5 - 8 5 1 1 www.deboertrans.com (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: CDL-A EXPERIENCE PAYS! Up to $5,000 SignOn Bonus, Tuition reimbursement up to $6000 New student pay And lease program Call or Apply Online! 877-521-5775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CLASS A FLATBED Get Home Weekends! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1yr OTR Flatbed experience, 1-800-5725489 x227, Sunbelt Transport (TnScan) DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! 50¢ / mile for Hazmat Teams! Solos start @ 36¢/mile 1 yr. exp. req’d 800-942-2104 Ext. 7308 or 7307 www.Drive4Total.com (TnScan) DRIVER: CDL-A VAN & Flatbed *New Pay Package! *Very New Trucks *Benefits After 30 Days *Great Miles, Pay *Dependable Hometime *Start Immediately! CDL Graduates Needed! 877-917-2266 drivewithwestern.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan)


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Public Notices NOTICE TO CREDITORS Notice is hereby given that on the 27th day of September, 2012, Letters Testamentary (or of Administration as the case may be) in respect to the estate of Lisa Darlene Cox who died August 6, 2012, were issued to the undersigned by the Chancery Court of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the Clerk and Master of the above named court within the earlier of four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from the decedent’s date of death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This is the 27th day of September, 2012. Casey Darlene Dancy Personal Representative Lloyd Tatum Attorney for Estate Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

S U B S T I T U T E TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default having been made in the payment of the debts and obligations secured by a Deed of Trust executed on September 24, 2010, by Kelly A Revnoc to Old Republic Title Company of Tennessee, Trustee, for the benefit of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as nominee for Leaders Credit Union and appearing of record in Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in Book 344, Page 160; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to Crescent Mortgage Company and WHEREAS, Crescent Mortgage Company, as the holder of the Note for which debt is owed, (“Note Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed or to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117, not less than sixty (60) days prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose was properly sent, if so required; and NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Note Holder, and that the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee, or its duly appointed attorneys or agents, by virtue of the power and authority vested in it, will on Thursday, November 1, 2012, commencing at 12:00 pm at the Main entrance of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: Beginning at a point in the centerline of State Route 22A, which point is the Southwest corner of Keith LeCornu; and the southeast corner of the herein described tract; thence, from the point of beginning and with the centerline of State Route 22A, North 52 degrees 50 minutes 12 seconds West 200.00 feet to a p.k. nail set; thence on a new line through Cox, North 06 degrees 59 minutes 02 seconds East to an iron pin set in the south line of Harold Richerson as recorded in Record Book 141, Page 464, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence, with the south line of Richerson, South 87 degrees 27minutes 47 seconds East 200.00 feet to a iron pin set at the northwest corner of LeCornu; thence, with the west line of LeCornu, South 13 degrees 59 minutes 02 seconds East 898.44 to the point of beginning, containing 2.94 acres. [Legal description is the same as contained in the previous deed of record]

Being the same property conveyed to Kelly A. Revnoc by warranty deed of record in Record Book 261, Page 411, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2215 St Rt 22 A South, Jacks Creek, TN 38347 CURRENT OWNER(S): Kelly A Revnoc The sale of the abovedescribed property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or setback lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Substitute Trustee will only convey any interest he/she may have in the property at the time of sale. Property is sold “as is, where is.” For every lien or claim of lien of the state identified above, please be advised notice required by § 67-1-1433 (b)(1) was timely given and that any sale of the property herein referenced will be subject to the right of the state to redeem the land as provided for in § 67-1-1433(c)(1). All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. NATIONWIDE TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC. 400 Northridge Road Suite 700- MC- 7 Suite 1100 Sandy Springs, Georgia 30350 404-417-4040 File No.: 1563112 Web Site: www.JFLegal.com

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated December 5, 2003, executed by RONALD BLACKWELL, AND, JENNIFER BLACKWELL, HIS WIFE, conveying certain real property therein described to DIXIE WITH ARNOLD M. WEISS, ATTORNEY as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, on December 10, 2003, as Instrument No. 17519, in Book 244, at Page 402; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-2, who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose(“Notice”) was given in compliance with Tennessee law by the mailing a copy of the Notice to the parties at least sixty (60) days prior to the first publication of the Substitute Trustee’s Sale. WHEREAS, the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., having been appointed by as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as Substitute Trustee or its duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on October 18, 2012, 11:00 AM at the Chester County courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held At the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, TN, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: LYING AND BEING SITUATED IN THE SIXTH CIVIL DISTRICT OF CHESTER

COUNTY, TENNESSEE, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: LEGAL DESCRIPTION EXHIBIT A COMMENCING AT A POINT IN THE CENTER OF DITCH, THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE DAVID MARTIN TRACT, SEE RECORD BOOK 153, PAGE 292, REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES, 11 MINUTES, 55 SECONDS, EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 221.90 FEET WITH THE SAID DITCH TO A POINT IN SAID DITCH FOR A TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE SUBJECT TRACT, THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES, 11 MINUTES, 55 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 24.48 FEET WITH SAID DITCH; THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 133.52 FEET WITH SAID DITCH, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 231.88 FEET WITH SAID DITCH, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.48 FEET WITH SAID DITCH, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 179.86 FEET WITH SAID DITCH TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 26 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 377.20 FEET LEAVING DITCH AND PASSING A STEEL FENCE POST ON DITCH BANK TO A STEEL FENCE POST IN THE NORTHERN RIGHT OF WAY OF A NEW ROAD, THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 676.69 FEET WITH SAID ROAD TO A STEEL FENCE POST, THENCE NORTH 26 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 262.93 FEET LEAVING SAID ROAD AND PASSING A STEEL FENCE POST ON DITCH BANK TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, EASEMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD. SAID PROPERTY CONTAINS 5.015 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AS SURVEYED BY JAMES A. MARTIN, R. L. S. NO. 1469, ON SEPTEMBER 22, 1997. ALSO CONVEYED HEREUNDER IS A NON-EXCLUSIVE PERTETUAL EASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS, INCLUDING THE INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE OF UTILITIES, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT; PARCEL# 055 01407 000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 2135 SIMMONS RD, HENDERSON, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): RONALD BLACKWELL AKA RONALD LEE BLACKWELL AND JENNIFER BLACKWELL AKA JENNIFER REBECCA BLACKWELL, OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: The sale of the abovedescribed property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or setback lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead,

and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Substitute Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 Tel: (800) 281-8219 Fax: (866) 681-5002 Registered Agent: CT Corporation System 800 South Gay Street, Suite 2021 Knoxville, TN 37929 Tel: (865) 342-3522 TS#: 12-0057731 FEI # 1006.168577

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated March 25, 2008, executed by ROY E. HEMBY SR. AND RHODA M HEMBY, HUSBAND AND WIFE AND ROY HEMBY JR., A SINGLE PERSON, conveying certain real property therein described to ADVANCED TITLE & ESCROW, LLC. as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, on April 8, 2008, as Instrument No. 32107, in Book 313, at Page 503; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose(“Notice”) was given in compliance with Tennessee law by the mailing a copy of the Notice to the parties at least sixty (60) days prior to the first publication of the Substitute Trustee’s Sale. WHEREAS, the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., having been appointed by as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as Substitute Trustee or its duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on October 18, 2012, 11:00 AM at the Chester County courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held At the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, TN, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT A STAKE IN THE NORTHERN MARGIN OF PLUNK ROAD AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ELMO LOFTON; RUNS THENCE WITH THE WESTERN BOUNDARY LINE OF ELMO LOFTON NORTH 13 DEGREES AND 24 MINUTES WEST 249 FEET TO A STAKE; RUNS THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 106 FEET TO A STAKE; RUNS THENCE SOUTH 13 DEGREES AND 24 MINUTES EAST 249 FEET TO A STAKE; RUNS THENCE NORTH 74 DEGREES AND 18 MINUTES WEST WITH THE NORTHERN MARGIN OF PLUNK ROAD 105 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. PARCEL# 033H A 00600 000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 840 WOODLAND DRIVE, HENDERSON, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall

control. CURRENT OWNER(S): ROY E. HEMBY SR. AKA ROY HEMBY JR. and RHODA M. HEMBY OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: The sale of the abovedescribed property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or setback lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Substitute Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 Tel: (800) 281-8219 Fax: (866) 681-5002 Registered Agent: CT Corporation System 800 South Gay Street, Suite 2021 Knoxville, TN 37929 Tel: (865) 342-3522 TS#: 12-0058417 FEI # 1006.168335

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on October 30, 2012 at 12:00PM local time, at the south door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee, pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Michael Rhodes and Sherri M. Rhodes, husband and wife, to John Clark, Trustee, on January 26, 2009 at Record Book 324, Page 433; all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Owner of Debt: CitiMortgage, Inc. The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and encumbrances of record: Described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described in deed of record in Record Book 324, Page 433; in the Register’s Office of Chester County,

Tennessee Parcel Number: 025 000617 000 Current Owner(s) of Property: Michael Rhodes and wife, Sherri Rhodes The street address of the above described property is believed to be 520 Guy McAdams Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description referenced herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5117 have been met. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP 555 Perkins Road Extended, Second Floor Memphis, TN 38117 Phone (901)767-5566 Fax (901)761-5690 File No. 12-038902

Notice Cause No. 183254-1 In The Chancery Court for Knox County, Tennessee Adoption of William Brady Shadrick, DOB: November 16, 2004 (Birth Mother: Eva Victoria Shadrick) By: John David Piacitelli and Lisa Denette Piacitelli, Petitioners, Vs. Larry Neal York Jr., Respondent. In this cause, it appearing from the Order of Publication, that the Respondent, Larry Neal York Jr’s, residence is unknown and cannot be ascertained upon diligent inquiry, it is ordered that publication be made for four successive weeks, in the Chester County Independent, Henderson, Tennessee, notifying Respondent, Larry Neal York, Jr., to file an answer with this court and sending a copy to Petitioners’ attorney, Dawn Coppock, whose address is P.O. Box 388, Strawberry Plains, TN 37871, within 30 days from the last date of publication, exclusive of the last date of publication, or a judgment by default may be entered and the cause set for hearing on December 11, 2012 at 9:00 a.m., ex parte as to said Respondent. Failure to appear may result in the termination of Respondent’s parental rights. This 19th day of September, 2012. Howard G. Hogan Clerk and Master


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

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Page 10-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, October 11, 2012

Chester County Independent 10-11-12  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 10-11-12