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Chester County

Arts in the Alley, 16-A A

Thursday

AUGUST 23, 2012

Independent

148th YEAR - NO. 16

chestercountyindependent.com

City projects: Gas lines extended, streets get paved City utility crews, as well as contractors, were busy in the last week on separate projects. Below, crews for Gallagher Paving, from near Chicago, Ill., begin a paving project on Mill Street with a new system called Re-HEAT Hot-in-Place, in which the old pavement is removed, recycled, and put back down on the street all in one process. According to the company’s website, this process is about 30 percent cheaper than the conventional method, and with a carbon footprint 63 percent less. Also, at left, a crew with the Utility Department trenches under New Friendship Road to connect the Billy Priddy residence to city natural gas lines. Priddy’s residence was the first house hooked up to the new line just recently laid in that area.

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Beard not guilty of rape, incest Mistrial declared on additional charges By Marney E. Gilliam Staff Writer

Elfin “Rod” Beard was found not guilty on 41 counts of rape, and 41 counts of incest. The announcement from the jury came last week after a two-day trial in Chester County Circuit Court. The jury, however, could not come to a decision on 41 counts of rape by an authority figure, and a mistrial was declared on those charges. Emotions ran high as both families waited for the jury’s return, and Beard’s family clasp hands and nervously awaited the verdict. The alleged victim’s family surrounded her, draping their arms around her shoulders. A little before 6 p.m. Friday, the jury returned with a verdict. Before the verdict was read, the judge cautioned those in the gallery against any outburst of emotion. As the verdict was read, Beard’s supporters embraced and cried while Beard cast a small smile over his shoulder toward his family. Beard was led from the courtroom, still held on $100,000 bond which will be reconsidered by the judge on Wednesday. The 41 counts of sexual battery by an authority figure will be taken up again on Wednesday of this week.

ELFIN “ROD” BEARD On Aug. 16 after the jury was sworn, Shaun Brown, Assistant District Attorney for the State of Tennessee, read the charges. Kandi Collins, Assistant Public Defender for the State of Tennessee, stood with her client as he pled not guilty to all charges against him. The trial then began with the juvenile alleged victim taking the stand. Brown questioned her on each of the 41 incidents which allegedly started in May 2010 and lasted until December 2010. She testified that she was 14and 15-years-old at the time that she was raped by Beard. According to alleged victim testimony, beginning on May 20, See BEARD, Page 2-A

Former CCI employee passes

Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Enville Fun Days are Saturday

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

4-A 8-A 9-A 10-A 12-A 1-B 4-B 6-B

TODAY’S WEATHER

The Annual, “Enville Fun Day” is scheduled from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. this Saturday, Aug. 25. It is sponsored by the Enville Community Club and Fire Department. Schedule of Events includes: 11 a.m. - Barbeque Pork, Chicken, and Bologna. 11 a.m. - Dunking Booth. 12 noon – 1 p.m. - Children’s Games. 2 p.m. - Parade (Line Up at 1:30). 3 p.m. - Horse Shoes, Husband and Wife Calling, Hog Calling, and Tobacco Spittin’. 4-5 p.m. Talent\Lip Sing ($5 Entry Fee). 5 p.m. - Supper Meal. 6 p.m. - Cake Walk. (Dunking booth closes) 7-10 p.m. Street Dance with Bo Jack. 8 p.m. - Silent Auction Ends. 9 p.m. - Drawing for a 50/50 Pot. There will also be an Antique

Car and Tractor display, plus hamburgers, nachos and cheese, popcorn, and ice cream. Everyone is invited to come join the fun.

Mary Maxine (Weaver) Cox of Waverly passed away Aug. 14 at her home. Cox was an employee of the Chester County Independent in the 1960s, working for former editor T.D. “Dred” Pace. Cox was a 1947 graduate of Chester County High School. Services were Sunday, Aug. 19 with interment in Hillcrest Cemetery.

MARY COX

County vehicle overturns Monday morning

Tenn. Highway patrol schedules checkpoints The Tennessee Highway Patrol has scheduled two checkpoints as part of their enforcement plans for Chester County on the Labor Day weekend. From 7-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, they will conduct a Driver’s License Checkpoint on Old Jacks Creek Road at the intersection with Talley Store Road. Also, from 11:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. the same night, Aug. 31, they will conduct a Sobriety Checkpoint at the intersection of Highway 100 and 22A.

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

A bucket truck owned by Chester County Highway Department overturned at 11:53 a.m. Monday morning, Aug. 20, on Old Montezuma Rd. The truck, driven by Brian Keith Goff, ran off the road and hit a mailbox. Goff lost control and overcorrected causing the vehicle to topple onto its side near 1160 Old Montezuma Rd. Law enforcement, as well as city, county and rescue crews hurried to the scene. The passenger David Loyd Stansell was ejected through the windshield and was transported to the hospital by EMS. Henderson Police Officer Jose Puente investigated the crash.


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Tennessee Civil War Trails

From Page 1-A

Marker to be dedicated on Front Street Aug. 29

Beard 2010, Beard would sneak into her room after she had fallen asleep and rape her. She testified that this happened repeatedly over the course of about a seven-month period. On cross examination, Collins tried to paint a different picture, one in which the victim, her mother, her brother, and Beard lived happily together. Collins suggested that because of racial motivation, the victim’s maternal grandparents

Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Mitch Bowman, left, executive director of Civil War Trails, shows plans for the trails across Tennessee to Henderson Mayor Bobby King, while in the background, workers install a new marker on Front St. in Henderson. Cox’s raid occurred in Henderson in October 1862. A dedication of the marker is scheduled for 10 a.m. Aug. 29.

Henderson Police identify “John Doe” wanted in Arkansas for first degree murder parole violation Henderson Police Department used fingerprints to identify a “John Doe” arrested last week at 505 Great Oaks Circle. According to police reports, Robert Earl Galvin repeatedly refused to give his name when police executed a search warrant at the Henderson residence where he was staying. Galvin also refused to provide his name in court, and he was found in possession of a stolen driver’s license. Galvin was on probation for first degree murder and is considered one of the Pulaski County, Ark., Sheriff’s Department’s “most wanted.” He had arrest warrants for him from the Arkansas Board of Probation for failure to appear, violation of parole for first degree murder and multiple drug charges. Galvin was arrested on Aug. 9, along with Jessica Faye Cupples, who claimed to be his girlfriend and identified him to police as “Derrick.” Both

ROBERT EARL GALVIN were charged with possession of schedule II, possession of schedule VI, manufacturing/selling of controlled substance, sale and delivery of cocaine, possession of controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of schedule II with intent to resell, possession of schedule VI with intent to resell, manufacturing/delivery/selling of controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Galvin is also charged with criminal impersonation.

Workshop will help small business owners learn about available loans Business people in need of a small business loan to start a small business or grow an existing business should make plans to attend the free SBA Express, Patriot Express Loan, Export Express Loan and the new SLA v. 2 Loan Program Workshop hosted by the Jackson Chamber of Commerce. From 9:30 a.m. until noon on Sept. 11, the Chamber of Commerce will provide information and help for small businesses interested in acquiring loans to start or expand a small business. The workshop will be held at the Chamber office at 197 Auditorium Street in Jackson. Anyone who is looking to secure a small business loan may attend. For-profit full-time, part-time and home-based businesses are eligible. Business owners will learn step-by-step how to apply for U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) Working Capital Loans from a lending expert. These are not credit card loans; they are

SBA guaranteed loans. Businesses will be able to apply for the SBA loan at the workshop. To attend this workshop, call the Chamber office at 423-2200. Preregistration is required. Highlights of the SBA loan program include: no collateral necessary; no prepayment penalty; no hidden fees; affordable payments; establish credit in the business name; Patriot Express loans available for veterans, reservists, and the spouse/widow of the aforementioned; and rapid response. This workshop is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. Additional funding is provided by the TN Board of Regents. All SBA programs are extended to the public on a nondiscriminatory basis. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested in advance by calling the TSBDC office at 424-5389 to make the arrangements.

Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Public defender Kandi Collins emphasizes her client’s innocence in her opening statement to the jury.

bribed her into concocting this story. Collins attempted to poke holes in the victim’s accounts by pointing out inconsistencies or misstatements regarding dates, but overall the victim maintained her story. The next day, the defendant took the stand vehemently denying any inappropriate action toward the alleged victim. Beard’s mother and sister also testified. Following the closing arguments the jury deliberated for hours. At 4:30 p.m., the jury reconvened in the courtroom and the court was called back to order so the judge could address the jury regarding questions they had. At that time, the jury was at an impasse and had not come to a unanimous decision on any of the counts. After the judge answered their questions, the jury was led back to further consider the case, later returning with their verdict.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Greens, Beans and Taters celebrates opening Kirkland Cancer Center Groundbreaking is Aug. 24

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Henderson/Chester County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting for its newest member on Friday, Aug. 17. Staff and diners at Greens, Beans and Taters participated in the ribbon cutting, celebrating the homestyle restaurant’s grand opening and chamber membership. Greens, Beans and Taters is located in the former Besso’s location, which was previously occupied by Arnold’s restaurant. A grand opening celebration was held throughout the weekend.

33rd annual West Tennessee Health Fair offers free health screenings West Tennessee Healthcare will once again offer free screenings at the West Tennessee Health Fair from 8 a.m. until noon on Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Carl Perkins Civic Center. The theme of this year’s health fair is “LiFTing our Community to Good Health!” West Tennessee Healthcare and WBBJ Television sponsor this free event. Information about West Tennessee Healthcare’s new LiFT Wellness Center will highlight the health fair. The LiFT ( Living in a Fit Tennessee) is scheduled to open in downtown Jackson next to the Farmer’s Market in January. The LiFT will be

a medically supervised center staffed with a professional clinical and fitness staff specializing in safe, effective exercise. The center will include everything from leading edge equipment to lifestyle classes to special events to disease management. Membership information will be available. Free screenings at this year’s health fair will include: blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, bone density for people ages 50 and above, vision, grip strength, foot screenings, height and weight, oxygen saturation and body mass index. Visitors are encouraged to fast at least four hours before having your

blood taken for a cholesterol screening or a glucose screening. This year free colorectal cancer screening kits will be distributed as well. Also for the first time, mini sessions will be offered on healthy eating and diabetes management as well as ask the physician sessions and exercise classes every hour. The Jackson-Madison County Metro Narcotics Unit is asking the community to bring and dispose of unused prescription drugs at the fair. The public will also have the opportunity to take advantage of on-line risk assessments including: HeartAware, Sleep-

Aware, CancerAware, SpineAware and DiabetesAware. There will also be special areas for children, seniors and disabled individuals with screenings, games, prizes and educational information. Each child who visits the health fair is eligible to get a free gift. Prizes will be given away throughout the fair. Bobby Arnold, President and CEO of West Tennessee Healthcare says, “We are proud that the hospital is once again able to give free screenings to the community.” For more information call Kay Cranford at 731541-4907.

Tennessee custom tin showcases state pride and monuments: Cookie Advantage customized a cookie tin to celebrate the most memorable things in Tennessee Cookie Advantage, a national franchise system that provides customized gifts for businesses, created a custom Tennessee tin to showcase the shrines that everyone knows and loves about Tennessee. The tin allows businesses and people to share their Tennessee pride and love with their customers, friends and family. Cookie Advantage provides a customer followup service to help businesses secure repeat and referral customers. The company delivers a custom tin with made-fromscratch cookies to businesses’ customers. Each tin includes a “Thank You” note along with a customer survey or a referral card. Cookie Advantage has 20 operating franchises in 15 different states, and is looking for potential franchisees in Tennessee. Cookie Advantage will award a total of four franchises in the Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville areas. Cookie Advantage doesn’t require the franchises to be set up in these cities’ proper, just in the city’s territory. The initial investment to buy a Cookie Advantage franchise is $25,000 with min-

imal additional investment to establish the bakery making the total investment only $60,000$80,000. Cookie Advantage franchise owners enjoy a fourday work week by design, allowing owners to enjoy a three-day weekend, which is rare for business owners. “The nature of our business is to help other businesses grow and increase their sales through repeat business and referral business,” said Kim Carns. “We believe Tennessee is a great market for small businesses to succeed and

look forward to finding a franchisee in the area. We hope our customized Tennessee tin show the state of Tennessee how excited we are to expand our business to Tennessee.” For more information or to schedule an interview with the founders of Cookie Advantage, contact PR Manager Heather Carver at 918-779-5771. About Cookie Advantage: Cookie Advantage has been helping businesses build relationships for more than 15 years. Founded in 1997 by the

husband and wife duo Duane and Kim Carns, Cookie Advantage was established to provide a customer follow-up service to help businesses secure repeat and referral customers. Cookie Advantage sends customized “Thank You” tins with made-from-scratch cookies for businesses wishing to follow up with its customers. Cookie Advantage has 20 operating franchises in 15 different states with plans to expand nationwide. Visit Cookieadvantage.com to learn more.

Jackson-Madison County General Hospital invites all West Tennesseans to the groundbreaking of the Alice and Carl Kirkland Cancer Center at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 24, at 720 West Forest Avenue. In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will take place at 620 Skyline Drive in the J. Walter Barnes Conference Center, which is located in the main lobby of JacksonMadison County General Hospital. The Kirklands donated $5 million to the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation providing the stimulus to begin the construction of a new, comprehensive treatment center and establishing an endowment to help secure the future of that center. The design of the multi-story facility will create one of the largest cancer centers in the region. The new 85,000 square foot facility will house three linear accelerators for the administration of radiation therapy, 42 infusion bays for chemotherapy treatments and the third floor will house clinic space for physicians and providers. The cancer center will also include a healing garden, boutique, chapel and a café. A patient navigator will join the healthcare

team, an advocate who will assist patients, families, and caregivers through one’s cancer journey. “Alice and Carl’s generosity will help West Tennessee Healthcare serve the people of this community for generations to come,” said West Tennessee Healthcare CEO Bobby Arnold, “We are extremely grateful for this extraordinary kindness, which lays the groundwork to increase services and provide care that is close to home for our patients.” Since 1990 the Cancer Center has offered treatment and diagnostic services that include medical, surgical, radiation oncology, tumor registry and Hospice care. With an 18-county service area, The Kirkland Cancer Center provides high quality, compassionate healthcare regardless of a patient’s ability to pay. Executive Director of the Kirkland Cancer Center Gina Myracle states, “Every decision that we’ve made we’ve always tried to ask the question, what is best for the patient. Our goal in the new cancer center is that our patients will feel like they’ve taken the next step in survivorship. It’s a journey of hope.”


Life & Style

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Happy Birthday wishes go to Patrick Haley, Robie Haley, and Millie Slezak on Aug. 23; Anita Lambert on Aug. 24; Maxine Grisham on Aug. 26; Garin Griffin and McKenzee McCleod on Aug. 27; and Charolette Canaday on

Aug. 28. Happy Anniversary to Steve and Taryn Sonnenberg on Aug. 24; and Jeff and Lisa Finley on Aug. 26. The Annual, “Enville Fun Day” is from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. this Saturday, Aug. 25. It is sponsored by the Enville Community Club and Fire Department. Schedule of Events includes: 11 a.m. - Barbeque Pork, Chicken, and Bologna. 11 a.m. - Dunking Booth. 12 noon – 1 p.m. -

Children's Games. 2 p.m. - Parade (Line Up at 1:30). 3 p.m. - Horse Shoes, Husband and Wife Calling, Hog Calling, and Tobacco Spittin’. 4-5 p.m. Talent\Lip Sing ($5 Entry Fee). 5 p.m. - Supper Meal. 6 p.m. - Cake Walk (Dunking booth closes) 7-10 p.m. – Street Dance with Bo Jack. 8 p.m. - Silent Auction Ends. 9 p.m. - Drawing for a 50/50 Pot. There will also be an Antique Car and Tractor display, plus hamburgers,

nachos and cheese, popcorn, and ice cream. Everyone is invited to come join the fun. Just for thought: A woman ran into someone she had not seen in a long time, this person only wanted to talk about things that the woman would prefer to forget. So she listened without interruption, and when this person was done talking, the woman said, “My God is not scandalous,” and walked away. Have a great week and please call me at 989-0212 if you have anything to share.

Can you believe this is August? It is usually around 100 degrees this time of year. Get well wishes this week to: Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Winna Knipper, Randie Snider, Earlene Cleek, Lavern Cain, Marjorie Hopper, Edra and Benny Barnett, Wanda Lovelace, Carolyn Brasfield, J.W. Knipper and Aleigh Brown. Please continue to pray for our sick. Happy Birthday this week to: Judy Loftis on the Aug. 22; Michelle Julian on the Aug. 25; Patrick Hollingshead and Gina Tully on the Aug. 27; and Addison Ross on the Aug. 28. I hope you all have a great day. Happy anniversary to Tommy and Sandra Landers on the Aug. 28. The community club meeting will be Sept. 4. Please try to attend. At our last meeting we voted to have the Deanburg Homecoming the last Saturday in April, the reason being it is just too hot the last Saturday of June and that keeps some from coming. Please help pass the word especially to out of town people. Our Haunted Hollow

will be Oct. 26, 27, 29, 30, and 31. Put these dates on your calendar. It is different this year because Halloween falls on a Wednesday. Since it’s football time again I found some interesting facts: Football, any of a number of games in which two opposing teams attempt to score points by moving an inflated oval or round ball past a goal line or into a goal. Differing greatly in their rules, these include soccer (association football) and rugby, in addition to the games covered in this article: American football, Canadian football, Gaelic football, and Australian football. In the United States, the word football generally refers only to the American game; in other parts of the world it usually means soccer. Football, amateur and professional, is perhaps the most popular spectator sport in the United States, attracting a total attendance of more than 40 million and watched by many more millions on television each year. Most of the modern forms of football are derived from ancient games, especially harpaston and harpastrum, played in Greece and Rome. These survive today in Tuscany and Florence under the name calcio. Meanwhile a rugged, undisciplined type of football took root in the Middle Ages in England,

where despite royal edicts banning the game from time to time, football remained popular until the early 19th century. Different forms of the game soon developed at the various English public schools, including Rugby, Eton, and Harrow. Eventually, two main games emerged. One was primarily a kicking game, which later became association football, or soccer; the other (dating from 1823) was football as played at Rugby, in which carrying the ball and tackling were permitted. The first intercollegiate football match in America (actually a 50-person soccer game) was played (1869) at New Brunswick, N.J. The Intercollegiate (Soccer) Football Association, composed of Columbia, Princeton, Rutgers, and Yale, was created (1873) to standardize rules. Harvard, meanwhile, refused to join the group and, looking for other opponents, accepted a challenge from McGill University of Montreal to play a series of games (1874-75) under Rugby rules. The Rugby-type game soon caught on at the other schools also, and within a decade the distinctive game of American football evolved. Although professional football was played as early as 1895 in Pennsylvania, it was not until 1920 that national organization began, with the formation of the

American Professional Football Association at Canton, Ohio. Originally consisting of five teams, the association evolved and in 1922 was renamed the National Football League (NFL). The professional game received a tremendous boost when Red Grange, a star halfback at the University of Illinois, signed a professional contract (1925) with the Chicago Bears. Other college stars soon followed, and the public began to show interest in NFL teams. In the period immediately following World War II, professional football's popularity grew tremendously. A new league, the All-America Conference (established 1944), competed with the NFL until the two groups merged (1949). The American Football League (AFL; formed 1959) competed with the NFL during the early 1960s; the first Super Bowl championship game was held in 1967 between the NFL and AFL c h a m p i o n s . __Reference.com My grandson, Mitchell, had his first practice tonight so I had football on my mind. We love watching him play, as I am sure all parents but especially grandparents do. I hope everyone has a great week. Get out and enjoy our cooler weather. Call me at 879-9777 with any news. Keep smiling because God loves you!

years of marriage on Aug. 27, Larry and Vivian Kelly, we wish you a Happy Anniversary. Larry, keep on doing what you are doing! May the Lord bless these couples to have many more years together with each other. It is an honor to let everyone know what is going on in our facilities located in Henderson. The first one we will visit is Southern Oaks: The word is getting around that it is fun to volunteer at Southern Oaks. Besides the regular volunteers such Janice Haithcoat who is there every Tuesday morning for “Janice Jingles” where she plays the piano and leads the residents in songs and singing, Marty Wilkins conducts Bible study every Monday afternoon. Sothern Oaks is excited to welcome Melody Willis with Avalon Hospice who was their celebrity bingo caller this week. She had so much fun that she asked to be put on a regular schedule as a bingo caller. Another group that they are very excited about coming is the Chester County High School Football Cheerleaders. The cheerleaders that came this week were Shelby Hardy, Kaitlin Stewart and Bailey Henley. Thank you girls. Every Wednesday afternoon a different group of

four cheerleaders will come to give manicures. See how easy it is to volunteer at Southern Oaks. Anything that you can do would be much appreciated even if it is to just drop by for a visit. The residents love to just talk to people and boy can they talk. Our resident MaryNelle Abney’s brother, Neal Smith brought our residents cupcakes from our new store in town, Cupcakes Ever After. Thank you Mr. Neal. They were delicious. The monthly Resident Council Meeting was Thursday morning. The topic of the meeting was food safety. Everything was discussed from how the dietary staff takes precautions in preparing, cooking and storing food to how residents who keep snacks in there room must use food safety. We are also excited to welcome the newest staff member, Jo Anna McCarty to Southern Oaks. We know she will do a wonderful job. Until next week, greetings from Southern Oaks. Now let’s see what our Chester County Senior Center is doing this week, last week was a very exciting week and this week is just exciting. On Wednesday Aug. 22 they will start out with Bible Study at 10 a.m. At 9:30 a.m. on Aug. 23 they will go to visit their friends at

Southern Oaks for a friendly game of Wii bowling. On Aug. 24 there will be the beach-party day. Come enjoy the party at the beach. At 10:30 a.m. Aug. 27 is the Wide West Day, so put your boots, jeans and cowboy hats on because the place to be is at the Senior Center. At 9:45 a.m. Aug. 28, they will visit the Henderson Healthcare/Rehab for songs and visit. Finally, Aug. 29 is Bingo. For info on all of the activities at the Senior Center, contact Joanne or Kay at 9897434. From 11 a.m. until on Saturday Aug. 26, Tillman Chapel Church will be having a Benefit. This will be held on Franklin Street. Chicken and fish plates, hamburgers, hot dogs, chips and drinks will be available for purchase. Everyone is asked to come and support them. For more information, contact Nancy Trice 731435-1039. Pastor Melvin White and the Frye's Point Christian Church Family will open their Annual Revival Services at 2 p.m. on Sunday Aug. 26 with Pastor Johnnie Williamson and the J.P. Baptist Church Family as their special guest, starting at 7 p.m. Wednesday Aug 29. The guest speaker is Pastor Jimmy Moore and the Missionary Outreach

Church Family. At 7 p.m. Thursday Aug 30, the guest will be Pastor Robert Wooden and the Beech Springs Baptist Church Family. And at 7 p.m. on Friday Aug. 31, the guest will be Pastor James Arnold and the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church Family. Everyone is invited to attend. At 3:30 p.m. on Sunday Aug. 26, Elder Cleophas A. Cherry and the Harvest Time C.O.G.I.C. Family will present their Youth Program, with Elder Albert Clark from Deliverance Temple in Memphis. Everyone is invited to attend. On the prayer list this week is anyone you know that needs prayer. Pray for our children, teachers, families, the men and women that are serving our country, and also the incarcerated Remember to patronize with our local businesses here in town. Lets try to support our own as much as we can. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City, I need to hear from you. Call me at 989-1907 and leave your message or you may email me at gloria__holiday@msn.com .HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

STEPHANIE MARIE FOXX AND WILLIAM JAMES JONES

Foxx-Jones Engagement John and Jackie Foxx of Three Way are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Miss Stephanie Marie Foxx to Mr. William James Jones, son of Anne Rushing of Corinth, Miss., and Dave and Rebecca Jones of Tullahoma. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Bernie Ziegler and the late Wanda Ziegler of Sugar Grove, Ill., and the late William and Evelyn Foxx formerly of Montgomery, Ill. Stephanie is a 2006 graduate of Liberty Technology Magnet High School and a 2011 graduate of The University of Tennessee at Martin, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Special Education. She recently completed her first year of teaching as a Pre-K Special Education teacher at Milan Elementary this past May. The groom-elect is the grandson of the late James K. and Faye Ware, Jr., formerly of Columbus, Miss., and Juanita Garland of Trenton and the late James Jones, formerly of Humboldt. Will is a 2008 graduate of Chester County High School. He enlisted into the United States Air Force in July 2009. Senior Airman Jones is currently stationed at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia where he serves as a network system administrator. The couple will exchange vows on Sept. 1, 2012, at 3 p.m. at Saint Luke's Episcopal Church (where they first met) in Jackson. Music will begin at 2:30. A reception will follow immediately after the ceremony in the church fellowship hall. Family and friends are invited to attend. After a honeymoon to the Caribbean, the couple will reside in Hampton, Va.

Lifestyle Pricing The Chester County Independent charges $33 for engagement announcements with photo, wedding announcements with photo, anniversary announcements with photo, and miscellaneous lifestyle photos. There is no charge for birth announcements without photo, but $28 with photo, and $40 for color photo. For more information, call 731-989-4624.

Hello to everyone! I hope you had a wonderful week. The first thing I would like to do is thank the Lord for my mother recovering from the bad fall she took two weeks ago. The family would like to give a shout out to Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center to the nursing staff, for what a fine job they are doing there. The facility is clean, the staff is friendly and the food is great. Our mother is walking and doing so much better. Our cousin Robert is doing so much better also. The family would like to thank all of you for yours prayers. Speaking of good health, the West Tennessee Healthcare Health Fair is on it way. Theme this year is On The Right Track of Good Health. This year’S event is planned for Sept. 8 at the Carl Perkins Civic Center in Jackson. There will be healthy education and fun for the whole fam-

ily including free screenings. This is a great opportunity for everyone especially for those who do not have insurance. I’ll have more information next week, including the type of screenings available. Last but not lease to start school is our Head Start Classes. Monday, Aug. 20, was the first day of Pre-school for Chester County Head Start. There were 60 little boys and girls ranging from the age of 3-4, and for the most of them it was their first time been away from mom or dad. I can remember my first day of school even though it has been more than 50 years ago. There are wedding bells in the air. Some said yes 65-years ago and some said yes 18-years. But one thing about it they still have the honey in the moon. Our oldest couples was married on Aug. 24, 1947 in Corinth, Miss., and out of that matrimony they had three sons, Buddy, Bill and Bob Moore. To Warren and Annie Jo Rodgers Moore your sons would like to let you know how much they appreciate you being their parents and to say Happy 65th wedding anniversary, so celebrate and enjoy life together! To our other couple, who will be celebrating 18-

Thursday, August 23, 2012


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Last Thursday night, thunderstorms along with lighting and lots of thunder brought us some rain. About one and one half inches along with cooler weather. I noticed John Allen Moore is harvesting corn around Hickory Corner. June and July has been extremely hot and dry, with no rain and the corn yield will be less. The drought has affected the farmers all over the state. Remember our farmers in prayer. The meeting at the center will be Thursday, Aug. 23 at 7 p.m. All members are encouraged to attend and voice their opinions on how the center operates. Following the meeting there will be refreshments. If you would like to rent the center for you special event call 989-3315. The community sends sympathy to the family and friends of Tommy Smith and the Roger Hodge Family. Happy Birthday to: Janet Crane and Peggy Whitman — Aug. 25, Lulene Goodwin and Raymond Green — Aug.

26, Brenda Scott — Aug. 28, Eluie Lee Sanders — Aug. 30, and Amy Kesler — Aug. 31. Happy Anniversary to Wayne and Peggy Patterson — Aug. 28. Belated Anniversary wishes to Buster and Ossie Mae Beshires who celebrated their 50th Anniversary on Sunday, Aug. 19. Wishing you all many more happy years together. On our prayer list are: James and Elie Lee Sanders, Casey Dancy, Walt and Ann Bennett, Earl Clayton, Larry Lard, Christine Gray, Erma McNeil, Vickie Beshires, Drew and Jesse Lee Rowland, Leo Weaver, Raymond and Sue Greene, Allie Sheffield, and Earl Crouse and Family. Get well wishes to Kim McNeil, who is recovering from injuries received from a motorcycle accident. Get well wishes to Diane Gipson, who is home and recovering from hip replacement surgery. She is doing great! I visited and met her daughter Tessie who came home to give her mom some tender loving care. She and husband Gary, who is a Major in the Air force live in Tucson Ariz., and have two children, son Briggs and daughter Lydia. Briggs was born in Korea and Lydia was born in Germany. The proud grandmother, Diane went to visit after the birth of

each child. Diane’s son Brandon is a Master Sergeant in the Air Force and stationed in Korea. His wife lives in Tucson, Ariz. As always, keep all of our military and their families in prayer as they all are making a great sacrifice for our country. Remembering Daye Louie Seratt, 08-07-1927 to 07-30-2011. Daye loved to quilt and one visit she showed me her beautiful quilts she made for me in the late 1970’s. I am the proud owner of two of her quilts; an appliance butterfly quilt and a strawberry quilt. She was a wonderful lady and I think of her every time I look at my quilts. Back during the depression many ladies spent many long hours quilting by hand, making quilts out of printed feed and flour sacks or any material they could get, as quilts were made for warmth and not too fancy. Most had no design. Now sewing machine quilting is popular as there are machines that make beautiful patterns and of course hand quilting is still practiced and is an American tradition and has expanded to an art form that now is shown in exhibit halls and art galleries all over the world. This is your column and call me at 989-3315 with birthdays, anniversaries or any news you would like to share. Have a good week.

We were thankful for the 2.5 inches of rain Aug. 16. After the rain I noticed birds were singing louder, that had to be a special song intended to give us pause to give thanks. There were numerous ant hills popping up all over the yard. I notice this occurs after a fast rain. Is there a reason? Thought small in number, the butterflies came out from their hiding places and began their feeding as they strectched their wings. I saw little bees sipping nectar from my Dusty Rose Haven flowers. It was fun to sit and observe them while checking on potted plants. Carolyn Henry shared an interesting tidbit with me. Did you know a “kilo” equals about 2.2 pounds? To make half a kilo bees must collect nectar from more than two million flowers!! “Busy as a bee” takes on a much more respected quote, doesn’t it. Nature is so wonderful. God made everything. Everything He created has a purpose. Wayne Moody got stung on the back of the head by a bee and got sick at his stomach last Friday. He got into the path of one of those busy bees. Wayne went to the doctor Tuesday, but he still had honey for breakfast. Looks like one of the neighborhood bees still did him a service! I put essential oil on Wayne’s head, which should help him! More of our friends will be gathering up wind to blow our candles on their cakes or pies, Ray Hooper, Aug. 25 will have a blueberry pie; Randy Hart, Aug. 26; Gary and Jason Rhodes, Aug. 29; and Charthell Jones, Aug. 31. Debra Connor surely found taped birthday card and photo envelope on her

side garage door. Hope the fierce Thursday blowing wind didn’t soak the surprise before she found them! Hope the “squeal” is not gone! Prayers have been requested for Sharon Lott Stovall, she is having knee surgery, Will Casey Young, son of Alan Young and Molly Smith; Olivia Springer; Jean (Don) Rouse; Bill Morris and Larry Reeves at Lexington Manor, Room 312. While at Lexington Manor Bill, Virginia (his wife), Barbara Williams (his sister) and I returned to those good old days at the Saddle Club. Bill wore white jeans and white western hat riding Red and winning ribbons. We talked about hamburgers selling for a quarter. As we ate supper our horses drank from the metal water tank making everyone’s belly contented. I also discovered bill’s roommate, Larry Reeves, was the nephew of Enid Kolwyck who lived in Jacks Creek. Enid’s sister was Brooxie Evans (Dayton) Reeves. Dayton and Fredrick Rhodes (former Jacks Creek resident) were MFA distributors. It was fun to learn this tidbit from Marilyn Kolwyck Murphy; she is the daughter of Erby and Enid. They are buried at Corinth Cemetery in Darden in Henderson County. They are missed, but as ling as their names are called or written they are not forgotten. I have a memory of Enid Kolwyck. Each morning on my way to junior high, she was bringing her feather pillows to the front porch chairs for airing. She was always wearing a house duster. Now when folks pass each morning they find me watering my flowers wearing an “Enid” house duster, too. Some memories stay. Wright Town has a big gathering for the yearly Wright reunion. In addition, Ernest and Biddle Moore Maness descendents gathered the same day. We had 38 present. The dessert judge couldn’t make it, so near empty

containers told the winners, Barbara Maness Johnson (caramel, peanut butter pie), Lisa Terry Price (Mississippi Mud Cake), Sarah Maness (three-lawyer coconut cake) and Pat jones (burnt sugar pie). Our community expresses sympathy to families who lost love ones last week. Tressie Bell Woods Lewis (12-2920 to 8-13-12) was buried at Oak Grove Community in Henderson County. She was the mother of my Jacks Creek friend, Rue (Dwight) Jones, and grandmother of Steven and Eric. A special memory is how Tressie raised Eric while his mother was at work. She talked to Eric like a small adult. She taught him skills from the garden to the kitchen. He learned those old timey sayings. (Example), one day upon hearing thunder Eric asked as he pointed his little finger in the air toward the north, “Was that thunder out of the north?” It was quite unusual for a young boy not old enough to attend school to ask, but proven Eric was learning from his grandmother. Two special floral tributes were designed for 11 grandchildren and 23 great grandchildren. After the graveside and mercy shall follow her all the days of her continued life. And she will dwell in the house of the Lord forever. Jerry Wayne Dyer (915-48 to 8-13-12) was born in Lexington, lived in Henderson, and was buried at Center Hill. His wife is Janie Dyer, his children, Talissa Neisler, Raymond Allen Neisler, Jr. and James Paul Neisler, Jr. are from Henderson. Just like his family, his dog, Rusty, gave him a wonderful part of life to hold and love. Loyd Holmes (7-7-43 to 8-16-12) was born in Henderson County and buried at Chapel Hill near Garnertown. His Parents were J.B. Holmes and Bertie Lois Johnson. His sons, Randy, Ronny, and Christopher are from Henderson, as well as his grandson, Ryan. Robert

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Omelets and porch-sitting, or how we managed to miss a tornado while cooking breakfast for dinner Omelets are one of my husband’s specialties. I’ve never attempted them because cooking and flipping eggs always seemed intimidating, but Chris makes it looks easy. When it comes to breakfast food, I’m much more comfortable making French toast, scrambled eggs and cinnamon rolls; however, Chris assures me that omelets have gotten a bad reputation for being difficult. When we first moved into our house in late January 2008, we didn’t have a lot of kitchen essentials. Most of our dishes and cookware were still in my apartment in Mississippi, and since we had a mixing bowl and skillet, we ate a lot of omelets. We didn’t have cable or even a working radio in our new home, and we were gloriously isolated. Chris was on R&R from Iraq, and neither of us had anywhere we had to be

during that time. So one night, we decided to have omelets during a thunderstorm. We thought the power might eventually go out, so we got to work on the omelets and watched the storm roll in out the back window. After our omelets were finished, we dragged our dining room chair out on the back porch and ate dinner with the storm raging around us. It was a nice thunderstorm, but apparently being so isolated from weather reports gave us false sense of security. About the time we finished dinner, our phone started ringing. Friends and relatives were wondering if we were okay. Someone had heard that there had been a tornado reported just half a mile

from our new house – there hadn’t been one anywhere nearby. But everyone who knew that we didn’t have a TV wanted to be sure that we knew that conditions were favorable for tornadoes and that the storms were severe. Everyone was worried that we were going to be blown away. That was the night when tornadoes destroyed much of the Union University campus in Jackson, but Chris and I were blissfully unaware of the severity of the storms. To us, it all seemed like a nice, winter thunderstorm, and now every time we have omelets, we laugh about how we ate omelets on our porch during one of the worst storms in recent West Tennessee memory.

Tomato/Bacon Omelets

Ingredients: 5 eggs 4 ounces shredded cheddar cheese 4 slices of bacon or ¾ cup of ham 1 ½ cups chopped tomato 1 cup diced mushrooms Optional add-ins and substitutes Onions, diced Bell peppers, diced Jalapeños, diced Salsa Salt and pepper to taste Directions: If using bacon, cook bacon strips over medium heat until crispy and set aside to drain on paper towels. Lois Stevenson, “Like a bird singing in the rain, let grateful memories survive in time of sorrow.” Roger Hodge (8-13-44 to 8-16-12) was raised in Woodville Community. He was the son of James and Othela Hodge. He was buried at Bethel Cemetery. “We find comfort that our lives were enriched by knowing our

If using ham, spray pan with cooking spray and preheat skillet to medium heat. In a medium bowl, lightly whisk together eggs. Pour evenly into skillet. Make two even, parallel lines of cheese over the eggs with enough space to separate omelets. Add tomatoes, crumbled bacon, ham and any vegetables on top of cheese. Cook until eggs are almost done. Cut eggs in half using spatula and fold omelets into thirds. Flip omelets and cook on reverse side until golden brown. Serve with salsa on top if desired. Serves two.

loved one.” Phyllis Ada Driver Diller (7-17-17 to 8-20-12) was a stand-up comedian. She used “Fang” in her comedy sketch (we all knew this meant husband). She wore wild stretched-out wired hair styles. Her laugh was unusual. She loved to entertain; she joked about her many face-lift opera-

tions. It is good to laugh at yourself. Call me with tidbits at 989-7485. May your week be blessed.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Our deepest sympathy goes to the family and friends of Irene Butler Jones. She was a former resident of the New Friendship community and daughter of Walter and Edna Holloway Butler. She attended school at New Friendship. She married Cornie Jones and they moved to Corinth, Miss. She passed away Aug. 13. Her funeral was at Corinth Memorial Funeral Home in Corinth and graveside services were at the Chester County Memory Gardens on Aug. 16. She was 92-years old. Her husband, four brothers and three sisters are deceased. They had four children, Faye, Jerry, Terry and William. She also leaves three sisters,

Estelle Jones, Clara Bell Busby and Gertrude Corson and one brother, J.T. Butler all of Henderson. On our prayer list this week are Bill Priddy, Clara Busby, LaVerne Lott, Teresa Wright, Donald Parchman, Lyndia Young, Donald Jones, Pam Priddy, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry and Minnie Austin, Wilma and Charles Cupples, Carroll Williams, Jean Latham, Joanne Sells, John Kent Sells, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Shirley Gaddy, Carolyn Potter, Gathel Latham, Randy Miller, Joanne Altier, Phillip Ross, Lisa Peddy, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl, Clyde Butler, Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Randy Sells, Teresa Seaton, Trish Nichols, their caregivers, our military personnel and their families. If you have any news, anniversaries, birthdays, or special events you would like included in our community news column, call 989-4875.

Just a shout out to our Junior Firefighters Dillon Faulkner, John Barton, Alec Gately and Nathan Pickett for washing all the fire trucks. It is so good to see the younger folks taking a interest in community things. We are always looking for people who would like to be a volunteer fire fighter. There are only a few of the original group left. It makes it very hard on those few. Our younger ones are not yet old enough or fully trained. Come on guys, step up and help these guys and your community out. If you are interested call Neal Kinchen at 9897342 or Dan Piechocki 989-7046. Thanks again for all that you do, and putting your life on the line each time you are called out. Happy Birthday to Noah Price, Aug. 24; Peggy Record, Aug. 25; Lessie Bullman, Aug. 26; Shane Brown, Ethan Kinchen and Hannah Hilton Aug. 28; Kendyl Kinchen, Aug. 29; and Briget Turner and Matthew Bodiford, Aug. 31. Anniversary wishes to Chuck and Karen Davis, Aug. 25; Austin and Holly Springer Aug. 28; Rick

and Lori Babin Aug. 29; and Kevin and Amy Faulkner, Aug. 31. Remember the following people on the prayer list: Olivia Springer, Perry Barton, Chrissy Busby, Grace Moody, Neal Kinchen, Betty Stout, Brenda Smith, Loretta Pickett, Ora Lea Barham, Bill Kinchen, Raymond Cothren, Randy Greer, Delois Kent, Mozella Crouse, our military and their families, our children and their teachers, and sick I may have missed. If you have news to share call 989-7523. Remember the monthly at Hopewell Church at 6:30p.m. Aug. 25. Everyone is invited to attend. Things on the mind of a little fella. What does God look like? Does the devil have horns and be red? Do you guess I will get to see all my pets when I get to Heaven? If I’m still a kid when I die, will they have toys for me to play with? Why would God unloose the devil if he knows that he was gonna do all that bad stuff? My granddad never got to see me, how will he know who I am? If God is supposed to watch over everyone and take care of them, “Where was He when the tree went through your roof?” “You mean if they didn’t eat the apple, we wouldn’t have to die?” What were they thinking? “I’m sorry God, I didn’t mean to think that bad thing.” Have a great week everyone!

Only Yesterday “City lowers taxes, ruckus over paving ensues” From the files of the Chester County Independent August 21, 1942 “Need For Men Abolishes 1-B Draft Group - Army to Accept Minor Defects; Only Totally Unfit Exempt From Service Call” The Selective Service System Wednesday abolished its “limited service” Class 1-B, the group with minor physical defects, and ordered all but the totally unfit reclassified as available for military service. Nearing exhaustion of the pool of 1-A registrants, those free of any known physical handicaps and not deferred from active duty for any other reason, the Army recently called for induction of men from the 1-B Class. When members of this group are reclassified they will be sent to induction centers as local boards fill their quotas, and the Army will decide after their induction whether to assign them to full or limited duties. At least 12,000 men in Tennessee in 1-B or limited service groups will be released immediately for reclassification in either 1-A, ready for Army duty, or 4-F, unfit for any military service, State Selective Service Director Thomas A. Frazier stated Wednesday. He added that additional thousands would be affected when complete data was compiled. “Letters To The Editor” Keesler Field, Miss. Dear Mr. Johnston: The Chester County Independent truly brightens up the day for me. I see how my good friends back home are striving and helping us win this terrible war. Believing I can speak for each soldier from Chester County, that our courage lies within us by the backing of our loved ones at home and that we will not fail because our people at home are not going to fail us. I was truly grateful to make your acquaintance while home on furlough. Your unselfishness in sending the paper to we Chester Countians will be cherished as golden memories. The Army is a fine thing for an American to experience as it makes us more self-reliant. Again wishing all you at home much luck, lots of happiness and continued success, I am, Yours truly, Edward Carmack Robertson “Welcome Stranger” Mr. and Mrs. Russell Harrison are the proud parents of a baby girl, born Aug. 18. She is their fifth child. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Austin of the Jacks Creek community are the proud parents of a baby girl, born Aug. 20. She is their first child. Mr. and Mrs. Coy Isbell of the Old Friendship community are the

From the Independent archives, Aug. 17, 1972

ARMY WORMS DESTROY SORGHUM FIELD – The above picture taken on Billy Fletcher’s farm in the Wilson Community. This Sudan-Sorghum hybrid field has been destroyed by the fall army worm. This army worm can destroy a field almost overnight. The worms were first noticed Friday morning and they went to cut the grass on Saturday afternoon and found nothing by stems present. The field contains 12-14 acres and Mr. Fletcher was counting on getting enough feed off of this field to feed his herd of 90 Jersey cows for one month. After the worms stripped this field, they crossed over a fence into a pasture of Bermuda grass and fescue. Use Sevin at the rate of 2 lbs. of 80 percent wettable powder in 20 to 25 gallon of water per acre. (Photo courtesy of County Extension Leader R.C. Darnall.)

proud parents of a baby boy born Aug. 17. He is their second child and has been named Enueal Isbell.

August 22, 1952

“New Pentecostal Church Is Under Construction Here” Construction is coming along nicely on the Pentecostal Church, which is being erected on Barham Street, according to Rev. J. O. Moore, pastor. The building is of red brick and will be valued at $12,000. It will include a 40 by 60 auditorium, preacher's study and a nursery. An educational department will be added later at the back of the main building, as called for in the original plans. Raymond Johnson is the contractor. The lot owned by the church is 208 by 75 feet and the church is on an 80-foot lot on the south side. A 50-foot parking lot will be prepared and a lot reserved on the north for a parsonage to be built later. Rev. Moore has been pastor of the Pentecostal Church since June 1947. He states that the church has an official membership of 50 with

Fair” Bargains are the rule and not the exception when wise homemakers turn colorful cotton bags into attractive clothing and household goods. Prizes will be awarded to many in this year's National Cotton Bag Sewing Contest when women in 33 states vie in the first round of the contest at 14 state and regional fairs. The Mid-South Fair in Memphis will again host one of the regional contests. The toys entered in the finals of the contest will be given to disabled children. The toys will probably range from dolls for the girls to locomotives for the boys and are fashioned from bright cotton bags. ...Winners in the state and regional contest will receive cash prizes in addition to a portable sewing machine. The first place winners will compete in the final in Memphis on November. Finalist winners go to New York City for a free fun filled vacation. This contest is sponsored by the National Cotton Council of America and the Textile Bag Manufacturers Association.

August 17, 1972

From the Independent archives, Aug. 17, 1972

average Sunday school attendance between 70 and 80. Rev. Moore says they expect the church to be ready for occupancy by the first of October. Services are being held now in a tent on the building lot. “Births” Mr. and Mrs. George Maddalena of Boston, Mass., announce the arrival of a daughter Aug. 16. Dr. H. D. Farthing Mr. and Mrs. Joe N. Bain of Pinson announce the arrival of a son on Aug. 16 Born to Joseph Hart Jr., and wife of Huron, a daughter, Linda Faye on Aug. 17. “First Bale Of Cotton Ginned In County August 19” The first bale of cotton for the 1952 season in Chester County was ginned on Tuesday, Aug. 19 at the Jacks Creek Gin Co. It was grown by E. H. Tignor on the farm of Mrs. Ike Parrish near Jacks Creek. Cotton prospects for the entire county are reported to look somewhat better and a good crop is expected.

August 17, 1962

“Births” Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Beshires of Henderson are announcing the arrival of a son, Brent Adams, on Aug. 10. The proud grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Buster Graves of Henderson and Mr. and Mrs. John Beshires of near Silerton. Henderson Clinic Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Whitman of Finger are the parents of a daughter, Becky Ann, on Aug. 7. Born to Horace and Wilma Croom a daughter, Helen Marie, on Aug. 9. “Sewing Contest At Mid-South

“City Taxes Lowered; Ruckus Over Paving” While the Henderson Mayor and Board of Aldermen, in regular session last Thursday night, were busy putting final touches on the 1972-73 budget, which resulted in the lowering of the city's tax rate from $1.70 to $1, a storm of irate citizens were gathering to protest the resurfacing of streets in newly annexed areas. The streets in question were Sanford Hill, Plunk and Hearn, which were being resurfaced by the Jackson Paving Company under a contract with the city. The total operating budget for the City of Henderson during fiscal 1972-73 will amount to $277,954 and will be financed without an increase in taxes. The tax rate was set by the board at $1 per $100 assessed valuation, 70 cents lower than the present tax rate. Mayor W. E. Burkhead quickly explained however, that the lowering of the tax rate will not mean a windfall of tax savings to city citizens. He said the reason the tax rate was being lowered was because of the higher assessment of property in the city and county. The city will follow assessments made recently by the county. The tax rate will be apportioned by placing $0.29 in the general fund; $0.38 in the salary fund; $0.12 in debt service; and $0.21 in the fire department fund... “Methodist Church Celebrates Centennial Observance” The Henderson First United Methodist Church will celebrate its 100th birthday on Aug. 27, it was revealed this week by Dr. O. M. McCallum, chairman of the centennial committee. The observance will begin at 10 a.m. and last until 3 p.m. Dinner will be served on the church grounds and each member is urged to “bring his own.” Dr. McCallum also urged those planning to attend the special services to wear dress of the 1872 period if possible. A brief history of the church, recently compiled by Mrs. T. H. Williams and Mrs. W. M. McCallum reveals that the church was founded in the later part of 1872 with a plain wooden structure serving the congregation. It burned in 1890 and was replaced by the present building in 1892. During its 100-year history, 47 ministers have served the congregation. The building was damaged during the tornado that struck Henderson in 1952 and the building had to undergo extensive remodeling which cost nearly $45,000. A full history of the church will be published next week.

From the Independent archives, Aug. 22, 1952


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Words for the Week: “You can DO it” By Junebug

Were those words ever said to you as words of encouragement – did you believe them? Did you kinda believe it already and just needed a little nudge to try something new? If so, did you succeed? Success is a strange thing to gauge, wouldn’t you say? In a marathon, is the one who crosses the finish line first the ONLY one who succeeded – absolutely not. Everyone who finished the race was a winner, and some, although not crossing the finish line, succeeded as well, because they know they did their best. How much influence could the words, “You can DO it,” have on you personally? Let me tell you my experience with those words, and what a marvelous lesson I learned. The stage is set – My high school girls’ track team is at a meet. I, the president of the high school Girls Athletic Association two years running (a never before occurrence at my school), am on the team as a shot put contestant. I had practiced well and I was ready for my FIRST track meet. Other events were going on, of course, but as I was taking my turns throwing the shot put, there were no teammates there to cheer me on. They ‘expected’ me to win, they felt no need to be there, and win I did; but the win felt hollow. There was not one pat-onthe-back, not one “well done!” The blue ribbon meant only that I had thrown the put further than the girls that were there on that particular day … disappointed, I doubted that I would remember it. And, but for the following events, I would not have. I walked back over to where all the others on our team were standing. We actually had the fastest sprinter in the state, and as I walked up I could hear this ‘star runner’ saying, “If I run the 300 meters, I may not have the stamina to win the last leg of the relay, and I HAVE to run in it to win that race, and the meet.” There were eight of us, and everyone BUT me was a runner. The coach, with such a look of disappointment in the star runner’s selfish attitude, was quickly glancing at everyone on our team, trying to decide what to do – could anyone else

run the 300 meter race, or would she have to demand the ‘star’ take her chances and run both races? During that awkward time for the others, I felt quite at ease because I had never been in a race, let alone a long race. I had absolutely NO training at all in running, as I preferred softball, tennis, and, oh yes, shot put. The coach, standing right beside me in our huddle, now began looking at each girl in our circle, starting on her other side, clearly wondering about each one, “Could SHE do it,” and then moving on to the next girl, as each one sighed a sigh of relief, UNTIL I was next. As she was turning to look at me, the speakers blared out, “All 300 meter racers, come to the starting line!” Without hesitation, looking at me now, she quickly said, “June, you can DO it! – They are lining up now – GO!!!” Without a second thought, I obediently ran to the starting line, as I was going I could hear the girls saying, “YEA, June – You can DO it!” “What in the WORLD am I DOING,” I was mumbling to myself at the starting line – “How do I DO this …?” BANG! – The starter gun goes off! My natural instinct was to try to win, so I took the lead. The other runners kind of hung back, and I soon figured out that might be smarter, so I slowed down a little too, although making sure I was still in the lead.

Everyone stayed in the same positions for what seemed an eternity, and I was starting to get tired, “This is a lonnnnnnng race,” I was saying to myself. And then, suddenly, straight ahead, I saw a long PUDDLE, just in my lane. What do I do about that? Knowing nothing about runners stride, I decided to jump the puddle. You are right, that was NOT smart. My stride was broken, and I had to exert all the energy I could dredge up to get back into the rhythm of running, all the while, of course, staying in the lead. Now we are in the final stretch, 50 yards to go – I’m really pooped by now, and the girls behind me, who knew how to run, are closing in to take the lead. Tired, no, more like totally exhausted, I straighten up a bit to catch my breath … and then I heard it … the crowd was roaring, “Come on June – You can DO it!” WOW! – Where did this new spurt of adrenalin come from – so I put my head down and used this faster gear that had suddenly arrived! However, one racer passed me; I was no longer winning, and it was obvious to me that I couldn’t catch her. Then, another racer was running up even with me – struggling to pass me. It was then I heard even louder the crowd screaming again, “June! – June! – June! – You can DO it!” I gave it everything I had, but my rubbery legs just wouldn’t

The country breakfast will be held from 7 a.m. till 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25. A bake sale will also be held, so, ladies, don’t forget your favorite sale items. This is a fundraiser for the center, so please come and support it. The Davis family reunion will be Sunday at the New Friendship Community Center. Family members can begin to show up around 10:30 a.m. Please bring your food and good fellowship. A big crowd came out to help Ossie Mae and Buster Beshires celebrate

their Golden Wedding Anniversary. Congrats go to the CCHS Eagle football team in their win Friday night. Chester County always carries a huge crowd. Our band and new director did a great job in getting the crowd involved. A recent picture of Daniel Beshires in the Chester County Independent showed Daniel with his grandfather, Jerry Beshires in front of the barber shop. Jerry Beshires was welcoming his grandson to help cut hair. Not only can Daniel cut the gentlemen’s hair, Daniel can also cut the ladies hair at Looking Good. Remember all those on the prayer list that are home, recuperating and those caregivers. Call Wanda Cook at 989-3724 or Celia Murley at 989-5300 and share your news.

obey “go faster,” or even “do NOT slow down!” So, the second racer also had now passed me with the finish line only about 20 yards away. The crowd (at least all eight of my teammates and my coach) CONTINUED to scream out, “You can DO it, June!” Now, again out of nowhere, there was another spurt of adrenalin that provided what was needed to go just a little faster than the runner beside me, so at the finish line I was still in third place. I was totally disappointed in myself, after all, I didn’t WIN! So, with my head down, I slowly walked back up the hill to our team, disappointedly staring at the ground. Suddenly my teammates were all around me, patting my back, all excited about the race I had just run. I didn’t feel like I deserved their expressions of praise, I could only look up at them and say, “But I didn’t WIN?” I didn’t understand their excitement. They had gotten the white ribbon for third place FOR me, and proudly handed it to me, saying, “We knew you could DO it June – because you aren’t a quitter. You

came in third, but you WON the race to do your best!” Remember, when I had won the blue ribbon earlier in the same day, there wasn’t a whisper of congratulations, but for this race there was total appreciation. WHY? Well, it wasn’t just because it was “a race.” Recall the relay race the “star runner” had saved herself for? We all watched it, and yes, she won it, but there was no celebration from the team, no excitement, no congratulations. She was expected to win it, she was trained for it. More importantly, she ran it ‘for herself,’ as I had thrown the shot put ‘for myself.’ The excitement and appreciation came from exerting oneself “for the team.” Success can be measured by many yardsticks. Remember, just as there are many winners in a marathon, there are many winners in life … they usually are the ones with the same view of life … they LISTEN to the words, “You can DO it,” but what they HEAR is, “If you do your best, you are already a winner,” and they try really hard. What did I learn that

day? Winning isn’t nearly as important as being the best you can be. It isn’t the trophies we win, the money in our bank accounts or the things we possess that gets us through life with real self worth – it’s knowing we have done all we could have done for others. By the way, I never ran in another race … what could ever have topped that one! (Smile) I still have the third place ribbon – I have no idea what happened to the first place one. I can still hear, “You can DO it” whispering in my memory each time I need it – and I hope you now do too. Email your ideas for ‘words for the week’ and/or opinion of this week’s article to jpatterson@chestercountyindependent.com. “Let’s keep life simple, real and fun.” - Junebug


Opinion

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Thursday, August 23, 2012

Best cure for the August morning, not quite fall blues is… a purring kitty on your shoulder No matter how you turn it, August is an insanely long month. With no holidays or anything remarkable happening during the month, it seems to stretch on and on. Just a few days ago, I thought we were finishing the last week of August, but then I realized that there is still another week left. Fortunately for me, there is already a hint of fall in the air. Maybe it’s just my wistful thinking, but after July’s scorching heat, I’ll take fall – real or imagined. My boss and several other people I know can’t believe that I like fall and winter more than summer, and they’ve threatened to mail me to the Arctic Circle. That might be a little extreme. I like cool weather, but maybe not that cold! Right now, I’m enjoying our warm days and cool evenings; it’s perfect weather for sitting outside in the evenings, but I could do without the mosquitoes and other annoying, biting insects that also seem to be enjoying this weather with me. I like waking up to a cool house in the mornings. Throughout June and July, keeping the house cool was a losing battle, but lately, I’ve been waking up to a nice brisk chill in the morning air. As I write this “Musing,” I have a blanket wrapped around my feet and a Snowbird by my shoulder. Poor little Birman kitty – she can’t wait until it’s fireplace weather. Snowbird has terrible skin allergies, especially during the summer. It’s been hot in our upstairs, which is her favorite room, but somehow hot summer attic temperatures don’t give her the same relief as a nap in front of a roaring fireplace. She has been bumpy and itchy all summer, but as soon as we light the fireplace for a few days, her skin will start to clear up. She has at least a month before it’s cool enough to light the fireplace, and I hope we don’t have any more scorching temperatures and excessive humidity before she can get her skin “treatment.” Out of all of my pets, Snowbird is our only “accident.” Chris and I had decided that we didn’t need any more cats, but when we saw Snowbird and heard her sweet voice, we changed our minds. She is incredibly timid, and since we got an extremely gregarious dog, we see even less of her than we did before. After a month of hiding under the couch upstairs, she finally decided we might not be so bad when we lit the fireplace and she felt how nice and warm it was downstairs beside the roaring fire. I enjoy writing my “Musings” at home in the early morning hours when everything is quiet and I can think without distractions. One of my favorite

parts of writing, however, is Snowbird perching on the back of the couch behind me. She purrs and reaches out for me to pet her, and she is better than any muse. All four of the kitties enjoy being close to me when I get up to write. It’s our quiet, together time. Even Spike and Stryker, who normally don’t get along, peacefully share the living room while I type. They all have their individual spaces, but they are close by, and they can watch me or get petted while I’m busy writing. Christabelle normally cuddles beside me when I’m writing or working on the computer, but sometimes she would rather keep watch from the back of a recliner. She would hate for one of her sisters or brother to get a snack or some cuddles that she wasn’t also privy to, and from the back of the recliner, she can see all around to make sure that everything is going according to her own plans. Ah, mornings. With a slight chill in the air and my favorite fur kids around me, it makes waking up before dawn worth it. I’m not normally a morning person, but I don’t mind so much when I have a little extra time to spend with the kitties. Ever since we got a dog, Clover dominates our days and evenings. She is extremely overbearing around the cats, and while she probably just wants to play, she terrifies them and drives me crazy with her high-pitched “I see a kitty!”-bark. I don’t blame the kitties for hiding when Clover is out and about (sometimes I would like to, too). It makes me appreciate even more my quiet time with the kitties in the mornings and late at night. There’s nothing more calming than a cat purring in your ear, and Snowbird enjoys purring loudly whenever I take a short break from typing just to pet her. Research says that having a pet can help lower a person’s blood pressure, and while I’m not sure that having our dog has affected my blood pressure in a positive way, I do think that my cats are extremely calming, soothing elements in my daily life. I don’t like mornings or August or hot weather, but I love early mornings with my kitties, especially when they do such a wonderful job helping me stay focused and feel productive. Unfortunately, as soon as the dog is awake, they scatter to the ends of the house. I have to get my early morning purr-time while they are awake and waiting for cuddles, or else I miss the time with my fuzzies until after Clover goes to bed. And they really are the best part of mornings since coffee and waffles.

Is America really ignorant about health – or just incredibly misinformed? By Gordon Filepas America must seem pretty dumb to the rest of the world when it comes to how we take care of ourselves. Here’s why: • America spends more per person on health-care costs than any other country in the world, by a huge margin, yet ranks 29th in longevity and has among the worst health outcomes. • Americans and their children are still getting fatter and sicker each year. • American physicians receive less than 24 hours of nutrition training throughout all of medical school. • 90 percent of what U.S.-educated physicians learn in their careers is either directly or indirectly funded by pharmaceutical companies. • President Obama’s health-care plan and Mitt Romney’s counter-proposal don’t discuss prevention. Everyone’s complaining about America’s increasing health and obesity issues and wondering how to solve these problems while also reducing health-care costs. They make it sound like a big, complicated mystery – how could this be happening? Giving everyone health insurance is the best solution anyone can come up with? It’s a noble proposition but it won’t solve the problem or do a thing to cure or prevent any disease. Twenty years ago, I would have thrown up my hands in frustration along with everyone else. Back then, I was in the same place that most of America is today – uninformed, a little bit frantic, and wondering what to do. But through two decades of common sense study, I’ve learned good

To the Editor and concerned citizens in Chester County: I wanted to thank everyone who worked for my election and voted for me for Circuit Court

health is easily attained and maintained – and it doesn’t require either deprivation or a big change in lifestyle. I know, now, that Americans aren’t dumb about health. They’re just incredibly misinformed about how to get and remain healthy and lean, and how to extend their longevity. In many other countries, such knowledge is simply part of the culture, handed down through the generations. Here’s what I’ve learned after 20 years of intensive research: • The human cell is essentially immortal and humans should live to, at minimum, 120 years of age while being lean and healthy. • To achieve this you must give your body what it needs biologically – oxygen, proper nutrition, adequate water and good drainage, freedom from toxins and adequate sunlight: The same things a plant needs to thrive. • Genetics has little to do with your weight, health or longevity. • Humans gain weight or get sick only when their body becomes out of balance because it is not receiving the raw materials to meet its biological needs. • America can save $600 billion a year with common sense preventative practices that ensure individuals receive the proper nutrients. • It is impossible to reform America’s healthcare “system.” The only way to change the system is to change the health of the people within the system through proper education about health and wellness. As people become healthier and demand for services is reduced, the

judge. We were disappointed with the result but not with the effort. Thank you! Lloyd R. Tatum Henderson

system will gradually adapt to reduced healthcare needs, much like how the music industry adapted to the introduction of iTunes. The key is proper education that emphasizes common-sense, time-tested practices focusing on how the human body works. High-tech gad-

getry and man-made petrochemicals cannot replace what the human body needs biologically. Rapid, mass health-care reform in America will result directly from individual self-care reform from proper health education. Try it, America. You’ll like it.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

To those who support liquor in Chester County: Have you considered the COST? Do you realize that what is more accessible will likely be accessed more? Do you want more drunks on the streets? Have you realized that alcohol impairs judgment and frees inhibitions? Have you considered these two factors lead to more crimes and arrests? Do you want to pay more for additional police protection? Do you want it easier for our young people to consume alcohol? Will those who say yes to alcohol feel more responsibility when these things occur? We will vote NO to

alcohol if it appears on the ballot. Will you? According to the National Institute on Alcohol, the following things are attributed to alcohol: 83 percent of fire deaths; 72 percent of aggravated assaults; 70 percent of sexual abuse, rape and incest; 69 percent of drownings; 54 percent of violent crimes; and 50 percent of murders. The wisest man who ever lived, Solomon, said in Proverbs 20:1 “Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging, and whoever is deceived thereby is not wise.” Paul and Billie Noles Henderson

M. Rice challenges D. Gresham to debate State Senate candidate Meryl Rice is calling on Senator Dolores Gresham today to join her in a public forum for a debate of their issues that are affecting the citizens of District 26. “The people of this district deserve to have the best information available to them when they prepare to go to the polls in November;” said Rice, “seeing us face-to-face is the best way for voters to make a decision about who would represent them best in Nashville.” According to a release from Rice’s office, the Hardeman County Journal and the Hardeman County Business and Professional Women have both offered to host debates between the candidates, but Rice says that she is ready to debate wherever the opportunity presents itself. “I believe that the issues are on my side,” she continued, “and I would love to have an opportunity to prove to the people of this district that Senator Gresham is out of touch with the needs of the people she is supposed to be represent-

ing.” Gresham, the Chair of the Senate Education Committee, has presided over some of the most controversial measures in the recent General Assembly, including the overhaul of collective bargaining for teachers, the implementation of a new complicated teacher evaluation system, sending state dollars to an out of state company to operate a virtual school, and an attempt to cut Lottery Scholarships in half for over 5,000 Tennessee students. Rice has spent her 39-

year career working as a human service professional. Her last full-time employment was as the Director of Crisis Services for Quinco Mental Health Centers. She has also worked at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Professional Counseling Services. The election for District 26 will take place on Nov. 6. Due to the once a decade redistricting process, District 26 is now comprised of Chester, Decatur, Haywood, Hardeman, Hardin, Henderson, Fayette, and McNairy Counties.

Graduation is Aug. 24 for Health Information Tech Program The Health Information Technology Program will hold is 2012 graduation at 6:30 Aug. 24 at Christ Community United Pentecostal Church, 638 White Ave., in Henderson. For more information, call 989-0095.

San Antonio Trip final payment due Aug. 23 There are limited openings left on the wonderful 7-day/6-night trip Oct. 20-26, 2012 to San Antonio, Texas, sponsored by the Selmer Senior Center. The cost of the trip is $989 per person with double occupancy. The $100 deposit is due ASAP, with the final payment due Aug. 23. For more information, contact Hollie Knight at 645-7843.

Jackson Children Teen Theater Auditions Aug. 23 - 24 The Jackson Children Teen Theatre will hold auditions for its fall production of “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” on Aug. 23 and 24 at 3:45 p.m. at the Ned R. McWherter West TN Cultural Arts Center, 314 E. Main St., Jackson. Those auditioning should be ages 12 through high school. Everyone will be asked to sing 25 measures of a Broadway Show tune and read from the script. Production dates are 7 p.m. Oct. 18 and 19.

Enville Fun Day Aug. 25 Enville Fun Day will begin at 11 a.m. Aug. 25, and will not close down until 10 that evening. The day is sponsored by Enville Fire Department and Enville Community Club, and will feature barbecue pork, chicken, barbecue bologna, children’s games, parade, horse shoes, husband and wife calling, hog calling, tobacco spitting, talent show, cake walk, street dance, dunking booth, car/tractor show, auction and more. All are invited to join the fun.

Chickasaw State Park trail cleanup Aug. 25 We need your help! Come join us at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, and help clean up our trails. We need volunteers to help pick up litter and clean up your park! This is a great opportunity for scouts, clubs and volunteer groups. For answers to questions or for more information, call the Chickasaw State Park Office at 989-5141.

Montezuma Community Center Big Country Breakfast Aug. 25 The Montezuma Community Center will have a Big Country Breakfast, from 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25. The cost will be $6 per plate, with all the trimmings. There will also be a bake sale, ladies. Please come and support the Center.

Davis family reunion Aug. 26 The Davis family reunion will be at the New Friendship Community Center. Family may begin coming at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 26. Please bring a dish and enjoy good fellowship.

Diabetes Self-Management classes begin Aug. 28 Chester County and McNairy County UT Extension are partnering to offer a program to help you learn to be a Diabetes SelfManager. Take Charge of Your Diabetes is a fun, skill-building program designed for people with diabetes. Anyone living with diabetes is encouraged to attend this six-week program. Cost for the program is only $12 for the entire 6 weeks! The classes are from 5 - 7 p.m. Aug. 28, Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25 and Oct. 2 at the Chester County UT Extension office (Public Safety Building). Registration is REQUIRED by Aug. 23rd. Diabetic refreshments will be served. Classes are subject to cancellation if participation does not reach the minimum number required in order to facilitate the class. For more information, call 989-2103.

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There will be a meeting of the Sanford Rogers Cemetery Association at Rogers Cemetery at 6 p.m. Sept. 1. Anyone interested in the Rogers Cemetery is encouraged to attend. Bring a covered dish, and folding chair. In case of rain, the meeting will be cancelled.

Modern Woodmen announce New Youth Club starting Sept. 1 A new Modern Woodmen of America Youth Service Club is starting in Henderson. The club will have its first activity at noon Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, at Chickasaw State Park. Children between the ages of 0 and 16 are invited to the activity to find out about the benefits of membership. Missy Geary, Henderson, will lead the club and Ronnie Geary Jr., Henderson, a Modern Woodmen representative, will sponsor the club’s monthly activities. For more information, call Geary at 989-4857.

Braly Family Reunion is Sept. 2 There will be a family reunion for all the descendants of Will and John Braly at noon Sept. 2 at Sagamore Lodge at Chickasaw State Park. Bring a covered dish and join the fun. All family and friends are invited to come.

West Tennessee Health Fair offers free screening Sept. 8 West Tennessee Healthcare will once again offer free screenings at the West Tennessee Health Fair from 8 a.m. until noon Saturday, Sept. 8 at the Carl Perkins Civic Center. Tennessee Healthcare and WBBJ Television sponsor this free event. Information about West Tennessee Healthcare’s new LiFT Wellness Center will highlight the health fair. Free screenings at this year’s health fair will include: blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, bone density for people ages 50 and above, vision, grip strength, foot screenings, height and weight, oxygen saturation and body mass index. You are encouraged to fast at least four hours before having your blood taken for a cholesterol screening or a glucose screening. This year free colorectal cancer screening kits will be distributed as well. The public will also have the opportunity to take advantage of on-line risk assessments including: HeartAware, SleepAware, CancerAware, SpineAware and DiabetesAware. Also for the first time, mini sessions will be offered on healthy eating and diabetes management as well as ask the physician sessions and exercise classes every hour. The Jackson-Madison County Metro Narcotics Unit is asking the community to bring and dispose of unused prescription drugs at the fair. There will also be special areas for children, seniors and disabled individuals with screenings, games, prizes and educational information. Each child who visits the health fair is eligible to get a free gift. Prizes will be given away throughout the fair. For more information about the West Tennessee Health Fair, call Kay Cranford at 541-4907.

Racing So They Can Ride on Sept. 15 Racing So They Can Ride, with a 5K, 10K, and 1 mile fun run/walk will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012. Registration will be 7-7:30 a.m. Location of the event is Dick’s Sporting Goods in Jackson. Register at racesonline.com. Preregistration ends Sept. 9. Entry Fees are 5K-$25, 10K-$30 and one mile-$15. After Sept. 1 add $5 to each entry fee. For more information, email mmmoore1@yahoo.com.

2012 Walking in the Footsteps of Christ Tour Register by Sept. 15

There will be a meeting of the Democratic Executive Committee at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, at Henderson City Hall.

Registration deadline is Sept. 15 for a faith-filled pilgrimage to Israel, to walk in the footsteps of Jesus, and to worship in the land called Holy. The tour will depart from Nashville on Nov. 15 and return on Nov. 26. Pilgrimage Price is $2,895, plus $150.00 for gratuities. The price includes private bus and two meals per day. Price is based on double occupancy. Tour is limited to 20. For more information, contact Dr. Roger L. Penn, P. O. Box 579, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, or call 989-2732 or 901277-0167 or email rpenn58@gmail.com.

Celtic Society holding membership meeting

Fields of Faith at Union Univ. Soccer Field - Sept. 26

The Celtic Society of West Tennessee will be holding a general membership meeting and dinner at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, at the Old Country Store, Jackson. The agenda will include planning for CelticFest 2012. Members are encouraged to attend; guests are always welcome! For further information, call 845-5521.

Fields of Faith is a peer-to-peer movement where thousands of students from across the nation gather on their school’s athletic field to share personal stories and challenge each other to apply the Bible as their “game plan for life.” The theme is, “One Day, One Message, One Stand.” Join the field at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, at Union University Soccer Field. For more information, contact Steve Patterson, 217-8540 or spatterson@eplus.net

Democratic Executive Committee meets Aug. 30

Library schedules book sale begins Aug. 31 Chester County Library will begin its book sale Aug. 31 through the end of September. Paperback books are 25 cents, Hardbacks are 50 cents, and DVDs/videos/audio books are $1. You may fill up a bag of books for $3. All proceeds from the book sale will be deposited directly into the library’s building fund. For more information, call the library at 989-4673.

Rogers Cemetery Association meeting is Sept. 1

Chester County High School class of 1972 reunion Sept. 29 The graduating class of 1972 will be having their 40 year reunion Saturday, Sept. 29 at the high school cafeteria. If you know someone who graduated in 1972 please help us with contact information. For more information, contact Garry Carroll or call Celia Murley at 989-5300.


Obituary/Religion Thursday, August 23, 2012

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Another brick in the wall By Ronnie McBrayer Keeping the Faith

Janet Hagberg was the first person who defined the experience for me. I had lived through it, but I didn’t know what to call it. In a book entitled, “The Critical Journey,” Janet called the experience, simply, “The Wall.” My summary goes like this. Many people begin their walk of faith, and everything goes as they expected. Out of genuine conviction, they attend church, learn from the Scriptures, volunteer, serve, give, and become “productive, committed, faithful, Christians.” (Whatever that exactly means, who knows?) But somewhere along the way things go wrong. Terribly wrong. The orderly, stalwart faith that used to “work” for these true believers becomes a muddled mess. Yes, they once taught Sunday school, sang in the choir, chaperoned the youth group, chaired the Stewardship Committee, and had bullet-proof answers to all questions of faith. But then, all at once or over an extension of time, their faith splintered into a million tiny pieces.

The woman, who was taught that living a godly life would protect her marriage, goes through a divorce. The church to which a pastor gave his best years, his heart and soul, fires him because of some petty transgression or because he didn’t go visit a prominent church member who was in the hospital with the gout. A child falls deathly ill and heaven seems silent as a stone, all while the godly parents pray for a miracle. A husband/father dies, leaving behind a young wife and even younger children. An accident leaves the once healthy college student broken and mutilated, physically and spiritually. The circumstances come in variegated form, but the impact is the same. It is more than a crisis of faith, more than theological bump in the road; these are an unraveling that robs people of their confidence and comfort. The once unshakable believer descends downward into the blackness of doubt, what Saint John of the Cross called “the Dark Night of the Soul.” Adding insult to injury, sometimes the only thing the church or we ministe-

rial types can say in those moments is, “Why don’t you pray more? Just believe. Let go and let God. Confess your sin. Try harder.” Not only is this insensitive, asinine advice, it simply won’t work. Those who have hit “The Wall” feel so lost and adrift, so dismantled at their very core, that to keep doing what they were doing – only with more enthusiastic dedication – is impossible. Like a bug striking a windshield, a sledgehammer falling on clods of dirt, or a ball sent through a bay window, “The Wall” breaks faith and people apart. I wish it were different. I wish such pain could be avoided. I wish there was a way to get over, under, or around these types of experiences, but if you live long enough, you will feel your faith being smashed and shattered. The only question left is, “What will come out of the splintered and scattered pieces?” Here is your choice: You can harden your heart and sweep the shards of your faith into the dustpan, giving up on faith and God completely; or you can pick up the broken pieces, with bloody hands

and heart, and reassemble faith on the other side of doubt. No, it won’t be the same faith you once had; rather, it will be dramatically different. It won’t be an improved or updated version of the beliefs you formerly held; no, it will be a new construction altogether. This reassembled faith will not provide you with all the answers to all your questions; instead, it will help you to see the world, God, and people differently. Faith on the other side of “The Wall” will not take you back to where you were; it will move you forward to where you must be. So if you find yourself crushed against what feels like the concrete and steel of disbelief, with not a drop of faith left in you, I understand. Don’t throw it all away just yet. In the breaking, you might find that faith has a new beginning. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author. His books include “Leaving Religion, Following Jesus” and “The Jesus Tribe.” Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

Science on television boosting U.S. fascination with space, spirituality Thanks to popular documentaries and programs like “Fearless Planet” and “Through the Wormhole” on TV’s Discovery and Science Channel, studying the universe is no longer reserved for academicians in lecture halls. “Because filmmakers and producers have made it entertaining and present science in language everyone can understand, there’s an increased interest in the genesis of the universe, and its future,” says Sanjay C. Patel, (www.SanjayCPatel.com), author of God Is Real, a book that explores similarities between modern science and ancient cosmology. What many people don’t realize, says Patel, is that ancient Indian yogis, Israelites and early

Christians all agreed on the origins of life and the universe. Moreover, new studies indicate many of their ancient beliefs correspond with the findings of modern science For instance, the scientific age of the universe is 13.7 billion years old, says Patel. When comparing this age to the Bible, if it is divided into six equal days spanning 2.28 billion years each, biblical Genesis’s timeline across all seven “days” suddenly corresponds with past and future episodes in our galaxy and Earth. In total, 21 major correspondences emerge. One among them is the following timeline: • Science says: the Sun and moon formed about 4.6 to 4.5 billion years ago.

Annual Youth Day at Harvest Time Harvest Time Church of God in Christ will present its annual Youth Day at 3:30 p.m. Aug. 26. Elder Albert Clark, pastor of Deliverance Temple Church of God in Christ, will be the guest speaker. Harvest Time is located at 414 Beechwood Ave. in Henderson. For more information, contact Sister Juanita Szaabo at 394-4789.

Revival at Sweetlips Aug. 27-31 Sweetlips Baptist Church will have revival services each night 7 p.m. Aug. 27-31. Brother Ronnie Geary will bring the message each night.

• Bible says: On Day 4 – “God made the two great lights: the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night.” This would be 4.56 billion years ago. (two days or eons ago since we are currently at the beginning of day seven.) Other interesting correspondences: • Science says: Volcanic fire scorched India about 118 million years ago. Nearby oceanic volcanoes submerged about 100 million years ago. These submarine volcanoes suck in seawater through cracks and pores and remove salt from the water. They then expel the desalinated water back into the ocean through hydrothermal vents. • Ancient Yogis said: Volcanic fire scorched India about 120 million years ago. Related volcanoes in the ocean south of India submerged about 117 million years ago. “The submarine Fire exists in the ocean. It drinks the seawater and removes its saltiness. It then expels the desalinated water from another opening.” For those who believe 2012 marks an end – be it because of the Mayan

Long Calendar’s end or some other prophecy – Patel offers this far-future convergence: • Science says: In about two billion years time, Earth will be so hot there will be no life on it. Volcanism will be common and the planet’s surface will be scorched by the fire of lava and sulfur. • Ancient Yogis said: In about 2.35 billion years time, there will be no life on Earth due to volcanic fire. • Bible says: in about 2.28 billion years – by the end of day seven – life on Earth will end in volcanic fire and brimstone (sulfur). Patel has found 121 points of agreement across 30 years of analysis and research based on expert translations of yoga literature dating back to 1,500 B.C., biblical texts which date back to about 1,000 B.C., and translations of the Talmud – an equally ancient biblical tradition. “So many correspondences cannot be coincidence,” says Patel, whose research has appeared in peer-reviewed scientific journals, including Marine Scientist in the United Kingdom.

Obituaries Loyd Holmes Date of Death – Aug. 16, 2012 Loyd Holmes, 69, passed away Aug. 16, 2012 at his home. Funeral services were Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Ken Kitchen officiating. Burial followed in Chapel Hill Cemetery at Garnertown. Mr. Holmes, known by his grandson as Pappaw and by his family as LoLay, and his CB friends as “Stranger,” was born and reared in Henderson County, the son of the late J.B. and Bertie Lois Johnson Holmes. He attended Henderson County Schools. He hauled for Argo-Collier Truck Lines out of Martin and later drove for Gulf Transport Bus Company out of Mobile, Ala. He retired as a self-employed driver. He was a member of the Henderson Masonic Lodge # 485. He is survived by three sons Randy Holmes, Ronny Holmes, and Christopher Holmes and a grandson Ryan Holmes all of Henderson. He has two brothers Floyd Holmes of Pinson and Riley Holmes of Huron and a sister Kathy Renfroe of Huron. He was preceded in death by a half-brother Edward Holmes. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 23, 2012

Paul Whitehead July 2, 1952 – Aug. 8, 2012 Paul Whitehead, 60, died Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012, at his home. Services were conducted by George A. Smith and Sons North Chapel. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 23, 2012

Roger Hodge Date of Death – Aug. 16, 2012 Roger Hodge, 68, of Bethel Springs, died Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012. Services were held of Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012, at 2 p.m. at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel. He was buried in Bethel Cemetery in Chester County. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 23, 2012

Cheryl Bates Date of Death – Aug. 19, 2012 Cheryl Ann Tom Bates, 64, passed away Aug. 19, 2012, at Regional Hospital. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Ronnie Sells officiating. Burial will follow in New Friendship Cemetery in Chester County. Family received friends from 5 until 8 p.m. Wednesday at Casey Chapel. She was born and reared in Chicago, Ill., the daughter of the late Charles Wells Tom and Betty Elaine Rittenour Larson. She graduated from Austin High School in Chicago. She worked in manufacturing in Chicago and was married to Larry Bates for 25 years. She moved to Henderson in 1980 and worked in the restaurant business. She worked at the Truck Stop, Skylark and had owned the Electric Grill in Henderson. Cheryl was a member of the New Friendship Baptist Church. She is survived by two sons, Marlin Bates of Springhill, and Jason Bates of Henderson; a daughter, Rebecca Bates of Henderson; and a grandchild, Dylan Bates of Springhill. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 23, 2012


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Sweetlips Baptist Church

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Study: Spanking may lead to adult mental illness Parents have historically disciplined their children by spanking, but a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says there's a significant link between children who are disciplined with harsh physical punishment and increased likelihood that those children will develop mental-health disorders as adults. Lu Hanessian, author

and founder of Parent to Parent U, says the report is not a surprise. “Frequent spanking and physical corporal punishment that hurts the child or creates fear in the child enormously raises the risk of that child developing mental health issues later in life.” The analyzed data was from multiple government surveys of more than 35,000 U.S. adults. Hanessian says the report is based on scientific data that shows a direct link to

increased odds of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, alcohol and drug abuse and several personality disorders. Hanessian says today's technology proves what researchers have been stating for 20 years. “You can see the brains. They took subjects who were subjected to chronic parental stress and their hippocampi are markable smaller. They're 30 percent smaller than the average person who wasn’t.”

Researchers say that spanking and other corporal punishment can have a significant adverse effect on the development of a child's brain and brain function. From a public health perspective, reducing physical punishment may help decrease the prevalence of mental disorders in the general population, according to the AAP. Hanessian says it's important to note that the report is not saying if you spank, your child is doomed.

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT August 14, 2012 A theft was reported at a Hill Ave. residence. Missing items included a skillet and a pan, valued at $5 each. A Makita Chop Saw valued at $850 was reported missing from Crocker Construction, who is building the addition at Arvin Sango on Premier Way. According to the report, a lock had been cut on a storage shed, providing entry for the theft. A theft of "Fun Parties" adult novelty merchandise and other items was reported at a Baughn Ext. residence. According to the report, several items were reported missing including approximately 100 DVDs valued at $500, and $300 in cash. Also missing was a display bag of Passion Party "Fun Party" display items valued at $500. Amber Nichole Benthal, 24, 1039C Barnett Dr., was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $750 bond. Brandon Eugene Northcott, 29, Jackson, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $750 bond. August 15, 2012 A welder and other items were reportedly stolen from a carport on Sanford St. Missing items included a red Lincoln 110 Met Pro welder with "Nascar" on it valued at $300, a welder's helmet valued at $75 and welder's gloves valued at $25. August 16, 2012 Dennis C. Arnold, 26, 606 Luray Ave., was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $250 bond. August 18, 2012 Approximately 20 aluminum wheels were reportedly stolen from HiWay Wrecker on South Church Ave. The wheels are valued at $1,000. A refrigerator and dryer were reported missing from a recently unoccupied house on South Carolina St. The appliances are valued at $275 combined. Saul Alexander Simpson, 23, McMinnville, was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct, criminal trespassing and resisting arrest. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $25,000 bond. August 19, 2012 Terrance Terrell Anderson, 29, 175 West Third St., was arrested and charged with public intoxication, resisting arrest and disorderly con-

duct. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $5,000 bond. August 20, 2012 April Bustamante, 30, 110 Guy McAdams Road, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license, no driver's license and failure to obey traffic control device/signal. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $300 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT August 12, 2012 3:36 p.m. - 131 Cason Ave., Freed-Hardeman University, Hall Roland Hall, hairspray activated smoke detector, false alarm. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT August 14, 2012 A Sweetlips Road resident reported medication theft. According to the report, he alleged some person or persons entered his residence through a boarded up window and stole medication leaving the bottles behind. Missing medication included 57 7.5mg Percocet, 24 5mg Xanax and 60 350mg Soma. Also reported stolen was a brown leather wallet with a silver duck head containing approximately $30 to $40 in cash. August 15, 2012 George Hernandez, 31, 145 Dusty Road, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 bond. August 16, 2012 Approximately $6,000 in tools was reportedly stolen from a property on Enville Road. Missing tools include a red Taskmaster top and bottom tool box with sockets, wrenches and air tools. Luke Dakota Martin, 19, Pinson, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $500 bond. Kelley Priddy, 44, 6100 Enville Road, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections - Felony. She is held in the Chester County jail without bond. August 17, 2012 Donna Elaine Bizzell, 42, Savannah, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $600 bond. Valencia Kenshae Johnson, 19, 557 Mifflin Ave., was arrested and charged with criminal trespassing. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $10,000 bond. David Simpson, 24, Bolivar, was arrested and charged with possession of a schedule VI controlled substance, driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license, violation of the vehicle financial

responsibility act and violation of registration. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Nicholas A. Weinfurter, 26, 75 Maple Lane, was arrested and charged with assault. He was released from the Chester County jail on his own recognizance. August 18, 2012 Jeffrey Tyler Jones, 19, Reagan, was arrested and charged with violation of probation. He is held in the Chester County jail without bond. Rodrick Lakinta Vincent, 34, 209 Harmon St., was arrested and charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $1,500 bond. August 19, 2012 ATM fraud was reported by a Chester County resident. According to the report, while checking her account online, the victim found two unauthorized ATM transactions in Maryland, for $503 each. Katherine Elaine Shields, 52, Adamsville, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Felony. She is held in the Chester County jail without bond.

incarceration. Count seven: He was sentenced to six months in the Chester County jail receiving credit for time served pretrial, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. He was ordered to pay court costs, and all counts are concurrent. Medrekus L. McKinnie, 19, 425 Mifflin Ave., was found guilty of Count one possession of marijuana. He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. He was ordered to pay court costs plus $250 in fines. He was found guilty of Count two, violation of the light law, and sentenced to 30 days in the Chester County jail, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. All counts are concurrent. Anthony Bernard Johnson, 38, Jackson, was found guilty of Count one Burglary - Auto; Count two theft of property under $500; Count three forgery; Count four burglary - auto; Count five theft of property under $500; and Count six Forgery. Count one: He was sentenced to three years and six months in a TDOC facility to serve a minimum of 35 percent prior to eligibility for release, receiving credit for time served pretrial. Count two: He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail receiving credit for time served, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. Count three: He was sentenced to three years and six months in a TDOC facility to serve a minimum of 35 percent prior to eligibility for work release receiving credit for time served pretrial. Count four: He was sentenced to three years and six months in a TDOC facility to serve a minimum of 35 percent prior to eligibility for release, receiving credit for time served pretrial. Count five: he was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail receiving credit for time served pretrial, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. Count six: He was sentenced to three years and six months in a TDOC facility to serve a minimum of 35 percent prior to eligibility for release, receiving credit for time served pretrial. He was ordered to pay court costs, with restitution to be determined. All counts are concurrent.

Bo Bradshaw Tennessee News Service

CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Shawn Eugene Williamson, 32, Jackson, was found guilty of Count one aggravated criminal trespass; two counts (Counts two and three) of aggravated assault; Count six possession of a handgun while under the influence; and Count seven criminal impersonation. Count one: He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail receiving credit for time served pretrial, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative status, to be supervised following incarceration period. Count two and Count three: He was sentenced to four years, for each count, in a TDOC facility, to serve a minimum of 30 percent prior to eligibility for release, receiving credit for time served pretrial, to be supervised following incarceration period. Count six: He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail receiving credit for time served pretrial, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. He is to be supervised following


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

By J. Brian Signaigo UT Extension Agent III

UT Extension questions and answers: Vultures and wild hogs, oh my! So, what’s all this “hype” about black vulture attacks on livestock? It’s not “hype” – it has been a documented fact that some black vultures will attack small, newborn livestock. In a recent meeting with USDA Wildlife personnel, I found that there is some “wiggle room” to deal with black vultures. First, it needs to be understood that black vultures and turkey vultures (commonly known as buzzards) are protected by federal law under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 – whether we like it or not. The black vulture has an ashy color to its bald head and the turkey vulture has a red bald head. The black vulture has a short but prominent beak and flat, relative small feet that are not very well adapted to grasping. The black vulture is a scavenger and

feeds on carrion (road kill and other dead animals), but will also eat eggs and, on occasion, will kill newborn animals. So, what do we do about it? It IS NOT illegal to “harass” the birds in order to get them to leave the area. However, this has not met with long lasting success. If one “harasses” the black vulture and accidently kills it, that’s what USDA Fish and Wildlife personnel call “incidental kill” and will be subject to a hefty monetary fine – the same as if someone intentionally kills a black vulture. Permits are available to get rid of the black vulture. The application for this permit (which costs $100) is available from the Regional USDA Fish and Wildlife Service in Jackson – 668-3388. The Regional director supervisor is Brad Robbins. The permit itself is administered by the

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Agency and takes four to six weeks to get it. What do we do while we wait on the permit? Call USDA Fish and Wildlife and they can provide some technical assistance until the permit arrives. This process certainly does not go fast enough to suit us, but it is the only legal steps to follow. If we think we’ve been overrun with coyote, fire ants, vultures and/or armadillos, just wait until the wild hogs get here. As a matter of fact, they are in a small part of Chester County, but are pretty much wide spread in Tennessee overall. There is a huge population in Alabama and Texas and they have been “transplanted” by hunters that wanted to hunt closer to home and/or naturally migrated to many other parts of the country. They can, and will,

Salmonella outbreak from cataloupes sickens Tennesseans, contaminates originate in Indiana Bo Bradshaw Tennessee News Service

The Tennessee departments of Health and Agriculture are alerting Tennesseans about an ongoing outbreak of salmonella linked to cantaloupe. Dr. John Dunn, deputy state epidemiologist with the Tennessee Department of Health, says at least six people in Tennessee have been sickened by infected cantaloupes that have been traced back to a southwestern Indiana farm. He encourages anyone who has become ill after eating cantaloupe to see their health-care provider. “Salmonella is a diarrheal disease, so diarrhea, vomiting and fever can go with along salmonella infection, as well. Those would be the typical signs, and people usually start having symptoms within a day or so of eating a contaminated food.” Six of the 141 reported cases have been in Tennessee, as well as two deaths in Kentucky; 31 people have been hospitalized. Dunn says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and affected states are collaborating in an ongoing investigation to identify all possible sources of contamination and prevent additional cases of illness. Information updated daily may be seen at the CDC or Tennessee Department of Health websites. Dunn says salmonella infections are a common

cause of food-borne illness. If an individual has been infected, they will know rather quickly, he adds. “The incubation period ranges from 12 hours to 72 hours. There are some variabilities, but within a few days people are typically ill if they have been contaminated with salmonella.”

Consumers can contact the store where they purchased cantaloupe to ask about the origin of the fruit. Based on that information, consumers can continue to purchase and eat cantaloupes that did not originate in southwestern Indiana. Dunn advises that if there is any doubt, it is best to throw it out.

TAKE US on vacation Summer has arrived and Chester Countians will soon be traveling to exciting destinations around the globe. When you take your trip, be sure to Take Us With You. Just take along a copy of the Chester County Independent, and have your photo taken as you read the paper on the beach, in front of a well-known landmark, or sign, similar to the photo above. Then submit the photo to the newspaper and we’ll publish it in a special edition next fall. You can also win prizes. For more information, call the Independent at 9894624.

destroy lawns, gardens, field crops, hay fields, golf courses or anywhere they can “root” for grubs, earthworms, roots or anything else that smells “good” to them below the soil surface. If this isn’t bad enough, they are omnivorous – they eat plants AND animals. If

they can catch it, they will probably eat it. Humans are not in much danger, even though wild hog attacks on humans have been documented. We can hunt and harvest them to our hearts content and not make much of a dent in their population – sows can

Page 13-A

have up to 20 pigs per year. So, if there is more than one sow roaming around your property, do the math. Again, USDA Fish and Wildlife can provide technical assistance. Call UT Extension office at 989-2103 is you need information on this or other topics.


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

33rd Annual Starlight Symphony set Aug. 25 The Jackson Symphony’s 33rd annual “Starlight Symphony” will be performed on the grounds of Jackson’s First Presbyterian Church on Aug. 25. The Starlight Symphony has been held on the grounds of the First Presbyterian Church, 1573 North Highland Avenue, each August for the past 32 years. No admission is charged for this community event which draws audiences of m o r e t h a n 5 , 0 0 0 f r o m throughout the mids o u t h region. “The Starlight Symphony is The Bank of Jackson’s gift to the community. We are pleased to co-sponsor this event for the 15th consecutive year,” said Anita Kay Archer, Assistant Vice-President, Business Development Officer, with the Bank of Jackson. “Let us all join together for this community gathering in support of our Jackson Symphony.” Prior to the symphony’s performance, a concert prelude is performed on the Jackson Memorial Carillon of First Presbyterian Church. Additional concert music selections will reflect the 2012-2013 season of The Jackson Symphony. Highlights of this

concert include the performance of Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” featuring the carillon, live civil war cannons manned by historic re-enactors, and free ice cream treats provided by the Bank of Jackson and Horne, LLP! The Starlight Symphony is just one of the gifts The Jackson Symphony provides to the community each year. Others include Youth Orchestra performances, Discovery Concerts, Christmas Gift to the Community Concerts, Tuba Christmas, as well as many, many more. The 2012 Starlight Symphony begins at 6:45 p.m. with the “Carrillon Prelude” to be performed by Kathleen Huneycutt, carilloneur. The Jackson Symphony performance is at 7:30 p.m. under the leadership of Music Director and Conductor, Dr. Jordan Tang. The mission of The Jackson Symphony is to enrich the quality of life in West Tennessee through performance that incorporates a variety of musical styles in a welcoming atmosphere and through a broad spectrum of educational programs for people of all ages.

Vehicle overturns

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

One person was sent to an area hospital following a one-vehicle accident at approximately 3:30 p.m. Aug. 16. Amber Benthel, 24, address unknown, was south bound on Garland Road when her Buick Regal left the roadway in a curve and overturn near the intersection with Frank Latham Road. Information on Benthel’s condition was unavailable.

State, MADD support drunk driving crackdown To highlight the importance of safe driving for the Labor Day weekend, the Governor’s Highway Safety Office (GHSO) and Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Tennessee are teaming up for a press event on at 10 a.m. Aug. 30 at the Tennessee Performing Arts Center. GHSO Director Kendell Poole will host MADD National Board President Jan Withers who is visiting Nashville to share MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving. MADD Tennessee Advisory Board Chair Millie Webb of Franklin will present an overview of recent laws pertaining to DUI offenses and recognize Tennesseans who have contributed to these laws, including Representative Tony Shipley whose recent legislation was signed into law by Governor Haslam in May. “The new law is an effective tool to hold impaired drivers accountable, but we hope as well that it will help deter people from driving under the influence in the first place,” Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security Commissioner Bill Gibbons shared. Every day in America, another 28 people die as a result of drunk driving crashes, but over Labor Day weekend, that number spikes to 42 people who are killed each day. The Governor’s Highway Safety Office and MADD are supporting law enforcement’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over crackdown this Labor Day weekend, in an effort to prevent the devastating deaths and injuries caused by drunk driving. “MADD is thankful for our heroes in law enforcement, who will be out in force to deter drunk driving and make arrests in order to keep our families safe on the road,” said Flint Clouse, MADD Tennessee State Executive Director. Over Labor Day weekend in 2010 (the most recent year for which there is national data), 36 percent of traffic deaths

involved a drunk driver that means more than one third of all the people killed on our roads could have been saved if those drunk drivers had not gotten behind the wheel. MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving® includes support for high-visibility law enforcement efforts, such as sobriety checkpoints, to help keep our roads safe. Intended to deter wouldbe drunk drivers, sobriety checkpoints are one of the most effective enforcement tools to combat drunk driving - in fact, they’re proven to reduce fatalities by 20 percent. As Tennessee residents make plans for Labor Day weekend, MADD urges them to also plan ahead for a safe way home if alcohol will be a part of their festivities: “It’s as easy as calling a cab, taking public transportation, or volunteering to be the sober driver,” added Clouse. “Impaired drivers account for approximately 30 percent of our state’s fatalities,” Poole said. “With the help of this new legislation, education, and enforcement efforts by our state and local law enforcement partners across the state, we can reduce that number and help save lives in Tennessee.” Law enforcement agencies on the city, county, and state levels will be conducting sobriety checkpoints across the Tennessee, including state borders. Many of these will utilize the new legislation for testing during No Refusal Weekends. “We are dedicated to saving lives across Tennessee”, remarked Poole. For more information about MADD Tennessee, visit www.maddtn.org. And to learn more about MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving, which includes support for high-visibility law enforcement, go to www.madd.org/campaign. About Mothers Against Drunk Driving Founded by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working

to protect families from drunk driving and underage drinking. With the help of those who want a safer future, MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving will end this danger on America’s roads. PowerTalk 21® is the national day for parents to talk with their kids about alcohol, using the proven strategies of Power of Parents™ to reduce the risk of underage drinking. And as one of the largest victim services organizations in the U.S., MADD also supports drunk and drugged driving victims and survivors at no charge, serving one person every eight minutes through local MADD victim advocates and at 1877-MADD-HELP. Learn more at www.madd.org or by calling 1-877-ASKMADD.

TAKE US on vacation Chester Countians are now planning exciting destinations around the globe. When you take your trip this summer, be sure to Take Us With You. Just take along a copy of the Chester County Independent, and have your photo taken as you read the paper on the beach, or in front of a well-known landmark (similar to the photo above). Then submit the photo to the newspaper and we’ll publish it in a special edition next fall. You can also win prizes. For more information, call the Independent at 989-4624.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Page 15-A


Page 16-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Crowding “The Alley”: Musicians and artists draw crowd to August’s Arts in the Alley Arts in the Alley draws a crowd to downtown Henderson every month from spring through fall. With live music and local artists displaying and selling their creations, “The Alley,” along with Henderson Arts Commission are working to put Henderson on the map as a

destination for arts in West Tennessee. During the August Arts in the Alley last Thursday, Kimberlie Helton and guitarist Eric Wood, along with Helton’s voice students performed. The music kept the crowd transfixed near the stage, but arts and local craftspeople line the

Cathy and Brooklyn Butler browse the artist booths at Arts in the Alley.

alley to display and share their creations. September is slated to be the final Arts in the Alley of the 2012 season, and an open mic night is scheduled. All artists and craftspeople are encouraged to come out for the event, as well, on Sept. 20. Chester County has many excellent local

artists who have many areas of talent. Patrons at “The Alley” are invited to browse the works of the artists who live in their very own community. The Christmas season will soon be approaching, and one-of-a-kind original art makes an excellent present for almost anyone.

Kimberlie Helton and Eric Woods perform.

Photos by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Anna Faith Howell performs the Star Spangle Banner.

Ashtyn Walker and Abbie Bayless have performed at many Chester County events. Their performances drew a large crowd to Arts in the Alley.

Local artist Algene Steel displays his paintings next to Dylan Dyer’s music-themed paintings and guitars.

A large crowd turned out for the music of Kimberlie Helton and her voice students.

Handmade jewelry is one of the many examples of local art for sale at Arts in the Alley.

Painters, jewelry-makers and craftspeople aren’t the only artists. Homemade bread, jellies, and baked goods are also examples of local crafts.


Sports Page 1-B

Thursday, August 23, 2012

CC opens with victory, 21-14

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

The Chester County offensive line, including Skylar Sheffield, 65, and Taylor Harrison, 79, seal off the Adamsville defense on the opening series of the season Friday at Adamsville.

A sophomore quarterback starting his first varsity game, and a pair of overlooked defensive backs, contributed heavily into 21-14 victory for Chester County in the opening game of the high school football season Friday. CCHS never trailed in the contest but had to make key stops in the second half to hold off Adamsville for the second year in a row in a game that closely resembled Chester County’s victory the over the Cardinals the previous season. The Eagles had no turnovers in the game, but grabbed the ball away from Adamsville three times in interceptions.

Bend, not break defense braces for Hardin County

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County Marching Band added to the excitement of the evening Friday at Adamsville as CCHS won its football season opener. More about the band, as well as CCHS, Junior High, and Freed-Hardeman sports will be included in the Independent’s annual Fall Sports section coming Aug. 30.

There were several players and coaches in the stands at Adamsville scouting the Chester County Eagles last week at Adamsville, and most of them were from Hardin County, the CCHS opponent this week in Henderson. It will be Hardin County’s first game of the season, a scenario that worked to Chester County’s advantage last year when the Eagles broke a long winless streak to the Tigers, 28-6. However, each team is much different from last year, so predicting this

game is difficult. Chester County was inconsistent on offense last week, but managed to make enough plays to score 14 points from scrimmage. Defensively, their interior linemen forced Adamsville outside for much of the night, and the Cardinals appeared just a play or two away from breaking the game open. However, the CCHS defense made plays when they had to, stopping the Cardinals by turnover or on downs four times on the Chester County side of the 50.

The extra possessions were needed to overcome the Cardinals’ 245 yards to 196 advantage in offensive output. “Lots of first games, early like this, you expect some sloppy play, but both teams executed most of the time,” stated Chester County Head Coach Michael Hodum, beginning his second season at Chester County. “It’s always hard to beat Adamsville here. They are a town that’s behind their players. It’s a healthy rivalry.” Each team scored on its first possession, indicating a possible shootout, but the offensives stalled much of the night after that. Chester County took the opening kickoff and marched 64 yards in 12 plays with Tyler Seagraves carrying the final yard. Brennan Conaway booted the PAT for a 7-0 CCHS lead. The Eagles had four first downs on the drive, the key play coming on fourth down and one to go when Matthew Butler broke off 10 yards to the Adamsville two-yard line. Adamsville’s first possession was similar, resulting in a four-yard run by Zach Neary. The Cards moved the chains five times, going 79 yards for the score. From there, however, things got messy. CCHS was three plays and punt, See CCHS, Page 2-B


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Bolivar ruins CC Junior fun Bolivar Middle School built a 24-0 first half lead, and then withstood a better Chester County second half to defeat the Junior Eagles 44-16 in middle school football Aug. 16 at Eagle Stadium. The visiting Tigers used a 50-yard punt return in the first period to set up their first touchdown. Chester County’s only first half scoring opportunity was spoiled when the Junior Eagles fumbled the ball away at mid-field. However, in the third period, Peyton Lynch of CCJHS caught a 31-yard pass from Bryan Napole, and they added the two

points-after-touchdown on a run by Ty Patterson, getting Chester County on the board. Napole threw another scoring pass before the quarter was out, this time 63-yards to Cody Compton, and Nick Newman ran in the twopoint conversion. The comeback ended on the next play, however, when Bolivar returned the kickoff 99 yards for a touchdown. CCJHS travels to Jackson to face University School at 7 p.m. tonight (Thursday). They return to Eagle Stadium at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 30.

Hall of Fame Golf Scramble is Sept. 7 at Woodland Hills The third annual Freed-Hardeman University Athletics Hall of Fame Four-Person Golf Scramble is scheduled for a 9 a.m. shotgun start, Sept. 7 at Woodland Hills Country Club near Pinson. Cost is $75 per player, or $300 per team which includes cart, greens fees and lunch. Teams will be flighted, and prizes awarded for flight winners, longest drive and closest to the pin. Proceeds from the event go to benefit FreedHardeman University golf programs. For more information, call the FHU Athletics office at 989-6900.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Colby Farley, 22, above, gives up his body to make the tackle on a Bolivar Middle School ball-carrier Aug. 16 at Eagle Stadium.

Special Needs Athletics announces fall season Special Needs Athletics of Selmer has announced the start of its Fall Baseball Season. First game is 6:30 p.m. Sept. 10 at Patriot Park. All games will be played on Monday nights through Oct. 29. Signups are noon until 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Selmer Community Center, 230 N. Fifth St, in Selmer. You may also sign up at the first game. For more information, call Linda Taylor at 610-7557, or visit website www.specialneedsathletics.org.

At right, Junior High cheerleaders, including Claire Garrison and Kelsey Maness, perform for the crowd at the CCJHS and Bolivar football game Aug. 16.

threw an incomplete screen pass. CCHS then ran out the clock. “We had some people make big plays. The corners came up big,” said Hodum. “Hearn has bided his time. All those times he’s been passed up for a starter’s role, he could have quit. His hard work paid off. “Defensively, we made some adjustments at halftime. (Adamsville) was in formations early on that we were not prepared for. If we were more experienced the kids would have noticed it themselves much sooner.” Senior lineman Skylar Sheffield was delighted with the victory, but kept things in perspective. “We

played well as a team, but as individuals we made some mistakes that need to be corrected before next week,” he said. Adamsville put the ball in the air 20 times, completing 10 to their own receivers for 75 yards but gave up three to Eagle defenders. Kesler of Chester County only threw five times, completing two without a turnover. Hodum intentionally did not put too much on his young quarterback, but was well-pleased with Kesler’s poise. “He’s very capable,” said Hodum. “We want a balanced offense. (But) I’m proud of him to just run the offense.”

From Page 1-B

CCHS and after Adamsville reached the Eagle 24-yard line, Maison Gray snatched a Cardinal pass in the end zone on fourth down. That was just the impetus CCHS needed. Quarterback Sam Kesler, starting his first game, tossed the ball over the middle to Butler who galloped 74 yards for a touchdown. Adamsville again got close to a score as time neared to a conclusion in the first half, but Dustin Plunk was short on a 40yard field goal attempt. However, to begin the second half, Plunk was soon kicking a much shorter point after touchdown when his team converted on fourth-down and goal at the four-yard line on a short pass to tie the game. Three minutes later it looked like the Cardinals were on the go again, that’s when Chester County’s Trannard Cobb had the chip knocked off his shoulder, picking off a pass, picking up a few blocks and going to the end zone 49-yards later. “I heard Adamsville was going to pick on me,” said Cobb, a junior defensive back. “The call was cover two. I saw the tight end coming in the flat, read the quarterback’s eyes, and knew exactly where he was going.” Now with a 21-14 lead mid-way of the second half, the Eagles could smell a victory. The Cardinals mounted two attempts to knot the score, the first time throwing deep, but the Eagles’ Colton Hearn played takeaway by taking Chester County’s third interception of the game. Then a sack by Kesler put the Cards behind the chains with 1:35 to go, and on fourth down they

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

High School Football Aug. 17 at Adamsville Chester County Adamsville

7 – 7 – 7 – 0 = 21 7 – 0 – 7 – 0 = 14

Unofficial Statistics: CC First Downs 7 Rushing (atts., yds.) 32-105 Passing (comp. Atts., int., yds.) 2-5-0=91 Penalties, yards 3-15 Fumbles, lost 1-0 Punts, average 3-26.7

A 19 41-168 10-20-3=75 3-25 1-0 1-24.0

Scoring Summary: First quarter: (6:37) CC - Tyler Seagraves 1 run (Brennan Conaway kick), [7-0]. (1:08) A – Zach Neary 4 run (Dustin Plunk kick), [7-7]. Second quarter: (4:56) CC – Sam Kesler 74 pass to Matthew Butler (Conaway kick), [14-7]. Third quarter: (5:25) A – Dalton Plunk 4 pass to Burcham (Dustin Plunk kick), [14-14]. (0:52) CC – Trannard Cobb 49 interception return (Conaway kick), [21-14]. Fourth quarter: None.

Unofficial Statistical Leaders: Rushing – CC – Butler 13-55; Seagraves 9-37. A – Neary 20-100. Passing – CC – Kesler 2-5-0=91. A – Dalton Plunk 1020-3=75. Receiving – CC – Butler 1-74; Gray 1-17.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Trannard Cobb of the Eagles heads for the end zone with an armada of blockers after intercepting an Adamsville pass in the second half of the contest Friday in Adamsville.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Chester County High School 2012 Girls’ Volleyball Schedule Date Opponent Aug. 23 Jackson Central Merry Aug. 25 Freed-Hardeman Tourney Aug. 28 Trinity Christian Aug. 30 Liberty Tech Magnet Sept. 4 Hardin County Sept. 6 South Side Sept. 7-8 River City Tournament Sept. 10 Lexington Sept. 11 McNairy Central

Time 4:30 TBA 5:00 5:00 5:00 7:00 TBA 5:00 5:00

Location Jackson Sports Ctr. Jackson Eagle Gym Savannah Jackson Memphis Eagle Gym Eagle Gym

Chester County Junior High 2012 Football Schedule Date Opponent Location Aug. 23 Univ. School Jackson Aug. 30 West Henderson Sept. 4 Hardin County Savannah Sept. 13 Lexington Lexington * Junior Varsity games before each contest, 5:30 p.m.

Time 7:00 6:30 6:30 6:30

2012 Sixth Grade Schedule Date Opponent Aug. 28 Decatur County Sept. 8 Alamo Sept. 15 Univ. School

Location Parsons Alamo Jackson

Time 6:00 TBA TBA

Chester County High School 2012 Freshman/JV Football Schedule Date Opponent Location Aug. 27 South Side (JV) Jackson Aug. 30 Bolivar Cent. (Fr) Bolivar Sept. 6 South Side (Fr) Henderson Sept. 10 Scotts Hill (JV) Scotts Hill Sept. 13 Hardin County (Fr) Henderson Sept. 17 Adamsville (JV) Adamsville

Time 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00

Chester County High School 2012 Girls’ Soccer Schedule Date Opponent Time Aug. 23 Madison Acad. 5:00 Aug. 28 McNairy Cent. 5:00 Aug. 30 Univ. School 6:00 Sept. 4 Trinity Christian 5:00 Sept. 6 Adamsville 5:30 Sept. 14-15, Liberty Tournament, times TBA Sept. 18 Scotts Hill 5:00

Location Jackson Henderson Jackson Jackson Adamsville Jackson Henderson

Chester County High School 2012 Golf Schedule Date Opponents Aug. 28 Riverside Aug. 30 Adamsville Sept. 6 Riverside Sept. 10 Scotts Hill Sept. 11 Bolivar Cent., South Side Sept. 13 Bolivar Central Sept. 17 Trinity Christian Sept. 18 Madison, Trinity

Time 4:00 4:00 4:00 4:00 4:00 4:00 4:00 4:00

Location Chickasaw Adamsville Tn. River Tn. River Chickasaw Bolivar Humboldt Chickasaw

Chester County High School 2012 Football Schedule Date Opponent Aug. 24 Hardin County Aug. 31 Jackson Central Merry Sept. 7 Dyersburg Sept. 14 Bolivar Central Sept. 21 Open All games begin at 7 p.m.

Location Eagle Stadium Jackson Eagle Stadium Eagle Stadium

Chester County Junior High 2012 Girls’ Softball Schedule Date Opponent Aug. 23 West Middle Aug. 27 Decatur County Aug. 30 Jackson Christian Sept. 4 Crockett County Sept. 6 Jackson Christian Sept. 10 Trinity Christian Sept. 11 Trinity Christian Sept. 17 Decatur County Sept. 20 Crockett County

Location Denmark Henderson Jackson Alamo Henderson Jackson Henderson Parsons Henderson

Time 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30

Chester County Junior High 2012 Girls’ Soccer Schedule Date Opponent Aug. 23 Jackson Christian Aug. 25 CCA (JV only) Aug. 27 Trinity Christian Aug. 30 St. Mary’s Aug. 31 University School Sept. 4 Lexington Sept. 7 Martin Sept. 10 Crockett County Sept. 13 Henderson County Sept. 15 Paris Sept. 17 Haywood Sept. 18 Selmer

Location Henderson Dyersburg Jackson Jackson Henderson Henderson Henderson Alamo Henderson Henderson Brownsville Selmer

Time 5:00 11:00 5:00 5:00 5:00 5:00 6:00 5:00 5:30 10:00 5:00 5:00

Freed-Hardeman University 2012 Women's Soccer Schedule Date Time Opponent Location Aug. 25 5:00 Harding (scrimmage) Searcy, Ark. Aug. 31 6:00 St. Catharine Henderson Freed-Hardeman Lions Cup Labor Day Tournament Sept. 3 Noon Louisiana College Henderson Sept. 6 5:00 Bob Jones Greenville, S.C. Sept. 14 7:00 Davenport Henderson Sept. 15 5:00 Auburn-Montgomery Henderson

Freed-Hardeman University 2012 Fall Golf Schedule Date Sept. 17-18

Opponent Freed-Hardeman Fall Inv.

Location Covington

Jackson Generals Baseball Date Aug. 22 Aug. 23 Aug. 24 Aug. 25 Aug. 26 Aug. 27 Aug. 28

Opponent Mobile Mobile Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga

Location Mobile, Ala. Mobile, Ala. Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga

Time 7:05 7:05 6:15 6:15 1:15 6:15 1:15

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America’s Great Outdoors: Reversing decades of decline, the number of hunters and anglers is on the rise Highlighting the reversal of decades of declining numbers, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the preliminary results of a comprehensive national survey of outdoor recreation showing a significant increase in hunters and a doubledigit increase in anglers over the past five years. “Seeing more people fishing, hunting, and getting outdoors is great news for America’s economy and conservation heritage,” said Salazar. “Outdoor recreation and tourism are huge economic engines for local communities and the country, so it is vital that we continue to support policies and investments that help Americans get outside, learn to fish, or go hunting. That is why, through President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative, we have been focused on helping Americans rediscover the joys of casting a line, passing along family hunting traditions, and protecting the places they love.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation found that hunters nationwide

increased by nine percent while anglers grew by 11 percent. Nearly 38 percent of all Americans participated in wildlife-related recreation in 2011, an increase of 2.6 million participants from the previous survey in 2006. They spent $145 billion on related gear, trips and other purchases, such as licenses, tags and land leasing and ownership, representing one percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. “The Fish and Wildlife Service is dedicated to connecting people and families with nature,” said Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe. “We look forward to continuing to work with the States, non-governmental organizations, and additional partners to help keep recreational fishing, hunting, and wildlife watching going strong for people across America’s great outdoors.” Other key findings include: • In 2011, 13.7 million people, six percent of the U.S. population 16 years old and older, went hunting. They spent $34 billion on trips, equipment, licenses, and other items in 2011, an average of $2,484 per hunter.

• More than 33 million people 16 and older fished in 2011, spending $41.8 billion on trips, equipment, licenses, and other items, an average of $1,262 per angler. • More than 71 million people engaged in wildlife watching in 2011, spending $55 billion on their activities. At the request of state fish and wildlife agencies, the Fish and Wildlife Service has been conducting the national survey every five years since 1955. It is viewed as one of the nation’s most important wildlife-related recreation databases and the definitive source of information concerning participation and purchases associated with hunting, fishing and other forms of wildlife-related recreation nationwide. “State agencies, hunters and anglers are the key funders of fish and wildlife conservation through their license and gear purchases,” said Dr. Jonathan Gassett, Commissioner of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Resources Commission and President of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. “An increase in participation

and expenditure rates means that agencies can continue to restore and improve habitat and fish and wildlife species, bring more youth into the outdoors and provide even greater access to recreational activities.” The U.S. Census Bureau interviewed 48,627 households across the country to obtain samples of sportspersons and wildlife watchers for detailed interviews. Information was collected through computer-assisted telephone and in-person interviews. The Survey is funded through a Multi-State Conservation Grant from the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program, which celebrates 75 years of conservation success in 2012. The preliminary report is the first in a series that the Service will release. The next report of preliminary findings will contain State data and will be available in the coming months. In late November, the National Report with more detail participation and expenditure estimates will be available online. From December 2012 to May 2013, the 50 State reports will be released on a rolling basis.

Murley accepts Madison A.D. position Craig Murley, formerly of Henderson, has accepted the position of Athletic Director at Madison Academic High School in Jackson. Murley has coached baseball at

Madison for the past five years and he will continue to coach baseball and teach classes at Madison Academic. Steve Patterson, the former Athletic Director is also Craig

Murley’s first cousin. Coach Patterson will continue to coach girls’ basketball and teach. Murley’s parents are Celia and Rickey Murley of Henderson, and he is a Chester County high grad.

Going camping? Add carbon monoxide risk to precaution list As Tennesseans pack up and head out to their favorite campsites, the State Fire Marshal's Office urges campers to be aware of carbon monoxide dangers in and around tents and RVs. Carbon monoxide (CO), often called “the silent killer,” is an invisible, odorless gas created when fuels (such as kerosene, gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane) burn incompletely. Carbon monoxide can result from a number of camping equipment, such as including barbecue grills, portable generators or other fuel-powered devices. "Carbon monoxide levels from barbecue grills or portable generators can increase quickly in enclosed spaces," said State Fire Marshal Julie

Mix McPeak. "Campers should keep and use these items in well-ventilated areas to avoid fumes leaking into the openings or vents of RVs and tents.”

monoxide detector, which could have prevented the deaths, was found to have no batteries. As a result of this tragedy, rented RVs are

Important Carbon Monoxide-Poisoning Prevention Tips • Only use barbecue grills outside, away from all doors, windows, vents and other shelter openings. Lit or smoldering barbecue grills should never be taken inside a home, tent, or RV. • Never use a fuel-powered lantern or portable camping stove inside a home, tent or camper/RV. • Use portable generators outdoors in well-ventilated areas away from all doors, windows, vents and other building openings to prevent exhaust fumes from entering the home. • Install and maintain CO alarms inside homes, campers and RVs to provide early warning of carbon monoxide. Last September in Clarksville, five campers died in their sleep when fumes from a generator seeped into their rented RV. The RV’s carbon

now required by Tennessee law to have a functioning carbon monoxide detector before being leased for use. The bill, which went into effect in

July, also holds RV rental companies responsible if they fail to document and test the CO detectors in their leased vehicles. It is important to note that as this law only applies to rentals. It is still imperative that personal RV owners stay diligent in testing and changing the batteries of the carbon monoxide detectors in their own campers. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning may include headache, nausea and drowsiness. Extremely high levels of poisoning can be fatal, causing death within minutes. Anyone who suspects they are suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning should immediately move to a fresh air location and call 9-1-1 or the fire department.


Education

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Smith graduates from Union Two hundred three graduated from Union University July 28 during the summer commencement service of the 187th graduating class at West Jackson Baptist Church in Jackson. Among the graduates was Randy Smith of Henderson, who received a B.S. in Organizational Leadership. Barbara McMillin, former dean of instruction at Union and new president of Blue Mountain College, delivered the commencement address. She challenged graduates to pursue being first in a number of ways in their lives, whether such achievements earn recognition or not. “Be the first to welcome a new hire and offer to show her around the office,” McMillin said. “Be the first to volunteer to finish up so that a colleague can make it to his son’s baseball game. Rest assured that your kindness at work will be no less mood-altering than the discovery that someone has already picked up your Starbucks tab.” Union University is a liberal arts-based university affiliated with the Tennessee Baptist Convention. Founded in 1823, Union is the oldest institution affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention.

Aug - Nov. Dates announced for Chester Co. GED orientation Dates for the fall 2012 New Student Orientation for the Chester County GED program will be Aug. 27-28, Sept. 17-18, Oct. 3-4, and Nov. 5-6. The Orientations will be held from 8 a.m. until noon at the Henderson-Chester County Technology Center and is required to enroll in the program. For more information, email thomas.leach@ttcwhiteville.edu or call 989-9407.

By Nancy Connor Mrs. Bailey is teaching her class about conservation and money management through several proj-

ects. Her class is managing a recycling program for the school. At the end of the year Mrs. Bailey receives a check from Terra Cycle for the material collected. The money is used to buy items for the school and her classroom. You can help by saving chip bags, Capri-sun pouches, glue sticks, highlighters, dry erase markers, and toner/ink cartridges. Last year the

By Rosemary McKnight East Chester’s Parent-Teacher Organization kicked off its Membership Drive on Tuesday evening at its first PTO meeting. The officers are hoping many parents, grandparents, and friends of East Chester will participate by joining PTO. The Membership Drive continues through Aug. 31. Classes are competing to see who can recruit the most members. East Chester’s “special” teachers spoke at Tuesday’s PTO meeting. Parents were able to hear what their children will do and learn in classes such as computer, guidance, music, library, and special services. P.E. teachers asked parents to make sure their child wears tennis shoes to P.E. activities each day. Guidance classes have begun the year by talking about friendship. Students are learning how to be a good friend and how to give compli-

Middle School earned $91 on chip bags and Capri-sun pouches. For more information, visit http://www.terracycle.com /en-US/. Mrs. Bailey has also submitted a project at http://www.donorschoose. org/bbailey. This site allows visitors to vote on her project using Sonic’s Limeades for Learning or donations. Mrs. Bailey is hoping to get some science, math and language

Thursday, August 23, 2012

ments to one another. Mrs. Brandi Welch is the guidance counselor and meets with classes bi-weekly. Melinda Carroll has Accelerated Reader up and running smoothly. Students are already earning points as they read and take tests on books. Students attend library classes each week, but they may also check out books and take tests in the library each morning before 8 a.m. East Chester is proud to welcome its new preschool and kindergarten students. They have been busy learning routines and procedures. Lovely artwork is on display outside their classrooms. First grade students have been reviewing sight words they learned in kindergarten. They are learning to write in tablets and workbooks and have been working very hard to write numbers to 100. Ms. Wendy’s class has learned about animals during DEAR Time. Each student has a magazine such as Zoobooks, Ranger Rick, or Your Big Backyard. They look at the magazine, choose an animal, and then draw a picture and write a sentence about the animal. Did you know that rhino mothers are among the best in the animal world? They keep their young with them for years. Amy Tims’ first graders created ladybug dot patterns arrangements of numbers using pipe cleaners, google eyes, and construction paper. Second grade classes began

arts software for the smart board. CCMS has organized a school-wide event to sponsor “Kids Helping Kids.” Students are collection can tabs that Ronald McDonald House can recycle for money. Ronald McDonald House enables more than 600 families a year to stay free of charge, while their child is receiving care at St. Jude. While learning about

“Walk to Read” last week. Students were divided into groups based on the scores of their assessment done the first week of school. Groups meet with teachers to participate in the new Read Well program. First grade classes will begin “Walk to Read” this week. Third grade classes began the year with a unit on the Olympics. They learned about the ancient Olympics and compared and contrasted them with the modern Olympics. Becky Welch and Stacey Pruett taught their third grade students about plot, characters, and setting last week by using fairy tales. There are beanstalks on display in the third grade hallway to show these features from Jack and the Beanstalk. Teachers use many strategies to help students learn. One is Thinking Maps. Each class has created a Circle map to show what students know about a topic and the resources they used to learn about it. Some of the circle maps on display include definitions of multiple-meaning words, long “o-” words, Olympic facts, and facts about fairy tales and fables. Throughout the year, other Thinking Maps will be added to help students organize the material they learn. There is a lot of learning going on at East Chester! Come see for yourself.

plant and animal cells, students in Mrs. Bailey’s class made models of cells using Play-Doh. Other classes created illustrations or labeled cell organelles. Target is helping CCMS raise up to $10,000! You can vote for CCMS at https://givewith.target.co m . For every 25 votes, CCMS will receive at $25 gift card. The PTS support drive

and T-shirt sale is in full swing. Funds raised during the drive are used to provide equipment, technology, and supplies for CCMS. The drive continues through Sept. 5. Other dates to remember are, Aug. 25 – Community Outreach; Aug. 29 – Wildlife Show, 9 a.m. for fourth grade and 10:30 for fifth grade; Sept. 3 – No School; and Sept. 6 progress reports.

own the surf shop on the beach road, but I volunteer with the turtle watch group.” “Nice to meet you, Mr. Stuart. I’m looking forward to working with you and the rest of the volunteers. Let’s get this turtle on the table and see how we can help it,” Ann said, all business when faced

with a patient. She organized the volunteers to move the injured turtle from the cart to the exam table. The animal was large and heavy. Everyone in the room had to help lift or move the equipment around to get the job done. (Check back next week for more of this story.)

The Sea Turtle Rescue Chapter 3 - Face to Face By Eric Douglas (Last week ended with: “You’ll need to listen to me very closely. I don’t know what happened to this turtle. If it’s hurt too badly and I don’t think you should see it, I’ll tell you. If that happens, you’ll have to leave. All right?” ) (Check back next week for more of this story.) “Mom, how does a sea turtle get hurt?” Marie asked. “Was it a shark or something?” “Sweetheart, there are a bunch of things that can hurt a sea turtle. It could be a shark, but I doubt that’s what hurt this turtle. There’s no way of knowing until the turtle gets here, but it was probably hurt by people,” her mother answered as she got her tools ready. They were in the animal care section of the research center. It looked like a large hosp i t a l examination room, but was designed for animals from the sea. As a veterinarian, A n n w o u l d help out with sick animals, or, if they died unexpectedly, try to find out what killed them. The room had all the same equipment you would find in an exam room for people, except most of it was bigger. “You mean someone was mean to the turtle and

hurt it, like kicking it?” Jayne asked, beginning to get upset. She couldn’t understand why someone would be mean to an animal. “No, sweetheart. Most of the time, people don’t mean to hurt the turtles, they just do it by accident,” Ann said. The girls’ mother explained that sea turtles get hurt when they are hit by boat propellers. Sea turtles must come up to the surface to breathe, and if boaters aren’t paying attention, the turtles can get run over. Sometimes, they get caught in fishing line or nets and are trapped under water. The line wraps around their bodies and cuts them or makes it hard for them to swim. If they can’t get to the surface, the turtles drown. Other times, tur-

tles will eat plastic shopping bags floating in the water. Under water, plastic bags look just like jellyfish and sea turtles may swallow them, thinking the bags are food. When they swallow the bag, their

stomachs can get blocked and they get really sick. “That’s so sad, Mom,” Marie said, nearly ready to cry. “Why can’t we stop people from being mean?” “I don’t know, sweetheart. I don’t know,” Ann said. “That’s one of the things your daddy is here to do. We can work with the people around here to help him.” She turned when she saw someone walking into the office. “Hi Sofia, come on in. Thanks for coming over. I didn’t think you would have to start this soon, but I’m glad you could.” Jayne and Marie’s mom had just hired Sofia earlier in the day to be her veterinary assistant. “No problem, Ann. I’m happy to help. I hope you don’t mind that I brought my son along – he didn’t have any place to go on such short notice,” Sofia said. “I thought he might be interested in what’s happening. Don’t worry, though, I told him he would have to stay out of the way.” “Hi Javier,” both girls said, as the boy entered the room behind his mother. “Hi Jayne. Hi Marie. Wow, this place is cool.” Javier looked around wide?eyed at the lab. “You know each other?” the mothers asked at the same time, sounding like Jayne and Marie. “Sorry, Mom. We told Dad, but we didn’t get to tell you yet. Things got all messed up when the call about the turtle came in. We made a couple friends today when we were riding our bikes,” Jayne explained, looking from

Photo by Sammye Sanford

her mother to Javier. “He will be in my class at school,” Marie chimed in. “Sofia, obviously I don’t mind having Javier here – my girls are here and it’s good for the kids to be included. It seems like they’re already friends, anyway,” Ann said, laughing. “Now, if only Monique would show up, we’d all be here,” Jayne said, referring to the girl she’d met earlier in the day. “Then it’s a good thing I’m here,” Monique said, walking through the door with her dad. They were helping to pull in the cart with the turtle. Sea turtles can reach a thousand pounds or more and this one was several feet across and very heavy. Jayne and Marie’s dad was with them. “Hello, Dr. Andrews,” Monique’s father said, talking to Ann. “I had hoped we would get a chance to meet before something like this came up. I’m James Stuart. I


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

By Vicki Brower Kindergarten students began the new reading curriculum, “Read Well,” this week. They are continuing to learn about twodimensional shapes and color words. Their nursery rhyme for the week has been “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” and they created their own shiny star to display. First grade also began “Read Well” this week, which got off to a great start as well. Ms. Michelle and Ms. Susan would like parents to remember to please remember to check their child’s folder each Monday for the sight word list. They also wanted everyone to know that they enjoyed Open House Thursday night and appreciate all who attended! Our second grade

By Ally Rogers All Junior High students participated in taking the STAR Assessment in both reading and math last week. Students will be given the STAR Assessment several times throughout this school year so they can see personal gains and monitor their educational growth. The goals from this first assessment were met and exceeded! Because of this, students have earned a “blue jeans” day on Friday! The CCJHS Eagles football team faced Bolivar last Thursday night at home. Both JV and the Varsity team were defeated; however, they played well. They will play against University School of Jackson on Thursday, Aug. 23 at the USJ stadium in Jackson. The JV games will begin at 5:30 p.m. and Varsity at 6:30 p.m. Come and support our Eagles! The girls’ soccer team

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary and Chester County Middle School *Milk choice offered daily Monday, August 27 Country fried steak/roll Hotdog Mashed potatoes Black-eyed peas Salad, pineapple Tuesday, August 28 Lemon Pepper Chicken Or Ham sandwich Green beans, roll Glazed sweet potatoes Salad, watermelon Wednesday, August 29 Philly Steak or Grilled chicken patty/bun Corn, salad, peaches Sandwich trimmings Baby carrots/Ranch dip Thursday, August 30 Baked ham or Maxwrap Pinto beans, baked apples Mustard greens, cornbread Baked apples Salad, mandarin oranges Friday, August 31

teachers are also working hard to get the new reading curriculum implemented into their daily schedule. It is a work in progress, but Ms. Nancy and Ms. Vicki feel that it will be very beneficial in advancing their students in reading. Also, Ms. Nancy and Ms. Vicki were very pleased with the turnout at Open House and very much appreciate all those that were able to attend. In Ms. Hayley’s third grade class, students learned how to count money and make change. On Friday, students earned “money” throughout the day. That afternoon, students shopped in the class store and were able to show off their ability to count money and make change. Students were also prompted to write about being principal for a day. Some of the responses that made her smile were those such as, Christian Valdez and Garrett Tubbs who both

wrote, “I will allow teachers to have a day off.” Tannah Hill wrote, “There would be only one rule and that is to HAVE FUN!” Carley Hopper wrote, “I would sing over the intercom!” Of course, just about each student mentioned extending lunch and P.E! Mrs. Amber Murley’s third grade class is busy reading different fairy tales and retelling stories. The class read “Jack and the Beanstalk” and is observing beans growing in a plastic bag with a wet paper towel. They are studying place value and learning a song called “The Place Value Line.” Some important dates to remember are as follows: Aug. 23 - Picture Day; Aug. 27 - Fall Fundraiser begins; Sept. 3 - No School due to Labor Day; Sept. 6 - Progress Reports; Sept. 10 - PSO meeting at 6:30; Sept. 11 PSO membership drive begins; and Sept. 25 - PSO Membership drive ends.

played their first game on Monday, Aug. 20 at Lexington, and will play their first home game on Aug. 23 against Jackson Christian. We had a very important meeting of our Eagle’s Nest parent association on Tuesday evening. I know that schedules are very busy this time of year and we really appreciated attendance. Those attending were able to hear a few words from Coach Eads about what the Eagle’s Nest does and were able to tour the school. If you have any questions, feel free to call the office at 989-8135. Individual sports (football, softball, cheer and soccer) and team pictures will be made on Wednesday, Aug. 22. Make sure students are sent with their uniform for the pictures, if this applies to your student. These, like the individual school pictures, will be pre-pay and forms were sent home earlier this week. Individual TCAP score sheets were passed out to students on Wednesday. Teachers went over the results with them. Ask

your student to see his or her sheet, as well. Powerade is giving us a chance to win $10,000 for sports gear for our CCJHS Eagle teams. This money can help our school get the equipment we need for students-like balls, helmets, goals, and more. All you have to do is, after purchasing Powerade or Coca-Cola products, look under the top for a code. Go to the website www.mycokerewards.com/ schools to enter the codes and receive points. Select the sweepstakes choose CCJHS and it will donate three points to our school! Check out our website: w w w. c h e s t e r c o u n tyschools.org. This website has been updated and will be an excellent resource for all parents and students. It contains links to teacher emails, lunch menus, sports schedules and much more! Progress Reports will go out on Thursday, Sept. 6. Ask your child to see his/hers If you have questions, or want to talk to a particular teacher about your child’s grade, please call or email to find out the best time to meet with them.

Pizza or Chicken fajita wrap Baked sweet potato puffs California blend Salad, banana

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, August 27 Country fried steak/roll Hotdog Mashed potatoes, salad Black-eyed peas, pineapple Tuesday, August 28 Lemon Pepper Chicken Or Ham sandwich Green beans, roll Glazed sweet potatoes Salad, watermelon Wednesday, August 29 Philly Steak or Grilled chicken patty/bun Corn, sandwich trimmings Baby carrots/Ranch dip Salad, peaches Thursday, August 30 Baked ham or Maxwrap Pinto beans, cornbread Mustard greens Baked apples Salad, mandarin oranges Friday, August 31 Pizza or Chicken fajita wrap Baked sweet potato puffs California blend Salad, applesauce

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Also, Stuffed crust pizza served as pizza choice each day Monday, August 27 Chicken nuggets/roll Pizza/salad Boxed salad (ham) Mashed potatoes, peas Glazed carrots, salad Tuesday, August 28 Taco (2 lines) Pizza/Salad Chef salad box (Chicken fajita) Fiesta rice, brown beans Sweet potato, trimmings Wednesday, August 29 Chicken tetrazzini/roll Pizza/Salad Salad box (Tuna) Corn, Green beans, salad Thursday, August 30 Barbecue/bun Corndog, Pizza/Salad Salad box (Turkey and pickle wrap) Barbecue beans, slaw Sweet potato puffs, Salad Friday, August 31 Beef/Mac casserole Clux Delux/roll Salad box (Ham/turkey) Collard greens, cornbread Black-eyed peas Squash casserole, salad

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Chester County School Bus Safety Procedures Boarding/Leaving the bus 1. Students may expect to walk some distance to a bus stop as required by the local Board regulations. 2. Arrive at the bus stop shortly before the bus arrives. Be on time at all designated stops. 3. Form an orderly line well back from the roadway. 4. Avoid “horseplay” and making excessive noises. 5. Wait in a safe place, clear of traffic and away from where the bus stops. 6. Do not damage property such as flowers, shrubbery, windows, fences and other items. 7. Do not place books, clothing, or other articles in the roadway. 8. Wait until the bus has come to a complete stop before attempting to enter or leave the bus. 9. Enter the bus in an orderly manner and go directly to an available or assigned seat. 10. Enter and leave the bus only at the front door, except in the case of an emergency. 11. Students who must cross the

By Misty Hall West Chester kindergarten and first grade teachers are becoming familiar with the latest technology in the classroom. Smart boards, like giant touch screen monitors, were purchased and installed by the county over the summer in all of the Kindergarten and first grade classrooms. These great additions to the classroom are getting children, and teachers, excited about the new school year. We want to say thank you to Mrs. Pipkin and the school board for our Smart boards. Kindergarten teachers have noticed many more students walking down to the classrooms each morning on their own. We love to see such well behaved and independent boys and girls coming in ready to learn! Kindergarten students will begin computer class this week with Ms. Renee where they will begin to work on reading and math skills while having fun at the same time. First graders have been busy reviewing kindergarten skills. They are also practicing writing from 0 to 120. First grade parents, please make sure your child remembers letters/sounds, color words, number words, and can

street at a bus stop shall not do so until they receive a signal from the bus driver. When crossing a street is necessary, it shall always be done in front of the bus far enough ahead of the bus so that the driver may adequately observe the rider. This means that students shall be able to see the face of the driver. The driver shall hold his bus with warning lights flashing until the crossing has been completed. Never cross in the back of the bus. 12. Students are permitted to leave the bus only at their assigned stops at home or at school. Leaving the bus at other stops shall require proper authorization as stated in Board policy. No unauthorized stops will be made. General Information 1. Inform the driver when absence is expected from school. 2. All students are to obey the principals and teachers at each school their bus serves. Any student who, in any manner of conduct, disobeys any school official on any school ground or shows disrespect for school property or equipment shall be subject to disciplinary action.

write from 0 to 120. Some also need to work on tying shoes! The first grade teachers have been very busy preparing for “Walk to Read.” Every first grade student has been assessed and placed in the appropriate reading unit. The classes had “Walk to Read” practice all last week and have started the real thing this week! The Read Well program was discussed at Parent Orientation and several notes have gone home regarding this. Teachers look forward to utilizing this new program and seeing much gain in our students reading abilities this year! In second grade math, students are working on FLUENTLY adding and subtracting. Parents please practice math facts with your child at home as well. Teachers are also noticing lots of talented artists this year in second grade! This will come in handy when illustrating stories that are written as part of the new Common Core standards. Second graders at West have also begun “Walk to Read” in the Read Well program and are doing a great job! Children and teachers are enjoying becoming acquainted with each other across the grade level. Library classes and AR testing have begun for second grade and the students are sending a friendly challenge to the third grade students: “We are going to read more books and pass more tests than you!” Watch out, third grade, because the second graders are going to keep

you on your toes this year! Our new read-well program is something totally different than has ever been done in the past with elementary age students. We are grateful to have such wonderful aides and interventionists to help us on our journey to reading success. Thank you Mrs. Phyllis, Mrs. Jennifer, Mrs. Shana, Ms. Sherri and Ms. Stephanie! We couldn’t get through without you! During the first few weeks of school, all teachers have the want, and need, to teach our children about getting along with each other. Fortunately, we never have to do this alone because Ms. Brandi, our guidance counselor, is here to help! Right now, she is talking with the classes about what it means to be a good friend. She is helping students to answer the questions “What do good friends do?” and “How can I be a good friend to someone else?” If you ever see Ms. Brandi, be sure to tell her thank you for all she does for our school! Parents, please remember to take care of your child’s transportation arrangements prior to the school day if possible and send a note in your child’s folder. If you have an emergency and something changes during the day, the office would love to get your call before 2 p.m. We are doing our best to get your child home safely and your help and cooperation is needed and greatly appreciated! Have a fantastic week West Chester Family!


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

FOR SALE FOR SALE – 5 Acres —$18,000 —- $200 Down —- $200 / Month. 10 Acres —- $34,000 — - $350 Down —- $350 / Month. Driveway, Dozer Work Done, Light Poles. No Restrictions and NO CREDIT CHECK. Jacks Creek Area —- 731-989-4859. (TFC) LAND FOR SALE – AUCTION ~ Thursday, September 6 at 6 p.m. 26 Acres in 2 Tracts w/ 30 x 40 Building, Grass, Trees on Parkburg Road, Medon, Tennessee. 10% Buyers Premium. Heritage Auction & Real Estate Inc., TFL #4556. 731-925-3534, www.tonyneill.com (18C) FOR SALE – 231 Massey Ferguson Tractor, Very Low Hours, $8,000. 6 Ft. Big Bee Finish Mower, $500. 6 Ft. Box Blade, $275. Call 989-5044. (16P) LAND FOR SALE – 5 Acres in Mifflin Area. Call 983-2766. (TFC) FOR SALE – Pit Bull Puppies, 7 Weeks Old, S & W, $50 Each. Both Parents On Site. Call 6080228 or 608-0860. (16C) FOR SALE – Large Macaw Bird, 7 Years Old w/ Cage, Talks, Very Friendly. $600. 608-0860. (16C) LOTS FOR SALE – $3,900 Each, Three Wooded 1-Acre Lots on Sand Mountain Road. No Restrictions. Call Debbie Jones at 731-608-1572 with Hart Realty at 731-989-9150. (16C) FOR SALE – 27 Ft. Holiday Rambler Camper. Good Condition. $3,500. Call 731-6880008. (16P) LAND FOR SALE – 2.2 Acres on Clarks Creek Road. $7,900. Call 731-608-2228. (17C) LAND FOR SALE – 5 Acres on Taylor Trail near Chickasaw. Owner Financing. Call 731-6082228. (17C) FOR SALE – King bedroom suite tall posted in good condition. Call 879-0254. (16P) FOR SALE OR TRADE – Black, Gentle Pleasure Walking Stallion, By WGC, Beautiful, Only $650, Tony Neill, Savannah 7 3 1 - 9 2 6 - 3 1 3 3 , www.tonyneill.com (16C)

HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE ~ $39,900 in Pinson, 1987 Mobile Home, 2 BR with 10 x 20 covered back porch and 30 x 30 wired shop on 1 acre. Call Debbie Jones at 731-608-1572 with Hart Realty at 731-989-9150. (16C) FOR SALE ~ 16 x 80, 3 BR, 3 BA, 24 x 32 Garage, 12 x 24 Workshop, 2.84 Acres. Chester County Schools. $80,000 OBO. Call 988-5033. (16P)

FOR SALE by OWNER ~ Brick, 3 BR, 2 BA, Open Floor Plan on 1.6 Acres. Must See To Appreciate. For More Details Call 731-989-7993 or 731-343-1367. (17P) FOR SALE ~ 4 BR, 2 ½ BA on 6 Acres, Double Carport, 40 x 40 Shop with CH/A, Above Ground Pool, Jacuzzi, CH/A. In Chester County School District, 4.2 Miles From School. $160,000 As Is. Call 731-697-9024. (16P) FOR SALE – 1999 Model Doublewide. 1,512 Sq. Ft., 3 BR, 2 BA, Kitchen Appliances, CHA. Must be Moved. $30,000. Call 731-608-0875. (16P) ANNIVERSARY SALE Who said you couldn’t buy a new home in the 20’s anymore! New, 2 Bedroom Homes Starting at $25,950. New, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Homes Starting at $29,950. VOTED BEST OF SHOW —Spacious 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath $44,500. All Homes Delivered & Setup on your Lot with Central Air. Hurry! Limited number at these prices. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER OF CORINTH. Hwy 72 West —- ¼ Mile West of Hospital. (TFC) SUMMER SIZZLER – New 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Energy Star Home, Vinyl Siding / Shingle Roof, 2” x 6” Wall Studs, Thermo Pane Windows, Heat Pump, Appliances, Underpinning, Delivered & Setup On Concrete Piers. ONLY $29,995! WINDHAM HOMES 1-888-287-6996. (TFC)

HELP WANTED NEED EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPER ~ Must have very recent franchise hotel experience, at least 3 years with proper references. Must apply in person between 10 a.m. & 3 p.m. No Phone Calls, Please. Americana Inn ~ 550 Sanford St. ~ Henderson, TN 38340. (17C)

FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT – 3 BR, 1 ½ BA. 450 Baughn St. With Stove & Refrigerator. $475 / Month. $300 Deposit. No Pets. References Required. 989-2631 (days) or 989-4296 (evenings). (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 to 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2-Car Garage. 3,500 Heated Square Feet. $850 / Month. No Pets. Call 731-989-0371. (16P) FOR RENT – Two bedroom duplex. New paint, carpet, tile. 429B Steed. $450 / month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Retail / office space. 1950 sq. ft. $800; 1250 sq. ft. $525. United Country Realty office building. 989-7488. (TFC) HOUSE FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 Bath, CHA, Stove, Refrigerator & Dishwasher, Fenced Yard, Inside

City Limits. 733 Sand Ave. $650 / Month. $400 Deposit. Call 731435-9154. (16P)

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FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, CHA, oak cabinets, washer, dryer. $425 / month. 367 University. 989-7488. (TFC)

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FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $390 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC)

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FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – Efficiency, One Bedroom Apartment. Stove, Refrigerator Furnished. Prefer Single Male or Female Occupant. Call 989-9378. (16P) FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. $1,500. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 ½ bath house. 463 Woods. $650 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 1 BR Apartment, Pleasant Area, No Pets. $370 / Month. $370 Deposit. Call 8799119. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex, Excellent Condition, 1 Year Lease, No Pets. 983-2766. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, garage, appliances, fenced yard, near Chickasaw. 180 Taylor Trail. $550 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom, office, storage, 2 acres. $550 / month. 340 Patterson. 989-7488. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS OUR HAUSS ~ 2446 Beech Bluff Rd. 731-506-4007. Booth Rental ~ Consignment ~ Antiques, Collectibles, Furniture, Jewelry, New Mattress Sets ~ New Items Arriving Daily! (16P) ROACHES? Use Harris All Natural Roach Traps. Guaranteed. First Farmers Coop. 731-9894621. (16P)

STATEWIDES SEEKING HIGHLY MOTIVATED INDEPENDENT distributors to market our full line of premium products. Training provided. Apply today at: www.amsoilOnlineStore.com (click opportunity link), Or info@amsoilonlinestore.com, Call 615-962-7344 (TnScan) BUY GOLD & SILVER Coins 1 percent over dealer cost For a limited time, Park Avenue Numismatics is selling Silver and Gold American Eagle Coins at 1 percent over dealer cost. 1-888665-7444 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $99.00. Includes name change and property settle-

NO HASSLE NO GIMMICK Pricing! We Have New & Used Homes. Come by Clayton Homes of Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) GUN SHOW AUGUST 25-26 Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-4 Hendersonville Expo Center (90 Volunteer Dr) Buy-Sell-Trade. Info: (563) 927-8176 (TnScan) L I V E - W O R K - T R AV E L PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-251-0768 (TnScan) WANTED: LIFE AGENTS; EARN $500 a Day; Commissions Paid Daily; Leads, No Cold Calls; Health & Dental Ins.; Complete Training; Guidance in Obtaining License Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) FedEx GROUND CONTRACTOR SEEKING Team Drivers or Individual Team Drivers: * No Touch Freight * All Drop & Hook. Must have CDL license and OTR experience. Call 901-3011395 (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! Call for pre-hire now! 1888-407-5172 (TnScan) ATTN: DRIVERS FREIGHT UP = More $$$ New Pay Package New KW Conventionals Need CDL Class A Driving Exp 877-

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 23, 2012

Public Notices SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on September 27, 2012 at 12:00PM local time, at the south door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Raymond Daniel, an unmarried man, to David W. Camp, Trustee, as trustee for EquiPrime, Inc. on December 5, 2001 at Record Book 208, Page 184; conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP having been appointed Substitute or Successor Trustee, all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of said Deed of Trust and the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable. Party Entitled to Enforce the Debt: Owner of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, NA The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder: Described property located at Chester, County, Tennessee, to wit: Beginning at a stake in the Western margin of Casey Road, this being the Southeast corner of Joe Allen as described in a Warranty Deed recorded in Deed Book 71, page 30, of the Deed Records of Chester County, Tennessee; thence in a Westerly direction with the Southern boundary line of Joe Allen (Deed Book 71, page 30) 315 feet to a stake; thence in a Southerly direction 105 feet to a stake; thence 315 feet in an Easterly direction to a stake in the Western margin of Casey Road; thence in a Northern direction with the margin of Casey Road 105 feet to the point of beginning. LOCATED UPON THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY is a 1998 Indies 64 x 28 manufactured home, Serial Number AL2864-198-1379AB, which is believed to be permanently affixed to said property. Street Address: 320 Casey Road (Per Deed of Trust), 2375 Dry Creek Road (Per Tax Assessor), Pinson, Tennessee 38366 Parcel Number: 029-002.04 Current Owner(s) of Property: Raymond W. Daniel The street address of the above described property is believed to be 320 Casey Road (Per Deed of Trust), 2375 Dry Creek Road (Per Tax Assessor), Pinson, Tennessee 38366, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the HB 3588 letter mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid taxes; and any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory right of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid taxes; and any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory right of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: SALE IS SUBJECT TO A 1998 INDIES 64 X 28 MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL NUMBER AL2864-198-1379AB, IS BELIEVED TO BE PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY. IT SHALL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PURCHASER TO UNDERTAKE ANY AND ALL LEGAL STEPS NECESSARY TO OBTAIN THE TITLE TO SAID MOBILE HOME. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twentyfour (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded by the Substitute Trustee at any time. This office may be a debt collector. This may be an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP 555 Perkins Road Extended, Second Floor Memphis, TN 38117 Phone (901)767-5566 Fax (901)761-5690 File No. 11-016365

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated December 15, 2009, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded December 22, 2009, at Book 335, Page 425 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County,

Tennessee, executed by Melissa Burcham a/k/a Melissa K. Burcham and Carl Burcham a/k/a Carl G. Burcham, conveying certain property therein described to Carter Stanfill and Associates as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Dover Mortgage Company and Dover Mortgage Company’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on September 13, 2012 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning on a spike in the center of Mt. Pleasant road, said spike being the new Northwest corner of the lot herein described and further located 453.01 feet as measured along the centerline of Mt. Pleasant road form a spike in the center of Mt. Pleasant road begin a original Northwest corner of the tract of which this is a part; thence South 01 degrees 33 minutes 55 seconds West 25.01 feet to an iron pin near the South right of way margin of Mt. Pleasant road; thence with a new severance line, South 01 degrees 33 minutes 50 seconds West 447.28 feet to an iron pin set to be the new Southwest corner of the lot herein described; thence with a new severance line, South 88 degrees 26 minutes 10 seconds East 160.32 feet to an iron pin set to be the new Southeast corner of the lot herein described; thence with a new severance line, North 01 degrees 33 minutes 50 seconds East 432.89 feet to an iron pin near the South right of way margin of Mt. Pleasant road; thence North 01 degrees 33 minutes 50 seconds East 25.44 feet to a spike in the center of Mt. Pleasant road being the new Northeast corner of the lot herein described; thence with the center of Mt. Pleasant road 50 foot right of way North 77 degrees 42 minutes 31 seconds West 86.90 feet and South 89 degrees 52 minutes 11 seconds West 74.97 feet back to the point of beginning being known as Lot 3, Phase 2, of the Hornsby Estates. ALSO KNOWN AS: 90 River Lane, Beech Bluff, Tennessee 38313 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Melissa Burcham a/k/a Melissa K. Burcham; Carl Burcham a/k/a Carl G. Burcham The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700204854

the southwest corner of the Frank Rowsey land and in the east boundary line of Sanford; runs thence north 88 degrees and 34’ east passing the power line at 555.50 feet or in all 591.50 feet to a stake in the west margin of Hughes graveled road, 20 feet west from the center of the same; runs thence with the west margin of said graveled road as follows: south 8 degrees and 26’ east 64.70 feet; south 1 degree and 17’ east 89.30 feet; south 10 degrees and 43’ west 82.10 feet to a stake in the western margin of said road; runs thence north 79 degrees west 611.50 feet to a stake in the east boundary line of Sandford with Cherry pointers; thence north 6 degrees and 44’ east 103.30 feet to the place of beginning, containing 2.35 acres, be the same more or less (acreage not warranted). Said legal description is the same description as contained in the previous deed of record. THERE MAY BE A MANUFACTURED HOME LOCATED UPON THE ABOVE- DESCRIBED PROPERTY WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT BE PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID PROPERTY. IN THE EVENT IT IS DETERMINED THAT THE MANUFACTURED HOME IS NOT PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE PROPERTY, IT SHALL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PURCHASER TO UNDERTAKE ANY AND ALL LEGAL STEPS NECESSARY TO OBTAIN TITLE TO SAID MANUFACTURED HOME. Street Address: 1785 Hughes Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 Parcel Number: 054-039.00 Current Owner(s) of Property: Rhonda Cheryl Wilson The street address of the above described property is believed to be 1785 Hughes Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the HB 3588 letter mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid taxes; and any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory right of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat any unpaid taxes; and any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory right of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded by the Substitute Trustee at any time. This office may be a debt collector. This may be an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP 555 Perkins Road Extended, Second Floor Memphis, TN 38117 Phone (901)767-5566 Fax (901)761-5690 File No. 12-034241

August 16,2012 :

WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on October 30, 2012 at 12:00PM local time, at the south door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Rhonda Cheryl Wilson, married, to Arnold M. Weiss, Esq., Trustee, as trustee for Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc on August 8, 2003 at Record Book 238, Page 743; conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP having been appointed Substitute or Successor Trustee, all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of said Deed of Trust and the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable. Party Entitled to Enforce the Debt: Owner of Debt: Wells Fargo Bank, NA The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder: Described property located at Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: Beginning at a stake with two hickory and one dogwood pointers,

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on April 22, 2005, BRENDA SMITH (DECEASED), by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 267, at Page 308, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Sixty Three Thousand Six Hundred Nine and 70/100 Dollars ($63,609.70), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointment executed on September 22, 2011, and recorded in Record Book 354, at Page 277, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MIDAMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Thursday, September 6, 2012, at 2:15 o’clock p.m., said

property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situate in the 5th Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, bounded and described as follows; to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin set in the centerline of dirt road, which point is the most western southwest corner of Max Lott as recorded in Deed Book 65, Page 683, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence, from the point of beginning, and on new lines through Casey, the following calls; north 80° 14? 32? west 210.00 feet to an iron pin set; north 04° 56? 44? east 210.00 feet to an iron pin set, south 80° 14? 32? east 210.00 feet to an iron pin set in the west line of Lott, thence, with Lott, south 04° 56? 44? west 210.00 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1.0 acres, as surveyed by Advanced Land Surveying, Inc., R.L.S. #1999. Also conveyed hereunder is a ten foot (10’) perpetual non-exclusive easement for ingress, egress, installation and maintenance of utilities described as follows: BEGINNING at the southwest corner of the above described tract, and the following calls being the north side of said easement; south 80° 14? 32? east 414.27 feet; north 89° 18? 55? west 97.68 feet; south 67° 53? 57? east 84.02 feet; south 36° 51? 37? east 91.47 feet to the centerline of Max Lott Lane. (Description taken from prior deed of record) It being the same property as that described in a Quitclaim Deed from David E. Boggs and wife, Amanda G. Boggs, to Brenda Smith, dated March 28, 2005, and of record in Deed Book 266, page 40, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Brenda Smith died on December 14, 2010, intestate, and under the laws of descent and distribution her property passed to her heirs at law, namely; James Hulon Smith, James Anthony Smith and Amanda Gail Boggs, identified in the Affidavit of Heirship of record in Record Book 356, at page 422, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, James Hulon Smith and James Anthony Smith conveyed their interest in the property to Amanda Gail Boggs and husband, David E. Boggs. Amanda Gail Boggs created an estate by the entireties with her husband, David E. Boggs, in her one-third (1/3rd) interest by a conveyance of record in Record Book 356, at page 426, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Said property is now owned by Amanda Gail Boggs and husband, David E. Boggs. Map 010, Parcel 031.03 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 105 Max Lott Lane, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 16th day of August, 2012. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on April 27, 2007, STEVE D. GARDNER, (unmarried) by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 299, at Page 766, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Fifty Eight Thousand Five Hundred and 00/100 Dollars ($58,500.00), payable to Farm Credit Services of MidAmerica, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointment executed on July 31, 2012, and recorded in Record Book 364, at Page 199, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MIDAMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Thursday, September 6, 2012, at 2:00 o’clock p.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder can-

not pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situated in the 1st Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, and as described in a Warranty Deed from Timothy Pearson to Steve D. Gardner, dated November 4, 1995, and of record in Record Book 141, page 393, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Map 063, Parcel 021.01 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 290 Lancaster Rd., Enville, Tennessee 38322, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 16th day of August, 2012. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE`S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated October 13, 2005, executed by HARRY RUSH AND RESA RUSH, conveying certain real property therein described to CTC REAL ESTATE SERVICES, as Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee recorded October 21, 2005, in Deed Book 275, Page 254265; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-17 who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose, if required pursuant to T.C.A. § 35-5117, was given in accordance with Tennessee law; and WHEREAS, the undersigned,Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on September 6, 2012 at 11:00 AM at the Main Entrance steps of the Chester County Courthouse , located in Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF PINE TOP ROAD, WHICH POINT IS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEONARD RUSH AS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 65, PAGE 611, REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE AND THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE , FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND WITH THE CENTERLINE OF PINE TOP ROAD, THE FOLLOWING CALLS: SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 53.32 FEET; SOUTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 176.72 FEET; SOUTH 15 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 531.14 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A DITCH; THENCE, WITH THE CENTERLINE OF SAID DITCH, NORTH 67 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 214.01 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE, ON A NEW LINE THROUGH RUSH, NORTH 06 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 694.97 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF RUSH; THENCE, WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF RUSH, SOUTH 83 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 287.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 4.38 ACRES. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO HARRY RUSH BY DEED RECORDED IN BOOK 174, PAGE 181 IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. Parcel ID: 83-14.03 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 220 HURST RD, HENDERSON, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): HARRY RUSH OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: ASSET ACCEPTANCE LLC RESA RUSH The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a

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fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38103 www.rubinlublin.com/propertylistings.php Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness and obligations secured by a certain Deed of Trust on property currently owned by JOHNNY MARTIN and wife, RACHEL MARTIN, and which Deed of Trust was executed by Johnny Martin and wife, Rachel Martin, to Anthony R. Steele, Trustee for Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., and is recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 330, page 500. WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by instrument recorded in Record Book 364, page 200, in said Register’s Office. WHEREAS, the owner of the indebtedness has declared the total amount due and has directed the undersigned to advertise and sell the property described by said Deed of Trust; THEREFORE, this is to give notice that I will on September 7, 2012, commencing at 10:00 a.m., at the Front Door of the Courthouse in Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee cause to be offered for sale and will cause to be sold at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: Said property is known as 90 Walter Willis Lane, Jackson, Tennessee. For a more complete description of said property see Trust Deed recorded in Record Book 330, Page 500, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Included in this Foreclosure Sale is a 2009 Heartlander Clayton Mobile Home, SER#CAP023761TNAB. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. R. Bradley Sigler Substitute Trustee 218 West Main Street Jackson, TN 38301

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE CLIFTON REEVES, ANTHONY MOODY, PLAINTIFFS VS. ALLISON LEE ARNOLD, DEFENDANT NO. 2012-CV-591, AT HENDERSON ORDER OF PUBLICATION AFFIDAVIT OF PLAINTIFF It appearing from the motion, which is sworn to, that the Defendant, Allison Lee Arnold is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee and that personal service of process cannot be had upon him; it is therefore ordered that publication be made for four (4) consecutive weeks in the Chester County Independent, a weekly paper published in Chester County, Tennessee requiring the said Defendant to defend a civil action by filing his answer with the Clerk and Master, and by servicing a copy of the answer on Larry F. McKenzie, Attorney for Plaintiffs, whose address is P.O. Box 97, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 within thirty (30) days from the date of the last publication of this notice, not including the date of the last publication. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you and this cause set down for public hearing ex parte as to you. Signed the 25th day of July, 2012. Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master


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Chester County Independent 08-23-12