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Chester County Serial story: Sea Turtle Rescue, 4-B B

Thursday

AUGUST 16, 2012

Independent

148th YEAR - NO. 15

chestercountyindependent.com

$1.00

Commission divided: Property tax increase passes By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Chester County Commission approved the 2012-2013 budget on its final reading Monday night during a special called meeting. The hotly contested budget calls for property tax increase of 35 cents, bringing Chester County property taxes to $2.52 per $100. During the July 12 meeting, commissioners, feeling pressure from a packed house, voted to raise the wheel tax. After the vote was approved, a petition for a referendum made its way through the county and was approved well before the Aug. 10 deadline. A referendum on the November ballot means that the new wheel tax rate cannot be collected until January – provided voters approve the tax at the polls. That, unfortunately, does not solve the county’s immediate financial woes, and the new property tax can be collected immediately, allowing Chester County to balance its

proposed budget for the current year. Not all commissioners were happy with the budget or the tax hike. “We can’t tell our elected officials they have to lay off people, but we can tell them that they have to cut a certain amount [from their budget],” said Commissioner Joe Melaro. “We [the budget committee] shared the opinion on several occasions that we needed to pursue significant cuts.” Commissioner Larry Blackstock disagreed, stating that the budget committee was never unanimous about requesting that offices make substantial cuts after officials brought in paperwork demonstrating a need to continue working with the same amount of county funding. Melaro lamented the fact that the budget committee could not reach a unanimous agreement See TAXES, Page 3-A

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Following the county commission meeting Monday, commissioners were still hotly debating the 20122013 budget and the increase of property taxes. Although the tax passed, commissioners were divided over how to fix the county’s budget woes.

Good news for schools: District shows overall improvement in end of year exams By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Members of Chester County School Board met in a special called session on Thursday, Aug. 9, to discuss results from the 2011-2012 TCAPs and end of year exams, and to also schedule School Board meetings for the 2012-2013 school year. Supervisor Randle Fenimore

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

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attended the meeting to explain the data from the end of year exams and to discuss the areas where Chester County schools have improved and where they must continue to work harder. Fenimore told the board that he wanted to “share some good news” about the school district’s progress this year, and he added that the overall district achievement was “outstanding.” Superintendent of Education Cherrie Pipkin concurred with Fenimore, stating, “Our students did extremely well, and our teachers did a great job preparing them.” In the past Chester County has struggled to meet the achievement milestones outlined by No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Since Tennessee adopted the NCLB waiver, struggling districts have had an opportunity to catch up without penalization, and while Chester County still has gaps that need to be closed and subjects that require more work, students across the county showed significant improvement on the most recent set of tests. For many years, Chester County Schools distinguished themselves in Language Arts while Math and Science lagged behind other schools in the state. A recent push to improve

math scores demonstrated significant improvement in overall math scores, and math scores have now surpassed scores for language arts. Students in Algebra I are now almost 70 percent proficient, Fenimore stated, and the results in that area demonstrate “wonderful progress”; however, the improvement is not statistically significant because the minority population did not make the same gains as the white population taking Algebra I. Chester County students scored near the middle of Tennessee students in language arts and science, but Fenimore stated that U.S. history was the county’s weakest showing, with Chester County ranking 94th out of 122 districts taking the U.S. history exam. In grades 3-8, Fenimore said that Chester County has made significant progress with African American students in math, and he added that the district now has enough Hispanic students that their minority group counts in the statistical findings. Two areas that Chester County can be extremely proud of is that the district ranked fifth out of 138 districts with students who are proficient in math in grades 6 through 8, and See SCHOOL, Page 2-A

Paul Edward Martin Jr. charged with aggravated 2012 BBQ Festival information released rape, aggravated kidnapping and carjacking TODAY’S WEATHER

Paul Edward Martin Jr., 23, of Jackson was arrested Friday, Aug. 10, and charged with the aggravated kidnapping, aggravated rape and carjacking of a Henderson woman. Martin turned himself in to authorities on Friday morning. Allegedly, Martin requested a ride from the victim but after traveling from North Carolina Street to Second Street Extended, he reportedly held the woman at gunpoint demanding that she remove her underwear. Martin then allegedly robbed the woman, taking her purse and her vehicle. The car was later found on

PAUL EDWARD MARTIN JR. Third Street. Martin is being held in the

Chester County jail in lieu of $200,000 bond.

The 35th Annual Chester County BBQ Festival is Sept. 27-29, 2012 in downtown Henderson. The BBQ Selling Pit sponsored by Henderson Stamping and Production will be open from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27 – Friday, Sept. 28, and from 10 a.m. until sell out on Saturday, Sept. 29. The Kimberlie Helton Band will perform on the Chester County Bank Stage on the courthouse lawn at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29. The Thomas Media Youth Talent Show will be at 7 p.m. See BBQ, Page 16-A


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

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School Chester County also ranked first for improvement in grades 3 through 8 science, rising 14 percent since 2010-2011. Like U.S. history, social studies continues to lag, but this year teachers will begin using social studies to teach reading at lower grades, providing an extra opportunity for students to practice the skills that are covered on the end of year test. Despite the growth and success Chester County students have achieved, Pipkin added that it won’t be possible to keep up the same rate of growth and improvement in future years. “We’re going to be graded on closing the gaps, and we’re struggling to move our subgroups up,” she said. Pipkin added that the school system intends to implement a kindergarten readiness program to help

students who aren’t quite ready for kindergarten have a year prior to kindergarten to mature and prepare without holding them back from their peers. She hopes that the program will bring in students who are ready to learn and unhindered by a poor performance in a regular kindergarten class, which often causes students to feel as though they aren’t cut out for school. In sixth through eighth grades, math and language arts teachers will have a double period to work with students, and students will have the same teacher for both reading and English. Overall, Pipkin felt that 2011-2012 was “really an awesome year for testing” in Chester County. The following school board meeting dates for 2012-2013 were approved: Sept. 6, Nov. 8, Jan. 10, 2013, April 4, May 2, and June 20.

Randle Fenimore, a supervisor for Chester County Schools, explains the results of Chester County’s TCAP assessments and end of year exams. The district has exhibited significant improvement in several areas, but students must continue to make yearly gains.

From left to right, Front Row: David, Glenda and Julia (Webb) Parchman, Beth (Lightsey) Kilgore, Emma Rucker, Calista Manuel, George and Adam Rucker. Second Row: Jay Parchman, Anne (Lightsey) Rucker, Stana Donnelly, June and Kimberly (Banner) Manuel. Back Row: René and James A. Webb, Sonja (Parchman) Manuel, James D. Pendleton, Adrienne Manuel Pendleton, Fred, Mitch, Michael and Kevin Manuel.

Manuel - Pendleton wedding Adrienne Manuel and James Douglas Pendleton were united in marriage on Saturday, June 30, 2012 in Madison, Ind., at the groom's ancestral church, Indian Kentuck Baptist. Adrienne is the greatgranddaughter of the late Mrs. Nola (Seaton) and John Murray Webb Sr., and the late Bertha (Johnson) and J.C. Parchman, all of Henderson. As the groom's mother, Stephanie (Graham) Fabrizio, recounted during her rehearsal dinner toast, she first introduced the couple while Adrienne and Stephanie were teaching together in Louisville in 2010. Two weeks after the couple's first date, Adrienne attended James' sister's (Kristen Fabrizio) graduation from Jackson's Union University in May 2010, and realized on that trip that she should marry James. On their wedding day, the wedding procession commenced with Adrienne's grandmother, Julia (Webb) Parchman (Chester County High School class of '55), entering the sanctuary escorted by her late husband's (Jerrell H. Parchman Sr., also class of '55) younger

brother, David Parchman of Henderson. Then, the groom's grandparents, JoAnn Wehner and Jim C. Pendleton Sr. (of Madison, Ind.), and Elizabeth and Doug Graham Sr. (of Venice, Fla.) processed. Next, the best man/groom's brother (Mason Roberts) escorted bridesmaid Leah Friedberg. The maid of honor/groom's sister (Kristen Fabrizio, now teaching at Tigrett Middle School, Jackson) was escorted by Nick Saar; and the junior maiden of honor/bride's sister (Calista) was escorted by Jerrell "Jay" Parchman II (Jackson's Southside High School '83). After the groom escorted in the bride's mother, Sonja (Parchman), Frederick L. Manuel (of Reno, Nev.) escorted down the aisle his daughter, who wore a wedding gown made by family for Mary (Webb) and Dr. George Rodney Lightsey's 1964 Easter wedding at Friendship Baptist, Beech Bluff; later, Sonja (Parchman) Manuel (University School of Jackson '76) and Beth (Lightsey) Kilgore also donned the gown. The bride wore her mother's

veil and an engagement ring set with the groom's late grandmother's engagement diamond. Ushers were cousins (George and Adam Rucker; Doug III, David and Abraham Graham), and Emma Rucker was the bride's attendant. The flower girl and ring bearer were Leila and Isaac Graham, and Nassema and Caleema Graham provided the recessional music. James A. Webb (of Henderson) served as a

photographer. The wedding colors were patriotic red, white and blue, and the wedding guests waved small American flags to bid the bridal couple goodbye. The groom (a graduate of Indiana University) works for UPS in Louisville, Ky., and the bride (a graduate of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, and SciencesPo, Paris, France) is a law student at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Anderson Science Center set to open Aug. 22; Associates Science Center renovated Ribbon cutting for Freed-Hardeman University’s Anderson Science Center is planned for Aug. 22 immediately following 10:30 a.m. chapel. Furniture assembly and landscaping are being done this week to be ready for the start of classes next Wednesday. The $8 million facility was built by Alliance Corporation, Glasgow, Ky. The approximately 22,000 square foot building is located at the corner of Main Street and Hamlett Avenue. Fleming and Associates, Memphis, designed the building. Anderson Science Center houses labs for chemistry, biochemistry, biology, microbiology, and anatomy and physiology. In addition to the larger classroom labs, six smaller labs are devoted to research. Faculty offices and a conference room are also a part of the facility. The science center was named in memory of James R. Anderson and in honor of Rubye Anderson, parents of James T. (Tom) Anderson, at ground breaking ceremonies March 4. Tom Anderson, Columbia, is the naming donor. He and his wife Jade are alumni of Freed-Hardeman and he is a member of the FHU Board of Trustees. He is co-

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Taxes on how to balance the budget without continuing to raise taxes. “We failed to be of one accord during meetings,” he said. The budget committee started out with more cuts on the table than were ultimately made. However, Commissioner Tim Crowe stated that cuts for two offices only equaled 1.5 cents, and the county faced opposition from the state in implementing the proposed cuts. “If we fight that fight, we will lose,” Crowe said. “We would have to pay all the attorney fees […], and we would end up spending five cents to save 1.5 cents.” By a margin of 11 to seven, the property tax increase passed, but it left commissioners wondering where Chester County will be this time next year. “Where are we going to be when we reach this

founder and president of Capella Healthcare. Associates Science Center, built in in 1971, has received a major overhaul this summer. Renovations for this facility are also expected to be finished for the beginning of classes Aug. 22. The nursing program will occupy the upstairs floor of the south wing of Associates Science Center. Two classrooms, a skills lab, a simulation room and a control room are dedicated to nursing classes. In addition, faculty offices, supply room and a student lounge were included in the renovations. Mathematics and computer science classes are remaining in the Associates building. Three downstairs classrooms have been equipped with multiple power screens and one room is equipped as an iLearn classroom. The entire building has new floor coverings, ceiling tiles and lighting. All areas have been painted and the restrooms have been renovated. Virtually all of the work has been done in house at a cost of a little over $100,000, according to Dr. Dwayne Wilson, executive vice president.

juncture to have to make this difficult decision next year?” wondered Commissioner Buddy Richardson. “How are we going to legislate?” Despite a divided vote, budgets passed for the School Board, the Highway Department, County General, the Chester County Library, the Solid Waste Department, the technology school debt service, and the drug fund. The board also passed a significantly tightened charitable contributions budget and voted to fund the volunteer fire department and appropriations. When the Mayor Dwain Seaton announced that contributions to Dixie Youth had been cut by half, one angry audience member stated, “It seems like the commission only had backbone enough to cut charitable contributions.” Commissioner Melaro agreed, stating that he felt that the cuts had not been “fair and equitable.” Melaro wasn’t the only commissioner upset dur-

ing the budget debate. Commissioners Al McKinnon and John Allen Moore expressed frustration that the budget committee meetings were not better publicized. Although not on the committee, McKinnon attended the most recent budget meeting, but Moore stated that he had not heard when any of the meetings took place. Voting against all budget motions, Moore added, “I’m really appalled that I didn’t hear about it.” He added that he felt unprepared and uninformed about the issues facing the commission due to the fact that the budget committee did not update the other commissioners about what was discussed and decided during its meetings. Commissioner Diane Jordan, however, was of a different mind about the committee’s budget. While she admittedly didn’t know about the meetings either, she stated, “My trust is in the committee.”

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

A full house packed the courtroom during Monday’s County Commission meeting.

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New vendors invited to Arts in Alley tonight Kimberlie Helton’s voice students will join Helton and Eric Wood (of the Kimberlie Helton Band) on the stage in downtown Henderson on Thursday, Aug. 16 at Arts in the Alley. Music begins at 6 p.m., and the event is hosted by the Henderson Arts Commission in the alley off Main Street beside Frix-Jennings Clinic. At each Arts in the Alley, vendors sell work that includes items such as sewn crafts, paintings, wreaths, wood cuttings, altered art crafts, handmade soaps and photography. Booth spaces are $15 for non-members and $10 for Henderson Arts Commission members. Membership is $25 annually. The requirement for a having a booth is that the vendor is selling something handmade. Confirmed vendors to date include Algene Steele with paintings; the Broke Artist; LaVon’s Timeless Treasures; Brenda Norwalk with greeting cards; Mary Mount Dunbar with Christabelle Glimmers; Sheila Hesselrode and Sandy Thompson with homemade breads, jams and more; Bill Kearns with yard flags; Dottie Smith with beaded bracelets; and Tracey Snow with LillyKate’s Jewelry. Henderson Arts Commission members will cook hamburgers and hot dogs on site for brown bag specials. The meal includes two hot dogs or a

hamburger, chips, drink and dessert for $6. The HAC brown bag special helps offset costs of Arts in the Alley events. The Arts in the Alley 2012 Finale will be held on Thursday, Sept. 20 with an open mic competition ($250 prize) sponsored by Tony and Julie Altman of Chickasaw Chalet. The Henderson Arts Commission exists to recognize, educate, enrich and entertain through the

arts in Henderson, Chester County and the surrounding area. Arts in the Alley events are planned for third Thursdays throughout the spring, summer and fall. For more information about the event or becoming a vendor, visit http://www.facebook.com/ HendersonArtsCommissio n or contact Jason Bramblett at jason@bramblettgrp.com or 989-8019.


Life & Style

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Thursday, August 16, 2012

I got a real compliment this week as Jimmy Ruth said that he was calling all the community writers as he looks forward to reading the news each week. He lives out of town. He is a brother to Bobby Ruth and Ossie Mae Beshires. He graduated from Chester County High School and he told of some of the students that were from the New Friendship area. He graduated in 1956. It lifts our spirits when we get compliments from

out of Chester County. A Stewart gentleman called from South Carolina and said that he had received a Chester County Pictorial Book and a Lewis Jones' Cemetery book off of E-bay and asked me some questions on his lineage and I hope that I helped him some and told him to call Faye Connor. She could probably help more than I could. I appreciated him calling as his grandparents were from Jacks Creek. We found out that his great-grandmother and my great-grandmother were sisters. His greatgrandparents’ home was blown away in a tornado in about 1940. They lived on Sand Mountain Road. They left, and so did their son Lomax and his wife Bertha Plunk Stewart. On our prayer list this

week are Teresa Wright, Donald Parchman, Lyndia Young, Donald Jones, LaVerne Lott, Pam Priddy, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry and Minnie Austin, Wilma and Charles Cupples, Carroll Williams, Jean Latham, John Kent Sells, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Shirley Gaddy, Carolyn Potter, Gathel Latham, Randy Miller, Joanne Altier, Phillip Ross, Lisa Peddy, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl, Clyde Butler, Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Randy Sells, Teresa Seaton, Trish Nichols, Joanne Sells (Joanne, I am sorry that I have missed you in my column), their caregivers, our military personnel and their families. Happy anniversary to Randy and Amy Connor, Norris and Shelia Frank,

and Johnathan and Carla Visser Reddin on Aug. 25; and Larry and Pat Johnson, and Jimmy and Mary Ann Priddy on Aug. 30. Birthday greetings to Ruby Wright, Curt Kimmins and Nicholas Priddy on Aug. 24; Allen Jordan on Aug. 25; Randy Connor on Aug. 26; Megen Connor and Ken Kersetter on Aug. 27; Blakley Wilson and Jason Haskins on Aug. 28; Bonnie Holder on Aug. 29; Lillie Arnold and Lola Butler on Aug. 30; and Doug Priddy, Amy White, Tyler McCaskill, Sylvia Spradlin and Gerald Williams on Aug. 31. If you have any news, anniversaries, birthdays, or special events you would like included in our community news column, call 989-4875.

Happy belated birthday to Jean Crowell on Aug. 11; Thomas Wayne Vaugn on Aug. 12; Gina Haley on Aug. 13; and Lee Ann O'Neal on Aug. 14. Happy belated anniversary to Donnie and Jennifer Gibbs on Aug. 10. Happy birthday wishes go to Christopher Canaday

on Aug. 16; Monica Martin, Haleigh Fletcher and Kelly Canaday on Aug. 18; Bob Cole on Aug. 19; and Justin Keen and Mike Mooney on Aug. 21. Happy anniversary to Tim and Jessica Culpepper on Aug. 18; and Mike and Marilyn Mooney on Aug. 21. I don't have any news to share this week. I would just like to ask everyone to be kind to people … we just never know what they or their family may be going through. Have a great week and call me at 989-0212 if you have any thing you would like to share.

Hello to everyone! As always, it is good to be here with you another week and I count it a blessing. Since last time we were together, the family has had some scary moments in our life. The family would like to thank all of you that prayed for my mother. She is doing well. She should get out of the hospital this week. Congratulations to our entire City Officials who were elected for another term to serve our City/County for the people. Well, our 13-year-old Dixie Boys are back home and in school now after returning from a safe trip to Virginia for the World Series. The city is very proud of their accomplishments. This team was able to represent the state of Tennessee. These boys are from Chester County. In addition, we thank the coaches for their hard work. To the mothers and

fathers, thank you for taking off work to support your child in Virginia. Those of us that could not be there, we were here cheering you on, screaming at the computer and making phone calls to let others know how we were doing in the series. Congratulations again for this great steppingstone in your life! It is always a blessing to know that the residents continue to stay busy at Southern Oaks. On Monday, Derrick Brown, with Rehab Care, did a presentation on “Living with Arthritis.” He gave the residents much helpful information. Derrick will be coming once a month to talk with the residents. Next month he will be speaking on “Active Aging.” Martha Goodwin’s son, Danny Goodwin brought some fresh tomatoes this week. The residents and staff want to thank the Goodwin brothers, Danny and Lynn, who make sure they always have fresh tomatoes. On Thursday, Lynn also brought four delicious watermelons. On Tuesday, Lance Bershires, Chester County Trustee, was the celebrity bingo caller. On Wednesday morning, Lisa Peters came to play the piano and sing with the residents. That afternoon, Virgil

Hooks entertained them playing his guitar and singing. The residents at Southern Oaks all have beautiful voices and love to sing. Our residents are working on a community jigsaw puzzle. The pieces are out on a table and residents come by and take turns working on it. We can’t wait until it is finished so we can frame it for display. So if you are not too busy, stop by and visit this great facility located here in Chester County. Just a shout out for our “Loving Paws Rescue.” They celebrated their seventh year on Aug. 11. You do know that the number seven is God’s perfect number. Congratulations on your success and the great work you are doing. You have done an outstanding job rescuing unwanted pets and finding homes for them. Joanne and Kay are also having some great happenings at Chester County Senior Center: Wednesday, Aug. 15, at 10 a.m., they will be on their way to Southern Oaks for singing and having lots of fun; at 10:30 a.m. Thursday Aug. 16, Northbrook Center will be visiting them for a game of Bingo, and before the games begin Lisa will be singing to set the tone; Friday, Aug. 17, at 8 a.m., the center will be going to

Hohenwald Loveless Restaurant, the cost is $25; Monday, Aug. 20, at 10:45 a.m., there will be a watermelon contest; and Tuesday, Aug. 21, at 8:30 a.m., they will go to the Lexington Center for a Rook Tournament. There is always something going on at this Senior Center. For more information, and how to become a part of this great center, give Joanne Osborne or Kay Springfield a call at 9897434 Happy birthday to Justin Barham Aug. 12, who will be 3 years old On the prayer list this week are the Bass family, Brown family, Jewell family, Bishop family and the Rouse family. Pray for our loved ones in the hospitals, those sick in their homes, our children, teachers, family, the men and women that are serving our country and the incarcerated Remember to patronize our local businesses in town. Let’s support our own as much as we can. If you live in the city of Henderson and would like this article to include information about your family, birthday, anniversary, or other announcements, call 989-1907 or email gloria_holiday@msn.com. I need to hear from you. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

In the beginning, the family reunion met at the small roadside park on White Avenue. The Cochran kids thought Charlie and Vaudie Cochran got the reunion started, but it was originally the Cochran-Malone family reunion. Sisters were discreetly in charge; Ree Finley (Brodie) Cochran and Exie Finley (Charlie) Cochran, had originally organized the family get-together. These sisters married brothers. Somehow, the Malone attendance dropped off, even though Burl Malone attended a Cochran reunion a couple of years ago with great pictures from the past. The family hopes he and others will attend again. Sixty-plus years later the Cochran Family Reunion continues, having a great time getting reacquainted and snapping family groups. This year

48 family members attended with an invitation extended to me. I am not only a former neighbor of Charlie Cochran, but we attended the same church and picked some cotton together. I sat with John and Sue Cochran Freeze from Memphis; they’ve been married for 70 years and still hold hands. Seeing them together was a dessert. Gayle Cochran Shield’s son, Anthony Greg “Tony” Ivey and daughters, Moria and Victoria, attended for the first time in approximately 30 years; they traveled from Monk's Corner, S.C. Sadly, Ernest Lee Maness made the trip alone from Michigan without Betty; Shirley Cochran made it from Scottsboro, Ala, without Donald; and Mary Etta Cochran was without Max. Bittersweet memories surfaced during the time spent as a family, but thanks were given for precious memories. Everyone has made it back home safely with the exception of Max's bunch. They are floating around in the Memphis area visiting other family members before returning to Texas. Ernest Lee is visiting with his brother, Andy Maness

in Henderson, until the Maness reunion third Saturday in August. The Cochran’s are a loving family; they appreciate the history that got them where they are today. Phyllis Cochran Knolton organizes the reunion. She adds the names of the growing families. Perhaps the Finley and Malone families can reconnect with their Cochran cousins. Blood is blood and love is love. Call me for addresses and/or phone numbers at 989-7485, or write P.O. Box 13, Jacks Creek, TN 38347. Regina Stone Brooks and Inez Alexander invited me to Shiloh Church for the Goff reunion Saturday. I snapped the picture of 22 cousins. Janice Stone Kelly invited me to another reunion in September. With these invitations including a close encounter of good food, I can be thankful for size 4X britches! Ha. The remodeling started in May, but Jacks Creek Church of Christ members moved the benches back into the newly remodeled upstairs auditorium Sunday. I was invited to attend the last service in the basement Sunday -

more good food to celebrate a new remodeling. Wouldn’t Margaret Bingham, Mattie and Dwain Segerson, John and Mary Tignor, Claude and Maggie Randolph and Fairy Jones be in awe of the growth of their church? I have gotten slack on visitations at the healthcare. However, from 5 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, I sure enjoyed seeing Wilma Hart, Lily Weaver, Cleo Connor, Ed Pitts, Bonnie Plunk, Mary Lou Mitchell Plunk, Dorothy Lambert, Reba Croom, Maizell Barnes, Mary Middleton, Lydia Dickson, Irene Cothern and Lavelle Bushnell. I met Alma Shotwell who will be 102 in September; she rooms with Maizell. I also met Gus Walton who shared a beautiful love story - I must write about that later. Mazie Plunk arrived at the healthcare as I was leaving. Her son was following slowly due to recent heart surgery. Please consider sending cards to lift our friends’ spirits and let them know tidbits. They are hungry for news at home, too. I am not a good role model for sending cards any-

more, but I know there is a need. JoAnne Vancleve, Carolyn Henry and Kathy Mays receive blue ribbons for these acts of remembrance. Don’t forget Darren and Amber Jones’ baby shower on Aug. 18 at Terry and Sharon Boothe’s home. Prayer has been requested for Wayne Moody. He has once again returned home from the hospital. He would appreciate a visit and perhaps a plate of good cooking! He was proud of the rain Monday. Another year older and wiser they say, so birthday greetings go to Debra Connor, Braxton Ellis, and Dwight Fisher (Aug. 16); David Parchman (Aug. 17); Braelyn Ellis, Misty Pruett Moore, and Karen Essary (Aug. 18); Michelle Essary and Mikel Mooney (Aug. 21); Joe Climer (Aug. 23); Ruby Nobles Wright and Kathy Fisher (Aug. 24); dad and son, Gary and Jason Rhodes share a special day, too (Aug. 29); Tammy Wright West (Aug. 30); and Randy Ross (Aug. 31). Friends, thank you for all the kindnesses you did to help me celebrate my big day. A person is always rich when friends are in

ones life. Sadly, I never attended any Elvis concerts. Elvis died Aug. 16, 1977. Would you believe I attended his visitation? It was a hot day and I wore black polyester. Big mistake – it was record hot that day and crowds were packed like sardines in hot sauce! Nine hours later, I entered his home and saw him first and last. It was a sad day, but thankfully, we can still hear his recorded voice singing those gospel songs he loved so dearly. Our community expresses sympathy to families who lost loved ones. Lola Carter Hilliard (2-8-32 to 8-8-12) was buried at Henderson City Cemetery; Tommy Smith (2-11-41 to 8-12-12) son of Glenn and Jenny Roark Smith, was buried at Chester County Memory Garden beside his beloved Norma; and Mrs. Lois (James) Smith lost her sister, Nancy Swope Lott (730-37 to 8-11-12) from Mesa, Ariz. “Today is not a sad day. There is joy in the strength God gives.” This quote is on the Shiloh Church bulletin board. It squeezed my heart, so I hope it will comfort you, too.

MR. AND MRS. WINDELL "BUSTER" BESHIRES

Beshires 50th anniversary Windell "Buster" and Ossie Mae Beshires of Henderson will celebrate their 50th anniversary Sunday, Aug. 19. The Beshires were married on Aug. 18, 1962 in the home of Rev. and Mrs. Melvin Geary. They have two children, Windell Beshires (Mary) and Johnny Beshires (Tammie), all of Henderson. They have five grandchildren, Megan, Becca (Hunter), April, Jacob and Bailee; and four great-grandchildren, Lane, Aiden, Brycen and Carter. The couple is now enjoying their retirement years together with friends and family. Mr. and Mrs. Beshires will be honored at a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012 at the Montezuma Community Center. All family and friends are invited to attend. No gifts please.

Lynch to celebrate a century Ora Lynch will be celebrating her 100th birthday on Aug. 17. Her family is hosting a reception for her from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, in the activities room at the Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center. All are invited to stop by and be part of making Ora’s day a very special one.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Cherry galette: It’s a pie, it’s a tart – It doesn’t matter what you call it, just enjoy! Recently, we were having company come over for a nice dinner. My husband, Chris, decided to make jaeger schnitzel with mushroom gravy, and I was in charge of the dessert. I bought a bag of Rainier cherries because they were a pretty, golden peach color, and I knew I had several cherry recipes that I could try. Since we were having a hearty meal, I didn’t want dessert to be too heavy. I settled for cherry gallette because of its simple ingredients and free-form crust. Piecrusts have gotten a reputation for being difficult and finicky, but Chris made his first piecrust last year and claims that it’s one of the easiest things that he has ever

tried to make. We use a very simple recipe that I’m sure can be found on almost any shortening package, but I’ll share it below as well to prove that it isn’t difficult at all. Using an ordinary piecrust recipe and the recipe for cherry gallette, I placed the crust on a round baking sheet and poured the cherry filling on top. Then all you have to do is fold the edges over the filling about two inches and brush the crust with buttermilk according to the instructions. Chris calls this a “flat pie” since it doesn’t require a pie pan and doesn’t puff up. In the

end, it looks like a tart with the center open to reveal the beautiful cherry filling. This is extremely easy to make, but it’s so rustic and pretty that your company will think that you worked on it all day. Don’t worry if your edges aren’t even or if the crust isn’t perfectly smooth. This is a rustic dessert, and part of its charm is that it’s all made by hand. Even if your company forgets the proper name and calls it a cherry “gazelle” like ours did, you will make a lasting impression with your simple, charming, not overly sweet dessert.

Cherry Galette

Ingredients: 1 piecrust (see additional instructions) 2 tablespoons sugar 1 ½ teaspoons cornstarch 3 ½ cups pitted Rainier cherries (1 ¼ pounds) ½ teaspoon grated lemon peel 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1 ½ tablespoons buttermilk 1 tablespoon sugar for sprinkling Directions: Remove pits from cherries. In a medium bowl, combine fruit with 2 tablespoons sugar, lemon peel, and lemon juice. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Prepare crust according to directions. Roll out crust to about 12 ½-inch circle on a parchment paper lined baking sheet. Sprinkle cornstarch over dough, leaving 2-inch edges. Arrange cherry mixture over crust, maintaining 2-inch border. Include juices. Fold edges of dough over cherries and press gently to seal. Dough will only cover the edges. Brush crust

The monthly singing will be at Hopewell Baptist Church at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 25. Everyone is invited to attend. The guys making the Appalachian run will be leaving Aug. 16. Please remember them in your prayers. As I walked out the door this morning, I actually felt a cool breeze, not muggy as usual. It was great! I guess everyone is set-

with buttermilk and sprinking with remaining sugar over crust and cherries. Bake for 25 to 35 minutes or until crust is browned and center is bubbly. Remove from oven and cool for about 20 minutes.

Pie Crust

Ingredients: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt ¾ stick vegetable shortening, wellchilled 4 to 8 tablespoons ice-cold water Directions: Blend flour and salt in a mixing bowl. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs with pea-sized pieces of shortening remaining. Sprinkle 4 tablespoons of ice water over mixture and gently blend with a fork. Add more water if the dough is too dry. Roll out dough on a floured surface to create a 12-inch circle. Top with filling according to instructions.

tling in with the school schedules. My grandson came in from school last week yawning, whining, etc. I said "Will, what seems to be your problem?" He said, "They give you all this work to do, won't let you talk or play, and in the first grade they don't even let you have a nap!" I said, "I don't get a nap either." Although the little fella never said a word, I could look in his eyes and tell he wanted to say, is that why you get crabby sometimes?! Remember the following people on the prayer list: Olivia Springer, Perry Barton, Betty Stout, Ernie Merriman, Brenda Smith, Loretta Pickett, Ora Lea Barham, Bill Kinchen, Raymond Cothren, Molly Russell, Brenda Collins, Delois Kent, Bobby

McEarl, Grace Moody, our military and their families. Olivia Springer is the daughter of Austin and Holly Springer. She is 3 1/2 years old, recently diagnosed with cancer and is at St. Jude's. She is the granddaughter of Cindy (Springer) and Dan Piechocki. Remember these family members in prayer as they have a tough road before them. Happy birthday to Jack McCaskill on Aug. 9; Renea Byford on Aug. 10; Justin Bishop, Patsy Collins on Aug. 11; Grace Moody and Deborah Terry Aug. on 12; Virginia

New benefits allowed for military spouses T e n n e s s e e Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development Karla Davis has announced changes to unemployment laws that allow a spouse of military personnel facing a military transfer to collect unemployment benefits if they quit their job. In most cases voluntarily quitting a job makes an applicant ineligible for unemployment benefits. “This expansion of eligibility for unemployment is the right thing to do in

Bullman on Aug. 13; Cindy Cherry on Aug. 14; Christie Newsom on Aug. 15; Seneca Deck, Megan Fowler and Brandon Lewis on Aug. 17; Austin Springer on Aug. 18; Justin Keen on Aug. 19; Joey Russell and Terry Moody on Aug. 20; and Jr. Miller on Aug. 21. Happy anniversary to Larry and Chrissy Bushy on Aug. 21. If you have news to share, call me at 989-7523. Thought for the week: “Any definition of a successful life must include serving others.” - George H. W. Bush. Have a great week everyone!

supporting Tennessee’s military families whom are often affected by military transfers,” said Labor Commissioner Karla Davis. “Lawmakers and the Governor have created this temporary assistance and protected employers from additional tax burdens, which is ideal for everyone involved.” Typically employers pay higher taxes when they lay off a worker and unemployment insurance is approved. The bill that was sponsored by Senator Tim Barnes and state Representative Joe Pitts of Clarksville was signed by Governor Haslam in April, but $278,800 in appropriations for the measure became available to claimants in July. “The Governor’s support of this bill shows that Tennesseans truly care about our military families,” State Representative Joe Pitts said. “This is a tangible way to show our support and gratitude to our veter-

ans, and I’m humbled to have the opportunity to do so.” The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development projects more than 70 families could take advantage of the benefits during this fiscal year. Funding for these benefits is paid from the state’s General Fund rather than from the state’s unemployment trust fund. The only exception to the new eligibility laws are assignments outside the United States, Canada, or any United States territory. Federal law prohibits the payment of unemployment benefits to claimants outside these areas. A dedicated phone line, 1-866-331-1271 ext 7590, is available to take initial claims for military spouses.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

A country breakfast with all the trimmings will be held from 7 a.m. till 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25. A bake sale will also be held. This is a fundraiser for the center, so please come and support it. The Davis family reunion has been moved to the New Friendship Community Center. Family members can begin to show up around 10:30 a.m., lunch will follow. Please come and enjoy. Mike and Sandra Lott have moved into their new home. Please remember Mike and Sandra as Sandra recuperates at home. Anthony and Betty

Cooper are proud grandparents of a new grandson, Mason Anthony, born Sunday at about 9:43, weighing 9 lbs, 13 ounces, and was 19 inches long. The proud parents are Mark and Becca. Wanda Cook attended the bridal shower for Nicki Mayers and Kurt Bray at the New Friendship Center. Montezuma United Methodist will hold revival services Aug. 19, 20 and 21. A meal will begin at 6 p.m., and starting at 7 will be the service. Please come hear Bro. Abe Russom. On the prayer list are: Ann Morrison, Earl and Faye Crouse, David and Virginia Morrison, Bobby Finley, Mike Clayton, Earl Clayton, Glenda Wilson, Amanda Hearn, Donald Jones, Ronnie Cappoth and Jeff Brewington. Call Wanda Cook at 989-3724 or Celia Murley at 989-5300 and share your news.

I am enjoying this cooler weather. I know you all are too. Get well wishes this week to: Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Winna Knipper, Randie Snider, Earlene Cleek, Lavern Cain, Marjorie Hopper, Edra and Benny Barnett, Wanda Lovelace, Carolyn Brasfield, and J.W. Knipper. Please pray for Aleigh Brown, Elizabeth Rinks and Alicia Rinks. They were in an accident Friday evening on Deanburg Road. Aleigh has gone through two surgeries and Elizabeth Rinks has an injured arm. They are three of our precious young ladies that attend Bethel Baptist Church and we just praise the Lord that He was looking over them. I’m sure he has a great plan

for each of them. I hope you all are feeling much better. Happy birthday this week to Kenny Mays and Kayla Hollingshead on Aug. 16; Phillip Mays on Aug. 17; Richard Mainers and Peyton Rowland on Aug. 18; Woodie Deming (my brother), Dorothy Bratcher (my cousin), Kim Ross (my cousin), James Melton (my cousin in Chicago that subscribes to the Independent) and George Storyknight on Aug. 19. Everyone have a great birthday. If you see Bobby and Norma Tulley this week wish them a happy anniversary. It is Aug. 20. Quote of the week: "Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?" - George Carlin (So true!) I hope everyone has a great week. Call me at 879-9777 if you have any news. Also, I haven’t gotten any calls about the Deming Reunion. I hope some of you are planning on coming.

Only Yesterday “Filthy alleys disgrace to ‘civilized’ community” From the files of the Chester County Independent August 14, 1942 “Large Number Leave Soon For Army; August Selective Service Quota Large and September May Be Larger” As the tempo of the war increases and enemy victories continue, still more and more thousands of American troops are being sent to the far corners of the world in the life and death struggle to overcome dictatorship and slavery. The August call on Chester County for men through the Selective Service Board is the largest for months, and it is expected the September call will be even larger. Just as the Independent went to press we obtained the names of the following white men to leave this month. There will be a number of colored men to go this month and their names will be published next week. White men in the August call: Heard Sykes, John Cecil Anderson, Robert Clifford Cox, Hornsby; Claude Herman Dunn, John Wyley Bolen, Jack Happel Boone, Lloyd Simms Taylor, Tommie Taylor, Carlos Buel Essary, Enville; John Paris Young, Bennett Walter Allen, Wilson C. Cash, Enville; James Edward Watlington, James Robert King, Jacks Creek; Lloyd Carl Melton, Guy Monroe Russom, Montezuma; Joe Harvie Kinchen, Mack B. Jester, James Jerome Hall, Montezuma; Edgar Cherry McCanless, Lula. “Boom Moore For Mayor” Former Mayor Ed Moore is being besieged by citizens from every walk of life to declare himself as a candidate for Mayor in the city election to be held Saturday, Sept. 12. Mr. Moore has not yet decided to enter the race, but businessmen, doctors, lawyers, school teachers, factory workers, clerks and laborers – white and colored – have already pledged him their support. Up and down Main Street, in drug stores and beauty parlors one hears “Moore made a good mayor.” Alleys of the city, which now are a disgrace to a civilized community, were kept clean under Mayor Moore and under the administration of Mayor Cecil Anderson. But not so today. These alleys are a health menace and a public disgrace. When ladies walk down the street, they must turn their head when passing an alley. The Independent is not sponsoring Mr. Moore for Mayor. It is not in the least interested in politics. There is not a job in the city or county which would interest its editor. But this paper has a duty to the community. The use of alleys as toilets and a place to dump garbage must stop. “Welcome Stranger” Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Colbert of West Main street are the proud parents of a baby boy, born Aug. 10, and weighing 8 ½ pounds. He is their first child. Mr. and Mrs. James Melton of the Seventh district are the proud

parents of a baby girl, born Aug. 11, weighing 6 pounds. She is their second child and has been named Evelyn Gay. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hughes of the Wilson S c h o o l Community are the proud parents of a baby boy born Aug. 11, weighing 6 pounds. He is their eighth child.

Chester County Independent archives, August 10, 1972

Members of the opposing All-Star team are pictured above, front row, left to right, Keith Warren, Lee Blair, Scott McPherson, Danny Croom. Second row, left to right, Jeff Isbell, Jason Newman, Rex Phillips, Steve Haskins, Scott Whaley, Emerson Ballard, Randy Meadows and Britt Siler. Back row, left to right, Coaches Jimmy Isbell, Clifford Isbell, Reed Lawson and Owen Lawson.

August 15, 1952 “Births” Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Etheridge of Finger are announcing the birth of a son on July 28 at the HumphreyPhillips Clinic. He has been named Randy Ernest. Mr. and Mrs. Leon Fiveash of Collierville, formerly of Henderson, are the parents of twin daughters born Aug. 10 at the Jackson Madison County General Hospital.

Nylon News”

August 10, 1962

“Chester County Library Expands” The Chester County Library has just received more new shelving making it possible for more books to be available to the readers of the county. Many people are taking advantage of the opportunities the library affords. At the present time there are 842 registered borrowers reading from the central library in Henderson. There are 11 bookmobile stations located in the county. A memorial book ALL THE MEN OF THE BIBLE was given to the library in memory of Mr. Bob Stewart, by Mr. and Mrs. Bailey Stanfill, this month. “Births” Mr. and Mrs. Larry Fields of Memphis are the parents of a son who was born July 25. He has been named John Robert. The grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Walter Harris and Mr. and Mrs. Max Fields of Henderson. Mr. and Mrs. Andy Maness of Henderson announce the birth of a daughter on July 28. She has been named Andrea Michele. Mr. and Mrs. William O. Peterson of Anchorage, Alaska Chester County Independent archives, August 10, 1962 are the proud parents of a daughter who arrived Aug. 5. They have been named Virginia and Mrs. Peterson is the former Lorraine Smith, daughter of Mr. and Elizabeth. Mrs. John Smith of Henderson. Dr. H. D. Farthing Henderson Clinic Mr. and Mrs. Earl Maynard of Mr. and Mrs. Dave Mitchell Jacks Creek announce the arrival of a daughter on July 26. She has been Hollowell of Henderson, announce the arrival of a daughter, Regina named Ivy Veronica. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Rankin of Louise, on Aug. 3. Drs. McCallum and Wilson Montezuma announce the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Moody of a daughter, Patricia Dianne, on Aug. Pinson are the parents of a daugh8. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stovall of ter who arrived Aug. 6. Mr. and Mrs. Arlie Lipford of Henderson, are the parents of a a son, Dennis Robert, who was born McNairy announce the birth of a daughter on Aug. 6. Aug. 11. Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Climer of Born to Lois Davis and wife, a Henderson are the parents of a son daughter on July 24. who arrived Aug. 7. Steadman-Guy Clinic Born to Doris and Leonard Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Kiser announce the birth of a son, Calvin Johnson of Henderson, a daughter on Aug. 4. Allen Kiser on Aug. 7. Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Cupples of “Cotton Open On Pierce Farm” Millard Pierce reports that cotHenderson are the parents of a son who was born Aug. 9. His has been ton began opening on his farm on Aug. 1. The crop was planted April named Joseph Anthony. Mr. and Mrs. Mert Greenway of 17. Mr. Pierce lives on the W. H. Luray announce the arrival of a daughter, Kathy Marie, on Aug. 11. Beecham farm in the McCalls Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd L. Kennedy Community. He plans to begin picking cotton of Henderson are the parents of a son, Danny Joe, who was born Aug. in about a week. August 10, 1972 12. Mr. and Mrs. “Bolton and Gladys All Stars Brice Burros of Defeat Co-op, Hearn in 19-4 Beech Bluff are Routing” It all started in the first inning, announcing the arrival of a son on when the All-Stars from Bolton and Gladys’ scored four runs over the Aug. 12. “ A b o u t All-Stars from Co-op and Hearn. Bolton and Gladys’ went ahead to Verbiage” “ T h e score ten more runs and Co-op and Declaration of Hearn scored only four. Monte Daniel took the win over Independence contains 300 Jason Newman. Newman was Chester County Independent archives, August 10, 1972 words; The Ten relieved in the third by Britt Siler Members of the champion Little League All-Star teams Commandments and Siler was relieved in the fourth sponsored by Bolton Motor Company and Gladys’ contain 297 by Lee Blair. Restaurant are pictured above after defeating their words; Lincoln’s Four of the runs for Bolton and counterparts made up of team members from Chester G e t t y s b u r g Gladys’ came with bases loaded Farmers Co-Op and Hearn Lumber Company. The Address contains when Nicky Bridges hit a grand Bolton-Gladys’ combination won by a score of 19-4 in a 268 words; The slam homerun. Terry Saulters came game played here last Thursday night. Members of the Lord’s Prayer through with a triple and Anthony team and coaching staff are, left to right, front row, contains 66 Hatch a double with men on. Nicky Lyndell Nicholls, Danny Meek, Nicky Bridges, Randy words; BUT the Bridges, Terry Saulters, Monte Fenimore, Steve Siler, Terry Saulter. Second row, left to OPS order set- Daniel, Glenn Harris, Mike Parker right, Anthony Frix, Monty Daniel, Danny Seaton, ting the price of and Danny Meek all had singles. Glenn Harris, Anthony Hatch, Mike Parker. Back row, cabbage contains For Co-op and Hearn, Scott left to right, Coaches Bob Moore, Jimmy King, Jerry 26,911 words!” - Whaley had a double, Lee Blair, Beshires and Joe Mosier. Nicky Bridges also played on “ F r o m Jason Newman and Steve Haskins the Sardis Little League team two nights a week and C h a t t a n o o g a had singles. was chosen for their All-Star team, too.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Page 7-A

Words for the Week: “should be thankful” By Junebug

Do you ever feel taken for granted? We all want our loved ones to tell us they appreciate what we do for them – do we not? When they don’t, our hurt feelings may stem from our childhood!!! Actually it has been said that childhood is the architect of the foundation for our adulthood in many different ways!!! (And sometimes our children greatly impact our foundation.) We all “should be thankful” for so many things in our lives. Even without considering the religious basis for thankfulness, we have much in our lives to appreciate, and we should verbalize our appreciation to those who are responsible.

To that end, we want our children to grow up well adjusted, kind, taking nothing for granted, appreciating everything they now have, and will receive or accomplish. How have you tried to instill those qualities into your children; or how did your parents try to instill them in you? Teaching them to say, “Thank you” is a great first step, and we start early in their lives, don’t we? We try to help them to grasp it, to hold on tightly to that attitude as they grow older. After a certain age they no longer need to hear, “What do you say … ” reminding them to say “Thank you.” When they have learned it well, taken it into their

heart, they offer those words more often to others than to their parents. But hey, isn’t that what we are trying to teach them, to be “really” thankful and express those feelings to others? Sometimes they even surprise us! One morning I had a friend over for coffee before starting our day’s activities. My son, the inventor, at about 14, came bounding down the stairs ready for school, passed us as we sat at the table, going toward the pantry behind us, looking for his favorite cereal in the cupboard, and seeing nothing that interested him said, “Mom, where is MY cereal?” To which I matter-offactly replied, “If yours

isn’t there then just have some Cherrios.” There is some more rustling through the cupboard, then I hear a cereal box gently slammed down on the counter, and the refrigerator door roughly opened. SO, as my friend begins to take a sip of hot coffee, I say gently to my son, “Danny, you should be thankful you HAVE cereal.” To which he immediately and sarcastically retorted, “I am soooooooooo thankful!” – My friend bursts out in laughter, trying and failing to contain the coffee she had just sipped, she spewed it all over the table. I began laughing too, and then Danny began laughing. That morning he enjoyed eat-

UT Extension questions and answers: Heading back to school with breakfast By Michele Sides UT Extension Agent

School is back in session, and with that, so is the hustle and bustle of getting somewhere on time! Start your child’s school day off right with a balanced breakfast. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It is also the meal that is most often skipped. Research studies have shown that by adding breakfast to your child’s morning routine, their concentration will be improved, energy levels increased and they will be more productive. Why are our children not eating breakfast? There are many excuses; the most common reason is that they don’t have an appetite first thing in the morning. One solution to this is offering a glass of 100 percent fruit juice and some whole-wheat toast. Perhaps you could spread the toast with a spoon of peanut butter for some added protein. This is a very light breakfast, should not upset a tummy but will give them the energy boost their brains need first thing in the morning!

Another excuse for not eating breakfast is lack of time. It only takes an extra 15 or 20 minutes in the morning to prepare a small breakfast for your child. However, if time is a serious constraint, stock your pantry with quick items, breakfast bars, mini bagels, cereal, yogurt or fresh fruit. Don’t allow your lack of time to force you into serving high fat, high calorie items to your child. High fat, high-calorie items are often high in sugar and this is not the best way to start the day! Keep in mind that a balanced meal should include certain key ingredients: carbohydrates, protein and fiber. Carbohydrates are a good source of energy and can be found in whole-grain breads and cereals, and fruits and vegetables. Protein, which is good for lasting energy can be found in eggs, nuts, and low-fat or non-fat dairy products. Fiber creates the feeling of fullness and can be found in fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads and cereals. For a balanced meal, try pairing some of the following: Whole grain cereal

topped with fresh fruit and low-fat milk; Veggie omelet with whole wheat toast and juice; or Whole-wheat mini bagel topped with peanut butter and bananas with low-fat milk. Check out www.choosemyplate.gov and www.eatright.org websites for more nutrition related information or contact your local Extension office. University of Tennessee Extension provides programs in agriculture and natural resources, 4-H Youth development, family and consumer sciences and resource development. University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture and county governments cooperating. UT Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employ-

ment.

ing Cheerios, visited with us both, and then went out to catch the school bus. He never fussed about not having the cereal he really preferred again. Lesson learned! Of course, I did still try to have ‘his cereal’ often. We all have moments when we absolutely prefer to have something that is special to us – NOT just what we have available. Cheerios weren’t my favorite either; but I ate them at times and was glad to have them. Then, when I did have what I preferred, it was a treat, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Being raised to appreciate whatever we have, and adopting that attitude as our own, doesn’t make us NOT want special things. I have to admit I have used Danny’s expression on myself – “I am

soooooooooo thankful!” – to laugh at myself when I wanted something, that at that particular moment just could not be had. It brings me back to the reality that I should be thankful for wherever I am in life, what ever I have in life, and who ever I really am. Yes, a real aid to happiness is taking nothing for granted, working toward the special things and qualities we desire to have, enjoying our travel through life, never forgetting we should be thankful, and letting people KNOW we appreciate every little thing. Email your ideas for ‘words for the week’ and/or opinion of this week’s article to jpatterson@chestercountyindependent.com. “Let’s keep life simple, real and fun.” – Junebug


Page 8-A

Opinion

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Who knew that steps toward self-sufficiency would lead to our own private zoo Since we started our garden last year, self-sufficiency has become a key word at my house. We’re nowhere remotely close to self-sustaining, but we like to talk about it and plan for a time in the not too distant future when we can support some of our basic needs with fruits and vegetables that we have grown ourselves. We’ve done well with peppers last year and tomatoes this year, and hopefully next year we’ll have enough space to grow a garden that supports more than one main crop. I love going outside and picking a basket full of fresh, homegrown produce. I’ve always been crazy about cherry tomatoes, or “Tommy Toes,” as I used to call all bite-sized tomatoes. I could eat a bushel in one sitting, and there is nothing better on a salad or accompanying a meal. Several of our tomato plants have already called it quits this summer. I don’t know whether to attribute that to overcrowding, record heat, lack of water, disease or insects. There have been too many factors at play, not to mention the fact that we let our tomato plants grow about seven-feet tall, until they started spilling over the stakes we set out and cascading to the ground. I have a feeling that the excessive weight of some of the plants contributed to their early demise, but that’s a lesson learned for next year. This year I was more concerned about actually having a tomato plant that produced something edible rather than if we were doing it right. We planted a lot of plants very close together, hoping that a few of them would live long enough to bear fruit. Not expecting them to thrive, we didn’t put up stakes until the plants were already wild, so we had tomato plants going everywhere. I picked out several heirloom varieties, but the tangle got so thick that it’s been difficult to tell which plant is which, and it wouldn’t surprise me if some got cross-pollinated and created some strange hybrid tomato; we’ve definitely had some unique-looking tomatoes this year. As for being self-sufficient, I was too shocked when our tomatoes started producing to figure out what to do with the bounty. We’ve eaten most of them, and we lost some to disease and decay. I was afraid to start putting tomatoes up for fear that each day’s harvest might be the last, and I didn’t want to have a freezer full of frozen tomatoes or a pantry full of juice and not have had a chance to enjoy my tomatoes fresh from the vine. So when winter comes, we’ll be back to scouring the grocery store shelves for a decent-looking tomato that probably has no flavor and was raised in a greenhouse without ever seeing the sun. Chris and I both promised to do better with our planning and planting next year. We know enough to give our tomatoes room to grow and to stake them before they are taller than my head. We won’t plant tomatoes and squash side-by-side, and we’ll make sure our corn has room to put down roots. Our pepper plants won’t be buried underneath a tomato jungle, and we’ll diversify our garden a little more – but in a larger area. Aside from creating a sustainable vegetable garden, Chris presented me with a new idea last week: chickens. He thinks chickens would be a wonderful all-in-one solution for eggs, meat and fertilizer. I’m not convinced that chickens are very nice animals, but “Southern Living” published an article about raising chickens in its most recent issue. If chickens are chic enough for “Southern Living,” I might as well give in and give them a try. Of course, we have a difference of opinion on what kinds of chickens, how many and what their purpose should be. Chris would be happy starting out with 20, all of which would be a combination egg-layers and meat producers. I feel that five hens would be a good place to start – all egg-layers. My husband doesn’t care about chicken aesthetics; as long as they laid eggs and tasted good in a pot of chicken and dumplings, he wouldn’t care if they were all ugly, featherless and mean. I, on the other hand, have decided that if we’re going to be chicken farmers, we might as well have the bestlooking flock we can come by. I like Silkies. If my longhaired Birman cat Snowbird were struck by a spell that turned her into a fowl, she would be a Silkie chicken. Honestly, I can’t get over how cute Silkies are, especially for birds. I told Chris that I would consent to chicken farming if I could have a Silkie, and I guess he really wanted a flock of chickens because he agreed to let me have a mostly ornamental, fluffy bird that looks like it would need a good blow-drying after every rain. Now, we have to wait until spring to purchase chicks, and until then, I guess we should figure out how to build a nice chicken coop. One good thing about potentially raising chickens is the possibility of fresh eggs. Nothing compares to farm fresh eggs, and every recipe that calls for eggs tastes better when the eggs are fresh from a happy, organic, free-range chicken. Growing and raising our own food is extremely satisfying. There’s something almost transformative about going outside to pick or harvest the ingredient you need for a meal. Having a kitchen herb garden right outside the backdoor makes me so happy when I have a chance to season my food with fresh herbs. Bunches of dried herbs hanging from the cabinets give our house a special, homey feel, and the best thing is that we know exactly where our food came from, how it was raised and that nothing is fresher or better for us than the fruits of our own labor.

Stopping an EPA regulation that would destroy 340,000 jobs By Lamar Alexander U.S. Senate

In the Senate, I urged my colleagues not to overturn a good rule that prevents other states’ dirty air from blowing into Tennessee. Overturning the rule would cost us jobs and hurt our health. I asked my Senate colleagues: Why are we picking on a good rule when the Environmental Protection Agency is a happy hunting ground of unreasonable regulations? Perhaps the most unreasonable regulation is the boiler MACT rule. This is a regulation that will force hundreds of industrial companies around America to install the Maximum Available Control Technology (MACT) on their boilers. Let me try to give you a sense of this rule’s impact on our economy: It is estimated that it will result in a loss of 340,000 jobs nationwide. In Tennessee alone, the cost to businesses to comply with this rule will be $530 million. I have talked to the leaders of large industrial companies that will be affected. I’ve talked to small business owners who are facing a million dollar cost to try to implement this unworkable rule

on their boilers. The small business owners have told me they will have to close their plants instead. They cannot possibly afford to comply with this rule in this short of a time period. It’s a good idea to clean the air of such pollutants as mercury. But what’s a bad idea is that the EPA gives an unrealistic timeline—just three years— for companies to install the technology to reduce these pollutants. This is not like a lot of the other clean air laws and rules that have been around for years; this is an unexpected new rule on thousands of industrial boilers that are essential to our manufacturing jobs in America. As a result, businesses all over America are going to be forced to spend billions of dollars trying to comply with this rule instead of spending that money on creating jobs. A number of Republican and Democratic senators have introduced legislation to give the EPA enough time to fix the rule, give the EPA additional authority to use the correct methodology to write a rule that makes some sense and does not appear to have been delivered from Mars or Venus

Sept. 7 is deadline for liquor referendum To the Editor and concerned citizens in Chester County: We have [until Sept. 7]to get the signatures needed to put a liquor referendum on the November ballot. We’re almost there with the city. We need more for the county. Monday night the county commissioners passed a 35-cent increase on property tax, and we don’t know what is going to happen to the wheel tax. Seven of our commissioners stood up for the people. I commend them. I have had many phone calls about this petition. It is not about the “liquor.” This petition is about the money spent other places than our county. Many non-drinkers have called and signed the petition.

Many elderly have called to say they have to choose between having food/ or medicine or paying their taxes. Many others just want to keep the money here. From 18 years old to 65 years old, all denominations, all from different ethnic backgrounds, we all want the same thing – to find a way to bring in more money to this county. I will be at [various locations]. Please come sign so your voice can be heard. I have several businesses in town and several people spread throughout the county collecting signatures. Sincerely, Tonya Patterson 608-3718 tpatterson69@att.net Henderson

or some other planet, and give our industries enough time – five years instead of just three – to comply with the rule. This boiler MACT rule is a prime example of a bad regulation costing jobs. Fortunately, there is strong bipartisan agreement on legislation to fix this bad rule, and the House of Representatives, in an overwhelming bipartisan vote, agreed with us by passing similar legisla-

tion. Congress can take steps right now to help the millions of Americans suffering to find good privatesector jobs by reforming our tax and regulatory systems to free up businesses to hire, and starting on entitlement reform to lower our job-killing debt. Making sure the EPA doesn’t implement this bad boiler MACT regulation would be one step in the right direction.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Gresham’s legislation has hurt Tennessee education To the Editor and concerned citizens in Chester County: I have been a teacher in the public school system for 30 years. I am deeply disturbed by the actions of our legislators over the past two years. They have spent a lot of time and money creating a complicated system for evaluating teachers. I have neither the time nor the space to go into all the problems with this system. It has been widely written about in the news, so you can judge for yourself. In my opinion the biggest problem facing our education system is the large number of students we have who cannot read or cannot read well enough to do their grade level work. Somewhere along the way we have failed these students. You can’t blame the teachers alone. By the time these students get to the fifth or sixth grade they are placed with a class of 25 or so students and a teacher who has to teach up to a hundred or more state objectives on grade level in 180 days. Sometimes these students are pulled out for 30 minutes or so of extra help and sometimes the teacher has an assistant to help. These students cannot learn to read under these circumstances. Most of the time they need an expert in the field of reading instruc-

tion. One day of staff development with an expert does not give the teacher the knowledge to help these students. Parents need to insist that the state legislature come up with a plan to help these students and funds to pay for this plan. My senator, Dolores Gresham has spent her time backing legislation that will allow our students to attend a for-profit, virtual shool in Florida. Our tax dollars pay for this. This school is not accountable to anyone. They don’t get evaluated at all. She has also helped pass legislation that takes

away teachers’ rights to negotiate their contracts. This was the only way we could influence what we thought should be done for our students. We no longer have the right to elect our representative to our retirement board. The people of this state need to start asking questions of their elected officials. They need to look past party affiliation and elect people who will do the right things. I believe that Meryl Rice is the best candidate for senator in district 26. Sincerely, Greg Treece Selmer

Jackson Life Member Telephone Pioneers meeting Aug. 16 The Jackson Life Member Telephone Pioneers will meet at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 16 at Perkins Restaurant in Jackson. Please bring school supplies for Parkway Middle School, our Partners in Education. All retired communications employees and their spouses are invited to attend. For additional information, call 423-0944.

Financial Workshop Aug. 16 BancorpSouth and Selmer Senior Center are co-sponsoring a Financial Workshop at 10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, at the Selmer Senior Center, 230 N. 5th St., Selmer. Topics will include Reverse Mortgages, Phishing, scams targeting senior adults, and the changes in how the Federal benefits will be paid beginning March 1, 2013. There will be no sales, this is an informational workshop designed to help you understand financial situations you may face in the future. Please call Hollie Knight at 645-7843 for more information, or to pre-register.

Boy Scouts car wash Aug. 18 Henderson Boy Scouts are having a car wash Saturday, Aug. 18, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot of FHU’s Bulliner-Clayton Visual Arts Center, 231 White Avenue. Please help support your local scout troop.

Special Needs Athletics of Selmer Fall Baseball signups Aug. 18 Special needs Athletics of Selmer is happy to announce the start of its Fall Baseball Season! All games will be at 6:30 Monday nights at Patriot Park. Our first game will be Monday, Sept. 10. The last game will be Monday, Oct. 29. We will be having sign-ups for this baseball season from noon until 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Selmer Community Center, 230 N. 5th St., Selmer. For more information, contact Linda Taylor at 6107557, or visit our website, www.specialneedsatheletics.org to download registration forms. If you are unable to make the sign-up date, you may sign your athlete up at the first game. However, this will affect the receipt of a team shirt since this is a shortened season. We invite everyone out to support these incredible athletes!

Taking Charge of Your Diabetes Class – Register by Aug. 21 UT Extension Office will be hosting a Taking Charge of Your Diabetes Class beginning Aug. 28. The class is a six-week series to be held Aug. 28, Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25 and Oct. 2 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Chester County Extension office. Cost of the total six week program is $12. (Only $2 per session!) Participants will gain skills necessary to selfmanage their condition and work effectively with their health care providers. Diabeticfriendly refreshments will be served. Registration is required by Aug. 21. For more information, or to register for the class, please call the office at 989-2103.

San Antonio Trip final payment due Aug. 23 There are limited openings left on the wonderful 7-day/6-night trip Oct. 20-26, 2012 to San Antonio, Texas, sponsored by the Selmer Senior Center. The cost of the trip is $989 per person with double occupancy. The $100 deposit is due ASAP, with the final payment due Aug. 23. For more information, contact Hollie Knight at 645-7843.

Jackson Children Teen Theater Auditions Aug. 23 - 24 The Jackson Children Teen Theatre will hold auditions for its fall production of “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” on Aug. 23 and 24 at 3:45 p.m. at the Ned R. McWherter West TN Cultural Arts Center, 314 E. Main St., Jackson. Those auditioning should be ages 12 through high school. Everyone will be asked to sing 25 measures of a Broadway Show tune and read from the script. Production dates are 7 p.m. Oct. 18 and 19. In this delightful adaptation of her popular children’s book, Judith Viorst set Alexander’s rather trying life to music and brings to the stage one of America’s feistiest characters.

Chickasaw State Park trail cleanup Aug. 25 We need your help! Come join us at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, and help clean up our trails. We need volunteers to help pick up litter and clean up your park! This is a great opportunity for scouts, clubs and volunteer groups. For answers to questions or for more information, call the Chickasaw State Park Office at 989-5141.

Montezuma Community Center Big Country Breakfast Aug. 25 The Montezuma Community Center will have a Big Country Breakfast, from 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25. The cost will be $6 per plate, with all the trimmings. There will also be a bake sale, ladies. Please come and support the Center.

Davis family reunion Aug. 26 The Davis family reunion will be at the New Friendship Community Center. Family may begin coming at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Aug.

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26. Please bring a dish and enjoy good fellowship.

Diabetes Self-Management classes begin Aug. 28 Chester County and McNairy County UT Extension are partnering to offer a program to help you learn to be a Diabetes SelfManager. Take Charge of Your Diabetes is a fun, skill-building program designed for people with diabetes. Anyone living with diabetes is encouraged to attend this six-week program. Cost for the program is only $12 for the entire 6 weeks! The classes are from 5 - 7 p.m. Aug. 28, Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25 and Oct. 2 at the Chester County UT Extension office (Public Safety Building). Registration is REQUIRED by Aug. 23rd. Diabetic refreshments will be served. Classes are subject to cancellation if participation does not reach the minimum number required in order to facilitate the class. For more information, call 989-2103.

Modern Woodmen announce New Youth Club starting Sept. 1 A new Modern Woodmen of America Youth Service Club is starting in Henderson. The club will have its first activity at noon Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, at Chickasaw State Park. Children between the ages of 0 and 16 are invited to the activity to find out about the benefits of membership. Missy Geary, Henderson, will lead the club and Ronnie Geary Jr., Henderson, a Modern Woodmen representative, will sponsor the club’s monthly activities. For more information, call Geary at 989-4857.

West Tennessee Health Fair offers free screening Sept. 8 West Tennessee Healthcare will once again offer free screenings at the West Tennessee Health Fair from 8 a.m. until noon Saturday, Sept. 8 at the Carl Perkins Civic Center. Tennessee Healthcare and WBBJ Television sponsor this free event. Information about West Tennessee Healthcare’s new LiFT Wellness Center will highlight the health fair. Free screenings at this year’s health fair will include: blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, bone density for people ages 50 and above, vision, grip strength, foot screenings, height and weight, oxygen saturation and body mass index. You are encouraged to fast at least four hours before having your blood taken for a cholesterol screening or a glucose screening. This year free colorectal cancer screening kits will be distributed as well. The public will also have the opportunity to take advantage of on-line risk assessments including: HeartAware, SleepAware, CancerAware, SpineAware and DiabetesAware. Also for the first time, mini sessions will be offered on healthy eating and diabetes management as well as ask the physician sessions and exercise classes every hour. The Jackson-Madison County Metro Narcotics Unit is asking the community to bring and dispose of unused prescription drugs at the fair. There will also be special areas for children, seniors and disabled individuals with screenings, games, prizes and educational information. Each child who visits the health fair is eligible to get a free gift. Prizes will be given away throughout the fair. For more information about the West Tennessee Health Fair, call Kay Cranford at 541-4907.

Racing So They Can Ride on Sept. 15 Racing So They Can Ride, with a 5K, 10K, and 1 mile fun run/walk will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012. Registration will be 7-7:30 a.m. Location of the event is Dick’s Sporting Goods in Jackson. Register at racesonline.com. Preregistration ends Sept. 9. Entry Fees are 5K-$25, 10K-$30 and one mile-$15. After Sept. 1 add $5 to each entry fee. For more information, email mmmoore1@yahoo.com.

2012 Walking in the Footsteps of Christ Tour Register by Sept. 15 Registration deadline is Sept. 15 for a faith-filled pilgrimage to Israel, to walk in the footsteps of Jesus, and to worship in the land called Holy. The tour will depart from Nashville on Nov. 15 and return on Nov. 26. Pilgrimage price is $2,895, plus $150.00 for gratuities. The price includes private bus and two meals per day. Price is based on double occupancy. Tour is limited to 20. For more information, contact Dr. Roger L. Penn, P.O. Box 579, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, or call 989-2732 or 901277-0167, or email rpenn58@gmail.com.

Fields of Faith at Union University Soccer Field on Sept. 26 Fields of Faith is a peer-to-peer movement where thousands of students from across the nation gather on their school’s athletic field to share personal stories and challenge each other to apply the Bible as their “game plan for life.” The theme is, “One Day, One Message, One Stand.” Join the field at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, at Union University Soccer Field. For more information, contact Steve Patterson at 217-8540 or spatterson@eplus.net


Obituary/Religion Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Raymond Smith

Obituaries Tommy E. Smith Feb. 11, 1941 – Aug. 12, 2012 Thomas Everett Smith, 71, passed away Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012 at Maplewood Nursing Home in Jackson. Funeral services will be 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Ricky Burse officiating. Burial will follow in Chester County Memory Gardens. He was born and reared in Henderson, the son of the late Cube Glenn and Jennie Roark Smith. He was educated in Henderson and graduated Chester County High School in 1959. He attended Freed Hardeman for one and half years. He joined his family in the Peoples Cleaners which he took over at the death of his father. He was married to Norma Smith of Finger in 1962. She preceded him in death in 1990. He closed the business in 2000. He was later employed in the Real Estate Business, later returning to the dry cleaners business working with West Side Cleaners. He was a member of the Medina First Methodist Church. He is survived by a daughter, Tonya Burks (John) of Jackson; two grandchildren, Hunter Burks and Rachel Burks, both of Jackson; and a sister, Glenda Kimball (Howard, MD) of Collierville. The family will receive friends at Casey Chapel beginning at 1 p.m. Thursday until service time at 3 p.m. Memorials may be made to www.woundedwarriorproject.org Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 16, 2012

Jana Laurie Record Harris Date of Death – Aug. 10, 2012 Jana Laurie Record Harris, 55, of Dyersburg, died Friday, Aug. 10, 2012 at her residence. Services were Monday, Aug. 13, 2012 in the chapel of Dyersburg Funeral Home with Bro. Jim Tom Pilcher and the Rev. Bill Phipps officiating. Burial was in Fairview Cemetery. She was a finance manager for automobile dealerships. The family received visitors Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012 at the funeral home. Survivors include her son, David Lowery (Holly) of Dyersburg; a step-daughter, Sandy Winchester of Dyersburg; her father and step-mother, Buddy and Margaret Record of Henderson; a sister, Jennifer Lowery (Danny) of Dyersburg; a brother, Jeffrey Record (Ellen) of Henderson; two step-sisters, Allison Hill of Savannah, Ga., and Constance Campbell of Henderson; five grandchildren, Hunter Lowery, Madelyn Lowery, Lucas Lowery, Hannah Ramsey and Tucker Cozort; a step-grandchild, Blake Winchester; and a step-great-grandchild. She was preceded in death by her husband, Nathan Harris; a daughter, Ricki Suzanne Lowery; and her mother, Olera Nance Asbridge. Pallbearers were Hunter Lowery, Blake Winchester, Eloiett Johnson II, Preston Ozment, Ben Lowery and Josh Lowery. The family requests that memorials be directed to LeBonheur Children’s Hospital. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 16, 2012

Lola Hilliard Feb. 8, 1932 – Aug. 8, 2012 Lola Carter Hilliard, 80, passed away Aug. 8, 2012 at her home. Funeral services were Friday Aug. 10, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Jay Lockhart and Ben Flatt officiating. Burial followed in Henderson City Cemetery. She was born and reared in Dyer County, at Newbern, the daughter of the late Clarence Odell and Rosa Mai Willis Carter. She graduated from Newbern High School in 1949. She married Jack Hilliard in 1951 and they made their home for 16 years in Southeast Missouri where Mr. Hilliard preached for the Churches of Christ. They did mission work in Bermuda and the Appalachian Mountains in Jellico. They lived at Sitka, before moving to Henderson in 1975 to begin work for Freed-Hardeman University. She worked in the registrar’s office and later in placement and development, retiring in 1994. She was a member of the Henderson Church of Christ and the FreedHardeman Associates. She is survived by her husband, Jack Hilliard of Henderson; two sons, Deryl Hilliard (Vicki) of Henderson and Mark Hilliard (Rosemary) of Franklin; a daughter, Deidra Beene of Henderson; four grandchildren, Alex Beene, Rachel Connor, Jessa Sexton and Mark-Aaron Hilliard; six greatgrandchildren, Jonas Sexton, Jack Sexton, Charlie Hilliard, Isaac Hilliard, Camryn Connor and Travis Connor; two brothers, Larry Carter of Newbern and Gene Carter of Dyersburg; and two sisters, Arlene Lockhart of Tyler, Texas, and Sheila Viar of Newbern. She was preceded in death by a brother, Virgal Carter. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 16, 2012

June 9, 1951 – Aug. 6, 2012 Raymond Smith, 61, passed away Monday, Aug. 6, 2012 at McNairy Regional Hospital in Selmer. Memorial services were held at 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012 in the Mount Zion Church Cemetery in McNairy County. S & S Chapel Funeral Services was in charge of arrangements. He was born in Selmer, the son of the late Wess and Evelyne Smith. He was very well known for his work as a lumber jack and timber cutter. He will be missed by a host of relatives and friends He is survived by four sisters, Mary Dean Baggett and Glenda Houston both of Henderson, Linda Sue Teaugue of Memphis and Ollie McVay of Jackson; seven brothers, William Smith of Selmer, Troy Wayne Smith of Henderson, Kenneth Smith of McNairy, Steve Smith of Henderson, and Bob Smith both of McNairy; a special caring niece, Tammy Hurst of Henderson; and a very special friend, Faye Thompson of Henderson. Also a special thanks to Caris Health Care of Somerville. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Danny and Albert Smith. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 16, 2012

Jerry Wayne Dyer Sept. 9, 1948 – Aug. 13, 2012 Jerry Wayne Dyer, 63, passed away Aug. 13, 2012 at the Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services will be 1 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Johnson Chapel with Rev. Ken Kitchen officiating. Burial will follow in Center Hill Cemetery at Reagan. He was born in Lexington and grew up in Chesterfield, the son of the late John Luther and Katie Elizabeth Todd Dyer. He began working at an early age changing tires at a service station. He worked many years doing maintenance and repair work. He married Janie Neisler in 1968. He was a hard worker and particularly loved yard work, washing cars, and painting houses. He also enjoyed fishing and conversing with people. He was a member of the Victory Temple Church and loved his dog, Rusty. He is survived by his wife, Janie Dyer of Henderson; a daughter, Talissa Neisler of Henderson; two sons, Raymond Allen Neisler Jr. (Kimberly) and James Paul Neisler Jr., all of Henderson; 10 grandchildren; and a brother, Billy Gene Dyer of Darden. He was preceded in death by a son, Steven Wayne Dyer; and two brothers, James Ray Dyer and Todd L. Dyer. The family will receive friends at Johnson Chapel from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. on Wednesday. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Aug. 16, 2012

Put out the fire Ronnie McBrayer Keeping the Faith

The ancient holy man and scholar Lal Shahbaz Qalandar was the subject of many mythological and instructive stories. In one such story, recorded by William Dalrymple, Lal Shabaz was wandering through the desert with a friend as evening began to fall. The desert was terribly cold, so the two pilgrims began to gather wood for a fire. With their pyre neatly constructed, they realized they had no way of igniting it. Lal Shahbaz’s friend suggested that he transform himself into a great bird (the meaning of “Shahbaz”) and fly down into hell to collect coals for a fire. Lal Shahbaz considered this a wise suggestion and flew away. After many cold hours Lal Shahbaz returned to his friend empty-handed. Puzzled, he asked why he had not returned with fire to keep them warm. Lal Shahbaz replied, “There is no fire in hell. Everyone who goes there brings their own fire, their own pain, from this world.” There is a great deal of truth in this story. If we think of hell as a selfimposed prison or a selfignited blaze, then Lal Shahbaz is correct: Anyone suffering from the results of their own hard-hearted decisions or their own hand is truly suffering hell. They have not been cast away by God; they have kindled their own

fire. They have hurt themselves, and nothing hurts worse than a selfinflicted wound. By Jesus’ definition, the most “burning torture to bear” is the scorching heat of resentment and unforgiveness. When we refuse to forgive others, we sentence ourselves and our world to hellish suffering. Our future – and today’s well-being – depends upon our willingness to extinguish the burning inferno in our souls by forgiving those who have harmed us. Dr. Fred Luskin offers this hopeful counsel: “To forgive is to give up all hope for a better p a s t … Fo r g i v e n e s s allows you a fresh start….” Forgiveness forges a firebreak and says, “It ends here!” The only way to stop the continual and rampant hate in this world is to make peace. The only way to make peace is to forgive. The only way to forgive is through the unrelenting love and forgiveness of God. That love will extinguish the fires of hell. That love will indeed change the world. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular ecolumns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

Montezuma United Methodist Church Revival Aug. 19-21 Montezuma United Methodist Church will host a revival August 19-21. The guest speaker will be Bro. Abe Russom. A meal will be served at 6 p.m. and at 7 p.m. the service will begin. Everyone is invited to attend.

Friendship Baptist Church Revival Aug. 19-22 Revival at Cave Springs Baptist Church Aug. 11-17 Revival continues through Friday, Aug. 17, at Cave Springs Baptist Church. Nightly services are 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Bro. Ronnie Geary will be preaching each evening.

Palestine Baptist Church Revival Aug. 13-16 Revival services will be Wednesday, Aug. 15, with Bro. Jimmy Donaldson, and Thursday, Aug. 16, at Palestine Baptist Church. Bro. James Young will speak. The starting time is 7 p.m. for all evening services.

Friendship Baptist Church, 720 New Friendship Rd,. Beech Bluff, will host a revival August 19-22. Evangelist Phil Glisson from Memphis will speak. Service times will be Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., and at 7 Monday through Friday evenings. Everyone is welcome to attend.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Holly Springs Methodist Church

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT August 6, 2012 A break in was reported at a residence on Tulip Ave. According to the report, a back window was broken, but nothing was known to be missing at the time of the report. August 7, 2012 Danny Francis Dailey Jr., 42, 607 Old Finger Road, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $300 bond. August 9, 2012 A counterfeit $20 was reportedly found as part of a deposit in a Chester County Bank overnight depository. Jessica Faye Cupples, 20, 505 Great Oaks Circle, was arrested and charged with two counts manufacture/deliver/sell of a controlled substance, possession of a schedule VI controlled substance, possession of a schedule II controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $10,000 bond. Derrick Sherrod Galvin, 36, 505 Great Oaks Circle, was arrested and charged with criminal impersonation, two counts manufacture/deliver/sell of a controlled substance, possession of a schedule VI controlled substance, possession of a schedule II controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of $250,000 bond. Takisha Moore, 23, 358 Laura St., was arrested and charged with aggravated assault and vandalism. August 10, 2012 A Corner Express customer reportedly attempted to pay for purchases with a counterfeit $20. The customer gave a statement to the police, reporting the counterfeit $20 was believed to have been received when he cashed his check at an outof-town business.

August 11, 2012 A theft of prescription medication, clothes and cash was reported at a Baughn St. residence. Missing items included approximately $150 in several pieces of clothing, $175 in cash, and 10 150mg Lamictae, 4 7.5mg Hydrocodone and 6 3mg Requip. An attempted break in was reported at Hillview Manor. According to the report, officers found shoe prints on the door and cracks in the door frame from what appeared to be the force of kicking, as well as damage to the door frame latch. It did not appear that entry had been made, and nothing was known to be missing at the time of the report. August 12, 2012 Jessica Hughes Delorey, 27, Stantonville, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $300 bond. Lisa Collins, 45, 570C Steed St., was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a schedule IV controlled substance. She is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $5,000 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT August 7, 2012 10:07 p.m. - 335 E. University St., FreedHardeman University, Sewell Hall, cooking set off alarm. August 9, 2012 6:15 p.m. - 1495 White Ave., vehicle fire. August 12, 2012 12:51 p.m. - 270 E. Main St., Freed-Hardeman University, Brown Kopel, false alarm. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT August 6, 2012 A burglary was reported at a residence on Allen Peddy Loop. According to the report, the resident allegedly found pry marks on the door and then realized several times miss-

ing. Missing items include a black Dell laptop computer valued at $800, a gold necklace with a gold cross valued at $200, a side by side double barrel .410 shotgun valued at $500, a silver 38 revolver valued at $400 and several Hydrocodone pills. August 7, 2012 Lisa Kaye Jones, 40, Bethel Springs, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Misdemeanor. She is held in the Chester County jail with no bond. August 8, 2012 Scotty Douglas Mayes, 42, Finger, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $750 bond. Jacob Andrew Pope, 21, Jackson, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,000 bond. James Douglas Williams, 48, 597 Sanford, Apt. 201, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license, simple possession and manufacture/deliver/sell of a controlled substance. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $1,000 bond. August 9, 2012 Don P. Campbell, 49, Lexington, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $300 bond. Brandon Allen Kilzer, 30, 1490 Parker Loop, was arrested and charged with violation of Community C o r r e c t i o n s Misdemeanor, possession of legend drugs without a prescription and driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released on his own recognizance from the Chester County jail for the violation, after posting a $1,500 cash bond for the possession and driving charges. August 10, 2012 Harold Lamont Arnold, 33, 253 N Franklin Ave.,

was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $300 bond. Ricky Dean Box, 42, 800 Talley Store Road, was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $250 bond. Paul Edward Martin Jr., 27, Jackson, was arrested and charged with aggravated kidnapping, aggravated rape and carjacking. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of $200,000 bond. August 11, 2012 Dakota Lee Parker, 23, Reagan, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 bond. August 12, 2012 Willie Neal Burton, 45, 318 N Franklin Ave., was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000 to $9,999. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of $5,000 bond. Michael Vincent Heinen, 23, Enville, was arrested and charged with assault and vandalism. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $50,000 bond. Nicholas Dewayne Wolfe, 26, Enville, was arrested and charged with resisting arrest. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,000 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Mitchell J. Hammett, 37, was found to be in violation of Community Corrections. His probation was revoked and reinstated, sentence to begin anew.

Annual Starlight Symphony set for Aug. 25 The Jackson Symphony’s 33rd annual “Starlight Symphony” will be performed on the grounds of Jackson’s First Presbyterian Church on Aug. 25. The Starlight Symphony has been held on the grounds of the First Presbyterian Church, 1573 North Highland Avenue, each August for the past 32 years. No admission is charged for this community event which draws audiences of more than 5,000 from throughout the mid-south region. “The Starlight Symphony is The Bank of Jackson’s gift to the community. We are pleased to co-sponsor this event for the 15th consecutive year,” said Anita Kay Archer, Assistant VicePresident, Business Development Officer, with the Bank of Jackson. “Let us all join together for this community gathering in support of our Jackson

Symphony.” Prior to the symphony’s performance, a concert prelude is performed on the Jackson Memorial Carillon of First Presbyterian Church. Additional concert music selections will reflect the 2012-2013 season of The Jackson Symphony. Highlights of this concert include the performance of Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” featuring the carillon, live civil war cannons manned by historic re-enactors, and free ice cream treats provided by the Bank of Jackson and Horne, LLP! The Starlight Symphony is just one of the gifts The Jackson Symphony provides to the community each year. Others include Youth Orchestra performances, Discovery Concerts, Christmas Gift to the Community Concerts, Tuba Christmas, as well as many, many more. The 2012 Starlight

Symphony begins at 6:45 p.m. with the “Carrillon Prelude” to be performed by Kathleen Huneycutt, carilloneur. The Jackson Symphony performance is at 7:30 p.m. under the leadership of Music Director and Conductor, Dr. Jordan Tang.

The mission of The Jackson Symphony is to enrich the quality of life in West Tennessee through performance that incorporates a variety of musical styles in a welcoming atmosphere and through a broad spectrum of educational programs for people of all ages.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

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One person can make a difference: Jordan Moore fights for the voiceless “No matter what you’re going through, you can always help somebody else” By Marney E. Gilliam Staff Writer

Jordan Moore, 28, was born in Nashville but has lived in Henderson since she was 4 years old. She is currently working on her Master’s Degree in Public Administration with a concentration in Non-Profit Management at the University of Memphis. She will graduate in May 2013 and then will either “go to work at a non-profit with future plans of getting my Ph.D. or pursue a Ph.D. after graduation.” “I haven’t decided, but I’d really like to continue my education,” she said. She doesn’t know where she would ultimately like to work. She describes her interests as “arrayed” and loves anything that “has to do with the voiceless.” She enjoys working with the elderly and worked at the Chester County Nursing home every summer during high school and for three years after receiving her Bachelor’s Degree. She believes she would be happy working in the field of geriatrics, human rights, or animal rights. Moore added that her parents fostered a charitable spirit in her. “I’ve

because this is the kind of world where people tell you ‘you can’t make a difference. One person can’t save the world.’ But Paul, to me, is the person that completely defies that. That’s what really inspired me and made me want to work for him so badly.” Moore received the internship after writing to the Foundation through their website. She told them that she had to have an internship as part of her Master’s Degree program and that “it was her life’s dream to work with” Rusesabagina. After a telephone interview, she was offered the position in Chicago, Ill. After being told she had the position, she was so happy she cried. She worked remotely in Memphis for the Foundation before her internship began and then spent six weeks in Chicago. Her time was spent on research and writing. She helped update all varieties of data for the Foundation’s new website. The interns were also in charge of maintaining the Facebook page to mobilize young people. The culmination of her

Photo courtesy Kathryne Kurth

Paul Rusesabagina is the founder of The Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation. always been instilled with that,” Moore said. “You give back. I feel like no matter what’s going on, we’re very lucky in this country and I feel like I’ve been very blessed. Even though we all go through very hard times, you can always help somebody else.” Moore just finished her internship with The Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation. The Foundation was founded by Paul Rusesabagina in 2005. Rusesabagina was in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide and saved more than 1,200 people when armed gunmen repeatedly came to massacre everybody in the hotel where he was the manager. At risk to his own life, he talked them out of it day after day. Moore learned of the Foundation as an undergraduate student at UT Knoxville. First, hearing Rusesabagina’s story, then seeing the movie based on it, Moore was excited when she was finally able to meet Rusesabagina after a speech he gave at Rhodes College in Memphis. “To me his story is so moving

efforts was her Healthcare Report on Rwanda. With so much going on in the world today, Moore found it most challenging to create interest in Rwanda. “I think a lot of people haven’t heard the story of the genocide. They’re not familiar with

Photo courtesy Jordan Moore

From left are: Julia Savich, Hannah Helbert, Jordan Moore, Aaron Kearney, Elena Colas and Becky Neems. it, and that’s the challenging part: keeping people aware and being able to get people behind us.” The Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation has a very small staff of about four to five permanent employees as well as about eight interns. It is funded entirely by private donations. The Foundation is based in Chicago while Rusesabagina has made his home in Brussels. While Rusesabagina is not present for the day to day affairs, the staff keeps him constantly informed. Where is Rwanda? According to the Encyclopedia of Nations (http://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/economies/ Africa/Rwanda.html), “the Republic of Rwanda is a land-locked country located in central Africa. It is bordered on the east by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, with which it shares the shores of Lake Kivu; on the north by Uganda; on the west by Tanzania; and on the south by Burundi. Rwanda is a small country with an area of 26,338 square kilometers (10,169 square miles). Comparatively, Rwanda is about the size of the state of Maryland. The capital city of Kigali is in the center of the country.” So why was this Foundation formed and what is its purpose? To fully understand it, one must look at the history of Rwanda. Moore describes the tension in Rwanda by explaining how the two ethnic groups in Rwanda, the Tutsis and the Hutus,

came to exist and developed over time. Before the Belgians colonized Rwanda, a person was defined as a Tutsi or Hutu based on wealth, usually on the number of cattle he owned. One could climb the social ladder so to speak by gaining more cattle and becoming a Tutsi. But when the Belgians came they froze the social classes and allowed no more upward movement. They gave much of the control to the Tutsis but when the Belgians pulled their forces out, they left the power to the Hutus because they were the majority. Unfortunately, this led to violence that was spawned from the mistreatment of one side by the other. And as power has shifted back and forth, the violence continues. During the genocide in which Paul Rusesabagina saved so many, the country seemed to be in chaos. Moore explained that because Rusesabagina was a Hutu and the Hutu people were in power during the genocide, Rusesabagina could have left the country safely at any time. But Rusesabagina’s wife was a Tutsi and he chose to stay to protect her and others. Rusesabagina’s choice to stay put him in danger as well. Many moderate Hutus and those who stood up for Tutsis were killed along with those they protected. When the Tutsis took back power Hutus suffered too. After leaving Rwanda, Rusesabagina began speaking at various

engagements regarding United States. Under the the genocide in Rwanda current regime, no one and some friends can oppose or speak approached him, encour- against the president in aging him to start a foun- any way or they could face dation. Moore reveals that prison or death. “We really when Rusesabagina first just want to advocate for founded his organization democracy and truth and his focus was on widows open political debate.” and orphans created by the The eventual goal is to genocide. However, once have a “truth in reconciliasome time had gone by, he tion commission” so that found that the corruption those who have been and inequality that led to wronged in the past can the genocide were still feel free to express thempresent in the country and selves without fear. Moore that there were other feels that this will help the organizations with a simi- country move forward lar mission. Therefore, without any more ethnic Rusesabagina decided to conflict. change direction and use Paul Kagame is the curhis foundation to further rent president. He is a democracy in the country. Tutsi and Moore feels that So what is going on in he is problematic because Rwanda today? Through “he stifles his opposition.” Moore’s research she has Moore recounts cases of found that currently the journalists jailed or majority of Hutus live in deported because they rural poverty while the criticized Kagame. Tutsis are concentrated in “People that run against the capital city of Kigali. him, that speak out against Because of their location, his party, are either the Tutsis have access to harassed until they leave, many things that the they disappear, or they’re Hutus do not such as assassinated. It’s very healthcare and clean much a country where you water. Moore fears that it can’t speak out. He wins is only a matter of time his elections by landslides before this injustice because people aren’t breeds violence. “You allowed to disagree with have all of these people him.” that are living in poverty Victoire Ingabire is a and it’s for no other reason woman who ran against except that they’re just President Paul Kagame in not on the winning side a previous election. Moore right now. And I feel like if explained that Ingabire nothing changes in that had been out of the councountry, you give it a few try for years but returned years and we’re going to to run for president advobe back to the same condi- cating for “shared power, tions that led to the geno- for understanding.” cide.” Kagame’s government has Rwanda has a democra- charged Ingabire with cy of sorts but it’s not like See RWANDA, Page 14-A you would find in the

Photos courtesy Kathryne Kurth

At a speech Paul Rusesabagina gave at the Conrad Brussels for the London Speakers Bureau on Feb. 3. a graphic artist “drew” Rusesabagina’s speech in real time as he was presenting. Left, Rusesabagina meets the graphic artist. At right is a sample of the artist’s work during Rusesabagina’s speech.


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

From Page 13-A

Rwanda “genocide denial” because Ingabire has stated that in the genocide Hutus died as well as Tutsis. “The Rwandan government refers to it as the Tutsi genocide. If you say Hutus suffered too, Hutus died too, that’s a crime.” Moore pointed out that Ingabire is “basically looking at life in prison.” Moore further stated that Ingabire boycotted the last part of the trial because it had been corrupt and “so obviously one-sided that she knows that this isn’t going to go her way. It’s not been fair.” Moore disclosed that a recent UN report demonstrated that Kagame’s government is funding M23. M23 is a rebel force within the Congo that Rwanda is funding and supporting in hopes that M23 will eventually take over the Congo. The Congo is known for its mineral wealth. Rwanda has “made a fortune from mining their wealth and using their people” and

The Foundation works to combat all of these atrocities through educating both the public and politicians because “Rwanda is one of the most aid-dependent countries in the world, and they get help without question because there was a huge international guilt after the genocide because people were so afraid to step in while almost a million people were slaughtered.” Moore recently had a part in writing a letter from Rusesabagina and the Foundation to Bill Clinton in which they encouraged the former president to rethink his support for President Kagame’s regime. She is proud of the positive attention and support that the Foundation got because of the letter. Moore was told by Rusesabagina that he believed her writing in the letter was “excellent.” She states “I could live on that compliment for the rest of my life.” The Foundation is currently asking the politicians to “cut military aid. Don’t keep fueling a president who is not open and

Photo courtesy Jordan Moore

Jordan Moore and Aaron Kearney worked at the Foundation together. humanitarian aid but Moore says, “The U.S. cut $200,000 of aid in the last couple of weeks to Rwanda for their military training and then other countries followed suit. I think [Kagame’s] lost

Photo courtesy Kathryne Kurth

Straight Talk Africa. Paul Rusesabagina with hosts Shaka Ssali and Katrina Lantos Swett. the Rwandan government hopes for that to continue if M23 comes to power.

honest with what he’s doing.” The Foundation recognizes the need for

around $60 million in aid from the different countries that have already cut

funding. Other countries are already talking about pulling funding as well just because they don’t want to fund this corrupt regime.” As well as writing letters as part of her internship, Moore wrote a report on the state of healthcare in Rwanda. Moore found most shocking that “17 percent of the people in the country have access to over 81 percent of the medical personnel because the majority of doctors and nurses are concentrated in Kigali and only 17 percent of the people live there. Their average life expectancy is 55.” Moore shared the stories told by a nurse, Claire Uwamutara from Rwanda, who attended a meeting at which President Kagame was present. Uwamutara was told that as a nurse she was suppose to “... limit the number of Hutu births by finding ways to make birthing complica-

tions, such as sewing scissors into the mother’s stomachs as a kind of population control.” According to Moore, Uwamutara worked in a prison for a time too and was given infectious vaccines so that a certain percentage of the inmates would die that way. To Moore, Uwamutara’s stories were really eye opening. Ultimately, Uwamutara’s husband and 9-year-old son were killed. Uwamutara’s husband was in the military and had, like her, refused to kill others based on the regime’s political agenda. Uwamutara was forced to flee the country with her remaining children and only the clothes on their backs. Overall, Moore felt honored to be part of educating others regarding the heartbreaking circumstances of those in Rwanda and working to

make a difference to those who struggle every day there. Her favorite part of the internship was getting “to work day-to-day fighting for something that is so real, then actually seeing results.” She enjoyed working with people who were like-minded and who “… were just as excited about this as I was.” She has advice for those who want to ultimately work in a charitable field. “I would tell them to really think about what they are passionate about. The possibilities are just endless. Choose something you believe in and think is worth fighting for. You can get so discouraged, but if you really want to make a difference, you can.” If anyone wants more information about The Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation, visit their website or their Facebook page.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Page 15-A

City of Henderson makes ordinance change By James A. Webb Editor in Chief

Henderson City Council approved a change to the city’s ordinance governing minimum lot size. The action came at the Council’s regular monthly meeting Aug. 9 at City Hall. The amendment to the Municipal Zoning Ordinance now allows for a subdivision exception on lots not meeting the minimum lot area requirement in residential two-lot infill subdivisions. Subdivided lots failing to meet the minimum lot size may be approved if they meet all the following criteria: A. Contained entirely within a residential district(s); B. Does not exceed a two-lot subdivision; C. Able to meet all setback requirements and minimum width at the building line for said district, and; D. Able to meet minimum

street frontage requirement. Building Inspector Brent Beshires stated the lot in question, on Iris St., was originally laid out for a house, but did not comply with current ordinances. The change was passed unanimously, as was a second reading which followed. The change became effective immediately. The meeting had a lengthy agenda but moved quickly, lasting approximately 35 minutes. One delegate addressed the board, Randle Jones, owner of Jones Lumber in Magic Valley, offered the city $1,000 for the lot next to Jones’ business in which a city water tank previously stood. The tower was removed in the last three weeks, and Mayor Bobby King stated because the lot was so small the city could actually do nothing with it but

keep the grass mowed. The council agreed to sell the lot to Jones provided he pay for the surveying. The Council also approved the “Report of Dept Obligation on the $500,000 Gas Department’s seven-year Capital Outlay Note. They also approved a six-month extension, in the amount of $22,000 per month, under the current terms on the lease agreement with Eagle Logistics for the city-owned building at 60 Record Drive. Air conditioner breakdowns at Fire Station No. 1 forced the city to make emergency repairs at a cost of $4,300 through Mike LeCornu Heating and Air. However, Fire Chief Glenn Bryan stated he only had $4,000 in his budget for maintenance, therefore Councilman Johny Farris made the motion to pay for this item out of capital outlay and

Two charged with drug violations Two persons were arrested Aug. 9 following the execution of a search warrant at a Henderson residence. Jessica Faye Cupples and a John Doe, who refused to give police his real name, face multiple charges following their arrest at 505 Great Oaks Circle by officers of the Henderson Police Department. Each is charged with possession of schedule II, possession of schedule VI, manufacturing/selling of controlled substance, sale and delivery of cocaine, possession of controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of schedule II with intent to resell, possession of schedule VI with intent to resell, manufacturing/delivery/selling of controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Doe is also charged with criminal impersonation. According to the incident report, officers executed the search warrant at 505 Great Oaks Circle finding two persons, one

JOHN DOE

JESSICA FAYE CUPPLES

of whom was identified as Cupples. Doe repeatedly refused to give his name to police, giving several false names and aliases instead, and he was found in possession of a stolen driver’s license. Cupples denied knowing anything about marijuana or cocaine in the house, and said that “Derrick” comes to the residence and stays while she is at work. Doe is said to have stated to police

that he visits Cupples and did not know anything about narcotics in the house. Officers also confiscated cash, plus audio and video equipment. Cupples and Doe each were scheduled to appear in General Sessions Court on Aug. 14. Doe is being held in the Chester County Jail under $250,000 bond, and Cupples under $10,000 bond.

the council approved. Two temporary employees were transferred to the Public Works Department to fill in for employees that quit or are out on extended sick leave. Reports were also given on replacement of the city’s email server, and update was given on increases in Liability, Workman’s Comp and Property Insurance above what was budgeted for 2012-13. The council was also given updates on current and future projects. King noted the City of Henderson would have a tent at Freed-Hardeman University on Saturday as the college welcomes its new students. A temporary closing of Hamlett Ave. was announced for Tuesday, Aug. 22, as FHU holds a dedication for its new science building. Swearing in of newly elected city officials is tentatively set for Aug. 30. King and Aldermen Farris, Buel “Snookum” Maness, and Michael A. Phelps were each reelected Aug. 2 without opposition.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Henderson’s water tower in Magic Valley was taken down recently, and the land sold last week to the adjacent business, Jones Lumber Company.


Page 16-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Four injured in separate accidents Four persons were injured and sent to area hospitals in two separate accidents last weekend. According to the Tennessee Highway Patrol, at approximately 6:15 p.m. Friday, a Nissan Sentra driven by Alicia Rinks of Pinson left the roadway and overturned while traveling south on in the 900 block of Deanburg Road. Rinks, and a passenger, Elizabeth Rinks, were each taken to Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Elizabeth Rinks

was later discharged. No information was available on Alicia Rinks. A juvenile passenger was airlifted to the Med in Memphis. Her condition is unknown at this time. In a separate incident at approximately 4 p.m. Sunday, a three-vehicle chain reaction accident resulted in Jeff Kneller of Reagan being transported by ambulance to Jackson Madison County General Hospital where he was later discharged. According to the

Tennessee Highway Patrol, Zachary Kneller of Scotts Hill was west bound on Hwy 100 driving a Ford 350 pickup and attempting to turn left on to Talley Store Road. However, a Ford Explorer driven by Mica Freeman of Henderson is alleged to have struck the rear of a Buick Park Avenue driven by Jeff Kneller, causing it to strike the rear of Zachary Kneller’s vehicle. Freeman was cited for improper following and no proof of insurance.

Chester County High School Class of 1946 The CCHS Class of 1946 met for their 66th anniversary Saturday, Aug. 4, at Whisker’s restaurant, with 11 classmates attending. Seated front row left to right: Carrie Neal Cherry, Lavelle Rogers Page, Kathryn Harwell Eldridge, Louise Sanford Finley and Ruby Nobles Wright; Second Row: W.T. Nolen, Lurlene Butler Guinn, Dorothy Johnson Mitchell, Neva Bailey Harvey, Elbert Jones and Murray Cook.

Photos by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Tennessee State Trooper Kevin Davidson, center, sorts out the information concerning a three-vehicle chain reaction incident which occurred at the intersection of Hwy 100 and Talley Store Road Sunday afternoon.

From Page 1-A

BBQ Friday, Sept. 28, and the Thomas Media Adult Talent Show will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29.

Contact Thomas Media for entry forms. The Miss Chester County BBQ Festival Pageant will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at Williams Auditorium and is sponsored by Star

107.7. Festival vendor booths are still available, please call the Henderson/Chester County Chamber of Commerce for more information at 989-5222.


Sports Page 1-B

Thursday, August 16, 2012

CCHS Eagles near perfect in Jamboree By James A. Webb Editor-in-Chief

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Tyler Seagraves breaks away for big yardage in the Chester County Eagles’ 21-0 victory Friday in the annual Jamboree at Eagle Stadium.

Star Physical Therapy Football Jamboree Aug. 10 at Eagle Stadium Decatur County Chester County

0–0= 0 14 – 7 = 21

Unofficial Statistics: DC First Downs 5 Rushing (atts., yds.) 14-46 Passing (comp. Atts., int., yds.) 2-5-0=47 Penalties, yards 0-0 Fumbles, lost 2-1 Punts, average N/A

CC 6 17-199

Hardin County dominates, Cobb victorious in skills Hardin County athletes dominated the skills activities at half-time of the Jamboree, winning three events including two by the Tigers’ Kendall Atkinson who won with a 47-yard punt and 55-yard pass. Hardin County’s Freddy Palomino won the kick-off contest with a 56yard boot. Other winners included Chester County’s Trannard “Tootie” Cobb in the 40-yard dash for backs and ends, Aaron Gauldin of Dyersburg in the 40-yard dash for linemen, and Adamsville’s Alli Petty took first place in the popular 30-yard dash for cheerleaders.

1-1-0=14 3-15 1-0 N/A

Scoring Summary: First period: (10:35) CC – Seagraves 68 run (Miskelly kick), [0-7]. (0:25) CC – Hearn 14 pass from Kesler, (Miskelly kick), [0-14]. Second period: (0:13) CC – Butler 4 run (Miskelly kick), [0-21].

Special promotions even in postseason

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Jeff Teague, left, of Teague-Noles 45 Automart, presents the award to Trannard Cobb of Chester County after Cobb won the 40-yard dash for backs and ends at the Star Physical Therapy Jamboree Friday at Eagle Stadium.

Junior Boys eliminated, awarded Sportsmanship Every player pitched and all had fun, and along the way the Chester County Dixie Junior Boys won three contests in the World Series played Aug. 4-8 in Christiansburg, Va. They also brought home some hardware as they were awarded the Sportsmanship Trophy. Chester County, the Tennessee State Champions, out-slugged the host team Christiansburg 12-9, outplayed the Georgia champions 5-1, and again won a slug-fest beating Brunswick County, N.C. 16-12. However, the lack of pitching depth was their downfall in a semi-final 163 loss to Sebring, Fla. It was Chester County’s second setback at the hands of Florida, including a 10-0 loss in the opening round. Florida then extended Sumter County, S.C. into the “if necessary” game

See CCHS, Page 2-B

Generals announce playoff dates

CC Youth Football announces signups Final signups for Chester County Youth Football League is scheduled for 10 a.m. until noon, Saturday, Aug. 18, also at Eagle Stadium. Equipment will be passed out at this meeting, and cheerleaders will be sized for uniforms. The program is for children in grades K-5. For more information, call Jerry Newsom for player information at 608-0489, or for cheerleaders call Misty Ellis at 608-0071.

Chester County coaches knew not what to expect when their relatively inexperienced Eagle football team took the field Friday in the Star Physical Therapy Jamboree at Eagle Stadium. CCHS was coming off of one of the school’s greatest gridiron seasons with a 10-3 record, but graduated 16 seniors, seven of whom signed college scholarships. However, the Eagle players were confident, expecting to win and they did, 21-0 over Decatur C o u n t y Riverside. The twop e r i o d warm-up to the regular season featured four games and eight teams played under always perfect conditions. A packed house of fans roared their approval on almost every snap of the football, most leaving with smiles and eager anticipation of the upcoming season. “Huge hats off to this community and (CCHS athletic director) Doyle Murphy. They know how to do the jamboree,” said CCHS head football coach Michael Hodum. “Doyle has been doing this for a long time, and he does a good job of arranging it.” Hodum also noted the tremendous support of the Henderson/Chester

County community which gets behind the effort that brings thousands of outof-town fans to Henderson and helps support the CCHS athletic program. Hodum also was wellpleased with his football team which committed a few bobbles but mostly dominated play against a former long-time rival which the Eagles have not played in the regular season for several years. It took CCHS only 85 seconds to put points on the board. Junior running back Tyler Seagraves took a handoff on third down and two to go, zipped through the hole created by the offensive line, and then simply outran the Panthers’ defense for the score 68y a r d s later. Wilson Miskelly booted the first of his three extra-points and the Eagles were on their way to victory. Decatur County did manage three first downs on the next series but gave the ball up on downs. Again the Eagles wasted little time in putting points on the board, the final 14 yards coming on a pass from sophomore quarterback Sam Kesler to senior Colton Hearn who dove for the goal line just stretching the ball into the end zone.

before the Palmetto State champs won the championship. In the victory over Georgia, George Tatum and Braden Lott took care of the mound duties, together allowing 10 hits and 10 earned runs. The Tennessee champions

scored four times in the sixth, only one earned, to pull away to the victory. Cameron Neely had three hits for Tennessee in five trips to the plate and stole a base while driving in three runs. Nathan Lott drove in four on two hits and scored twice.

opened the contest with a six-run first inning, all earned. Two unearned runs padded their lead to 8-1 before Carolina began a furious comeback. Three runs in the fourth and five more in the fifth inning brought Carolina back to within two runs of Tennessee. However the victorious Volunteer State

In the final loss to Florida, Tennessee coaches knew their pitching staff was mostly used up, but began the game with Cody Compton on the mound. He later gave way to Trey Beecham, who gave way to, well anyone who wanted to give it a try including LaDerrick Means and finally Neely.

Florida hitters took advantage of the opportunity by pulling away with a sevenrun fourth, and six-run sixth. Chester County avoided a run-rule loss by scoring three times in the fifth inning on a double by Neely, a walk to Braden Lott and hits by Tatum and Chance Lott. However, Florida completed the mercy-rule ending by scoring six times in the top of the sixth for the 163 win. As the contest came to a close, Chester County coaches realized the end was near and made sure all the players brought home fond memories of the trip. They allowed the players to choose their position in the field, with some playing positions they had never tried, such as Means who took a turn behind the plate as catcher.

The Jackson Generals baseball club has announced that games one and two of the 2012 Southern League Divisional Series, which will be played at Pringles Park, will feature two top promotions from the regular season. Game one of the Series is scheduled for 6:05 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6, and will be Dollar Thursday, with general admission tickets, hot dogs, popcorn, soda and draft beer all available for only one dollar each. Reserved seating tickets will be available for the special price of five dollars. Game two will be at 6:05 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, and will be followed by a Classic TV-themed High-Tech Special Effects Fireworks show. If the Generals win the second-half North Division championship, games four and five will be played at Pringles Park at 6:05 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9, and Monday, Sept. 10, if necessary. The Generals will also introduce their Whiffle Ball Challenge following every post-season game. All fans who bring their own whiffle ball to the park and write their name on it will be allowed to throw their ball at a target on the field for a chance to win cash with a top prize of 10 percent of the attendance of each post-season game with a guarantee of at least $100 and up to $600 with a sell-out. Tickets for games one and two are on sale now. Tickets for all other games will be available once that game becomes necessary. Opponents for all 2012 SL Playoff games will be determined at the conclusion of the regular season. Season ticket holders will receive their tickets for all possible 2012 SL Playoff games at Pringles Park in the mail in the next few days. As the Generals make their push towards the playoffs, they want to encourage fans to come out and support their Generals during the final 10 games of the regular season at Pringles Park by introducing “Win with the Generals.” Following the final out of every remaining Generals win during the regular season at Pringles Park, all fans will receive two complimentary tickets for any post-season game that the Generals play at Pringles Park in September. Tickets for all Generals home games can be purchased at the Generals Box Office at Pringles Park, online at jacksongeneralsbaseball.com or by calling 988.5299.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Chester County Junior High 2012 Football Schedule Date Opponent Location Aug. 16 Bolivar Henderson Aug. 23 Univ. School Jackson Aug. 30 West Henderson Sept. 4 Hardin County Savannah Sept. 13 Lexington Lexington Sept. 20 Jackson Christian Henderson Sept. 27 Trinity Christian Henderson Oct. 4 Selmer Selmer * Junior Varsity games before each contest, 5:30 p.m.

Time 6:30 7:00 6:30 6:30 6:30 6:30 6:30 6:30

2012 Sixth Grade Schedule Date Opponent Aug. 28 Decatur County Sept. 8 Alamo Sept. 15 Univ. School Oct. 2 Decatur County

Location Parsons Alamo Jackson Henderson

Time 6:00 TBA TBA 6:00

Chester County High School 2012 Freshman/Junior Varsity Football Schedule Date Opponent Location Aug. 27 South Side (JV) Jackson Aug. 30 Bolivar Cent. (Fr) Bolivar Sept. 6 South Side (Fr) Henderson Sept. 10 Scotts Hill (JV) Scotts Hill Sept. 13 Hardin County (Fr) Henderson Sept. 17 Adamsville (JV) Adamsville Sept. 20 Humboldt (Fr) Humboldt Sept. 24 Trinity Chr. (JV) Henderson Sept. 27 TBA (JV) Henderson Oct. 1 Jackson C-M (JV) Henderson Oct. 8 Bolivar Cent. (JV) Henderson Oct. 15 McNairy (JV/Fr) Henderson

Time 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 TBA 6:30 TBA 6:30 6:00 6:00

Chester County High School 2012 Girls’ Soccer Schedule Date Opponent Time Aug. 23 Madison Acad. 5:00 Aug. 28 McNairy Cent. 5:00 Aug. 30 Univ. School 6:00 Sept. 4 Trinity Christian 5:00 Sept. 6 Adamsville 5:30 Sept. 14-15, Liberty Tournament, times TBA Sept. 18 Scotts Hill 5:00 Sept. 20 Martin Westview 5:00 Sept. 24 South Side 7:00 Sept. 25 North Side 5:00 Sept. 27 McNairy Cent. 6:00 Oct. 2 Lexington 5:00 Oct. 4 Liberty Tech 4:30 Oct. 9 Fayette Acad. 6:00

Location Jackson Henderson Jackson Jackson Adamsville Jackson Henderson Henderson Jackson Henderson Selmer Henderson Henderson Somerville

Submitted photo

Chester County’s Dixie Sweetees, coach-pitch age 5-6, participated last month in the State Tournament at Lexington. Team members include Ivy Knight, Brooklyn Rush, Annabelle Lockridge, Brooklyn Butler, Maleah Griggs, Hannah Hughes, Tori Snodderly, Mykayla Martin, Sydney Stout, Natalie Croom, Sarah Holder and Blakely Wilson.

Sweetees take sixth, get Sportsmanship Chester County’s Dixie Sweetees, girls’ softball ages 5-6, recently participated in the state tournament at Lexington, placing sixth out of the 11 teams in the tournament. CC also received the coveted Sportsmanship Trophy. Rain delayed the opening day games, July 14, and McEwen further dampened Chester County’s spirits with a 17-6 victory. However, CC bounced back in the second round to

defeat Madison Central 20-18. Atoka then ended the season for Chester County with a 24-22 setback. Maleah Griggs led the team offensively, going eight-for-nine at the plate with five runs scored. Ivy Knight, Brooklyn Rush, Tori Snodderly, and Sydney Stout each had seven hits. “The girls played well, and we were extremely proud of their performance as well as their sports-

Chester County High School 2012 Football Schedule Date Aug. 17 Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Adamsville Hardin County Jackson Central Merry Dyersburg Bolivar Central Open McNairy Central Lexington Liberty Tech South Side Fayette-Ware

Location Adamsville Eagle Stadium Jackson Eagle Stadium Eagle Stadium Selmer Eagle Stadium Jackson Eagle Stadium Somerville

Freed-Hardeman University 2012 Women's Soccer Schedule Date Time Opponent Location Aug. 20 3:00 Truett-McConnell Cleveland, Ga. Aug. 21 3:45 Point East Point, Ga. Aug. 25 5:00 Harding (scrimmage) Searcy, Ark. Aug. 31 6:00 St. Catharine Henderson Freed-Hardeman Lions Cup Labor Day Tournament Sept. 3 Noon Louisiana College Henderson Sept. 6 5:00 Bob Jones Greenville, S.C. Sept. 14 7:00 Davenport Henderson Sept. 15 5:00 Auburn-Montgomery Henderson Sept. 18 7:00 Bethel Henderson Sept. 22 Noon Benedictine ………. Sept. 25 5:00 Martin Methodist Pulaski Sept. 27 2:00 Harris-Stowe State St. Louis, Mo. Sept. 30 1:00 Rhodes Memphis Oct. 9 5:00 Union Jackson Oct. 13 1:00 Bethel McKenzie Oct. 16 5:00 Martin Methodist Henderson Oct. 19 7:00 Trevecca Nazarene Henderson Oct. 27 7:00 Williams Woods Henderson

Freed-Hardeman University 2012 Fall Golf Schedule Date Opponent Sept. 17-18 Freed-Hardeman Fall Inv. Oct. 8-9 Trevecca Fall Inv. * Oct. 29-30 Redhawk Fall Inv. Nov. 5-6 Union Fall Inv. ** * Women only; ** Men only

Location Covington Old Hickory Lawrenceburg Jackson

Jackson Generals Baseball Date Aug. 16 Aug. 17 Aug. 18 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 21 Aug. 22 Aug. 23 Aug. 24 Aug. 25 Aug. 26 Aug. 27 Aug. 28 Aug. 30 Aug. 31 Sept. 1 Sept. 2 Sept. 3

Opponent Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Mobile Mobile Mobile Mobile Mobile Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville

Location Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Mobile, Ala. Mobile, Ala. Mobile, Ala. Mobile, Ala. Mobile, Ala. Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park

Time 7:05 7:05 6:05 2:05 7:05 7:05 7:05 7:05 6:15 6:15 1:15 6:15 1:15 7:05 7:05 6:05 2:05 2:05

Southern League postseason playoffs - To be announced.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Interested fans were all smiles as they enjoyed four contests under clear skies and nice temperatures Friday at the jamboree at Eagle Stadium.

Jester is CCHS “Iron Eagle” Kyle Jester is the Chester County High School football Iron Eagle for 2012. Jester, a 6’1” junior lineman, totaled 227 points in the competition which is a combination of lifts, squats, and weightlifting activities. Four seniors make up the next four members of the top-five. Running back Veto Swain is second with 217 points, linebacker

Jonathan Murley is third with 192 points, back Masion Gray is fourth with 188.5 points, and running back Matthew Butler rounds out the top five with 178.5 points. The Eagles face Decatur County Riverside Friday at Eagle Stadium in the last of four preseason Jamboree games. The regular season gets underway at Adamsville Aug. 17.

From Page 1-B

were loyal, worked their butts off and now it’s their turn.” Due to injuries, Kesler had not played since seventh grade. “He did a good job of doing what we needed him to do running the team down the field. That was big for a sophomore,” continued Hodum. CCHS now must forget about the jamboree, which after all is just a scrimmage, and get ready for the season opener at 7 p.m. Friday at Adamsville. The Cardinals lost to CCHS 12-6 in the opener last year, and then ran off 12 straight before losing in the state semi-finals. “It’s a broken record, they are big and physical up front,” said Hodum of the Cardinals. “They are always well-coached. They have a lot of excitement. It’s a small town that really gets behind their team.”

CCHS A Riverside fumble, recovered by Chester County’s Veto Swain, set up the final score of the contest. Matthew Butler, one of the few returning starters for CCHS got the final four yards rushing to complete the 21-0 victory. Seagraves had only five carries on the night, unofficially gaining 124 yards. About the only blemish on Chester County’s performance of the night were three penalties for 15 yards, one resulting in a Riverside first down. “Seagraves has waited his turn. He played junior high, played junior varsity, and now he’s the guy,” said Hodum. “The line, the new guys did a good job too. They put their time in with the JV. They

manship,” said Coach Jason Lockridge. “The rapid learning and skill development of the girls at this level is remarkable, and these girls have more state tournaments in their future. Most importantly, I think the all-star experience was a lot of fun for them.” Summertown eventually won the tournament, going undefeated and beating Dyersburg 21-2 in the championship game.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

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Hall of Fame Golf Scramble is Sept. 7 The third annual FreedHardeman University Athletics Hall of Fame Four-Person Golf Scramble is scheduled for a 9 a.m. shotgun start, Sept. 7 at Woodland Hills Country Club near Pinson. Cost is $75 per player, or $300 per team which includes cart, greens fees and lunch. Teams will be flighted, and prizes awarded for flight winners, longest drive and closest to the pin. Proceeds from the event go to benefit FreedHardeman University golf programs. For more information, call the FHU Athletics office at 9896900.

Special Needs Athletics announces fall season Special Needs Athletics of Selmer has announced the start of its Fall Baseball Season. First game is 6:30 p.m. Sept. 10 at Patriot Park. All games will be played on Monday nights through Oct. 29. Signups are noon until 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Selmer Community Center, 230 N. Fifth St., in Selmer. You may also sign up at the first game. For more information, call Linda Taylor at 6107557, or visit website www.specialneedsathletics.org.

Tennessee custom tin to showcase state pride and monuments Cookie Advantage, a national franchise system that provides customized gifts for businesses, created a custom Tennessee tin to showcase the shrines that everyone knows and loves about Tennessee. The tin allows businesses and people to share their Tennessee pride and love with their customers, friends and family. Cookie Advantage provides a customer followup service to help businesses secure repeat and referral customers. The company delivers a custom tin with made-fromscratch cookies to businesses’ customers. Each tin includes a “Thank You” note along with a customer survey or a referral card. Cookie Advantage has 20 operating franchises in 15 different states, and is looking for potential franchisees in Tennessee. Cookie Advantage will award a total of four franchises in the Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville areas. Cookie Advantage doesn’t require the franchises to be set up in these cities’ proper, just in the city’s territory. The initial investment to buy a Cookie Advantage franchise is $25,000 with minimal additional investment to establish the bakery making the total investment only $60,000 $80,000. Cookie Advantage franchise owners enjoy a four-day work week by design, allowing owners to enjoy a threeday weekend, which is rare for business owners. For more information or to schedule an interview, contact PR Manager Heather Carver at (918) 779-5771.

Cheerleader Olympics Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Cheerleaders from some of the participating schools race for the finish line in the 30-yard dash at the Jamboree Friday at Eagle Stadium.

Understanding second impact syndrome protects players Perhaps thanks to professional sports leagues, concussions have become a hot-button issue within the medical community. Rule changes in the National Football League were enacted to protect players not only from concussions, but from further injury after suffering a concussion. Beginning with the 2010 season, NFL players who were diagnosed with a concussion during a game were not allowed to re-enter the game and were subjected to thorough testing in the days following to determine if they would be allowed to play the following week. If they failed the tests, they were not cleared to play. Though protecting its players was at the core of that rule change in the NFL, a condition known as second impact syndrome might have also played a role in the league’s decision. A rare condition in which a second concussion occurs before a first concussion has healed, second impact syndrome causes severe and rapid brain swelling. Fans of the NFL, and other sports where the risk of head injury looms large, as well as parents of athletes and athletes themselves can educate themselves about second impact syndrome to get a better idea of just how important it is to emphasize safety when it comes to head injuries. Who is most at risk?

Due to the nature of certain sports, athletes, and particularly young athletes, are most at risk for second impact syndrome. According to BrainandSpinalCord.org, an online resource for brain injury and spinal cord injury survivors, second impact syndrome is most

common among young people who play football, hockey and baseball as well as those who ski or box. These sports can be especially violent, even for youngsters. How soon can second impact syndrome occur?

A second impact injury can occur within minutes of a first concussion. Such a reality only highlights the importance of the NFL’s decision to keep players from returning to games in which they have suffered a concussion. Athletes young and old should never return to a competition if they have suffered a concussion. In order to avoid further damage, players must be removed from the competition and stay on the sidelines until fully healed. A second impact injury might also occur days or even weeks after the first concussion, and the impact does not have to be severe for a second impact injury to occur.

certain instances. Such rapid brain death is one reason for the high fatality rate among young athletes who have suffered a second impact injury. Longterm effects of second impact syndrome are similar to those of severe traumatic brain injury. Speech, cognitive ability, sensory ability, perception, and social and emotional interactions might be permanently affected after a second impact injury. Athletes who complain of or demonstrate any of the symptoms of second impact syndrome should be pulled from their competition immediately and visit a sports medicine physician for follow-up care. The worst thing to do is minimize the significance of a concussion or its symptoms, especially if it’s a second impact injury.

Young athletes, particularly those who play football, are susceptible to second impact syndrome.

What are the symptoms of second impact syndrome?

Symptoms of a second impact injury typically occur immediately after the injury. Some of the more common symptoms include: • Dilated pupils • Loss of eye movement • Appearance of being stunned • Unconsciousness • Sudden collapse • Respiratory failure After an initial brain injury, the brain is so vulnerable that even minimal impact can cause irreversible damage. When the injury occurs, the brain struggles to control the amount of blood volume to the brain and, as a result, a second impact injury can lead to rapid brain death, which occurs in as few as three to five minutes in

TAKE US on vacation Chester Countians are now planning exciting destinations around the globe. When you take your trip this summer, be sure to Take Us With You. Just take along a copy of the Chester County Independent, and have your photo taken as you read the paper on the beach, or in front of a well-known landmark (similar to the photo above). Then submit the photo to the newspaper and we’ll publish it in a special edition next fall. You can also win prizes. For more information, call the Independent at 989-4624.


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By Garrett Bowen Attention parents who have seniors in high school. The yearbook staff of CCHS would like to stress the importance of turning everything in on time or before the due dates. The dates are as follows: Senior quotes – Aug. 29-31; Baby Pages –

By Misty Hall Picture day is almost here! Yes, you read that correctly! Fall picture day will be Wednesday, Aug. 22. Schedule that haircut, pick out your clothes, and get here on time with a brilliant smile and a rocking hairstyle because these photos will last a lifetime, preserved in the West Chester yearbook. Kindergarten students are off on their

By Kim Scott Our year at East Chester has started in a great way! We welcomed three new teachers: Sara Beth Connor in kindergarten; Blair Beckham in first grade; and Victoria Botts in second grade. We also have some new faces in the cafeteria, Krystale Ross is back with us and Darlene Priddy has joined our cafeteria staff. We also welcomed Carissa Miller to our custodial staff. Thirty of our students participated in our Summer Reading Program! We are so proud that they chose to continue reading over the summer to keep those reading skills ready. Students received free ice cream, a pencil, and a little critter as rewards for reading this summer. Congratulations to Nathan Shirley, Ty Baker, Brianna Arroyo, Robby Novak, Jagger Young, Hallie Bramblett, Maggie Huckaby, Drew Bramblett, Riley Plunk, Cade Thompson, Reese Robison, Pearce Walker, Rachel Pierce, Colt Eskew, Garrett Robison, Brett Tims, McKinley Hopkins, Blake Snyder, Ben Jones, Chance Thompson, Colston Callis, Anna Robertson, Haydn Haltom, Evan Eads, Blakely Wilson, Ethan Hopkins, Carter Welch, Jackson Knoell, Jada Arnold and Lawson Young. We’ve had Olympic fever at East Chester so far this year! The thirdgraders are enjoying an Olympic unit for beginning school activities. In addition to this, each room in our building has an Olympic Country display

Education Sept. 5-7; and Casual Pictures – Sept. 26-28. All underclassmen pictures were supposed to be taken Tuesday, Aug. 14. The representitives from Lifetouch took the senior drape and tux pictures on Aug. 15th. The CCHS football team won their Jamboree game against Riverside 21-0. Everyone should show up to as many football games as possible to show support for our team. They play this upcoming Friday Aug. 17 against Adamsville at Adamsville. If you can’t make it there, show support however you can. amazing quest to learn to read, beginning with 12 new sight words this week! Parents, please be sure to practice these words at home with your child each night. When parents and teachers work together, students are more successful. Also, please have Kindergarten students wear yellow on Friday, Aug. 17. West Chester students will be finishing their STAR reading and math tests this week in the computer lab with Mrs. Renee. Your child’s results should come home soon. If you have any questions, you can ask your child’s teacher. Have a great week West Chester family! outside their door so that as we travel around our school, we can “visit” these countries and learn a little about them. We had very successful parent orientation meetings last week. Every meeting was very well attended and lots of good information for this school year was shared with our parents. Our students have been participating in STAR testing. Students are assessed in reading and math each nineweeks using this program. We are able to use the results to help students master the skills they are struggling with. Parent reports were sent home in order to keep everyone informed about the children’s progress. We enjoyed a very fun “back to school” party from 6 to 8 p.m. at Up ‘N’ Jumpin’ on Friday night. Lots of East Chester students, parents and staff attended. Thanks to Nathan Ward for providing this fun place for us to celebrate the beginning of school together! There has been a change in our first PTO meeting date, due to a conflict with Chester County Middle School. We will have our first meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 21. Parents that also have students at Chester County Junior High should be able to attend our meeting, and at 7 p.m. go over for their Eagles Nest meeting. We hope many of you will be able to attend to hear all about the great plans our PTO has for our school year. Important dates to remember: Aug. 21: PTO meeting at 6 p.m. Aug. 21- 31: PTO Membership Drive Sept. 3: No School – Labor Day We are looking forward to a “Paws-atively” awesome year at East Chester.

By Ally Rogers All Junior High students participated in taking the STAR Assessment in both reading and math this week. The purpose of this assessment is to help teachers better serve students on an individual basis. Students will be given the STAR Assessment several times throughout this school year so they can see personal gains and monitor their educational growth. School pictures were taken last Friday. If your child was absent, or if you get the pictures back and are not satisfied, re-takes will be taken in the next few weeks. Individual

sports (football, softball and soccer) and team pictures will be made on Aug. 22. Watch for upcoming details. The CCJHS Eagles football team, coached by head coach Steve Robinson and assistants Todd Lewis, Mike Showers and Jeff Cupples, played their first scrimmage Thursday night against Adamsville. Both the JV and Varsity teams had BIG wins with complete shutouts against Adamsville. They will face Bolivar this Thursday night at home, and will play against University School of Jackson on Thursday, Aug. 23, the JV games will begin at 5:30 p.m., and the Varsity will play at 6:30, at the USJ stadium in Jackson. Come and support our Eagles! The girls’ soccer team, coached by Hunter Callis and Tommie Kirk, play their first game on Monday, Aug. 20 at

Thursday, August 16, 2012 Lexington. They will play their first home game Thursday, Aug. 23 against Jackson Christian School. They have worked hard all summer preparing for this season. I hope you will make it to one of their games. We will have a pep rally on Aug. 16 to honor all of these teams. I hope you will make time to come and support our student athletes and their coaches. Good luck … GO EAGLES! Mark your calendar for a very important meeting of our Eagle’s Nest parent association on Aug. 21. By attending you will learn how you can support our students and you will have the opportunity to tour our school. You will not want to miss this very informational meeting. We will pass out the individual TCAP score sheets to students next week. Teachers plan to go over the results with

them. Ask your student to see his or her sheet, as well. Check out our website, w w w. c h e s t e r c o u n tyschools.org. It is current. and will be an excellent resource for all parents and students. It contains links to teacher emails, lunch menus, sports schedules and much more! We want to extend a warm welcome to Ms. Sonya Luttrell who was most recently added to our staff. She brings a happy, smiling face with her, and we hope she enjoys working with us at the Junior High. Progress reports will go out on Thursday, Sept. 6. Ask your child to see his/hers. If you have questions, or want to talk to a particular teacher about your child’s grades, please call or email to find out the best time to meet with them.

Eight ACT prep class sessions Oct. 2 - 25 Jackson State Community College invites the community to take advantage of the ACT Prep Class Oct. 2 – Oct. 25 to boost your ACT scores at lightning speed! In just eight sessions, you will learn everything you need to know to do well on the ACT test, including essential test-

taking techniques, hardhitting strategies, and ways to use the multiplechoice format to your advantage. You will receive targeted skill-building instruction to maximize your abilities in the four sections of the ACT (English, reading, science reasoning, and math).

You will also take two practice tests to help you become familiar with the test format and feel more comfortable on testing day. Just a few days after you finish the course, you will be able to take the actual ACT test. You are responsible for scheduling your own exam.

The class will be at Jackson State Community College’s Jackson Campus, McWherter Bldg., Room 231. The price is $175. To purchase tickets go to www.jscc.edu/continuing-education.html. For more information, contact Holley Wood at 425-2627 or hwood@jscc.edu

The Sea Turtle Rescue Chapter 2 - Mom goes to work! By Eric Douglas (Last week ended with: “Girls, can you go get your Mom for me? Tell her some boaters found a sea turtle that’s been injured. She’s going to need to get to work,” he said.) The girls sped to their house, one of the stilt houses that dotted the island. The Outer Banks are low islands that barely rise up higher than the ocean itself. To keep the water out when a big storm hits, the houses are built on stilts. “Mom, Mom, where are you? Dad needs you!” Jayne called out as soon as they got inside the house. They found their mom in the kitchen, unpacking boxes of dishes and putting away supplies. They had moved into their new home, but their dad had started his job as soon as they got there. They joked that they were camping in their new house, unpacking a box whenever they got the chance. Things were still a mess, but they were trying to get through it and get settled as quickly as they could. “Slow down, girls. I’m right here,” Ann said. “What’s going on?” “Dad needs you to come over to the research center,” Jayne said, the words coming out in a rush. “Yeah, right now,” Marie added. “What’s wrong? What’s going on?” Ann asked. “Did something happen to your Dad?” “No, he’s ok, everything’s fine,” Jayne said. “He got a call that some boaters found a sea turtle that was hurt. They were bringing it in for you to look at it.” “Oh!” Mom exclaimed. “Time to get to work,

then. I’m not finished setting my lab up, but I guess we’ll just make it work, won’t we?” “Sure, Mom, and we’ll help you, too,” Marie offered. “I just hired a new assistant. I’d better call her, too,” Ann said out loud as she began to make plans. She left the kitchen for a moment to put on her work clothes and call her new assistant. “What do you think makes a turtle sick?” Marie asked her older sister. “I don’t know. Dad said the turtle was injured. That means its hurt, not sick,” Jayne replied, trying to sound like she knew what was going on. “We’ll ask Mom. I hope she lets us help – she didn’t say anything when you asked.” “Of course I’ll let you help,” their mom said

Photo by Sammye Sanford

when she came back into the room. She was dressed in her medical clothes and looked like a doctor, not Mom anymore. The girls were used to the change, having helped her care for hurt and sick animals before. This would be the first time they had helped with a sea turtle, though. “You’ll need to listen to me very closely. I don’t know what happened to this turtle. If it’s hurt too badly and I don’t think you should see it, I’ll tell you. If that hap-

pens, you’ll have to leave. All right?” “Yes, Mom,” the girls answered, excited. “Then let’s walk over to the center and get things ready,” Ann said. (Check back next week for more of this story.)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

By Nancy Connor By Amy Wooley The boys and girls at the Creek, including our newest members of our Jacks Creek family, the kindergarteners, are settling into the procedures and rules quite nicely. The kindergarteners are meeting new friends, learning about school rules, identifying colors and color words and a whole lot more fun and exciting activities. They have learned the nursery rhyme, “Humpty Dumpty,” a song about Humpty Dumpty, and have made their very own Humpty Dumpty art project. Our first-graders are busy reviewing kindergarten skills and sight words. Ms. Michelle and Ms. Susan are very excited about what their firstgraders know and how well-behaved they are. They have all been getting to know each other with their “All About Me” booklets. Also, the first grade “All About Me” project is due back in on Aug. 13. The children love sharing their projects. The second grade students are working on their “All About Me” projects as well. Not only are they sharing information about themselves on their “All About Me” posters, but they are excited about personalizing their own posters with fabric, ribbon, buttons, glitter, sequins, and so forth. Their projects will be on display during Open House on Aug. 16. The second-graders have been working hard on becoming refreshed with the rules and procedures of school and have been discussing the importance of having good manners as well. Mrs. Amber’s thirdgraders are practicing rules and procedures of the Daily Five in reading. They have also been reading several books by Kevin Henkes, and made self-to-text connections with them. Mrs. Amber would like the parents of her third grade students to ask their child which Kevin Henkes character is their favorite, and why. They have also been working on retelling and summarizing stories and are practicing place value in math. Ms. Haley’s thirdgraders read “Boom Town” by Sonia Levitin, and discussed life long ago during the California Gold Rush. Students learned how the City of Henderson was formed as a railroad stop on the Mobile Railroad, and that it too became a boomtown. Friday’s science activity, panning for gold, demonstrated that the physical properties of a mixture are used to separate the mixture. Students saw that gold is much denser than other materials, just like the miners saw during the Gold Rush. Finally, be sure to mark your calendars for our Open House Aug. 16, and Fall pictures Aug. 23. These pictures will go on sale at our PSO meeting on Sept. 10.

The first full week of school has drawn to a close and students are already hard at work. We need all emergency forms and bus notes returned to school. Open House is Tuesday, Aug. 14. The evening will begin in the auditorium and then continue in your child’s classroom. This is the perfect time to become acquainted with you child’s teacher and ask questions. The TCAP test scores for last year are in and will be handed out during Open House. Students participated in “The NED Show” Aug. 1. NED stands for: Never give up; Encourage others; Do your best. The program encourages positive attitudes, better behavior and academic achievement in school. You can find more information at www.theNEDshow.com. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Friday, Aug. 17, is Up-NJumpin for Your School,

The PTS Support Drive. The T-shirt sale will begin Aug. 20 and go through Sept. 5. Mrs. Callis’ class is working on a book project as they read “Because of Winn Dixie.” Students will choose a project from a list, which might include drawing a map of Florida, making a vocabulary book, creating a party invitation for Opal’s party, or making a model of the grocery store where Winn Dixie was found. Projects will be due Friday Aug. 31. Fourth grade has had fun learning the steps to the scientific method. Most classes have been doing fun science experiments using these steps. Mrs. Snider’s class had fun making “jitter bugs” the first week of school. They said “Goodbye to jitter bugs, and Hello to Fourth grade.” All fourth-graders have really done a great job transitioning from elementary school to the middle school. Computer lab and library will begin next week. Internet permission forms have been sent home. Students will not be allowed to use the computers until these forms have been completed and returned.

Treasurer Lillard hosts financial literacy summit for teachers in Jackson The first 100 elementary school teachers who sign up for an Aug. 25 financial literacy summit in Jackson will each be eligible to receive a $50 gift card from Amazon and a $20 gas allowance. However, all the summit par ticipants will be getting something much more valuable: Financial literacy lessons that they can teach their students and apply to their own lives. The free summit is being sponsored by the Tennessee Financial Literacy Commission, which is administered by the Tennessee Treasur y Department. The commission is emphasizing the importance of teaching students financial literacy skills at a young age so they will develop and maintain good habits later in life. The summit will also stress the importance of reaching out to students’ parents, to help them develop good financial literacy skills and recognize the importance of saving for their children’s college education. Representatives from Smart Tennessee and the Memphis branch of the Federal Reser ve Bank of St. Louis, a partner in the Tennessee Jump$tar t Coalition, will lead panels. Another session at the summit will provide teachers with infor mation on preretirement planning from staff members of the Tennessee C o n s o l i d a t e d Retirement System, which is also a division of the Tennessee Treasury Department. Treasurer David H. Lillard Jr. will speak to the summit attendees about the importance of financial literacy education.

“I encourage elementary school teachers, particularly those living in West Tennessee, to attend this ver y wor thwhile and helpful event,” Treasurer Lillard said. “No child’s education is complete without a good understanding of financial literacy skills. This summit will provide teachers with tips about how to integrate the teaching of those skills into their lesson plans.” The summit will be held from 8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Aug. 25 in the Wilder Student Union Building on the L ambuth Campus of the University of Memphis, 705 L ambuth Blvd. in Jackson. Free parking and lunch are provided for attendees. Teachers who attend the summit may be eligible for professional education credits, if per mitted by their school districts. To register online, teachers can visit www.TNFLC.org. For questions, they may contact James Ar mistead at (615) 532-5892 or by e-mail a t James.Ar mistead@tn. gov. The Tennessee Financial Literacy Commission is a nonprofit organization created by the Tennessee General Assembly in 2010. Treasurer Lillard chairs the commission’s board, which includes the commissioners of the state’s departments of financial institutions and education and six other Tennesseans from across the state. This is the second in a series of financial literacy summits that will be held across the state. The first was held in Nashville in June.

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FHU in top four of conservative universities

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Freed-Hardeman University is among the nation’s most conservative universities, according to a recent national survey. Newsweek magazine recently released its list of the top universities in several categories. FreedHardeman University of Henderson is listed as the No. 4 most conservative university in the nation. FHU is a Church of Christ affiliated university, as are three of the top 11. The magazine also gives FHU a score “5” in a 10-point scale in terms of political diversity.

Top Conservative Universities (As compiled by Newsweek Magazine) (Political diversity, 1-10 scale, in parenthesis) 1. Ave Marie, Florida (2.4) 2. Grove City College, Pennsylvania (2) 3. Fransiscan of Steubenville, Ohio (2.7) 4. Freed-Hardeman, Tennessee (5)

5. Dordt, Iowa (3.6) 6. Brigham Young, Utah (3.2) 7. Oklahoma Christian, Oklahoma (5.7) 8. Covenant, Tennessee (2.3) 9. Northwestern, Minnesota (3.2) 10. Washington and Lee, Virginia (2.7) Other schools of interest: 17. Lee, Tennessee (5.9) 21. Liberty, Virginia (5.2)

Coordinated school health hosts seminar to help parents help their children Attention parents, join the Chester County School System for an educational seminar entitled “A Parents’ Guide to Helping Your Child Survive in a Fast-Moving Society” on Saturday, Aug. 25, at Chester County Middle School. Times for the seminar will be from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m.

At 9 a.m., Laura Melaro, APN, with Melaro Behavioral Consultants will present “Stress and Teens.” At 10 a.m., Justin Denbow, SRO for Chester County Sheriff’s Department/Chester County Schools will present “Cyberbullying: Internet Security and Responsibility for

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools and Chester County Middle School

Broccoli/cheese Baked sweet potato fries Salad Watermelon

*Milk choice offered daily Monday, August 20 Popcorn chicken/roll Corndog Mashed potatoes Salad Peaches or apple wedges Tuesday, August 21 Lasagna/cheesy garlic stick Ham sandwich Green beans Carrot sticks/ranch Salad, orange slices Wednesday, August 22 Cheeseburger or Turkey/cheese wrap Baked beans, corn Salad Applesauce or cantaloupe Thursday, August 23 Dixie scroodle fish sticks Or crispito White beans Macaroni/cheese Salad Mixed fruit or banana Friday, August 24 Pizza or Tuna salad plate

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, August 20 Popcorn chicken/roll Corndog Mashed potatoes Salad Peaches or apple wedges Tuesday, August 21 Lasagna/cheesy garlic stick Ham sandwich Green beans Carrot sticks/ranch Salad, orange slices Wednesday, August 22 Cheeseburger or Turkey/cheese wrap Baked beans, corn Salad Applesauce or cantaloupe Thursday, August 23 Dixie scroodle fish sticks Or crispito White beans Macaroni/cheese Salad Mixed fruit or banana Friday, August 24 Pizza or Tuna salad plate Broccoli/cheese Baked sweet potato fries Salad Watermelon

Chester County High School

Children.” Both sessions will offer information and insight as well as tips and advice for dealing with these issues. The Coordinated School Health Program hopes that all parents will attend this free event. If you have questions concerning this seminar, contact Heather Griffin at 989-5148.

*Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Also, Stuffed crust pizza served as pizza choice each day Monday, August 20 Ravioli casserole/roll Pizza/salad Salad box (ham) Green beans Glazed carrots Baked apples Tuesday, August 21 Chicken nuggets/roll Pizza/salad Salad box (tuna) Mashed potatoes Broccoli/cheese Carrots/celery/broccoli ranch dip Salad Wednesday, August 22 Philly steak/cheese/hoagie Pizza/salad Salad box (turkey/cheese wrap) Baked sweet potato fries Baked beans Salad Thursday, August 23 Teriyaki chicken/egg rolls Pizza/salad Salad box (crispy chicken) Stir-fry vegetables Rice, corn, salad Friday, August 24 Meatloaf/cornbread Pizza/salad Salad box (ham and turkey) Pinto beans Mustard greens Sweet potatoes Salad


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

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FOR SALE FOR SALE – 5 Acres —$18,000 —- $200 Down —- $200 / Month. 10 Acres —- $34,000 — - $350 Down —- $350 / Month. Driveway, Dozer Work Done, Light Poles. No Restrictions and NO CREDIT CHECK. Jacks Creek Area —- 731-989-4859. (TFC) FOR SALE – Sofa, Chair & Ottoman, Self-Cleaning Stove, Older Upright Piano. Call 4351054 or 435-9608 after 4:30. (15P) FOR SALE – Slightly used sofa, excellent condition, $150. Call 731-608-1499. (15P) FREE PUPPIES – 1 Male & 1 Female Half Miniature Pinscher Pups Needing Good Home. Call or Text 731-989-0686. (15P) FOR SALE – 1985 Chevrolet, 2 Ton Truck, Flat Bed – All Steel, Twin Cylinder, Dump Bed. $4,800. Call 989-7640 or 4417992. (15P) FOR SALE – 16 Ft. Aluminum Ladder, $60. Call 731-879-0815.

FOR SALE – 27 Ft. Holiday Rambler Camper. Good Condition. $3,500. Call 731-6880008. (15P) FOR SALE – Bed frame, white iron head board, box springs, mattress, $45. Two nice brass floor lamps with shades, $25. Maple coffee table with glass top, $25. Call 989-5640. (15P) HAPPY JACK Mange Medicine promotes healing and hairgrowth to any mange, hot spot, or dandruff on dogs and horses without steroids! HENDERSONCHESTER COOP ~ 731-9894621. www.happyjackinc.com (15P)

HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE by OWNER ~ Brick, 3 BR, 2 BA, Open Floor Plan on 1.6 Acres. Must See To Appreciate. For More Details Call 731-989-7993 or 731-343-1367. (17P) FOR SALE – 1999 Model Doublewide. 1,512 Sq. Ft., 3 BR, 2 BA, Kitchen Appliances, CHA.

Must be Moved. $30,000. Call 731-608-0875. (16P) ANNIVERSARY SALE Who said you couldn’t buy a new home in the 20’s anymore! New, 2 Bedroom Homes Starting at $25,950. New, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Homes Starting at $29,950. VOTED BEST OF SHOW —Spacious 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath $44,500. All Homes Delivered & Setup on your Lot with Central Air. Hurry! Limited number at these prices. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER OF CORINTH. Hwy 72 West —- ¼ Mile West of Hospital. (TFC) SUMMER SIZZLER – New 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Energy Star Home, Vinyl Siding / Shingle Roof, 2” x 6” Wall Studs, Thermo Pane Windows, Heat Pump, Appliances, Underpinning, Delivered & Setup On Concrete Piers. ONLY $29,995! WINDHAM HOMES 1-888-287-6996. (TFC)

HELP WANTED KINCHEN’S PLUMBING SERVICE is now looking to hire a plumber’s helper. Call 731-983-

3135. (15P)

FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT – 3 BR, 1 ½ BA. 450 Baughn St. With Stove & Refrigerator. $475 / Month. $300 Deposit. No Pets. References Required. 989-2631 (days) or 989-4296 (evenings). (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 to 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2-Car Garage. 3,500 Heated Square Feet. $850 / Month. No Pets. Call 731-989-0371. (16P)

CHA, oak cabinets, washer, dryer. $425 / month. 367 University. 989-7488. (TFC)

Duplex, Excellent Condition, 1 Year Lease, No Pets. 983-2766. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $390 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, garage, appliances, fenced yard, near Chickasaw. 180 Taylor Trail. $550 / month. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – 155 Hidden Valley Lane. 2 BR, 1 BA Mobile Home. $400 / Month. $200 Deposit. Call 571-1158. (15P)

FOR RENT – Two bedroom duplex. New paint, carpet, tile. 429B Steed. $450 / month. 9897488. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. $1,500. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Retail / office space. 1950 sq. ft. $800; 1250 sq. ft. $525. United Country Realty office building. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2 BR Duplex, 2nd Street. $525 / Month. $300 Deposit. Call 731-608-8280. (TFC)

HOUSE FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 Bath, CHA, Stove, Refrigerator & Dishwasher, Fenced Yard, Inside City Limits. 733 Sand Ave. $650 / Month. $400 Deposit. Call 731435-9154. (16P)

FOR RENT – 1 BR Apartment, Pleasant Area, No Pets. $370 / Month. $370 Deposit. Call 8799119. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house,

FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA

FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 Bath Duplex Apartment located on Deer Drive. One Car Enclosed Garage and Appliances Furnished. References, Credit Check and 1 Year Lease Required. No Pets. $550 / Month. $300 Deposit. 6084885 or 989-4979. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS FOUND ~ In the Roby Area, Young Dog, Very Sweet, & WellMinded. Call 731-608-3566. (15P) ROACHES? Use Harris All Natural Roach Traps. Guaranteed. First Farmers Coop. 731-9894621. (16P) JIM’s TRASH SERVICE – $16 / Month. $13 / Month for Senior Citizens. Call 731-989-5732 or 731-879-0662. (15P)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

STATEWIDES BUY GOLD & SILVER Coins 1 percent over dealer cost For a limited time, Park Avenue Numismatics is selling Silver and Gold American Eagle Coins at 1 percent over dealer cost. 1-888665-7444 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $99.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) GOLD AND SILVER CAN Protect Your Hard Earned Dollars Learn how by calling Freedom Gold Group for your free educational guide. 888-654-8357 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR PRE-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. NEED A FRESH START/ Bad Credit? Fresh Start Program Clayton Homes in Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NO HASSLE NO GIMMICK Pricing! We Have New & Used Homes. Come by Clayton Homes of Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)

FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC Currently Hiring OTR Drivers Home most weekends, Excellent Equipment and Maintenance, P r e P a s s / E Z P a s s , BlueCross/BlueShield insurance, 2 Bonus programs, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-6849140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A EXPERIENCED DRIVERS: 6 months OTR experience starts at 32¢/mile Up to $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! New student pay and lease program! 877-521-5775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-On Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Great Benefits Package. CDL-A required. Call 888-691-4472, or apply at w w w. s u p e r s e r v i c e l l c . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS - REFRIGERATED AND DRY Van freight. Flexible hometime. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan) CALLING ALL CDL-A DRIVERS! Join the Team at Averitt. Great Hometime & Benefits. 4 Months T/T Experience Required - Apply Now! 888-362-8608 AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan)

L I V E - W O R K - T R AV E L PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-251-0768 (TnScan)

OWNER OPERATORS WANTED SOUTHEAST Regional, Class A CDL, Home Weekends, FSC Paid All Miles, $1500 Sign On Bonus Frontier Transport 800-991-6227 w w w. d r i v e f o r f r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan)

WANTED: LIFE AGENTS; EARN $500 a Day; Commissions Paid Daily; Leads, No Cold Calls; Health & Dental Ins.; Complete Training; Guidance in Obtaining License Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan)

DRIVERS/ FLATBED CLASS A. Get Home Weekends! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39¢/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, 1-800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan)

DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan)

DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan)

OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) JOIN THE SCHILLI COMPANIES New Pay Package!!! Van and Flatbed Positions Class A CDL 1yr rec. OTR Exp. Min. 23 yrs old 1-877-261-2101 www.schilli.com (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! Call for pre-hire now! 1888-407-5172 (TnScan)

TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) CLASS A CDL DRIVERS Regional or OTR 38-44 CPM, Paid Orientation, Paid from 1st Dispatch, Full Benefits, $1500 Sign On Frontier Transport 8009 9 1 - 6 2 2 7 w w w. d r i v e f o r f r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) TEAM DRIVERS - OPERATIONS In Greater Memphis Area. Good Miles/Pay/Super: Benefits/Equip/Touch Free Freight, Quarterly Bonus, Pet Friendly! CDL-A, 2 yrs. OTR exp., Clean Criminal Record, Call HR 800-789-8451, www.longistics.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 93 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 23 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz.

(TnScan) BUY GOLD & SILVER Coins 1 percent over dealer cost For a limited time, Park Avenue Numismatics is selling Silver and Gold American Eagle Coins at 1 percent over dealer cost. 1-888665-7444 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $99.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) GOLD AND SILVER CAN Protect Your Hard Earned Dollars Learn how by calling Freedom Gold Group for your free educational guide. 888-654-8357 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR PRE-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. NEED A FRESH START/ Bad Credit? Fresh Start Program Clayton Homes in Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NO HASSLE NO GIMMICK Pricing! We Have New & Used Homes. Come by Clayton Homes of Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) L I V E - W O R K - T R AV E L PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-251-0768 (TnScan) WANTED: LIFE AGENTS; EARN $500 a Day; Commissions Paid Daily; Leads, No Cold Calls; Health & Dental Ins.; Complete Training; Guidance in Obtaining License Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) JOIN THE SCHILLI COMPANIES New Pay Package!!! Van and Flatbed Positions Class A CDL 1yr rec. OTR Exp. Min. 23 yrs old 1-877-261-2101 www.schilli.com (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! Call for pre-hire now! 1888-407-5172 (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to

.04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC Currently Hiring OTR Drivers Home most weekends, Excellent Equipment and Maintenance, P r e P a s s / E Z P a s s , BlueCross/BlueShield insurance, 2 Bonus programs, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-6849140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A EXPERIENCED DRIVERS: 6 months OTR experience starts at 32¢/mile Up to $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! New student pay and lease program! 877-521-5775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-On Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Great Benefits Package. CDL-A required. Call 888-691-4472, or apply at w w w. s u p e r s e r v i c e l l c . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS - REFRIGERATED AND DRY Van freight. Flexible hometime. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan) CALLING ALL CDL-A DRIVERS! Join the Team at Averitt. Great Hometime & Benefits. 4 Months T/T Experience Required - Apply Now! 888-362-8608 AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) OWNER OPERATORS WANTED SOUTHEAST Regional, Class A CDL, Home Weekends, FSC Paid All Miles, $1500 Sign On Bonus Frontier Transport 800-991-6227 w w w. d r i v e f o r f r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS/ FLATBED CLASS A. Get Home Weekends! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39¢/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, 1-800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) CLASS A CDL DRIVERS Regional or OTR 38-44 CPM, Paid Orientation, Paid from 1st Dispatch, Full Benefits, $1500 Sign On Frontier Transport 8009 9 1 - 6 2 2 7 w w w. d r i v e f o r f r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) TEAM DRIVERS - OPERATIONS In Greater Memphis Area. Good Miles/Pay/Super: Benefits/Equip/Touch Free Freight, Quarterly Bonus, Pet Friendly! CDL-A, 2 yrs. OTR exp., Clean Criminal Record, Call HR 800-789-8451, www.longistics.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 93 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 23 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan)

BUY GOLD & SILVER Coins 1 percent over dealer cost For a limited time, Park Avenue Numismatics is selling Silver and Gold American Eagle Coins at 1 percent over dealer cost. 1-888665-7444 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $99.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) GOLD AND SILVER CAN Protect Your Hard Earned Dollars Learn how by calling Freedom Gold Group for your free educational guide. 888-654-8357 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR PRE-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. NEED A FRESH START/ Bad Credit? Fresh Start Program Clayton Homes in Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NO HASSLE NO GIMMICK Pricing! We Have New & Used Homes. Come by Clayton Homes of Lexington, TN 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1985-646-1700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) L I V E - W O R K - T R AV E L PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-251-0768 (TnScan) WANTED: LIFE AGENTS; EARN $500 a Day; Commissions Paid Daily; Leads, No Cold Calls; Health & Dental Ins.; Complete Training; Guidance in Obtaining License Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) JOIN THE SCHILLI COMPANIES New Pay Package!!! Van and Flatbed Positions Class A CDL 1yr rec. OTR Exp. Min. 23 yrs old 1-877-261-2101 www.schilli.com (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! Call for pre-hire now! 1888-407-5172 (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K

PAGE 7-B

Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC Currently Hiring OTR Drivers Home most weekends, Excellent Equipment and Maintenance, P r e P a s s / E Z P a s s , BlueCross/BlueShield insurance, 2 Bonus programs, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-6849140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A EXPERIENCED DRIVERS: 6 months OTR experience starts at 32¢/mile Up to $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! New student pay and lease program! 877-521-5775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-On Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Great Benefits Package. CDL-A required. Call 888-691-4472, or apply at w w w. s u p e r s e r v i c e l l c . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS - REFRIGERATED AND DRY Van freight. Flexible hometime. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan) CALLING ALL CDL-A DRIVERS! Join the Team at Averitt. Great Hometime & Benefits. 4 Months T/T Experience Required - Apply Now! 888-362-8608 AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) OWNER OPERATORS WANTED SOUTHEAST Regional, Class A CDL, Home Weekends, FSC Paid All Miles, $1500 Sign On Bonus Frontier Transport 800-991-6227 w w w. d r i v e f o r f r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS/ FLATBED CLASS A. Get Home Weekends! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39¢/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, 1-800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) CLASS A CDL DRIVERS Regional or OTR 38-44 CPM, Paid Orientation, Paid from 1st Dispatch, Full Benefits, $1500 Sign On Frontier Transport 8009 9 1 - 6 2 2 7 w w w. d r i v e f o r f r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) TEAM DRIVERS - OPERATIONS In Greater Memphis Area. Good Miles/Pay/Super: Benefits/Equip/Touch Free Freight, Quarterly Bonus, Pet Friendly! CDL-A, 2 yrs. OTR exp., Clean Criminal Record, Call HR 800-789-8451, www.longistics.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 93 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 23 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan)


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Public Notices SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness and obligations secured by a certain Deed of Trust on property currently owned by JOHNNY MARTIN and wife, RACHEL MARTIN, and which Deed of Trust was executed by Johnny Martin and wife, Rachel Martin, to Anthony R. Steele, Trustee for Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., and is recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 330, page 500. WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by instrument recorded in Record Book 364, page 200, in said Register’s Office. WHEREAS, the owner of the indebtedness has declared the total amount due and has directed the undersigned to advertise and sell the property described by said Deed of Trust; THEREFORE, this is to give notice that I will on September 7, 2012, commencing at 10:00 a.m., at the Front Door of the Courthouse in Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee cause to be offered for sale and will cause to be sold at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: Said property is known as 90 Walter Willis Lane, Jackson, Tennessee. For a more complete description of said property see Trust Deed recorded in Record Book 330, Page 500, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Included in this Foreclosure Sale is a 2009 Heartlander Clayton Mobile H o m e , SER#CAP023761TNAB. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twentyfour (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. R. Bradley Sigler Substitute Trustee 218 West Main Street Jackson, TN 38301

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE`S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated October 13, 2005, executed by HARRY RUSH AND RESA RUSH, conveying certain real property therein described to CTC REAL ESTATE SERVICES, as Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee recorded October 21, 2005, in Deed Book 275, Page 254-265; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-17 who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose, if required pursuant to T.C.A. § 35-5117, was given in accordance

with Tennessee law; and WHEREAS, the undersigned,Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on September 6, 2012 at 11:00 AM at the Main Entrance steps of the Chester County Courthouse , located in Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT A POINT IN THE CENTERLINE OF PINE TOP ROAD, WHICH POINT IS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEONARD RUSH AS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 65, PAGE 611, REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE AND THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE , FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND WITH THE CENTERLINE OF PINE TOP ROAD, THE FOLLOWING CALLS: SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 53.32 FEET; SOUTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 176.72 FEET; SOUTH 15 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 531.14 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A DITCH; THENCE, WITH THE CENTERLINE OF SAID DITCH, NORTH 67 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 214.01 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE, ON A NEW LINE THROUGH RUSH, NORTH 06 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 694.97 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF RUSH; THENCE, WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF RUSH, SOUTH 83 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 287.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 4.38 ACRES. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO HARRY RUSH BY DEED RECORDED IN BOOK 174, PAGE 181 IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. Parcel ID: 83-14.03 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 220 HURST RD, HENDERSON, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): HARRY RUSH OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: ASSET ACCEPTANCE LLC RESA RUSH The sale of the abovedescribed property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or setback lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as

Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38103 www.rubinlublin.com/prop erty-listings.php Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on April 27, 2007, STEVE D. GARDNER, (unmarried) by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 299, at Page 766, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Fifty Eight Thousand Five Hundred and 00/100 Dollars ($58,500.00), payable to Farm Credit Services of MidAmerica, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointment executed on July 31, 2012, and recorded in Record Book 364, at Page 199, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and

WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Thursday, September 6, 2012, at 2:00 o’clock p.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situated in the 1st Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, and as described in a Warranty Deed from Timothy Pearson to Steve D. Gardner, dated November 4, 1995, and of record in Record Book 141, page 393, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Map 063, Parcel 021.01 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 290 Lancaster Rd., Enville, Tennessee

38322, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser

all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 16th day of August, 2012. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Public Notices NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on April 22, 2005, BRENDA SMITH (DECEASED), by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 267, at Page 308, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Sixty Three Thousand Six Hundred Nine and 70/100 Dollars ($63,609.70), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointment executed on September 22, 2011, and recorded in Record Book 354, at Page 277, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MIDAMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Thursday, September 6, 2012, at 2:15 o’clock p.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situate in the 5th Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, bounded and described as follows; to-wit: BEGINNING at an iron pin set in the centerline of dirt road, which point is the most western southwest corner of Max Lott as recorded in Deed Book 65, Page 683, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence, from the point of beginning, and on new lines through Casey, the following calls; north 80° 14? 32? west 210.00 feet to an iron pin set; north 04° 56? 44? east 210.00 feet to an iron pin set, south 80° 14? 32? east 210.00 feet to an iron pin set in the west line of Lott, thence, with Lott, south 04° 56? 44? west 210.00 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1.0 acres, as surveyed by Advanced Land Surveying, Inc., R.L.S. #1999. Also conveyed hereunder is a ten foot (10’) perpetual non-exclusive easement for ingress, egress, installation and maintenance of utilities described as follows: BEGINNING at the southwest corner of the above described tract, and the following calls being the north side of said easement; south 80° 14? 32? east 414.27 feet; north 89° 18? 55? west 97.68 feet; south 67° 53? 57? east 84.02 feet; south 36° 51? 37? east 91.47 feet to the centerline of Max Lott Lane. (Description taken from prior deed of record) It being the same property as that described in a Quitclaim Deed from David E. Boggs and wife, Amanda G. Boggs, to Brenda Smith, dated March 28, 2005, and of record in Deed Book 266,

page 40, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Brenda Smith died on December 14, 2010, intestate, and under the laws of descent and distribution her property passed to her heirs at law, namely; James Hulon Smith, James Anthony Smith and Amanda Gail Boggs, identified in the Affidavit of Heirship of record in Record Book 356, at page 422, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, James Hulon Smith and James Anthony Smith conveyed their interest in the property to Amanda Gail Boggs and husband, David E. Boggs. Amanda Gail Boggs created an estate by the entireties with her husband, David E. Boggs, in her one-third (1/3rd) interest by a conveyance of record in Record Book 356, at page 426, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Said property is now owned by Amanda Gail Boggs and husband, David E. Boggs. Map 010, Parcel 031.03 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 105 Max Lott Lane, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 16th day of August, 2012. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE CLIFTON REEVES, ANTHONY MOODY, PLAINTIFFS VS. ALLISON LEE ARNOLD, DEFENDANT NO. 2012-CV-591, AT HENDERSON ORDER OF PUBLICATION AFFIDAVIT OF PLAINTIFF It appearing from the motion, which is sworn to, that the Defendant, Allison Lee Arnold is a nonresident of the State of Tennessee and that personal service of process cannot be had upon him; it is therefore ordered that publication be made for four (4) consecutive weeks in the Chester County Independent, a weekly paper published in Chester County, Tennessee requiring the said Defendant to defend a civil action by filing

his answer with the Clerk and Master, and by servicing a copy of the answer on Larry F. McKenzie, Attorney for Plaintiffs, whose address is P.O. Box 97, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 within thirty (30) days from the date of the last publication of this notice, not including the date of the last publication. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you and this cause set down for public hearing ex parte as to you. Signed the 25th day of July, 2012. Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the terms, conditions, and payments provided in a certain Deed of Trust dated SEPTEMBER 23, 2011, executed by BRYAN L. CERMAK (A/K/A BRYAN CERMAK) AND TONYA M. CERMAK (A/K/A TONYA CERMAK), HUSBAND AND WIFE, to NETCO, INC., Trustee, of record in RECORD BOOK 357, PAGE 640, for the benefit of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR 3RD FINANCIAL SERVICE CORPORATION, AN OHIO CORPORATION, in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee and to J. PHILLIP JONES, appointed as Substitute Trustee in an instrument of record in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee, to secure the indebtedness described; WHEREAS, the said Deed of Trust was last assigned to U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; the entire indebtedness having been declared due and payable by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, being the present owner/holder or authorized agent, designee or servicer of the holder/owner of said indebtedness, has requested foreclosure proceedings to be instituted; and as provided in said Deed of Trust, I, J. PHILLIP JONES, will by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as Substitute Trustee, on TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,

2012 AT 12:00 P.M. (NOON), AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE CHESTER COUNTY COURTHOUSE IN HENDERSON, CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, sell to the highest bidder for cash, free from the equity of redemption, homestead, and dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived, and subject to any unpaid taxes, if any, the following described property in CHESTER County, Tennessee, to wit: PROPERTY LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF CHESTER, TENNESSEE: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL OF REAL ESTATE LOCATED, LYING AND BEING IN THE THIRD CIVIL DISTRICT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, AND MORE PARTICULARLY BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: A REPORT OF A LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF LOT 5 OF PHASE 1 OF THE MCLINTOCK PLACE SUBDIVISION LOCATED ON THE NORTH SIDE OF DENNIS LATHAM ROAD IN THE 5TH CIVIL DISTRICT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TN WITH SAID PROPERTY BOUND RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 257, PAGE 740-744 ON SEPTEMBER 17, 2004, PHASE I, LOT 5: BEGINNING ON A SET IRON PIN AND I.D. CAP IN THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY MARGIN OF ELDORADO LANE, SAID IRON PIN BEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 4, AND THE BEGINNING SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE LOT 5 HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE WITH A NEW SEVERANCE LINE, NORTH 01 DEGREES 33 MIN. 50 SEC., EAST 420.87 FT. TO A SET IRON PIN & I.D. CAP BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5 HEREIN DESCRIBED AND LOCATED IN THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF HORNSBY ESTATES SUBDIVISION, PHASE 3; THENCE WITH SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE HORNSBY ESTATES SUBDIVISION, PHASE 3, NORTH 88 DEGREES 28 MIN. 10 SEC., WEST 249.32 FT. TO A SET IRON PIN & I.D. CAP IN THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 6, SAID IRON PIN BEING THE NORTH-

WEST CORNER OF LOT 5 HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 6 AND THE NORTHEAST RIGHT-OFWAY MARGIN OF TRUE GRIT LANE (50’ RIGHTOF-WAY), SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MIN., 37 SEC., WEST 81.46 FT., & SOUTH 28 DEGREES 01 MIN. 10 SEC., EAST 388.51 FT. TO A SET IRON & I.D. CAP AT RIGHT-OFWAY INTERSECTION OF TRUE GRIT TRAIL & ELDORADO LANE BEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 5 HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY MARGIN OF ELDORADO LANE (50’ RIGHT-OF-WAY), SOUTH 86 DEGREES 55 MIN., 50 SEC., EAST 58.78 FT., BACK TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO BRYAN L. CERMAK AND WIFE, TONYA M. CERMAK, BY DEED DATED FEBRUARY 7, 2007 OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 296, PAGE 164, IN THE REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. ALSO BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED FROM TONYA CERMAK TO BRYAN CERMAK, BY QUITCLAIM DEED DATED FEBRUARY 3, 2012 OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 361, PAGE 88, IN THE REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 180 TRUE GRIT LANE, BEECH BLUFF, TENNESSEE 38313 (A/K/A 180 TRUE GRIT LANE, CHESTER, TENNESSEE 38313). MAP 006 PARCEL 003.25 THE SALE OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, AND IS FURTHER SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF ANY TENANT(S) OR OTHER PARTIES OR ENTITIES IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY. THIS SALE IS SUBJECT TO ANY UNPAID TAXES, IF ANY, ANY PRIOR LIENS OR ENCUMBRANCES LEASES, EASEMENTS AND ALL OTHER MATTERS OF RECORD INCLUDING

Page 9-B

BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE PRIORITY OF ANY FIXTURE FILING. IF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY/ INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, OR THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT ARE LISTED AS INTERESTED PARTIES IN THE ADVERTISEMENT, THEN THE NOTICE OF THIS FORECLOSURE IS BEING GIVEN TO THEM, AND THE SALE WILL BE SUBJECT TO THE APPLICABLE GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY, ALL AS REQUIRED BY 26 U.S.C. 7425 AND T.C.A. 67-1-1433. IF APPLICABLE, THE NOTICE REQUIREMENTS OF T.C.A. 35-5117 HAVE BEEN MET. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY, TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE IN THE EVENT THE HIGHEST BIDDER DOES NOT HONOR THE HIGHEST BID WITHIN 24 HOURS, THE NEXT HIGHEST BIDDER AT THE NEXT HIGHEST BID WILL BE DEEMED THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER. OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: NONE OF RECORD THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. This day, July 16, 2012. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 180 TRUE GRIT LANE, BEECH BLUFF, TENNESSEE 38313 (A/K/A 180 TRUE GRIT LANE, CHESTER, TENNESSEE 38313). J. PHILLIP JONES SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE 1800 HAYES STREET NASHVILLE, TN 37203 (615) 254-4430 www.phillipjoneslaw.com F12-0634


Page 10-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, August 16, 2012

Chester County Independent 08-16-12  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 08-16-12

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