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Chester County High School Grads Special Section Thursday

MAY 12, 2011 147th YEAR - NO. 1

chestercountyindependent.com

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Expansion bids under budget By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Expansion work at Chester County Junior High School to add 15 additional classrooms and incorporate sixth-graders along with the existing seventh and eighth grades, will take approximately 160 days to complete said architect Jimmy Anderson at the May 5 school board meeting. MG Construction, which has constructed the most recent additions at the high school and junior high, placed the low bid in every category, for a total of $1,184,897.

Anderson originally estimated that the addition would cost $98.87 per square foot, and the bid from MG Construction came in under budget at $78.72/square foot. “I was very surprised considering the extensive amount of site work,” Anderson said. “As you know, we’re adding bus lanes, additional bypass lanes, as well as additional parking all around one side, and of course doing 15 classrooms. We’re very pleased.” See BIDS, Page 3-A

Young beauties beautifying downtown Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

As an incentive for participating in Join Hands Day and planting flowers to beautify downtown Henderson, Daisy Girl Scouts will earn a community service badge. From left are Claire Henson, Ivy Knight, and Alexa Babins. (See story and additional photos, Page 14-A.)

Commission endorses, barely, Loving Paws rescue facility A relatively routine Chester County Commission meeting Monday went to the dogs when they were asked for a simple nod of recognition. However, at the conclusion of the meeting, the consensus seemed obvious that commissioners would some day have to address the issue of animal control. Laurie Parton, with Loving Paws animal rescue, addressed the board near the conclusion of the meeting asking not for money, but for a vote of support. Parton indicated such an endorsement would aide the facility in its continuing battle to secure grants to house unwant-

stated, noting they were actually in the business already due to the expense incurred by the county in the large number of calls answered by the sheriff’s department. Crowe suggested that in the future the county should explore the possibility of contracting with the city of Henderson owned facility to handle county animal control issues. Eventually the endorsement passed, but only 11-7 on a roll call vote. Randy Morris, pastor of Hopewell Baptist Church, and a See COUNTY, Page 3-A

Guard responds to flooding

3 Sections Life & Styles Opinion Obituaries What’s Happening Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds Graduation

ed pets before they could be adopted out. Commissioners grilled Parton about how the facility is funded, and how animals are adopted out, however, they seemed surprised that no animals at the facility are ever euthanized. Sheriff Blair Weaver noted that his office answers five to six calls a week with animal complaints. Commissioner Tim Crowe, a Henderson Police officer, warned that the county, which does not have an animal control facility, would eventually have to deal with the issue. “We are going to have to get in the dog business,” Crowe

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See page 5-A

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam and Major General Max Haston announced Monday that soldiers from the Tennessee Army National Guard’s 1/278th Armored Cavalry Regiment, headquartered in Henderson, have been called to state active duty to assist in disaster relief operations in and around Tiptonville as needed. Gov. Haslam and Maj. Gen. Haston, the Adjutant General, toured flood-ravaged areas last week to assess the situation. The order to bring in National Guard soldiers came after they viewed the affected areas. With flooding expected to worsen in the next few days, approximately 100 soldiers are already performing a variety of missions. Seventy-six Guardsmen from the 278th ACR are providing high-water vehicles to support the Tennessee Wildlife

Resources Agency with whom they have been working over the past 72 hours. Guardsmen of the 194th Engineer Brigade have been involved in providing sandbagging trailers and operators to help protect the correctional facility near Tiptonville. More than 3,400 sandbags have already been filled. Helicopter support out of Smyrna is being provided by the Guard’s Aviation Office and 30th Troop Command in transporting government officials to affected areas and providing reconnaissance of the flooded areas. Units of 230th Sustainment Brigade, headquartered in Chattanooga, are providing logisticians to evaluate state and commercial facilities to be utilized in evacuations. These facilities will also be used to receive and distribute materials, bottled water and food as needed.

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

School board members receive a demonstration of the new camera system recently installed in county school buses.

City Board to meet tonight The Board of Mayor and Aldermen for the City of Henderson will meet at 7 p.m. tonight (Thursday), May 12, in the council chamber of Henderson City Hall. On the agenda is action on an ordinance amending the Accessory Building and Uses section of the Municipal Zoning Ordinance. A public hearing is set on the proposed ordinance, and they will consider its passing. They will also have action on an ordinance amending the Municipal Zoning Ordinance changing the Uses Permitted section in B-4 (Highway

Business) Zone and an M-3 (Retail Industrial) Zone to allow health services, including hospitals and nursing homes as a use permitted. The Board will hold a public hearing and consider passing the ordinance. The Board will also consider appointing a member to the Board of Zoning Appeals (BZA) to fill the unexpired term of Leon Robison, who recently passed away. Also on the agenda is to set a date and time for the utility budget meeting. The meeting is open to the public, and everyone is invited to attend.

Pre-K registration scheduled May 18 Pre-kindergarten registration will be held from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Wednesday, May 18, at North Chester School cafeteria at 186 Luray Ave. A child must be 4 years old by Sept. 30, 2011, in order to be eligible for the 2011-12 school year. Documents needed during the registration process include birth certificate (official copy),

Social Security card, proof of income, and proof of residence (example: water or electric bill, or rent receipt). You will be notified in July if your child qualifies for the class. On the first day of school you must provide updated immunization records and physical exam. For information, call Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 9895134.

Chester, other counties, on disaster list TODAY’S WEATHER

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Monday the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has approved nine counties to receive federal disaster assistance due to tornadoes and flash flooding in the state on April 4 and 5. The counties include: Chester, Davidson, Decatur, Dickson, Henderson, Humphreys, Lake, Shelby and Sumner. “Though we are currently focused on severe flooding in

counties along the Mississippi River, we have not lost sight of the severe weather damage many Tennessee counties received in early April,” Haslam said. “This federal disaster declaration will ensure these county governments receive assistance in repairing and replacing damaged infrastructure.” For more information on FEMA’s public assistance program, go to http://www.fema.gov/government/grant/pa/index.shtm.

Tree Campus USA Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

A new tree is planted on the campus of Freed-Hardeman University as part of the college’s plan to become a Tree Campus USA. (See story and additional photos, Page 7-A.)


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Art meets athletics in mural project Members of the FreedHardeman University Art Guild are spending the last spare minutes of the semester making a lasting mark on the campus. They and their sponsor Brian Bundren are painting a 20- by 100-foot mural on the Loyd Auditorium retaining wall. The mural, which is being painted with Porter Paint Advantage supplied by Jones Lumber Company, utilizes the athletics logo in the school colors. The paint is made for external use on a variety of surfaces. Bundren gives credit to his students for the mural. “The idea came from the students. The project really belongs to the Guild members,” he said. “I am just their

sponsor.” Students did the sketches, created templates and donated the manpower for the project. The mural is a hit with the intercollegiate athletics coaching staff, according to Mike McCutchen, athletic director. “Our coaches have been very positive about it,” he said. “The retaining wall has been a blank canvas for a long time so it’s great to see our logo on it.” The mural is highly visible from Brewer Sports Center and from University Street. The goals of the project were three-fold, Bundren said. “We wanted to beautify our campus, create pride in FHU, and showcase the talents of our art students,” he said.

Members of the Freed-Hardeman University Art Guild are spending the last spare minutes of the semester making a lasting mark on the campus. They are painting a 20- by 100-foot mural on the Loyd Auditorium retaining wall.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Alabama reporter to speak at FHU graduation May 14

Next Arts in the Alley is planned for May 19

A television reporter from Huntsville, Ala., will bring the commencement address at FreedHardeman University Saturday, May 14, when 242 students will be awarded either Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees. Elizabeth Gentle, a reporter for the NBC affiliate in Huntsville, will speak to the graduates. In addition to the 242 students receiving degrees, an additional 33 students who are scheduled to complete their work by August will participate in the ceremonies. Commencement exercises are scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. in FHU’s Loyd Auditorium. Gentle graduated from Freed-Hardeman in 1996 with a Bachelor of Science degree in communication.

As a student, she wrote for the student newspaper and worked with the campus radio and television stations. At WAFF-48 News, Gentle is a general assignment reporter covering crime, breaking news, politics, and federal, state and local court cases. She has provided live coverage for NBC, CNN, Fox, Raycom Media, and The Weather Channel. Gentle covered former President George W. Bush’s tour of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Reactor, visits to North Alabama by former vice president Dick Cheney, the BP oil spill’s effect on the shrimp industry, and the inauguration of Alabama Governor Robert Bentley. In April 2008, Gentle and her photographer Ben

Isenhower made news themselves when they interrupted a break-in at an abandoned restaurant where they had been shooting video. The would-be burglars were attempting to steal equipment from the restaurant. The photographer called 911 and Gentle chased one of the burglars. Huntsville Police arrived shortly and arrested all three suspects.

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could help a lot more.” The organization distributed 18,000 pounds of food last month, and expects to distribute almost double that amount next month. H o w e v e r , Commissioner Barry Smith expressed his concern with setting a precedent, that if they should extend space to Faith, Hope, and Love Ministries, the commission might be obligated should other organizations ask for the same consideration. Without a motion from the commission, no action was taken on the issue. In other more routine matters, the commission

heard reports from the different departments, passing several budget amendments. Also, the commission approved a donation of $250 toward sponsorship of a student from Chester County High School to attend American Legion Boys State. At a previous meeting, Commissioner Burl Malone had requested a statement listing the number of county funded cell phones. Mayor Dwain Seaton provided the information which indicated 23 such cell phones at a monthly cost to the county of $1,190, or $14,280 per year. Thomas Leach, with the Technology Center,

dalize something.” At this time, she suggested that no additional work be done on the goals. Since the sixth-graders are moving from the middle school to the junior high next year, Pipkin stated that the school system is planning to renovate portions of the middle school, including the office and the restrooms. “It’s going to help the looks of the school quite a bit and add to the overall culture of the school,” she concluded. Donna SpearmanTegland presented a delegation to the board to request a work study elective for her son. She stated that her son, who will be a senior next semester, intends to enroll in college to become a large animal veterinarian, and to gain experience prior to col-

lege, he would like to use one elective slot to help train horses on a local farm. “He has grown immensely as a person through doing this job,” Tegland told the board. She explained that while her son currently works part-time at the training facility, he would not be paid for any time allotted to him during school hours and they would be willing to submit a curriculum to demonstrate the value as a learning opportunity. Pipkin and the board remained skeptical of the “different” type of elective request, and they plan to seek additional clarification from the school level before submitting a decision. They will revisit the subject at the next board meeting.

County member of the board of Faith, Hope, and Love Ministries, then addressed the commission seeking space centrally located in the county to store food which the ministry gives out on a monthly basis. Currently they use space at Hopewell Baptist Church, but which is on the edge of the county in a remote, inconvenient area. “Doors have been opened to us. We need a facility here in Henderson to use,” he said. “We help a lot of people and we

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Bids During examination of the bids, Anderson added that the timeframe ranged from a low of 160 days all the way to 300 days. MG Construction swept the bids in all categories, and the board unanimously approved acceptance of the bids. Superintendent Cherrie Pipkin presented 10 teachers eligible for tenure. After a brief synopsis of each teacher’s skills and classroom abilities, the board granted tenure to the following teachers: Wendy Bennett, Teresa Crouse, Wes McPeake, Leigh Ann Skaggs, Claire Wilder, Tanya Harwell, Melissa Kinard, Brooke Welch, Sarah Nichols, and Amy Tims. To discuss the bus camera project that the board recently had installed on all Chester County school buses, Ed Crook of 24/7 Security demonstrated the quality and definition that the cameras provide. The system has high quality video on each school bus, and the videos can be viewed in any school office that needs to review an incident. Board members were noticeably impressed by the amount of information that each camera picks up. The equipment has four cameras equipped in each bus, along with audio. In other business, Pipkin informed the board members that because soccer goals have been torn down recently at the North Chester soccer field, she advises that new goals the board recently voted on not be installed at this time. “We want them to have a place to play,” she said. “They were really enjoying it, but somebody always has to go and van-

ELIZABETH GENTLE

Hundreds of guests, artists and musicians will gather in downtown Henderson for Arts in the Alley at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 19. Hosted by the Henderson Arts Commission, the showcase of area talent will be held in the alley off Main Street beside Besso’s. This month’s featured musicians are Mike Cook (guitar and vocals) and Randy Cooper (bass and vocals). Their band, BoomerNation, has been influenced by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Tom Petty, John Mellancamp, Neil Young, the Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, Willie Nelson, John Prine and Creedence Clearwater Revival. BoomerNation is based out of Jackson and has been performing regionally for five years. Artists’ work to be displayed and sold includes: sewn crafts, oil paintings, wood cuttings and crafts, photography, jewelry, altered art crafts, yard art, stained glass and more. Hamburgers and hot dogs will be grilled on site, and Besso’s will have gelato and specialty drinks for sale. Arts in the Alley events are planned for third Thursdays throughout the summer, and an Inaugural Front Street Arts Festival is planned for Saturday, June 4. To participate, e-mail Jason Bramblett at jason@bramblettgrp.com or call 731-989-8019. Connect with the Henderson Arts Commission at www.facebook.com/HendersonArtsCommission. informed the commission that, other than the GED program, 27 students had been involved in programs at the center since September of 2009. He indicated that a new course in Health Information Systems was awaiting approval from the state and could begin as early as Sept. 1 of this year, as well as the possibility in the future of some business courses. “We are thankful for the beautiful facility,” said Leach. “We feel good about what we are doing.” He expressed his opinion that the quality of the courses now offered is good, and he hopes for more quantity of course offerings in the near future. The commission approved the hiring of Johny Farris as

Emergency Management Agency Director, replacing the retiring Mike Burkhead. They gave approval of the appointment of Malone, Russell Clayton, Al McKinnon, Diane Jordan, Jerry Emerson, John Welch,

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Historical Society meets The Chester County Historical Society met for their regular meeting on May 2. Lee Nell King read a story handed down through her family since the mid-1800s. Dr. J.D. Thomas presented everyone a map of Henderson with streets and landowners before it was Chester County. Gary O’Neal added quite a bit of information. Dr. J.D. Thomas served refreshments to members, Lloyd and Lee Nell King, Vicki Zamata, Charles and Loretta Haggard, June Smith, Robbie Stanfill, Joann VanCleave, Jeff Evans and guest, Gary O’Neal. The next meeting will be June 6. Everyone is invited. Beverly Morton, and Michelle White to the redistricting committee. And Billy Schultz, Bobby Ruth, William (Bill) Trice, Manley Hardin, and Jimmy Wamble were appointed to the Board of Equalization for 2011.


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Life & Style

The Montezuma CME Church will be having their annual Decoration Day at 2 p.m. on Sunday, May 15. Pastor Sammie Hankins from Bascom CME Church in Jackson will speak. Everyone is invited to attend.

The prayer list includes Troy Cooper, Bonnie Cook Davis, Virginia Morrison, Ann Morrison, Ruth Austin, and Mildred Seratt. Remember the flood victims and their families. Be thankful for all we have and pray for those that have lost everything. I hope all mothers and grandmothers had a wonderful day. Call Celia Murley at 989-5300 or Wanda Cook at 989-3724 with your news.

There were approximately 75 people who attended the Russell/Dunn Reunion at the Sweetlips Community Center on May 7. They were here from Georgia, Oklahoma, Illinois, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee. The oldest relative attending is 94 years old, Lorraine Lipscomb. She is the only relative on either side of that generation still living. The youngest relative was Cole Stanfill, who is age 4. Sweetlips Store had a small group of visitors on May 4. Rev. Jerry Weaver had seen their Facebook page. He called Dianne and said he and some friends would like to come for lunch. A friend of his, from Union University days, also met with them. Judy Malone had not seen Jerry for about 40 years. Jerry was here from Panama City Beach, Fla. So, ‘neath the shade of an old oak tree, the five friends shared a leisurely meal from the store menu. They had meatloaf, green beans, creamed potatoes, yeast rolls, beverage and pie. By the way, they ordered two pies to go, one chocolate and one coconut. We are still cleaning up from the storm and probably will be a month from

now. You know how you think about things after the fact. My grandson Will had given me a vase for Easter. I had filled it with flowers and sat it on my picnic table on my carport. We had winds strong enough to rip a 100-yearold tree from the ground by its roots and toss it through the roof of a house, and yet the vase of flowers never moved, not one fraction of an inch. God and nature never cease to amaze me. On our prayer list are Loretta Pickett, Ernie Merriman, Ruby Bailey, Betty Stout, Cindy Lewis, Mamie Morain, Peggie Phillips, Jean (Dewey) Pickett, Randy Greer, Butch Russell, Mary Russell, Chrissy Busby, Crys Chapman, Marvin Weaver, Donnie Pierson, Alyse Rietz, all the storm victims, and our military and their families. Congratulations to those who will be graduating soon. With God leading you, hard work, patience and faith, any of your goals are attainable. Birthday wishes to Lacey Jenkins on May 13; Jean (Dewey) Pickett on May 14; and Lequita Pickett Wylie and Jordana Jenkins on May 18. Happy anniversary to Bud and Kathy Ward on May 13; Neal and Nancy Kinchen on May 15; and Spencer and Grace Goodwin (69 years) on May 18. If you have news to share, call 989-7523. Thought of the week: If you have ever planted a seed, you know the power and promise of hope. Have a great week!

Loving Paws is a rescue organization in Chester County that wants to help control over population of dogs. They place healthy dogs into homes for a fair price. Carol Reese, Laurie Parten, and a few volunteers work tirelessly in helping animals find a forever home. They depend on fundraisers and private contributions to operate this organization. Laurie Parten is director of fundraising and community spay/neuter for Loving Paws. She attended the commissioners meeting Monday night with hopes of a simple endorsement, and if funds are available some financial assistance would be an additional help. Loving Paws desires to be recognized as a rescue organization and they want the public informed better to know their cause. They not only shelter these dogs until they are adopted, but medical attention is given soon. Dogs receive heartworm tests, worming, rabies and other vaccinations, deliv-

ery for spay or neuter, a return for pick-up, and finally back to the site to be monitored. After a dog is seen on the website and adopted - a forever home is the last delivery. Ask your commissioner how he or she voted on Loving Paws being endorsed. Three things this writer asks of you. Will you simply help with or suggest a plan for a yearly fundraiser for Loving Paws in your community (overcrowding is due to over population)? Can you simply foster a dog only until it can be placed in a forever home or until the organization can take it from you (we fostered “Sadie” for four months)? Could you mail a contribution? Money doesn’t grow on trees that these dogs frequent either! Al McKinnon and I are working on a fundraiser for Loving Paws in Jacks Creek? I will keep you posted. Two 22 guns or throwing caged dogs into a creek is not the answer. Is that a role model for being a responsible pet owner? Animals can’t go into a grocery store or storage area for food. Try to remember who created animals first as you remember the Sabbath! Here are examples of animals who found help last week. A man calls a

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Ingleside – Pentagon Club meets The Ingleside-Pentagon Club gathered for the April meeting in the beautiful Victorian home of Joan Brown. The Brown home, on North Avenue, is one of the oldest homes in Henderson. After Joan welcomed her guests and club creeds were read, Nancy Lofton conducted the meeting, as President Beverly Hardin was absent. Following the business meeting, Ann Woods presented a program based upon a recent trip to Ireland. Ireland, a nation a little larger than West Virginia, has a moderate climate, with cool summers and mild winters, and has a population of over four million. In about 1800, Ireland – not altogether willingly – became a part of the United Kingdom. The treaty of 1921 divided Ireland, granting independence to the 26 southern counties (now called Ireland) and allowing Great Britain to retain control of the six northern counties (now called Northern Ireland). For decades, Ireland has resented losing the northern counties, a fierce resentment that led to ongoing guerilla warfare between Protestant Northern Ireland and Catholic Ireland, with most of the fighting and terrorist attacks taking place in Northern Ireland. In 1998, Ireland ceded claims to Northern Ireland, and Great Britain agreed that if ever a majority of Northern Ireland voters choose to do so, it may join Ireland. There is now peace between the two countries. A tourist in Ireland is impacted by its natural beauty and by its long his-

tory; Irish history is very much part of the attitudes and actions of the Irish people today. Known Irish history extends for centuries back before 409 A.D. when Christian missionaries arrived in Ireland, establishing monasteries and schools. About 400 years later Vikings invaded, settling in Ireland and adopting the Catholic faith. A fascinating museum in Dublin, Dublinia, focuses on medieval Ireland, with a guide dressed as a Viking taking visitors through vignettes portraying medieval life in Ireland. During the Reformation, when Henry VIII and Oliver Cromwell tried to force staunchly Catholic Ireland to become a Protestant nation, and many Scots and English Protestants migrated to the northern sections of Ireland, the stage was set for the troubles of the 20th century. Castles and church buildings in Dublin dating back to the 1100s and 1200s sit near modern department stores and bustling activity. Not far away is a series of poignant statues – figures depicting the horror of starvation during the great potato famine of 1846-1848. Potatoes were both the primary food crop and the primary money crop for the agricultural nation when blight attacked the potatoes and the crop failed. In 1846, the population of Ireland was over 8 million; in 1848 the population was just over 4 million, with one to two million having emigrated, and one to two million having starved to death, most dying along the roadside after being evicted from tenant farms by

absentee English landlords. The faces and emaciated bodies of the statues vividly depict the despair of parents and children facing death by starvation. Driving through the countryside and small villages of Ireland, a tourist is struck by the vivid natural beauty and the beauty of flowers in window boxes and immaculate yards, with charming modern homes right next to structures such as Clonmacnoise Monastery, which dates back to 545 A.D. The tourist is also struck by the cleanliness of the villages and the lack of litter along the roadsides. Their last evening in Ireland, Ann and her husband and their tour group enjoyed a traditional Irish dinner at the historic Abbey Tavern in Dublin, which is located in the newer part of the Abbey – it only dates back to the 15th century. The older part of the Abbey dates back to the 12th century. It is in a neighborhood with buildings dating to the 17th century. The next day they returned to the United States – where anything two or three hundred years old is really old! Following the program, Joan Brown served her guests croissants stuffed with chicken salad, delicious cake, and special teas. Other members present were Becky Cyr, Regina East, Glenda Gardner, Junie Gilliam, Nancy Lofton, Frances Melton, June Roland, Laurel Sewell, Carolyn Swift, Joan Swift, Beth Tatom, Glenda Wiley, and Ann Woods.

News from the City of Henderson

Hello to everyone! Occurs it is great to be with you today. Last Sunday was such a beautiful Sunday for Mother’s Day. I would like to thank Cool Spring MBC, Pastor and members for inviting me to be their speaker on Mother’s Day, it was a blessing. Russell Epperson wrote in his column last week about Tennessee being a Volunteer State that our

ancestors earned that title by sending many volunteers to fight in several wars throughout the early history of America. Russell is asking for us to help the victims of the storms. Call 1-888-4211266 to see how we can help our other family and friends. Russell thank you for the information and what we can do as a whole. On May 5, the Chester County Head Start had three classrooms to have their end of the year celebration, there were songs, plays, and dancing that the children did for there parents. Awards were given out to parents for volunteering in the classrooms, Linda Swafford’s class received second Place award out of 30 classrooms for the most volunteering hours

and Susan Hemby’s classroom came in tenth place. This has been another great year for Chester County Head Start, all of the teachers did an outstanding job, enjoy your summer off – you have earned it. The family case managers and teacher at Chester County Head Start would like to thank the foster grandmother’s for all of their hard work and dedication they did for the children. Also, the city would like to congratulate Pam Durbin for being named 2011 Administrative Professional of the Year for McNairy Regional Alliance, keep up the great work my friend. We would like to say happy birthday to Tyron Hall on May 15 and Kalie Hall on May 16.

Continue to pray for people that are in the hospitals, for the ones that are sick in their homes, for our children, teachers, family, the men and women that are serving our country, the storm victims, and the incarcerated. Remember to patronize our local businesses here in town. Lets try to support our own as much as we can. If you live in the city of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the city, I need to hear from you. Call me at 989-1907 and leave your message or you may email me at gloria_holiday@msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

woman for help. He has found a boxer dog in his yard deserted. The woman calls me. I mentioned this to Al McKinnon, Jacks Creek commissioner, who owns dogs and cats. He tells me he knows a lady who wants a boxer. I ask the lady. She agrees to call the man with the deserted boxer! The boxer is now in a new home with this lady. The boxer is named “Baby.” Remember the movie line, “Nobody messes with Baby?” This lady rescued a dog, now nobody messes with this lady! Another case this time with a cat - a man called asking for help with a momma cat and two twodays-old kittens he rescued. Call it fate or whatever, the same day a little girl wants a kitten, so a phone call will be made soon to make her dream come true. Who could separate two little kittens and miss all that playtime? My cousin lost her beloved French Poodle, Snickers (5-10-2001/ 5-42011). Eyes were first laid upon him when we were having a picnic for Mama Beck. Caregivers, friends, and cousins came first then the black fur ball came rolling into the room. Many hands wanted to hold Snickers. He was such a precious puppy; he

grew up to be devoted to only one. He loved his new momma, Vickie Ellis. If love could have kept him here – he would still be in her arms. Congratulations to the Ryalses in Jacks Creek, they have the best mouser in this area. He doesn’t leave the property, but yet breakfast is brought to the front door. Smokey Rover Ryals is earning his Meow Mix! A good belly rub is all the reward that greeneyed boy needs! And he’s only been there since Christmas so what else will be performed for show and tell on Father’s Day? Mother’s Day fetched a nice big rat from the barn… yum-yum with cheese probably. Think I’ll make a nice Mexican cheese dish for the Jacks Creek Community Club Thursday at 6 p.m.… wonder if there will be any to bring back home after talking about the rat. The women will be rattling those pots and pans to prepare an extra good meal for Joy and guests. Our own Joy McKinnon is retiring in May from teaching kindergarten at Jacks Creek School. The former students will always treasure special work and photos kept all year by Mrs. Joy and pressed into a keepsake

album. The school honored Joy with a nice reception – 70 friends dropped by to congratulate her! Ray and Shirley Hooper are sending happy birthday greetings to Brian Hooper on May 12 and Kevin Hooper on May 15. Wouldn’t blueberry cobbler make a wonderful gift? Blueberry muffins? Blueberry pie? Maybe green money? From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, May 14, Henderson Villa Assisted Living will be having an Alzheimer seminar. The team will be teaching caregivers what to expect from their loved ones, and what symptoms to be aware of daily. This should be a good guide in helping deal with this health issue. Jane Vestal Kanizar hopes it will benefit you and your loved one. We enjoyed visiting five cemeteries Sunday. Five hours were spent observing floral tributes, balloons, trinkets, shepherds rod holding love offerings, personalized mementoes, fresh-cut flowers in baskets, hanging ferns, and small planted flowers to grow and blossom through the summer and fall. These were simple expressions of love to make the giver feel good, and anyone passing by the

grave (known or unknown) will know a loved one is not forgotten. Reminds me some of the tomb of the “Unknown Soldier” – just think of the love and deep respect shown there daily. Decoration Day for the third Sunday in May covers the following 10 cemeteries: Cabo, Clarks Creek, Corinth in Darden, Estes, Johnson north of Enville, Montezuma C.M.E., Old Jacks Creek, Shiloh, Trice’s Chapel, and Woodsville. Please report any cemetery decoration, I would love to list all decoration days for all churches. Call 989-7485 Our community expresses sympathy to the family of Peggy Hemby Hall (5-18-35/5-2-11). She was the matriarch for this family. A nice lady who will be missed so much. Her attitude reflects in this motto, “Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day.” It will now be memories to share so the little ones will remember her worth to the family. God bless you, and God bless the families that suffered emotionally this first Mother’s Day without that special mother physically present. We saw special signs of love on Mother’s Day. Grief shows even in a wilted rose.

By Gloria Holiday


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

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Creative cooks prove that marinating is the key to restaurant-quality meals My husband is a creative cook, while I tend to be more of a recipe follower. I like to improvise, but only after I get the main recipe perfected. On the other hand, Chris, my husband, starts throwing things together until he has something that suddenly transforms from an assortment of ingredients into a meal. Pasta usually makes the quickest dinner when we don’t know what to have. It’s so versatile, and it can include vegetables, meat, sauce, and everything necessary for an entire dinner in one bowl. We typically make our pasta with chicken or shrimp, or if I’m in charge of pasta night, I like to make it a vegetarian meal. Recently, Chris decided to vamp up his pasta with marinated chicken. This recipe, which is included here, has rapidly escalated to our favorite incarnation of our go-to meal. While unmarinated chicken is filling and full of protein, 15 minutes in a marinade brings out flavors that rival any restaurant’s chicken and pasta dinner. I’ve never been so surprised that such a simple marinade can make a dish seem even more complete. While this recipe calls for orange and yellow peppers and mushrooms, a variety of vegetables can be used. Green or red peppers are always wonderful, while asparagus or sugar snap peas add a delicious crunch of green. For those who enjoy onions, chop half of a white or yellow one and sauté until it becomes translucent. Sun dried tomatoes also pack a

The Hickory Corner Community Center’s Homecoming will be on Saturday, May 21, with opening ceremonies beginning at 11 a.m., followed by entertainment by The Goodtime Grass Band from Booneville, Miss. The ham and bean meal includes slaw, cornbread, dessert and drink for $5. Hot dogs will be available. The cakewalk begins at 1 p.m. Everyone is welcome. The meeting at the Center will be at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 12. If you have sold meal tickets and cannot attend the meeting, call Linda at 989-5987 or Dot at 989-3315. We need a count on how many tickets have been sold. There will be an

Alzheimer’s Seminar at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 14, at Henderson Villa Assisted Living, 630 Kindra Drive in Henderson. There will be a speaker from the National Family Caregivers’ Support Program in Memphis. The seminar will include the signs and symptoms, causes, treatments and prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease. Everyone is invited; light refreshments will be served. Happy birthday to Ken White on May 16; Joann Clayton and Celeste Moore on May 17; Kristy Blackstock on May 19; Sam Kesler on May 21; Filecia Hathcock and Ann Morrison on May 22; Toni Tummins on May 23; Linda Maness and Billy Martin on May 25; Tyler Garner on May 27; and Newman Kyler Denbow on May 31. Happy anniversary to our daughter and her husband. Remember the sick in prayer, our military and the leaders of our nation. God bless America.

I hope all you mothers had a great Mother’s Day. I am so fortunate to still have my mother and was able to be with her. She also had a visit from a couple from Brazil. My nephew John came down with his family and they brought Carol’s parents with them. They will be here for several weeks. We enjoyed their visit.

The floodwaters from the Mississippi River are really something. I feel so sorry for the people affected. There are so many losing their homes and businesses. I can’t imagine what a horrible feeling that would be. I looked back on last year’s Deanburg news from May 4 and it was about the rains. I’m glad it wasn’t as bad in Jackson this year. Please pray for these folks. We had a lovely baby dedication at Bethel yesterday. Several children were dedicated to the Lord. I pray that the Lord will bless each child and parents. As Bro. Paul said,

I hope that all the mothers and grandmothers had a good Mother’s Day as I did. The mothers, teachers and nurses were treated at Holly Springs Methodist Church. In fact, I am a great-grandmother. Our daughter and sonin-law, Nancy and Tommy Connor, treated their daughter, Nancy Harris, (mother) Sue Connor and me (great-grandmother), and all their families for a delicious dinner and gifts. My best gifts were pictures of our little greatgrandson, Thomas Harris, but all the gifts were graciously appreciated. On our prayer list this week are LaVerne Lott, Josephine Hinson, Frances Carroll, Charles and Loretta Haggard,

Clessie Stovall, Randy Miller, Charlene Holmes, Donnie Sells, Allen Miller Jr., Ernie Reeves, Martha Mainord, Gayle Ellington, Joanne Sells, Pam Priddy, Shirley Rietl, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Lisa Peddy, Brian Peddy, Bobbie Nell Wells, Carolyn Potter, Joanne Altier, Gerald Stanfill, Diane Wells, Jean Latham, Nancy Connor, Carroll Williams, John Kent Sells, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Gathel Latham, Shirley Gaddy, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Happy anniversary to Dennis and Elaine Parker on May 13; Steve and Jan Priddy on May 14; and Jim and Jane Rowlett on May 17. Birthday greetings to Fred Tucker and Dyke Sells on May 13; Shannon Butler on May 14; Chris McCaskill and Sarah McLemore on May 15; Brooke Visser on May 16; Logan Butler and Lavelle Page on May 17; Tina Williams and Jimmy Reddin on May 18; and Betty Smith on May 19.

it is such a big responsibility to raise a child. Parents, remember Proverbs 22: 6, “Train a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not turn from it.” God bless you all. I know everyone had a great time at the Homecoming at Pleasant Springs United Methodist Church Sunday. I know there were a lot of people there. It was the 132nd Homecoming. Get well wishes to Sylvia (Deming) Heard, Nella Rush, Brenda Collins, Joyce Stockton, and Ed Davis. Call me if you know anyone that needs our prayers. I found

out that I will have to have my hip surgery. I go to Nashville on the 18th to talk to my doctor and we’ll decide when. I hope I can wait till September. I am in more pain, so pray for me too. Happy birthday this week to Kehlie Hopper on May 12 and Tyler Hopper on May 17. I hope you both have a great birthday. Quote: “Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil – it has no point.” Unknown Have a great week and keep smiling. God bless each one of you. Call me at 987-9777 with any news you want to share.

tasty punch that would truly compliment this dish. Since we enjoy pasta so much, we try to make our pasta meals healthier by using wholegrain pasta. If you choose to cook with wholegrains, be sure to boil your pasta just a little longer, so the texture is no longer grainy. The first few times we used it, we almost decided the grainy texture wasn’t worth the health benefits, but after we added a few minutes to the cooking time, we can hardly tell a difference – except per-

haps a more complex flavor. If you have any special recipes you’d like to share, send them to me, and I’ll be happy to feature them as part of this column. To find additional recipes, check out the “Just a Pinch” column on page 5-A, or visit www.justapinch.com. Email your favorite or best recipes to mdunbar@chestercountyindependent.com or mail them to Chester County Independent c/o Mary Dunbar, P.O. Box 306, Henderson, TN 38340.

Primavera pasta with chicken Ingredients: 1 package penne pasta 1 jar of Alfredo sauce 3 chicken breasts, cubed into ½-inch pieces 1 orange pepper 1 yellow pepper ½ cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon of oregano 1 tablespoon of rosemary ¼ cup cooking oil 1 cup chopped mushrooms 1 clove garlic (optional) Freshly grated parmesan cheese (optional) Directions: Prepare pasta according to directions on package (increase cooking time by several minutes if using multigrain pasta). Marinate chicken in soy sauce, oregano, and rosemary for 15 to 30 minutes. Heat oil in 12-inch skillet over medium heat. Slice peppers into pieces about finger-sized, then chop each strip into 2-inch pieces. Add peppers to skillet and sauté until tender. Add chicken and garlic clove to the skillet and cook through. Strain pasta, and return to pasta pot. Add Alfredo sauce, chicken, peppers and mushrooms. Stir to combine completely. Cook until warm throughout. Top with grated parmesan cheese and serve.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Happy birthday wishes go to Brittany Roe on May

14; Abbey Lambert on May 15; Robert Rice, Lyn Wynn and Jennifer Gibbs on May 16; Jonathan Roe on May 17; and Nancy Weeks, Larry Crowe, Keyna Rice, and Keith Troutman on May 18. The Enville Volunteer Fire Department will be having their Annual Barbecue Fundraiser at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 14. This will include barbe-

By Russell Epperson Chester County Independent archives, May 15, 1941

The Senior Royalty – Misses Martha Jean Malone, Queen, Martha Bell Reid and Martha Ruth McAdams, Maids, who graced the Henderson float in the parade at Humboldt Strawberry Festival last week.

Only Yesterday “Local man talks hogs on radio show” From the files of the Chester County Independent May 15, 1941 “Annual Poppy Day For Disabled Vets To Be Held May 24” “Memory of America’s war dead in the first World War will be honored here Saturday, May 24, when everyone will be asked to wear a memorial poppy in tribute to their service and sacrifice. “Plans for observance of Poppy Day are being completed by the Davidson-Haltom Unit of the American Legion Auxiliary under the leadership of Mrs. C. D. Mitchell, Poppy Day Chairman. The memorial flowers, made by disabled war veterans, will be offered on the streets throughout the day by the Auxiliary women. “Welcome Stranger” “Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Moore Herron of McKenzie are the parents of their first child, born May 6. Mrs. Herron is the former Miss Rebecca Burkhead. “Mr. and Mrs. Owen Rainey announce the birth of Jerry Oren, their first child, May 8. “A daughter, their fifth child, was born Saturday to Mr. and Mrs. Latham of Beech Bluff. She weighed 9 ¼ pounds. “Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Mays announce the birth of Walter Allan, weight 8 ½ pounds, May 6. He is their first child.” May 11, 1951 “Home Economics Plays Big Role” “By Miss Martha Rast” “Home Economics, contrary to many peoples’ belief, is not just cooking and sewing but is, as the name suggests, a study of the economics of the home. Today’s housewife would be the first to admit that there is much more to the job of homemaking than just cooking and sewing. There are consumer goods to be bought, laundry to be done, children to be cared for and trained, houses to be made comfortable and attractive, friends and business associates to be entertained, and many others. These duties must be done in such a way as to leave the housewife some time in which to enjoy her family and for taking part in community activities if she is to lead a well-rounded life. “The Home Economics department of CCHS believes that all girls, except those with serious mental and physical handicaps, must assume a certain amount of responsibility in the homes of today and tomorrow. “Local Writer’s Book Reprinted” “Jack Boone, Henderson short-story writer and novelist, has received an advance royalty check from J. B. Lippincott, Publishers, of New York, Philadelphia and Chicago, for the reprint edition of ‘Dossie Bell Is Dead.’ The first edition of 100,000 will be issued soon. “Births” “Mr. and Mrs. Layne Wilson, formerly of Chester County, but now of Nashville, announce the birth of a son on April 30. He has been given the name Dennis Paul” “Steadman Clinic” “Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Forsythe of Bethel Springs, are announcing the arrival of a son on May 3. He has been named William Edgar.” “Dr. H. D. Farthing” “Born to Mr. and Mrs. William Sherrod of Henderson, a son, Larry Lovele, on May 7.” “Dr. L. C. Smith” “Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Taylor of Enville announce the birth of a son on May 6. “Mr. and Mrs. Guy Smith of Bethel Springs announce the birth of a daughter on May 7.” May 12, 1961 “Enville Home Destroyed By Wind” “At Enville the Maness house was blown away in the violent storm that swept thru this section of West Tennessee late Monday afternoon. The members of the large family had gone to a storm house, so no one was injured. Several rooftops were damaged and many trees up-rooted. “Dark, menacing, low hanging clouds late Monday afternoon caused many Henderson residents to seek protection in storm cellars. The city was spared the agony of a damaging storm but received a drenching rain, accompanied by some hail. Outlying areas were no so lucky however. On the McKenzie farm about 4 miles out and just off Hi-way 45, one side of a big barn was torn completely out, tops on several buildings on

the place, a chicken house flattened, a shed damaged, a chimney knocked down and many trees up-rooted. “Charles Stumph On Radio Show” “Under the pressures of this fast-growing world old patterns are giving way to new procedures. For many years, Charles Stumph of Henderson raised cotton and a few hogs. But, with the coming of government allotments of how many acres could be consigned to cotton growing, Charlie had to supplement his income. He chose hogs making them his chief source of income – hogs of a much higher quality – meat type hogs. These he raised in less time and at lower cost than he had done before. “Charlie tells the complete story of his struggle to meet the challenge of these changing times on this ‘Let’s Go Visiting’ Med Maxwell interview. Hear this program on Radio Station WMPS, Memphis, Tennessee, 680 kilocycles, at 6:20 a.m., Tuesday, May 16, 1961.”

Chester County Independent archives, May 12, 1961

“Wards attend Strawberry Festival” “Mr. and Mrs. Buford Ward and children, Barbara, Debbie and Bill, were in Humboldt last Thursday and Friday for the Strawberry Festival. Bill took part in the festivities.” “Miss Polly Bingham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bingham, has been elected to the Student Christian Association at Lambuth College. This is one of seven offices which is elected by a vote of the entire campus.” “Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Joyner of San Diego, California, are the parents of a daughter, Beverly Ann, who arrived April 23. Mrs. Joyner if the former Miss Charlotte Bailey of Luray, Tenn. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. John Joyner of Henderson and Mrs. Edd Bailey and the late Mr. Bailey of Luray.” May 13, 1971 “Postal Rates Go Up Sunday” “Postmaster Paul Meadows said today that increases in most postage rates will take effect May 14. “Mr. Meadows explained that the new increases... will raise first class letter rates from 6 to 8 cents an ounce, and airmail letter rates from 10 to 11 cents an ounce.” “Postal Employee Receives Award” “James Thomas, an employee of the Henderson Post Office, recently received a Special Achievement Award from the Post Office Department for his outstanding performance. Special Achievement awards are given for contributions over and above normal work requirements or job expectancy of individuals or groups of employees. These awards are made for contributions which result in outstanding economy, efficiency, or measurably improved service to the public. “Along with a check in the amount of $150, he also received a certificate of award from the Post Office Department which reads: ‘Superior Accomplishment Award is conferred in recognition of Notable Performance.’ “Mr. Thomas began his career with the post office in 1948 as a substitute city carrier. He has had continuous service since that time. He became a rural carrier on Route 2 in July 1969. “He is a World War II veteran, having served in the European Theater.”

Columnist

Summertime is just around the corner and with it comes the wonderful fruits of the season. One of my favorite ways to eat fresh fruit is in a fruit smoothie. Smoothies can be a great way to add extra nutrients, fiber, and fun to your daily menu. One of the first things you need to do to become a master smoothie chef is to invest in a good blender or smoothie maker. Years ago my sweet mother-inlaw bought us a “Magic Bullet” blender to assist us in making homemade baby food. It served us well for that purpose and later for making smoothies. I usually am a little skeptical of made-for-TV products, but this blender turned out to be well worth the investment, especially since it was free (for us)! Once you have the equipment, you need to find a good base recipe you can make a couple of times until you feel more confident in your smoothie-making skills! My usual base fruit is the ever-popular banana. They are packed with vitamins, cheap to purchase, and super tasty. I then will add another fruit or two. A few of my favorites are as follows: Locally grown strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, peaches, kiwi fruit, mangos, fresh pineapple, and grapes. Basically, I am open to most any fruits if they will fit in a cup! Your current activity level or weight determines what, if any, other ingredients you need to add. A scoop of protein powder makes for a more hearty and calorie-heavy smoothie, which is good for those wanting to replace a meal for weight loss or to add calories for those trying to bulk up with healthy, protein-rich calories. Milk is another protein-rich ingredient that will help you stay fuller longer and provide lots of other wonderful nutrients and vitamins. In the same food group, yogurt is also a good addition to a smoothie. I would suggest a non-sweetened yogurt in order to hold down the empty calories of sugar. Recently, Greek yogurt has become popular due to its higher protein content compared to regular yogurt. One of my favorite ingredients is a texture enhancer—walnuts! The extra crunch they add really makes the smoothie for me. These guys are packed with all sorts of good heart-healthy fats; however, moderation is the key with walnuts as they are heavy in calories. Many people will probably add some sweeteners in the beginning of their smoothie-making journey. I would recommend some of the newer natural sweeteners that contain stevia instead of sugar. One of the oldest sweeteners, honey, is also a good choice. A splash of

fruit and vegetable juice can also be a good way of sweetening your smoothie and adding some veggies at the same time. To finish any smoothie I will normally add a piece or two of ice to the cup before blending. This gives the smoothie a texture that cools and refreshes. Finally, if you have been good all day and need a little indulgence I would suggest adding a scoop of ice cream or maybe a teaspoon (a little goes a long way in a smoothie) of peanut butter to your smoothie. Place all the ingredients in your smoothie machine and blend to your

RUSSELL EPPERSON

Living Well

cued pork, chicken and bologna. All proceeds are used for supplies for the department. They would like to thank you in advance for your support. “The worst of all fears is the fear of living.” ~Theodore Roosevelt. Have a great week and call 989-0212 with your news.

desired consistency. It may take several tries before you find the perfect combination of ingredients but I am sure you will enjoy all the near misses! Whether you are trying to lose weight, add muscle, recover from a long workout, or merely want to enjoy a glass full of delicious fruit, smoothies are the food I would recommend. So kick back with a glass full of deliciousness and smile knowing you are drinking to your health while living well!


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011 Page 7-A

Planting for the future: FHU works to establish an extensive tree collection on campus

Photos by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

A new ginkgo tree is planted in front of Freed-Hardeman University’s Loden-Daniel Library on April 29. The university planted ginkgos that day to replace two old sugar maples that were causing damage near the library. On hand to plant were (from left) Carl Weatherspoon, Russell Epperson, Wade Osburn, Shirley Eaton, Jeff Barkman, Staci Irwin, and Bethany Vaughan.

By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Freed-Hardeman University loves trees, and flowers, and – well, plants of just about any kind. The university has more than 300 different types of plants, and on April 30, the grounds crew, along with Director of Human Resources and Purchasing Russell Epperson and members of the campus beautification committee planted two ginkgo trees outside of the Loden-Daniel Library. The university recently cut down two aging sugar maple trees that were causing problems near buildings and breaking up the sidewalks with their roots. In an effort to diversify the plant life on campus and to replace the maples, FHU planted two ginkgo trees, which are slow growing, long-lived, and display brilliant fall foliage. Jeff Barkman, who is in charge of the FHU grounds, said that the university is “taking out damaged and dead trees and replacing trees that were starting to grow over on the buildings.” He has a five-year plan of helping FHU become a Tree Campus USA, which is sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation and encourages planting and maintaining trees on campus. Barkman has divided the campus into five sections, and he and his team intend to work on a section each year to establish and improve the quality and variety of trees throughout each section. The FHU commons, which is one of the most used sections of campus,

is receiving special planting attention in this phase of the plan. At the moment, Barkman estimates that the campus has about 160 species of trees, in addition to its wide array of plants. “The more diverse and better the collection [of plants], the easier it is to get grants and volunteers,” he added. To help eliminate plant waste, Barkman and the grounds crew have begun planting more perennials and fewer annuals, in order to ensure recurring color and to establish themselves for blooming year after year. Perennials also tend to be less susceptible to drought and disease and do well with less attention. FHU is also replacing the old and damaged trees with varieties of oak. Of the oaks, Barkman said that they are “longer lived, disease resistant and do well in the local environment.” So far this year, they have planted about 30 trees. As part of working toward Tree Campus USA and establishing itself as an arboretum – or collection of trees –FHU has taken an inventory of the

Shirley Eaton, Russell Epperson, Jeff Barkman, and Staci Irwin scoop dirt onto the roots of the second ginkgo tree planted on April 29. FHU is working to become a more eco-friendly campus by planting a wide variety of trees and plants.

existing trees and plants, including the sizes, varieties, health, and approximate age of each tree and plant on campus. As new trees are added and old ones removed, Barkman and others update the list. His favorites are the oaks, which include bur oak and post oak. However, he is also a fan of the ornamental rose collection, blue spruce

trees (which are a nonnative experiment), and magnolias. Epperson, who was also present for the tree planting, stated that he most enjoys an established saucer magnolia that is located behind Old Main. Barkman stated that he is excited about introducing drought-tolerant perennials, like those found in the Midwest, to reduce water usage across campus. As far as he knows, FHU is the only campus in Tennessee that is experimenting with different grasses. The university is currently trying out buffalo grass, a variety that doesn’t require fertilizer or water. He added that buffalo grass is the only native warm season grass in the U.S. He has planted it in the amphitheater and surrounding commons area. While Barkman and the grounds crew are introducing new plants to the campus, Epperson considers one enormous elm to be the most special tree on campus. Deemed the oldest tree at FHU, the elm is estimated to be around 115 years old. With its gnarled bark, many see a face in the tree, and it has taken on special significance for faculty, staff, and students. As seasons change and the five-year plans moves forward, expect to see more and more unique trees and plants being established on FHU’s campus. Not only do the plants add beauty to the campus, but they provide valuable oxygen to the entire community.

This elm is considered to be the oldest tree on the FHU campus, and its age is estimated at 115 years.

Puppy Personals There are 11 dogs and puppies are currently awaiting homes at Henderson City Animal Control., including a wide variety of short hair, long hair, scruffy, flop-eared, spotted and loveable would-be pets. These dogs/puppies each have a limited time to find a home due to the city’s animal control euthanasia policy. The adoption fee is $36, $25 of which is refundable upon confirmation of having your pet spayed or neutered following adoption. The other $11 covers vaccinations at Henderson Animal Clinic. If you would like more information regarding any of these pets, call 989-4628. Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent


Page 8-A

Opinion

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Once bitten by the travel bug, it’s a hard condition to shake – even when trips hit a few rough patches “Travel is the one pursuit which never loses its lure, probably because it offers so much variety,” proclaims my most recently acquired etiquette book. “No matter how many years you spend in going from one place to another, there always remains some new country to see, some strange land to explore.” Rife with a plethora of tip and tidbits, circa 1933, No Nice Girl Swears offers advice that often holds true today. I’m especially interested in the travel advice that this book offers. Its suggestion that “Buying tickets, checking trunks, and all the other details of travel should form a part of every person’s education” is an idea I’ve often shared with friends and family. From the time I was in high school, I was flying unaccompanied to visit friends in faraway states. I went to Washington, New York, and Europe along with several wonderful high school teachers who also believed in the benefits of travel. When I got to college, I still had the travel bug. I took two month-long study abroad trips to Europe, did mission work in Hungary, and traveled extensively in the U.S. for various clubs and organizations to which I belonged. Because my husband was stationed in Germany while we were dating and after our marriage, I flew frequently overseas alone, and I happen to love the thrill of travel – by myself or with others. I don’t write these things to appear worldly or especially well-traveled, rather I write to lament the failure on our society’s part to encourage exploration and breaking away from the comfort zone of home. Living in the post-9/11 age, we, as Americans, seem to have a collective fear of journeying beyond our shores. Yet, for most of the world, travel remains an exciting opportunity that opens a wide array of experiences and adventures. Just tonight, my husband told me about a German friend of ours who is planning a trip to Scotland and next year she plans to visit the U.S. Unfortunately, most Americans find ourselves stuck in a rut. We go to the beach or the mountains, maybe to the Great Lakes, and each year it’s almost always the same routine. Last year, several friends and I took a girls’ trip to the Caribbean. We embarked on a nine-day cruise to the southern islands, and it was a first for us all. The trip itself was amazing, but one part that stands out most to me is getting stranded at the dock on our way home. We arrived as a group of four girls from Tennessee, but somehow on the last day of the cruise, we had a spat and divided into two warring factions. We’d planned to hire a taxi and split the cost four ways, but two of us were left behind. We caught a cab and made it to the San Juan, Puerto Rico, airport, but since our plan had been to split the ride four ways, we were both short of cash. My friend and I tried to explain to the cab driver that I was going to run to the ATM while my friend waited by the cab to demonstrate in good faith that we weren’t going to short the driver our fair. Either our Spanish was especially horrible or the cabbie’s ire interfered with his language receptors, but by the time I got back with our cash, my friend was in deep conversation with a policeman while the driver yelled in the background. Fortunately, the policeman understood the situation – horrible Spanish or not – and the cash worked wonders on the cab driver’s attitude. We walked away with our bags and an interesting story to tell of the day we nearly got arrested in San Juan. While to some that may sound like the perfect reason not to travel, it’s stories like that which make travel exciting for me. Once when I left Germany after my husband deployed to Iraq, I was in tears going through international customs in Amsterdam. I was tired, lonely, and missed Chris already. My tears sparked the interest of the customs officials, and I got the “lucky” extra interrogation – which included questions about how long had I known the people with whom I stayed the previous night (um, about one day, officer. She was a nice fellow army wife who took pity on me when the guys deployed sooner than expected and I lost my room after my husband left). Apparently, that raises even more red flags with customs. After much questioning, they finally decided to let me through to the final checkpoint. The security guard there was also confused about my agitated state, and I sniffled through an abbreviated version of my story one last time. This time, the guard seemed touched by my tale – or maybe he thought I was just another crazy American who was afraid to get on the plane – and he gave me a pack of gum. You’re probably not supposed to take gum from customs officials, but I was one checkpoint from my plane home. I just wanted on that plane! Even in the strangest, most confusing situations abroad, I’ve still returned with stories and experiences that I would never trade. Despite the minor inconveniences, I love traveling – it’s gotten in my blood, and I never want to shake it.

Muddy boots, old guns and glorious days

Used to be, all my excitement and enthusiasm for hunting targeted October and November. Back 30-40 years ago I lived through an evolution (or revolution) of gun sports that changed what was mainly small game hunting in Southern Appalachia to the seasons for deer and wild turkey that we enjoy today. But I loved gunning for squirrel, rabbits and bobwhite quail – still do, in fact. I learned at my father’s knee, first with a single-shot J.C. Higgins .410 and later, when I could handle the recoil and was deemed safe enough, a 1940’s-era Winchester Model 12 pump-action shotgun in 16 gauge. The first quail I bagged with the Model 12 was at a distance of 15 feet. It was a very lucky shot. The gun had been Dad’s duck-hunting weapon of choice and was bored full choke. He later laughed that never had he seen so many feathers in the air than after my blast, which left only the head and feet of the hapless bird. Golden autumn days I spent in the field with my father and uncles left memories still as crisp as the rime of frost on a creek edge at sunup and sharp as the smell of ripe persimmons. But the quail hunting declined when farmers stopped planting soybeans and turned their fields to pasture after the market crash of the 1970s. Cattle trampled down the thickets and coverts, ate up the weeds and seedy plants – and the bobwhite quail populations went away, probably never to return with the vigor we saw around the middle of the last century. At the age of 17, I saw one of the first whitetail deer in the country. The doe crashed through a blackberry thicket and stopped in front of me. I thought she was big as a

cow. Dad just grinned when I told him. Ten years later, we were nailing boards up in pine trees to sit on while we hunted in our Army khaki pants and coats. My father and I learned to deer hunt together. Trial and error, a lot of comedy and argument and a gradual sharpening of skills made us effective. Or maybe it was just the burgeoning deer numbers. There is a story told along the Black Warrior River, in deer camps up and down the tupelo gum swamps, of two old men (my father and uncle) who arrived for a hunt with a chest-type deep freezer in the back of their truck and a 50-ft. extension cord. “We are gonna fill this freezer up with deer meat,” said one of the elderly hunters. They were rewarded with disbelieving laughter. Three days later, they waved goodbye, unplugged and rolled up the power cord and hit the road back home, hauling the freezer-wrapped meat of one good buck and six does. Nobody was laughing except them. Of all the adventures and experiences my father and I shared through the years – hunting, fishing, collecting arrowheads, camping, working and sweating side-by-side and laughing (Lord, how we kidded, joked and laughed), we never hunted wild turkey together. By the time I had become proficient, my father had begun to lose interest in trekking the cold woods, wading in sloughs and rising at 4 o’clock in the morning. He derided my fanaticism about gobblers and calling, shotgun chokes and camouflage, tactics, tricks and hard lessons learned. “Boy, I raised you up to be a good crappie and bream fisherman in the spring,” he lectured, with a twinkle in

his blue eyes. “Them big ol’ ground buzzards have ruin’t you for good!” If I could wish for one thing as another opening morning of wild turkey season approaches, it would be for Dad and I to be standing shoulder-toshoulder in the dawning woods, listening for the first gobbler to thunder on his roost. It would be one of those deep booming challenges that raises the hair on your neck and curls your toes as it draws sap into the prehistoric part of a hunter’s brain that controls the pursue-and-conquer reflex. This would be an old and cagey bird, too – not one to be fooled by a plaintive yelp at fly-down. A bird to work for, of ability to evade and trick a hunter, he’d allow a peek at his fanned tail feathers collapsing before taking wing and flapping over the next hill. And we’d be right behind, cussing and laughing and hoping for one more chance . . . This will never be. My father, long a victim of

growing senility, has decided to die. He lay down in bed at home and has not risen. Hospice has been called. It’s the way he wanted it — his plan not to expire in an impersonal hospital room or a nursing home. As his days slip past, he enjoys waking dreams. He is reliving those olden days a-field, when love was taking a 10-year-old boy crappie fishing or letting him squeeze off the first shot on a covey rise . . . when there were no wild turkeys or deer, no fancy hunting equipment or clothing, only old muddy boots, a well-worn gun stock and a glorious day ahead. Remember these things on your opening morning. God numbers days such as these, and how you use them makes all the difference. (Editor’s Note — This column was written and published April 1, 2011, on the Tennessee Turkey Hunting website: www.tnturkey.com. The author’s father died four days later.)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

A Tribute to East Chester Elementary Dear Editor, In August of 2000, we took our first son to kindergarten at East Chester. Since then, we have had at least one of our sons enrolled at East Chester Elementary. Now that our fourth son is about to complete elementary school, I have been reflecting on our years at East Chester. That day in August of 2000 seems like only a few days ago. I remember it well. When we walked through the front doors of the school, there were friendly faces everywhere. We were greeted and asked if we knew which room to which we were assigned. Down the hall, teachers were anxiously awaiting their new students. We walked to the last room at the back of the school to meet Mrs. Kim Scott, our kindergarten teacher. We liked all the great things that were in her classroom and knew our son would have a good beginning to his education. Leaving him

there under someone else’s care made both of us cry. Mrs. Kim held him in her arms and reassured me that he would be alright. He was all right and so were our other three sons who have attended East Chester. In fact, they were more than all right. They were great! They have all had wonderful teachers who have loved them and have given them the time and attention they needed. Mrs. Parker and Mrs. Scott have been the best principals. They always put the children first, and they have a compassionate authority that draws the students to them. A few years ago, Mrs. Spring joined the school as the assistant principal. She adds sunshine with her warm smile and loving ways. Mrs. Shelia and Mrs. Allison are shining lights in the office. They have a smile to share and a hug when a child (or a mom) needs some encouraging. The janitors know the

Rebuttal to critical Democratic challenge Dear Editor, Mr. Jeffrey H. Blackwood found fault with a positive and noncritical statement by the Chester County Democratic Party in the May 5, 2011 edition of the Independent. In no place was it critical of his political party. But his misrepresentations and omissions need a response. The truth is that neither party has been paragons of fiscal responsibility over the years. The Reagan-H.W. Bush administrations quadrupled the national debt from $1 trillion to $4 trillion. George W. Bush doubled the debt from $5 trillion to $10 trillion. Where was Mr. Blackwood’s voice during that time? Further, George W. Bush inherited a budget surplus from Bill Clinton according to

FactCheck.org. Acting on the advice of Dick Cheney that “deficits don’t matter,” Bush did the following: passed a huge tax cut, mainly for the wealthy during a time of war without spending cuts; started wars in Afghanistan and Iraq without asking Congress for funding; passed the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan, left totally unfunded. Where was Mr. Blackwood’s letter during that time? His party refuses to support the concept of shared sacrifice by protecting huge oil subsidies and numerous other perks for the corporations even though 74 percent of Americans oppose such subsidies. So these corporate elites make their obscene profits and raise prices while wages are going down.

kids by name and the kids know them. The kids love these people who work so hard to keep their school clean. The cafeteria workers dedicate many hours to feed our children. They demonstrate their love for our kids through their service and dedication. There are so many people who serve at East Chester. In the mornings if you come in the front, you will find Mrs. Norma, the computer teacher. She has taught for 35 years. She has a big smile and lots of hugs to give every day. In the afternoon, she is at the side door helping kids get in their cars with another hug to send them on their way. Take a stroll on down the hall, and you will find teachers, teachers’ assistants, volunteering grandmothers, and other staff waiting to say “Good Morning” and give you a smile. Each and every one of these people help our children start the day off well. Our school nurse is loved by the children because she fixes all their boo-boos. Some of them probably feel a little sick, just so they can go see Mrs. Kari. She brightens

their day with a hug or a bandage. With its librarian, school counselor, music teacher, speech teachers, physical education coaches, and all the other staff, East Chester has the best educators anywhere. As I write this article, once again I am crying. Ten years have passed too quickly. Mrs. Norma said to me recently, “When you came here with your first son, I thought we would never get rid of Phillipses boys. And now, your last one has only a few days left with us.” I must tell you that the last 10 years have been wonderful. Friends ask me about Chester County Schools, and I always tell them that they are the BEST! I want to thank ALL of you for the positive role models you have been. Thank you for the countless hours you have given. Thank you for your patience, guidance, encouragement, love, hugs and devotion to their education. Thank you for taking such good care of our sons!

The super rich were given a huge tax break (welfare for the rich) in 2002 on the grounds that they would create jobs and expand industry. By 2008, we all now know how well that worked; we were losing 700,000 jobs a month. Since 2009 we have started back gaining jobs. Blackwood says that the list of our party ideals were just “platitudes and promises.” It wasn’t “platitudes” when we provided seniors Social Security (doesn’t add to the deficit by law) and Medicare, made improvements in public education and supported teachers and aid for students, passed better medical care for more Americans, thus improving the life chances of the working and middle classes (all of which Blackwood’s party is attempting to privatize or dismantle altogether). We are working tirelessly every day to prevent his

party from making Medicare a voucher system where seniors would have to buy health coverage from Wall Street insurance companies whose first purpose is to find some reason for not paying for your health care. His point regarding a Scripture verse is unclear. Suffice it to say that the verses show that visiting prisoners, taking strangers at the gate into our houses, feeding the hungry, taking care of the sick, clothing the naked, etc. will determine where we spend eternity. Also emphasized is that unto whom much is given, much is required, and that the rich should be generous and share their wealth (Luke 12:48; 1 Timothy 6:17,18). As for “promises,” here is one: “We will kill Osama bin Laden,” Barack Obama, 2008. Promise kept! Faye Jones

A grateful mom, Gaye Phillips

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Obituary/Religion

Page 10-A

The Bridge

Obituaries

By Roy B. Duck

LaVonne Billingsley Scott Date of Death – May 10, 2011 LaVonne Billingsley Scott, 92, of Henderson, passed away Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at her home. Arrangements are incomplete at this time with Shackelford Casey Chapel in charge of funeral services. Services will be announced later in the week. Shackelford Casey Chapel 731-989-2421 www.shackelfordfuneraldirectors.com

Thelma Jean Bradford Aug. 1, 1933 – April 23, 2011 Thelma Jean Bradford, 77, of Mesa, Ariz., formerly of Toone, passed away April 23, 2011. Funeral services were held April 28 at Meldrum Mortuary Chapel in Mesa. Interment was at the National Memorial Cemetery of Arizona in Phoenix. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 12, 2011

Decoration Day Montezuma C.M.E. Church, 2610 Old Montezuma Road at Henderson, will have Decoration Day at 2 p.m. on Sunday, May 15. Pastor Sammie Hankins from Basom C.M.E. Church in Jackson will be the speaker. This program is for the upkeep of the cemetery. Donations may be mailed to Montezuma C.M.E. Church Cemetery Fund, 2610 Old Montezuma Road, Henderson, TN 38340. Valerie Conley is pastor of the church. Everyone is invited. For information, call 3947807 or 608-0296.

Pastoral Anniversary Harvest Time Church of God In Christ, 414 Beechwood St. in Henderson, will present the Third Annual Pastoral Anniversary celebration honoring Pastor Cleophas A. Cherry I, at 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 15. The speaker is Parsons District Superintendent Joseph Fisher, pastor of Temple Church of God in Christ in Parsons. Everyone is welcome. Harvest Time will also host a seminar concerning behavioral disabilities in children at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 19. The speaker will be Pat Lewing, MA, a psychological examiner, who has worked with the Chester County School System and Quinco. She is currently a child psychologist working with Madison County Schools. For more information, call 438-0539, 394-4789 or e-mail Juanita Szaabo at szaaboj@gmail.com.

Gospel Singing The Whisnants will be in concert at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 19, at the Selmer Second Baptist Church. The group has had 10 number one songs. Admission is free, however a love offering will be taken. For more information, call 607-1948.

Free Food Pantry A free food pantry is set up for the needy only from 911 a.m. on the third Thursday of each month, at Montezuma United Methodist Church. Take Hwy. 45 South from Henderson, turn right on Montezuma Road (across from Estes Church of Christ), the church is located three miles on the right. Drive around to the back of the church. Due to overwhelming response, the requirements for baskets are: must be a Chester County resident; picture ID for all adults; SS cards for the household; proof of residency, household income, custody for children; verification of children’s ages; your actual utility or rental bill; proof of household monthly expenses and loss/crisis (layoff notice or doctors’ excuse); DL may be required. For those who don’t have transportation, call 608-1038 or 695-9497.

Early bird service The Henderson Church of Christ worship hour is carried over WFHU 91.5 at 8 a.m. each Sunday. The program includes recorded acappella singing, prayer, scripture reading, and a live sermon.

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Is the pain dear to you? I was reading a book in which this phrase occurred and the author identified it as a Hebrew proverb. I have not been able to confirm this, but the idea is accurate. Sometimes in our grief, the pain is so overwhelming to us that we find ourselves hanging on to the pain, when we really want to separate ourselves from the pain as far as possible. Why do we hang on to the pain when we so desire to let DAVID COY go? Perhaps one reason is that we do not want our life to change. This significant change in our life is not what we asked for or desire. Therefore, we resist this change. One person describes it this way; grief is like being in a tunnel. If you try to come out of the tunnel the way you went in, you turn and go right back in the tunnel. Why? Because our life is not the way it was and we do not like it! So here we are back in the tunnel, and no matter how often we come out the way we came in, our life is never going to be the same again. We have to walk through the fog, tunnel, confusion, anger, disappointment, resentment, bitterness, doubt, depression, isolation, whatever feelings we may experience until we come to the point of accepting our new reality. It is extremely painful, yet if we will allow us to feel, to share with those who are willing to walk with us, we will emerge a stronger, more compassionate, and wiser person for the experience. You do not realize how blessed you are until you have shared your sorrow with others as frequently as you have need, because that person makes themselves available as often as you need them. You will find that pain will diminish eventually, in its own speed taking as long as is necessary. It does us no good to cling to our suffering, do not allow pain to become a crutch. This is Sunrise.

Vicarious bereavement Another way of understanding this topic is empathetic grief or sympathetic grief. This person displays much the same feelings; sorrow, numbness, lack of energy, anxiety, tightness in the throat and chest, headaches or nausea as do those who are directly affected with a significant and traumatic loss. The difference is they are not directly related or affected by the loss. Typically, this can be seen in the pre-teen or teenage years in the death of a fellow student. Peers who do not know the deceased will feel the same pain as the surviving family members and to the peers just as intensely. Another example that may be with the aftermath of societal tragedies, involving school shootings or terrorist attacks, many people have bereaved the innocent loss of many in our society. One person gave the example of feeling what they heard described by another close to them of their heartache, identifying with the emotions that they heard, feeling the emotion themselves, though they themselves have no direct connection with the loss. While we have become more and more distant and aloof in relation to significant traumatic loss in many regions of our country in past decades; in a very real sense perhaps our nation’s tragedies have brought us closer together in our country and in our local communities. We can hope that we have been given a wake-up call and now become more acutely aware of others around us and exercise more compassion and human kindness where their hurt is concerned. When our sorrow comes upon us we may find more community support for our situation because we ourselves showed more tenderness, patience and understanding toward our neighbor. Weeping with those who weep may only require a soft word of consolation, gentle pat on a shoulder, or a hug to show you sympathize. This is Sunrise.

In the late ‘70s, I was married to a lady several years younger than myself. With my consent, she had an abortion. Sometime later, we’d gone to a lake in the country to fish, taking along beer to enjoy. We ran out of beer and I was driving to a nearby store to get some more. I was going down a gravel road passing a Church For The Deaf, when Jesus severely chastised me by raining shame down upon me. I stopped in the middle of the road, crying and praying. I accepted Jesus in 1996. In the spring of 1998, I was in Savannah working one day, when a tornado was spotted in the general vicinity. I started home on Highway 64 West. Before getting up on the Tennessee River Bridge, I pulled over and called my wife on my car phone to make sure she was OK. She was and I started up on the bridge, when everything went totally dark. I couldn’t see forward, backward or sideways. I dropped my head to just below the top of the steering wheel peering forward and drove slowly ahead while chanting repeatedly, “Stay with me Jesus.” Suddenly, I was in the light again and heading down off the bridge. Later, I was in the Tipp-Topp Market in Parsons telling the owner and friend, Bill Perry, what had happened. After hearing my story, he said, “The Lord heard you praying and saved your life.” Actually, I had been praying to Jesus to stay with me in the afterlife, as I had felt that I would be dead shortly. If there is such a thing as verifying an earlier commitment to Jesus, I feel that was my time.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011 Page 11-A

Christ Community Church White Ave., Henderson


Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Handguns are primary items reported stolen this week in Chester County BQA Meeting A Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 12, at the UT Extension Office, 126 Crook Ave. This will be for BQA recertification and initial certification as well. Call the UT Extension Office at 989-2103 for more details.

Soccer Registration Chester County Youth Soccer registration will be held from 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. on Friday, May 13, at West Chester Elementary School. The ages are from 4–16 years. Your child must be 4 years of age by July 31. For more information, call Kim McNeil at 6958165 or visit the website at www.chestercountysoccer.com

Enville VFD Fundraiser The Enville Volunteer Fire Department will be having their annual Barbecue Fundraiser at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 14. This will include barbecued pork, chicken and bologna. All proceeds are used for supplies for the department.

Alzheimer’s Seminar There will be an Alzheimer’s Seminar at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 14, at Henderson Villa, 630 Kindra Lane in Henderson. The seminar will include the basics of Alzheimers, the 10 warning signs, caregiver’s view, and question and answer session. Refreshments will be provided. Contact Jane Vestal at 435-1219 to pre-register or for more information.

Caregivers’ Support meeting The Caregivers’ Support Group meeting will be at 2 p.m. on Monday, May 16, at the Chester County Senior Center. The speaker will be Kay Springfield, a caregiver for about seven years. Everyone is invited because you either have been a caregiver, you are, or you will be.

Headhuggers’ Hat Group meeting The monthly meeting of the Headhuggers’ Hat Group will be at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 16, in the Studio 412 building behind Henderson Assembly of God. This group makes and distributes hats to cancer patients in the Chester County/West Tennessee area. For information about this ministry or if you would like to be a part of it, call 608-7303 or attend the meeting.

Lafayette St. in Jackson. Please send $25 per person to Marilyn Malone Davis, PO Box 412, Henderson, TN 38340 no later than May 20, or contact Bruce McIntyre at Bruce@MyResilientLife.com for more information.

CCHS Class of ’81 Reunion The Chester County High School Class of 1981 has slated its 30-year reunion for Saturday, June 11. Forward your address, phone numbers and email address to Cindy Sherrill Jones, 4965 Wilson School Road, Henderson, TN 38340, or Facebook Renee Ross Phelps or email renee.phelps1981@att.net. Other classmate contact information is needed.

CCHS Class of ‘79 50th Birthday Party The Chester County High School Class of 1979 is having a 50th birthday party on Saturday, June 18, at “The Barn.” All classmates, whether graduates or not, are invited to attend. Please RSVP to Beverly Morton at 731-435-9185 or Phil Butler at 731-6978575.

Senior Center plan trip The Selmer Senior Center is sponsoring a trip out West for July 23-31, and a Western Caribbean Cruise Oct. 15-23. For more information, call Hollie Knight at 645-7843.

Quilt Group meets monthly “Quilters Without a Clue” meet the third Saturday of each month at the Chester County Library from 9:30 to noon. Quilters/needle workers of all experience levels are welcome. Lessons will be given for beginning quilters. For more information, call Carol at 608-2974 or go by the Fabric Corner, 110 E. Main St. in Henderson.

Hospice volunteers needed Hospice of West Tennessee is looking for volunteers to sit with cancer patients, run errands, read to them and provide companionship. Hospice volunteers are needed in Henderson and surrounding towns. For more information, call 664-4220.

Word Weavers meets each month Word Weavers, a local writing group, meets at 10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Chester County Library. Word Weavers is a group for anyone interested in writing. Visitors are welcome.

Pre-Kindergarten Registration

Alcoholics Anonymous

Pre-kindergarten registration will be held from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Wednesday, May 18, at North Chester School cafeteria at 186 Luray Ave. A child must be 4 years old by Sept. 30, 2011, in order to be eligible for the 2011-12 school year. Documents needed during the registration process include birth certificate (official copy), Social Security card, proof of income, and proof of residence (example: water or electric bill, or rent receipt). You will be notified in July if your child qualifies for the class. On the first day of school you must provide updated immunization records and physical exam. For information, call Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 989-5134.

The Henderson group of Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. each Tuesday (closed discussion), 8 p.m. on Thursdays (open discussion) and 3 p.m. on Sundays (open discussion and big book). Meetings are now located at First United Methodist Church on North Ave. in Henderson. For more information, call 989-8348.

‘Out of School Bash’ First Baptist Church in Henderson is hosting an “Out of School Bash,” for ages pre-school through sixth grade, from 5:307:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 18. The event will be held in the church parking lot and there will be food, games and fellowship. For information, call 989-2626.

Telephone Pioneers meeting The Jackson Life Member Telephone Pioneers will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, May 19, at Perkins Restaurant in Jackson. Bring old cell phones to be donated to our military personnel. All retired communications employees and their spouses are invited to attend. For additional information, call 423-0944.

Benefit Breakfast There will be an all you can eat buffet breakfast from 7-11 a.m. on Saturday, May 21, at the Chester County Senior Center. The buffet will include sausage, eggs, bacon, biscuits and gravy, pancakes, hash browns, cinnamon rolls, fresh fruit and juice. The cost is $8 for adults and $4 for children. All proceeds go toward the Finger Christian Fellowship Youth Fund. For more information, call 439-5516.

Hickory Corner Homecoming The Hickory Corner Community Center invites everyone to their Homecoming on Saturday, May 21. Opening ceremonies will start at 11 a.m. Ham and bean dinner plates include beans, slaw, onion, cornbread, dessert and drink for $5. Hot dogs will also be available. The cakewalk will be at 1 p.m. All proceeds go to benefit the center.

CCHS Class of 1954 Reunion The Chester County High School Class of 1954 will meet at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 21, at Whisker’s Catfish House. Call Betty Morris at 989-7454 or Tommie Polk at 9897552 for reservations.

Liles Family Reunion The Liles family will gather for a reunion at 1 p.m. on Sunday, May 22, at Chickasaw State Park. A potluck meal will be served.

CCHS Class of 1991 Reunion The Chester County High School Class of 1991 will hold its 20-year reunion at 7 p.m. on Saturday, June 4, at Miss Ollie’s at 111 E.

Yoga Classes Yoga classes are being offered at First United Methodist Church. The classes are taught by Carleen Miller, certified yoga instructor, and are held every Monday from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the church’s Christian Life Center gym. The cost is $5 per session. For information, call the church office at 9892732.

Recycle cell phones The Chester County Senior Center and the Chester County Solid Waste Department have joined together to recycle cell phones. You may drop them off at Miller’s Big Star, all five convenience centers, or the Senior Center. It helps the environment and is a fundraiser for the Senior Center. Used ink cartridges are also recycled.

Family History Books available at library The Chester County Family History Book, Volume I, and the Chester County Pictorial Book, Volume II, can be picked up at the Chester County Library.

Jackson Rural Development meetings The Jackson Rural Development Area Office holds meetings from 9–11 a.m. the first and third Wednesday of each month in the conference room of Henderson City Hall, 121 Crook Ave. A rural development specialist will be available to assist with rural housing applications. To set up an appointment, call 668-2091.

Loving Paws Fundraiser Loving Paws Rescue is having a special fundraising campaign to raise money to treat nine heartworm positive dogs. All the money received in the collection canisters is now designated for heartworm treatments rather than general funds. If you wish to donate, an account has been set up at Chester County Bank for heartworm treatments. Donations can be mailed to LPR, PO Box 95, Luray, TN 38352. For information, email luvdogz@bellsouth.net or call 9890319.

Head Start Program The Head Start Program is for 3- and 4year-old children of low-income families. Applications are taken Monday through Friday at the Southwest Human Resource Building located on White Ave. Go by the office to fill out an application for your child to have a head start. For information, call Marilyn Myhan or Gloria Holiday at 9895111.

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT May 3, 2011 Roy Thurmond, 60, Deanburg, was arrested and charged with public intoxication.

May 8, 2011 Timothy J. Melton, 52, 413A Steed St., was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. He is held in the Chester County jail. No bond has been set.

CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT May 3, 2011 10:48 a.m. – 103 E University St., Heritage Towers, burnt chicken.

May 4, 2011 8:18 a.m. – 113 Cason Ave., Freed-Hardeman University, Hall Roland Hall, hair dryer set off alarm.

May 9, 2011 6:58 a.m. – 129 E University St., FreedHardeman University, Scott Hall, room 221, hair dryer set off alarm.

CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT May 2, 2011 A Husqvarna lawnmower and other items were reportedly stolen from a residential property on Melanie Circle. According to the report, the lawnmower, valued at $300 was reported stolen in addition to a Honda four-wheeler valued at $500 and a 5/8 trailer valued at $500. Richard Glen King, 52, 680 Eaton Lane, was arrested and charged with sexual battery. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $25,000 bond.

May 5, 2011 Michael Ray Greene, 37, 215 McAdams Loop, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 cash bond.

May 6, 2011

A Colt .45 handgun was reported missing from a vehicle. The gun, which was last seen sometime in the past year was described as brushed silver with wood grips and valued at $700.

May 7, 2011

Theft was reported at a residence on Wilhelms Haven. According to the report, many items were

reported missing, totaling a loss of approximately $1,700. A .22 caliber American Arms revolver was reported missing from a residence on Enville Road. According to the report, the gun is stainless steel with a wood grip and valued at $240. Two handguns were reported missing from a camper on Bluebird Lane. According to the report, the guns were described as a .40 caliber Ruger P91 semi-automatic valued at $450 and a 9mm Rueger P89 semi-automatic valued at $450.

May 8, 2011

Several items were reported missing from a residence on McAdams Loop. According to the report, someone allegedly broke into the residence and stole a Playstation 3 valued at $300, 10 Playstation games valued at $100, and medications including Wafer, Oxycodone, 40 Xanax, and an inhaler. Danny L. Jackson, 52, 900 Plainview Road, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI). He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $1,000 bond. Jonathan Wood, 24, 120 College Inn, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $600 cash bond.

CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT April 10, 2011 5:47 p.m. – 2385 Pleasant Springs Road, house fire, Deanburg Volunteer Fire Department responding.

April 24, 2011 3:37 p.m. – US Hwy 100 E, Glendale Road, grass fire, Jacks Creek Volunteer Fire Department responding.

April 26, 2011 8 p.m. – US Hwy 100 E, Sand Mountain Road, storm clean-up, Jacks Creek Volunteer Fire Department responding. 8:45 p.m. – 575 Johnson Cross Road, lightning strike, Jacks Creek Volunteer Fire Department responding.

May 2, 2011 11:28 a.m. – US Hwy 100 W, St. Rt. 225, motor vehicle accident, Station One Volunteer Fire Department responding.

May 5, 2011 7:43 p.m. – 105 Frank Latham Road, smoke scare, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding.

May 8, 2011

3:05 p.m. – St. Rt. 200, Glendale Road, smoke scare, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding.

CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports.

CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT Mark Brown, 25, 209 Harmon St., pled guilty to vandalism up to $500. He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, all suspended and supervised. He was ordered to pay court costs plus $1,000 in restitution. Mamie Swafford, 42, Jacks Creek, pled guilty to four counts of writing worthless checks up to $500. She was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, all suspended and ordered to pay court costs. She also pled guilty to identity theft – SOL. She was ordered to pay court costs and is supervised. Perry Neal Barham, 44, 410 Baughn Ave. Ext, was charged with rape of a child – attempt and aggravated sexual battery. He was waived to the action of the Grand Jury.

CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Perry Barham, 45, was found guilty of counts one and two, of casual exchange of marijuana and count three, misrepresenting a substance to be a controlled substance. Count one and two: Barham was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail on each count, to serve a minimum of 75 percent prior to eligibility for work release, furlough, trusty status or rehabilitative programs. He was ordered to pay court costs and a $250 fine for each count. Count three: He was sentenced to two years in a TDOC facility at a 30 percent release eligibility, to serve. He was ordered to pay court costs plus $1,000 in fines. All counts are to be served concurrently.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011 Page 13-A

Chester County Schools Academic Awards The Chester County Board of Education hosted the annual Academic Banquet May 2 at Chester County High School. The top students in each grade from sixth to 12th were honored, as well as the CCHS Academic Decathlon Team.

At right:

Academic Decathlon Team Seated, from left, in order of rank: Piper Davis, Lydia Creech, Sunny Lloyd, Caitlin Hutcherson; and Zack Lloyd; and back row: Grey Davis, Lindsey Elkins, Joseph Martinez, Jon Kanizar, and Caleb Dunaway. Not pictured: Sierra Dove, Rodger Lampley III, and Forrest Vest. Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Sixth Grade Seated, from left, with rank in class: Skylar Nash (2); Charlee Thompson (5); Hanna Holder (4); and back row: Caleb Johnson (3); and Coltin Cronin (1).

Seventh Grade Seated, from left, in order of rank: Kelby Clark, Houston Holdren, Sydney Watson, Valerie Bogard, and Alyssa Showers.

Ninth Grade Eighth Grade Seated, from left, with rank in class: Andrew Creech (2); Brendan Clayton (1); and Madison Cherry (3) and back row: Dalton Sheffield (4); and Matthew Johnson (5).

Seated, from left, in order of rank: Ben Morris, Alex Plunk, and Nichole Patterson; and standing: Caitlyn Patterson, and Morgan Jones.

Eleventh Grade Tenth Grade Seated, from left, in order of rank: Karin Bogard, Ben Melton, and Maitlin Huet; and back row: Courtney Barber, and Morgan Williams.

Twelfth Grade From left, in order of rank: Mary Beth Morris, Josh Moore, and Alicia Rinks; and back row: Sara Pirtle, and Zach Lloyd.

Seated, from left, in order of rank: Piper Davis, Grey Davis, and Lydia Creech; and back row: Meghan Black, and Jacob Robertson.

Prayers made for community/nation Chester County Ministerial Association hosted a local observance of the National Day of Prayer, Thursday on the steps of the Chester County Courthouse. A small gathering of worshippers listened as pastors of local churches and community officials offered up prayers for a wide variety of areas including families, schools, the nation and Photos by James A. Webb, Independent its leaders, spiritual Charles Ward of Antioch Baptist Church offers awakening, and the prayers for healing and spiritual awakening armed forces, as well as Thursday at the Courthouse as part of the local the economy and busi- observance of the National Day of Prayer. nesses. Rick Seaton, of the Henderson Assembly of God, acted as moderator for the short program.


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Join Hands Day unites youth and adults to help beautify downtown Henderson Bridging the generation gap and improving communities was the focus of Join Hands Day, a national day of service sponsored by Modern Woodmen of America and other fraternal benefit societies. This year Join Hands Day was held on May 7. In Henderson, Join Hands Day partnered with local Daisy and Brownie Girl Scout troops as well as Modern Woodmen’s Youth Service Club to brighten up downtown by planting flowers in the planters along Main St. and at the Chester County Courthouse. About 20 children, along with leaders and parents, participated in the event. Ronnie Geary Jr., a local Modern Woodmen representative, was pleased with the turnout. With so many volunteers helping, the beautification project was quickly completed. “Modern Woodmen tries to do so much for the community and our youth,” said Geary. “Locally, since 2006, Modern Woodmen has

matched funds raised through benefits for people with needs, school organizations such as baseball, football, soccer, fall festivals, etc. and local organizations – volunteer fire departments, Rescue Squad, etc. From 2006 to present, Modern Woodmen has donated more than $65,000. Join Hands Day is just another way we are trying to give back to our hometown.”

Join Hands Day brought youth and adults together to plan and complete volunteer service projects in their communities. As the generations work side by side, they learn more about each other, sparking new levels of understanding and respect. “Join Hands Day gave us the chance to work with other groups to improve the community,” Geary added. “We also had

Photos by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Ireland Knight, a local Girl Scout, prepares the soil in a planter on the courthouse porch for awaiting flowers Saturday morning. Old, dead plants were replaced and the volunteers planted bright new flowers in their place.

the opportunity to connect with both young and older volunteers, which is the purpose of the day.” Coordinated by local Modern Woodmen members, chapters provide opportunities to connect through social activities and volunteer projects. Youth service clubs provide young Modern Woodmen members with opportunities to volunteer, be patriotic, learn new skills, make friends and have fun. As a tax-exempt fraternal benefit society, Modern Woodmen sells life insurance, annuity and investment products not to benefit stockholders but to improve the quality of life of its stakeholders – members, their families and their communities. This is accomplished through social, charitable and volunteer activities. Annually, Modern Woodmen and its members provide more than $23 million and nearly one million volunteer hours for community projects nationwide.

Daisy Girl Scouts Claire Henson, and Ivy Knight plant new flowers and greenery in the planters on Main St. on May 7.

The Chester County Courthouse was abuzz with activity Saturday morning as volunteers filled the planters and spruced up the porch.

Paisley Cook (left) and Kaley Zdravkov, along with adult volunteers, plant flowers on the courthouse porch.

Chester County Relay For Life: May 20, 2011 Relay For Life Events Relay Burger Lunch The City of Henderson will sponsor a burger lunch from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on Friday, May 13, in the City of Henderson parking lot. Lunch includes a burger, chips, drink and dessert. The cost is $5.

Relay Pancake Breakfast

The Chester County Lions Club will sponsor a pancake breakfast from 6–10 a.m. on Saturday, May 14, at the Senior Citizens’ Center. Tickets are $5 per person.

Relay’s Got Talent

Relay’s Got Talent is looking for anyone with talent to compete for cash prizes at Relay on May 20. Call WYN106.9 at 427-9616 and they will fax you an entry form, or inquire at Clayton Bank’s 101 E. Main St. branch. The first 20 entries will be accepted and is open to all ages. Win cash and help the American Cancer Society. An Elvis Look-Alike Contest will be held at Relay in honor of Danny “Goose” Jones. The contest is open to all ages. Participants in the Elvis Look-Alike contest will vie for the best Elvis costume of the evening.

Spirit of Relay Parade

Decorate anything small that can be pulled or pushed by someone or pulled by an ATV, etc. The theme for Relay this year is “Spirit of Relay,” so decorate accordingly. This small parade will begin at 6 p.m. and will consist of a lap around the high school parking lot. To par-

Bunko raises over $4,000 for Chester County Relay The 2nd annual Bunko Tournament, sponsored by Casey Realtors and Insurance, raised over $4,000 for Relay for Life. Organizers thank all who came out and supported this cause. A special thanks also goes to sponsors who gave time and money to make this event possible. Next year’s event is already eagerly anticipated and promises to be just as entertaining and profitable for Relay For Life.

ticipate, be at the high school at 5:45 p.m. For more information, contact Mendi at 989-2161 ext. 163.

Dog Show

There will be a dog show hosted by the Relay For Life committee at 6:15 p.m. on Friday, May 20, during the annual relay event. Prizes will be awarded in the small, medium, and large dog categories. Entry fee will be $5 and you may register by contacting Tami Casey at 9895984. Registration will also be accepted prior to the 6:15 p.m. show time. All proceeds will benefit the Chester County Relay for Life.

Cajun Shrimp Boil

Relay For Life Family Hair Care tent will have Cajun shrimp boil plates on May 20 at Chester County High School.

“You’ve Been Flocked” and “Paint the Town Purple campaigns now underway

“You’ve Been Flocked” and “Paint the Town Purple” campaigns are underway. Purple bows may be purchased for $10 at the Chester County Property Assessor’s Office, the Chamber of Commerce, and Taco Bell. Tell all your friends and neighbors to buy a bow for their mailboxes or doors and join in the cancer awareness outreach. Contact Beverly Morton at 989-4882 for more information. If you desire to see two dozen pink flamingos adorning the yard of your favorite person, you may do so for $25. The flock of birds will remain there for 24 hours until they fly away to another deserving person. Contact Kevin Howell at 731-608-2865 or any committee member for more information.

Recycling for a cure taking place throughout the county

Chester County Relay for Life is recycling for a cure this year. The community is being asked to assist with this fundraising event, by dropping off any aluminum cans at the recycling bins at any Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling locations within the county. Also, look for the purple barrels placed around businesses in the area. For additional information, call Teresa at 6952100.


SSppoorrttss Page 1-B

Thursday, May 12, 2011

CCHS continues advance in district tournament

Photo courtesy the McNairy County News

Chester County’s Kamara Trice delivers a pitch for the Eaglettes in a 7-3 victory Saturday over McNairy Central in Selmer.

Trice twice knocks out McNairy Kamara Trice hit two home runs, and Elantra Cox added an inside-theparker, as the Chester County Eaglettes moved into the winners’ bracket final of the District 14-AA softball tournament with a 7-3 victory Saturday over McNairy Central in Selmer.

Logan McEarl and Kirsten Henry each added two hits for Chester County which improved to 31-5 on the season. The Eaglettes and Lexington met Tuesday in Selmer. The victor was assured of advancing to the regional tournament, while the loser would have to win one more game.

Youth soccer registration is Friday at West Chester Chester County Youth Soccer registration will be held from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday, May 13 at West Chester Elementary School. The ages are from 4 – 16 years old, and your child must be 4 years of age by July 31. For more information, call Kim McNeil at 731-6958165, or visit the website at www.chestercountysoccer.com

QB Club meet is May 12, Haywood at CC is May 19 The Chester County High School Quarterback Club will meet at 6 p.m. May 12 at the school cafeteria. All interested parties are urged to attend. CCHS will play Haywood in a spring scrimmage at 4:30 p.m. May 19 at Eagle Stadium. The contest was originally scheduled at Brownsville.

Chickasaw Golf hosting summer junior camps Chickasaw Golf Club is hosting a series of summer junior golf camps. Pee Wee Junior Golf Camp, for ages 5-7, is May 23-26; Junior Pro Golf Camp, for ages 7-10, is June 6 – 9; Junior Champion Golf Camp, for ages 10 – 14, is June 13-16; and Advanced Junior Summer Program is May 15 to Aug. 14. Call Jim Merry at 731989-4700 for details and registration.

Chester County remained in contention for the district baseball championship with a 10-5 decision over South Side Monday at Eagle Field. The Eagles faced another do-or-die game Tuesday. Adam Crouse and Andrew Hunt teamed up on the mound for CCHS in its victory over South Side. Crouse worked out of two on and one out jam in the first inning without allowing a run. In the bottom of the frame, CCHS put up a three spot. Crouse led off with a walk, and Josh Cupples, Tanner Beecham, and Brandon Berry strung together three two-out hits. CCHS added to the lead in the second when Crouse doubled home Mason Wells. However, the Hawks struck for three runs in the third on only one hit. Cupples and Beecham teamed up again for another CCHS run in the fourth inning, and the Eagles batted around in the fifth scoring four times on only one hit. Jake Melaro singled leading off the sixth, and came home on Beecham’s fourth hit of the game to give Chester County some breathing room. In earlier district contests, Chester County and Lexington split two regular season contests, and therefore the expectation

was for a close contest Friday when they met in the second round of the tournament at Eagle Field. However, Lexington hit a number of singles through the CCHS defense in the first inning, and the bleeding did not stop until they had put up 10 runs. The Tigers went on to win 11-1 in five innings. Cupples, the CCHS starting pitcher, was within a strike of getting out of that first inning with only one run scored, but could not get the final out before leaving the mound with the loss. However, CCHS bounced back Saturday to record a 5-3 victory over

Liberty Tech. Josh Hatch picked up the victory with one inning of help from Cupples. The Eagles jumped on Liberty for three runs in the first inning, adding two more in the fourth. In the first inning, Adam Crouse reached on an error followed by a hit from Hunt. One out later Cupples walked to load the bases. Berry walked to bring in one run, and Wells singled home two more. In the third inning, Crouse and Hunt reached on a single and double respectively, with one run scoring on a fielder’s choice, and Cupples added some insurance with a two-out single.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Josh Cupples turns a double play for the CCHS Eagles against Lexington Friday.

Two and out for Lions in TranSouth The Freed-Hardeman Lions led midway through five innings but couldn’t hold off Cumberland University, as the fourthranked Bulldogs ended FHU’s season with a 9-3 defeat of the Lions on Thursday at the TranSouth Conference Championships. FHU scored runs in the first, third and fifth innings to take a 3-2 lead into the home half of the fifth before the Bulldogs scored three times on a home run by Tommy Winegardner to claim the lead for good. CU starter Aaron Wilkerson and reliever Daniel Kern combined to retire 12 out of the last 13 FHU batters, including nine in a row by Kern. Meanwhile, Cumberland

added insurance with two runs in the seventh and two more in the eighth. Justin Mackey was the only FHU player to record multiple hits as he went two-for-four. Kyle Dearing, Robert Prieto, Evan Mansell, Joe Mike and Tyler Wilson all had one hit each. Southard (3-5) took the loss, allowing five runs on five hits through five innings while walking four and striking out four. The Lions’ season comes to a close with a record of 27-28 as FHU qualified for the conference tournament for the second time under head coach Jonathan Estes. It also marked the final games for Lion seniors Leamond Arthur and Kyle

Parrish.

Drop opener to Vecca, 4-1 In FHU’s opening game, the Lions stranded 13 runners and Trevecca Nazarene pulled away late, sending FHU into the losers’ bracket with a 4-1 defeat of the Lions May 4. FHU starter Roberto Ferguson held the secondseeded Trojans in check for the better part of six innings but Trevecca got to Lion reliever Josh Reynolds for two runs in the top of the seventh to break a 1-1 tie. TNU tacked on an insurance run in the ninth inning while Dylan Kuhn did the rest, retiring the last seven batters he faced.

The majority of the Lions’ chances came early against Trevecca starter B.J. Boston. FHU loaded the bases in both of the first two innings but managed only one run, that coming on an RBI single by Mackey in the second. Freed-Hardeman also had opportunity in the fifth and sixth inning, putting two runners on base in each inning, but was unable to get any across the plate. Ferguson had a shutout through five innings before TNU finally got a run in the sixth to tie up the game. Reynolds replaced Ferguson with two outs and runners on first and second and retired Michael Maxwell See LIONS, Page 3-B

Golf tournament May 27 to benefit CCHS football It’s not too late to enter or sponsor the Chester County Quarterback Club Golf Tournament. This second annual tournament is scheduled for May 27 at Woodland Hills Golf and Country Club. Lunch is at noon with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Hole sponsorships are $100, and a four-man team may enter competition for $250. For more information, call Charles Cavaness at 989-4662.

Future Eaglettes Camp is May 30-June 2 The Future Eaglettes Basketball Camp at Chester County High School is scheduled for 9-11:30 a.m. May 30 to June 2.This camp is for girls in grades K-3, and 48. They will be divided into groups according to age. Cost is $35. Camp will focus on ball-handling, ball-handling, ballhandling.... and correct shooting form. Players will learn drills and games they can take away from camp so that they can work to improve on their own! Each camper will receive a T-shirt and a “camper pass” for 2011-2012 Chester County High School regular season home games. Register first day of camp starting at 8:30 a.m., or contact coach Lee Pipkin at Chester County High School, 552 East Main Street, Henderson, TN 38340, telephone 731-989-8125, or email to pipkinl1@tennk12.net.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Leamond Arthur is ready to hit as the Lions’ Justin Mackey Comes down the line in the first inning of FreedHardeman’s TranSouth Conference baseball tournament game against Trevecca May 4 at Union.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

CCHS soccer wins first tourney game Chester County defeated South Side 70 Monday in the team’s opening game in the district tournament. They advanced to a Tuesday encounter with Madison Academic; however, results were too late for press time. Semi-final and finals are Wednesday and Thursday at Trinity Christian Academy. In the South Side contest, Brandon Rodriguez added to his impressive cre-

dentials by scoring four goals. Will Taylor added a pair, and Taylor Hodges one. Hunter Hearn, Hodges, Taylor, and Rodriguez had assists. Cameron “Scooter” Hardison made a save on the only South Side shot on goal. In the Eagle’s final regular season match last week at Selmer, CCHS dropped a 2-1 decision to McNairy Central. The teams were tied 1-1 at intermission.

Lack of key hits eliminates FHU Lady Lion’s softball Freed-Hardeman University hosted the TranSouth Conference women’s softball tournament last week, with mostly perfect weather. However, the inability to drive in the crucial runs doomed the Lady Lions who won only once in three tries. Trevecca Nazarene, the league regular season champion, defeated Union in the final. FHU was eliminated Thursday with 2-1 loss to

Bethel. Each team scored a single run in the first inning. Bethel scored off FHU pitcher Savannah Cole on consecutive doubles to open the contest. The Lady Lions came back in the bottom of the frame with a single by Sarah Elizabeth Cousar, Brittny Johnson’s sacrifice, and a two-out single by Brittany Yates. In the top of the sixth, Bethel took the lead on a double by Amanda Renfroe, and a single by

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Freed-Hardeman’s Natalie Nelson makes a running one-handed catch in rightfield during the Lady Lions’ first tournament game May 4 at Morgan Stadium.

Jennifer Townson. FHU went quietly in the last two frames with only an infield single by Johnson. Cole struck out six and walked none for the Lady Lions, while her counterpart from Bethel, Leah Hensley fanned none and walked one. FHU ends the season with a record of 23-23. The Lady Lions lost a heartbreaker in their opening game Wednesday, a 2-1 loss to Lyon, before bouncing back later in the evening to out-last Blue Mountain 7-6. The opening game for the Lady Lions turned into a pitchers’ duel between Cousar and Lyon’s Hannah Pinegar. Both pitchers allowed only one run in the first seven innings, and both pitched out of a few jams along the way. The extra innings were oddly similar between the teams. Both Lyon and FHU put two runners on with no outs in the eighth inning only to leave them stranded on the bases. FHU had runners on the corners after a Vansandt double and a Yates bunt single but left the winning run 60 feet from home. In the ninth inning, the leadoff hitters for both teams singled. The only difference was that Lyon’s came around to score on a single to left field, while FHU’s was gunned down at the plate on a single to nearly the exact same spot. Kristi Kelley’s two-out single scored Cassie Wolfe from second base to give the Scots a 2-1 lead. In the bottom half of the inning, Vansandt singled to left field but Morgan was cut down at the plate after a perfect throw from Lyon left fielder Kristan Inman. In the elimination game, FHU scored in the sixth and seventh innings

Photo courtesy the McNairy County News

Chester County’s Will Barnes gains control of the ball in the Eagles’ soccer match at Selmer Friday. to come back from a 6-5 deficit to stay alive thanks to Vansandt’s walk-off single that scored Cousar from second. The game was tied at 44 after two innings and stayed that way until FHU

got a run in the fourth on an RBI double by Brittany Yates. But BMC stroked four singles in the top of the sixth and scored twice to take a 6-5 lead. The Lady Lions tied the game back up in the sixth

on Jill Brock’s RBI single up the middle and won it in the seventh on Vansandt’s fifth hit of the day. Cousar (14-11) pitched every inning of both games.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Betsy Pickler of FHU tags a runner, then throws to first to complete a double play for the Lady Lions last week in the TranSouth Conference Tournament.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Lady Lion softball players intently watch the action in the TranSouth Conference tournament last week at Morgan Stadium.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Freed-Hardeman’s Brittny Johnson slides safely into second base on a steal attempt against Lyon in the TranSouth Conference Tournament May 4 at FHU.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May12, 2011 Page 3B

Chester County High School 2011 Softball Schedule Date Opponent Location District Tournament – In Progress – at Selmer

Time

Chester County High School 2011 Boys Soccer Schedule Date Opponent Location District Tournament – In Progress – at Jackson

New CCHS coach desires the challenge Bolivar Central and Liberty Tech have alternated their dominance in District 14-AA boys’ basketball for the last decade.

The duo has dominated the state as well, winning almost every state title during that era. Ironically, Bolivar and

Time

Chester County High School 2011 Baseball Schedule Date Opponent Location Time District Tournament – In Progress – at Henderson

Jackson Generals 2011 Class AA Baseball Date Opponent May 11 Mississippi May 12 Mississippi May 13 Mississippi May 14 Huntsville May 15 Huntsville May 16 Huntsville May 17 Huntsville May 18 Huntsville May 19 Mississippi May 20 Mississippi May 21 Mississippi May 22 Mississippi May 23 Mississippi May 25 Mobile May 26 Mobile May 27 Mobile May 28 Mobile May 29 Mobile May 30 Montgomery May 31 Montgomery June 1 Montgomery June 2 Montgomery June 3 Montgomery June 4 Tennessee June 5 Tennessee June 6 Tennessee June 7 Tennessee June 8 Tennessee June 9 Huntsville June 10 Huntsville June 11 Huntsville June 12 Huntsville June 13 Huntsville June 15 Carolina June 16 Carolina June 17 Carolina June 18 Carolina (DH) June 19 All-Star Game June 23 Montgomery June 24 Montgomery June 25 Montgomery June 26 Montgomery June 27 Montgomery June 28 Chattanooga June 29 Chattanooga June 30 Chattanooga July 1 Chattanooga July 2 Chattanooga July 3 Chattanooga July 4 Mississippi July 5 Mississippi July 6 Mississippi July 7 Mississippi July 8 Birmingham July 9 Birmingham July 10 Birmingham July 11 Birmingham July 13 Carolina July 14 Carolina July 15 Carolina July 16 Carolina July 17 Carolina July 18 Carolina July 20 Montgomery July 21 Montgomery July 22 Montgomery July 23 Montgomery (2) July 26 Chattanooga July 27 Chattanooga July 28 Chattanooga July 29 Chattanooga July 30 Chattanooga July 31 Mississippi Aug. 1 Mississippi Aug. 2 Mississippi Aug. 3 Mississippi Aug. 4 Mississippi Aug. 5 Birmingham Aug. 6 Birmingham Aug. 7 Birmingham Aug. 8 Birmingham Aug. 9 Birmingham Aug. 11Huntsville Aug. 12Huntsville Aug. 13Huntsville Aug. 14Huntsville Aug. 15Huntsville Aug. 16Tennessee Aug. 17Tennessee Aug. 18Tennessee Aug. 19Tennessee Aug. 20Tennessee Aug. 21Mobile Aug. 22Mobile Aug. 23Mobile Aug. 24Mobile Aug. 25Mobile Aug. 26Huntsville Aug. 27Huntsville Aug. 28Huntsville Aug. 29Huntsville Aug. 30Huntsville Sept. 1 Jacksonville Sept. 2 Jacksonville Sept. 3 Jacksonville

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Location Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Mobile Mobile Mobile Mobile Mobile Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Sevierville Sevierville Sevierville Sevierville Sevierville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Montgomery Montgomery Montgomery Montgomery Montgomery Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Chattanooga Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Hoover, Ala. Hoover, Ala. Hoover, Ala. Hoover, Ala. Hoover, Ala. Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Mobile Mobile Mobile Mobile Mobile Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Pringles Park Jacksonville Jacksonville Jacksonville

MICHAEL MILLER JR.

Liberty are two of the reasons that Michael Miller Jr. elected to accept an offer to become the new head coach Chester County. “I look forward to the challenge of coaching in the same district,” said Miller Friday following a meeting with returning members of the CCHS Eagles. Miller, a University of Memphis graduate, comes to CCHS from Sycamore High School where he coached the girls team the last two years. “I look forward to getting in here and get the guys as competitive with Bolivar and Liberty as possible.” Miller has several game tapes of the 2011 Eagles who were senior dominated, and knows he has his work cut out for him. At the same time, he

stressed that the people of Chester County that come out in support of the team enjoy what they see on the court. Miller replaces Clay Murley who resigned at the conclusion of the 2011 season to move into administration. He is expected to be in Henderson to meet with the current CCHS team next week. In 2000, Miller earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing and business education from the University of Memphis, adding a degree from Trevecca University in 2009. His coaching career includes head varsity girls’ coach at Immaculate Conception High School from 200204, as well as stops as assistant varsity boys’ coach at Harding Academy and Christian Brothers.

Junior Eagles soccer out in second round Chester County Junior High lost to Covington 2-0 last week in the second round of the district soccer tournament. The loss concluded one of the team’s best seasons ever. According to head coach Tommie Kirk, the Junior Eagles finished the year with an 8-2 record, losing the tournament game to Covington, plus

a hard-found 2-1 setback to regular season champion Trinity Christian. The Junior Eagles were ranked No. 5 out of 19 teams in the district with a 5-1 league mark. They secured their first-ever home field for a tournament game, winning that contest to advance to the second round where they were eliminated

by Covington. CCJHS out-scored its opponents 27-8 for the season, and were shut out only once while dishing out three shutouts defensively. Over the last three years the progression of the program is obvious from their record which went from 6-7, to 5-3, and 8-2 this season.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Mason Wells awaits the throw to the plate which came just a bit late to retire the sliding Lexington runner during a district tournament game Friday at Eagle Field.

From Page 1-B

Lions

to end the inning. But the Trojans broke the tie in the seventh with two runs, and FHU could not answer offensively.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Freed-Hardeman University second baseman Kyle Dearing awaits the throw on a steal attempt in the TranSouth Conference baseball tournament May 4 against Trevecca Nazarene Univesity at Union University at Jackson.


EEdduuccaattiioonn

Page 4-B

FHU SIFE team gives food to local families Members of FreedHardeman University’s Students in Free Enterprise team provided bags of groceries to approximately 40 Chester County families Wednesday, May 3. The food was distributed at the North Chester School to families identified by the Carl Perkins Center for Prevention of Child Abuse. Canned goods had been collected earlier in the year at a concert by “Paper Route.” The concert was sponsored by the University Program Council. In addition, money raised from the annual Chili Bowl competition sponsored by the Office of Alumni Relations was used to buy food for the distribution. Dr. Lee Hibbett who, along with Mark Steiner sponsors the local chapter of SIFE, estimated the value of the food at more than $1,000. Brandon White, president of SIFE, and Clay Jordan, county director of the Carl Perkins Center, were on hand for the distribution.

Wheeler spreads sweetness

Inside CCHS by Meghan Black

Submitted photo

Heritage Christian Academy from Finger recently held a fundraiser to benefit Haiti. Marrissa Wheeler from Henderson was top seller, bringing in more than $350 in candy sales.

Joy McKinnon’s kindergarten class at Jacks Creek Elementary School held their 2011 Graduation and Awards Program on May 6. Students receiving awards were Ethan Carnell, Most Enthusiastic; Joshua Ross, Math Scholar-Boy; Haley Reed, Great Artist-Girl; Reilly McDonald, Great Reader-Boy; Katelyn Ross, Super Listener; Wade Vanhoose, Most Improved; Sierra Arnold, Quietest-Girl; Austin Spain, Most Creative; Jazmyn Sanders, Great Penmanship; Luke Miller, Great Worker; Rebecca Miller, Great Reader-Girl; James Davis, Great Architect; Alex Lopez, Computer Whiz; Jace Davis, Most Helpful; Sarah Holder, Great Math Scholar-Girl; Paul Gonzales, Best Manners; MacKenzie Cherry, Most CooperativeGirl; Gavin Marlow, Happiest; and Andrew Potts, Most Cooperative-Boy.

Jacks Creek Elementary 2011 Kindergarten Graduates

By Rosemary McKnight The end of the school year is a very busy time at East Chester Elementary School. Many special events have taken place. Last Monday Nancy Canada, the Chester County librarian, came to talk to students about the Summer Reading Program that will take place at the Chester County Library. Students were encouraged to get a library card and attend the special events that will take place throughout the month of June at the local library. Third-graders were espe-

Thursday, May 12, 2011

cially excited to learn about their opportunity to be a part of the Middle School Book Club that will take place on Thursdays throughout the summer. On Tuesday, the kindergarten classes went on their field trip. They had originally planned to spend a day at Chickasaw State Park, but the weather did not cooperate. Instead, they went to Up ‘n Jumping. They rotated through stations and participated in giant tricycle races, playing Wii games, and playing in the inflatables. PTO treated the kindergarten classes to a McDonald’s happy meal for lunch. On Tuesday, third-grade students went to Chester County Middle School for a tour. Christy Swope and Sarah Hibbett guided the tours to prepare students for their next school year. They were taken into some of the fourth-grade classes and got to see the appropriate uniform dress code. Students returned

excitedly anticipating their move to the middle school next fall. Parents were also given the opportunity to attend a Parent Orientation Program at the middle school to help them understand what to expect and give them an opportunity to meet teachers and staff. Third-grade classes went on their field trip to the West Tennessee Agriculture Museum in Milan on Wednesday and Thursday. They learned about life from 1850–1950. Students got to go in former Governor Gordon Browning’s one-room log cabin as well as see an outhouse. The museum is inside a huge barn. Staff guided them throughout displays such as a oneroom schoolhouse, a general store, a church, an old kitchen where teachers churned butter, and a veterinarian’s office. They saw corn and wheat ground into meal and flour and a cotton gin take seed out of cotton plants. Then

This school year is rapidly coming to a close. Next Thursday will be the last day of school with students only coming to pick up report cards. This week students have been taking End of Course exams. Monday, freshmen took the English I exam. Tuesday, juniors took the pilot English III exam. Wednesday, juniors and some seniors took the U.S. History exam. Final exams are coming up as well. Seniors took their finals this week. Underclassmen will take their exams starting Friday. Friday, students will take their fifth and sixth period exams. Monday, students will take first, second, and third peri-

MEGHAN BLACK od exams. Tuesday will be the last day of testing with seventh and fourth period. Seniors have several important dates coming up. This Friday will be the Awards Night in the high school cafeteria. Sunday is baccalaureate at W i l l i a m s Auditorium. Finally, Monday will be graduation at Loyd Auditorium. Congratulations to this year’s graduating class! We wish you the best of luck.

Kristen Moorehead’s kindergarten class at Jacks Creek Elementary School held their 2011 Graduation and Awards Program on May 6. Students receiving awards were James Legg, Best Manners; MacKenzie Wallace, Future Broadway Star; Hayden Franks, Computer Whiz; Kylie Franks, Most Improved; Tyler Sims, Entertainer of the Year; Tori Snodderley, Hardest Worker; Ty Miller, Class Helper; Becky Plunk, Future Author; Jacob Valdez, Future Heart Throb; Auburn Ward, Future Teacher; Andrew Sanders, Most Dependable; Faith Hart, Brightest Smile; Christopher Davis, Friend to All; Sadie Shiers, Mathematician; Miguel Puente, Best Handwriting; Sarai Martinez, Friendliest; Bradley Taylor, Sweetest Boy; Jazmin McPeake, Sweetest Girl; and Dayton James, Best All Around. they saw the cotton fibers spun on a spinning wheel, woven on a loom, fabric sewn on a treadle sewing machine, and then used in a quilt. Most students agreed that farm life in the past was very hard work, even for children. Friday was East Chester’s annual Field Day. Physical education teachers Janice Brown and Chad Hannah planned a full day of events that included a sack race, 50yard dash, egg-and-spoon race, tug of war, class relays, a hoop shoot, jumping and sliding on inflatables, and playground time. PTO treated students to snacks, water, and a popsicle. Even with all the special events, there is still a lot of learning going on. Amy Tims’ secondgraders made telescopes and binoculars using toilet tissue and paper towel tubes. Kindergarten and first-grade classes worked diligently on Mother’s Day projects. Beverly Rogers’

first-graders are practicing plays that they will perform for kindergarten students as well as their parents. The plays will be “The Little Red Hen” and “The Enormous Turnip.” They have also been learning about inventors Alexander Graham Bell and Ben Franklin. Third-graders read “Two Bad Ants” by Chris Van Allsburg. Two ant farms have been in classes so students can see how ants dig tunnels. One is a sand farm and one is a gel farm. Third-grade students are learning about Tennessee. This week students are making presentations about famous people and places in their state. Flat Stanley’s latest adventure took him to Boston to run the Boston Marathon. Parents need to be aware of several important events. Kindergarten graduation and awards night will be at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 12. First-grade classes will

have their Awards Day in their classrooms at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, May 16, and second grade will have present their awards at 9:15 a.m. Parents of third-grade students are invited to an Appreciation Breakfast at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, May 17, in the cafeteria. The breakfast is to express gratitude to the parents for all of their support while their child has been a student at East Chester. The third-grade Awards Day will follow from 8:30–10 a.m. in the gym. The last day for classes will be Tuesday, May 17. Students will pick up report cards on May 19 from 10–10:30 a.m. The school year seems to have flown by. East Chester’s faculty and staff would like to express appreciation to the Chester County Board of Education, our PTO, parents and grandparents, and the community for their support through the year.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011 Page 5-B

By Emily Brown West Chester students enjoyed a day of beautiful weather on Friday for their annual Field Day! The day was truly a day of fun in the sun! Students enjoyed the usual activities and games, but were very excited about the new clothespin relay and the new “batting” jumper. We would like to thank all of our P.E. teachers, staff, PTO, and parent volunteers who worked to make this day possible. Kindergarten Awards Night is at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 12. Parents, family, and friends are invited to attend. Parents, please have your child wear denim bottoms and a white tank or T-shirt. Students should arrive before 6:15 p.m. for lineup. Also, kindergarten students will be going on their spring field trip on Friday, May 13. They will visit the Henderson Fire Department and Chickasaw State Park. Please make sure your child wears tennis shoes. First-grade students have been busy learning about seeds, pronouns, and missing addends. They have made some special Mother’s Day gifts. First-grade students were excited finally to have a sunny day to have their TCAP bubble party. This was a celebration for completing the TCAP tests in which they have to “bubble in” so many answers! After rescheduling two times due to weather, first-graders were finally able to enjoy going on their spring field trip to the Tennessee River Museum and the Pickwick Belle. Third-graders have been reading the story titled “Jalapeno Bagels.” Cathy Whitehead’s class would like to thank Christian Williamson for bringing delicious, homemade jalapeño bagels to share with the class. They enjoyed their delicious treats with some cream cheese… yummy! Denise Davidson’s third-graders had a special visitor recently. Mrs. Denise’s son, Nick, who is a student at Vanderbilt University, did a presentation on Rwanda and how the traditional musical instrument, the inanga, has

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools Monday, May 16 Manager’s choice Tuesday, May 17 Manager’s choice

Chester County Middle School Monday, May 16 Manager’s choice Tuesday, May 17 Manager’s choice

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, May 16 Manager’s choice Tuesday, May 17

Baked chicken or Chili cheese Maxwrap Mashed potatoes Green beans Salad, roll

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice or fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Monday, May 16 Manager’s choice Tuesday, May17 Manager’s choice

All Chester County Schools Wednesday, May 18 School closed Teachers work on records Thursday, May 19 Students pick up report cards 10 – 10:30 a.m. Friday, May 20 School dismissed Summer break

Chester County Schools will resume Aug. 2 for the 2011-2012 Fall Semester All kindergarten through sixth grade students, seventh graders and ninth graders will attend Aug. 2 from 8 to 11 a.m. The first regular day of school for all students is August 3.

By Ally Rogers The junior high will host a fifth-grade night at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 12 for upcoming fifth-graders to the junior high. This will be a short meeting to hear information regarding the move of the fifth grade, clubs, programs and activities that are offered at the junior high, to meet and greet with teachers and to tour the building. I encourage all students and their parents to attend, if this pertains to you! Exams will be held at the end of this week and the beginning of next week. On Friday, first, third and fifth period exams will be taken. On Monday, second and fourth period exams will be taken and on Tuesday, sixth and seventh period exams will be taken. Students are allowed to check out at 11:30 on exam days. Just be sure and fill out the Final Exam checkout form allowing your child to check out and return it to school. They must be picked up and are not allowed to walk home. Students will be allowed to dress down in blue jeans and either their TCAP shirt or Homecoming T-shirt. Students who are exempt from exams because of grades and attendance and are not coming on Friday, will be allowed to wear their blue jeans and Math Boot camp T-shirt on Thursday.

impacted their culture both past and present. The class then made their own instrument, a wooden harmonica. We would like to say a special thanks to all the parents who have helped out lately with field trips, Field Day, PTO budget committee, and other school activities. Our PTO officers for the 2011-2012 school year were recently installed. They are follows: President-Tambrey Burkhead, Vice PresidentShelly Hutson, Secretary-Jean Smith, Treasurer- Tay McDaniel, and Reporter-Suzanne King. We are excited about all the wonderful things they will help do for our school next year. We also can’t thank our former officers enough. They were PresidentPhyllis Crawford, Vice President-Tambrey Burkhead, Secretary-Denise Davidson, Treasurer-Tay McDaniel, and Reporter-Jennie Krueger. These ladies have worked so hard this year and we truly appreciate it! Fall Festival, Fun Fridays, and Field Day are just a few events that would not be possible without our PTO and especially our officers. If you see these ladies, thank them for what they do for our students, our teachers, and our school! The PTO budget committee recently met and planned purchases that would be made using our spring fundraiser money. We would like to thank them for their hard work and we look forward to utilizing the items they will be purchasing for our students! Teacher Appreciation Week is being celebrated this week. On Monday, kindergarten families provided breakfast and firstgrade families provided lunch. Wednesday, second-graders brought breakfast and third grade, lunch. On Friday, the PTO will provide our meal. Thanks to all of those who brought items for our faculty and staff! As the end of the school year is approaching, it is always sad to say good-bye to good friends and coworkers. It is bittersweet to say that Tangie Sweatman will be transferring to Jacks Creek Elementary to teach kindergarten next year. Also, Sharon Miller will be retiring after 36 years of service in education. We will be hosting a retirement reception in her honor from 8:30-9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, May 18. We truly wish these ladies the best and will miss them dearly at WEST…Where Everyone Stands Tall! Boys’ basketball try-outs were held on Monday and Tuesday, and will be held from 3:30-5 p.m. on Friday, May 13. Good luck to all trying out for the team! If you have any questions, email or call Coach Kirk. We had our annual Awards Day on Wednesday, May 11. Congratulations to the students who received awards for highest grades in classes, most improved, A-B honor roll and excellent writing assessment scores! Congratulations to the following girls who made the cheerleading squad: Brianna Bailey, Emily Colbert, Madelyn Collins, Coneisha Geanes, Kaela Guinn, Hanna Hopper, Kelsey Maness, Claire McNatt, Genesis Mickens, Skylar Nash, Serteria Ross, Kendall Shaw, Baylee Smith, Kaitlyn Wilson and Grace Wray. Current cheerleaders include Ashton Campbell, Kelby Clark, Shelby Hardy, Carlee Morris, Amber Mosley, Sydney Watson, and Kelsey Yarbrough. I commend all the girls who tried out! Elections were held during Eighth-Grade Day for the freshmen Student Council representatives. Congratulations goes to Madison Parker, president; Brooklyn Davidson, vice president; Morgan Hays, secretary; and Jared Page, reporter; and student council members include Andrew Creech, Carley Fesmire, Sydney Fuller, Talia Hinson, and Bill Lampley. Students are able to come and get report cards from 10-10:30 a.m. on May 19. If you would rather stay home, you may send a self-addressed stamped envelope and we will mail it to you, just make sure you have all fines cleared.


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

FOR SALE FOR SALE – From 1 to 15 Acres. Chester County (LOW PRICE). As Low as $100 Down & $100 / Month. With Driveways, Building Site, Electricity. No Restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. 731989-4859. 7 days a week. (TFC) FOR SALE – Health & Beauty Aids, 3 for $5.00. Call 989-7739. (1C) FOR SALE – MTD Lawnmower, 40-inch cut, 16.5 HP – hydrostat. $400. Call 608-1284. (1P) FOR SALE – Clearance Sale on Display Homes. Save $$ on your New Home. Double & Singlewides available. Large Selection. WINDHAM HOMES, Corinth, MS. 1-888-287-6996. (TFC) FOR SALE – Stoves, Refrigerators, Washers, & Dryers. All 90-Day Warranty. Delivery Available. 254 North Church Street. 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday – Saturday, or call 731394-2490. (1P) FOR SALE – 7 acres on Taylor Trail, city water meter. Call for details. 731-608-2228. (TFC) FOR SALE – Electric Wheelchair (Golden Brand). Used 2 Months. Excellent Condition. Gray Color. Call 731-217-7163. (1P) MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE – Don’t buy before you shop CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER on Highway 72 West in Corinth, MS. 35 Display Models to Choose From. Call 662-2874600. (TFC) FOR SALE – Nice, 3 BR, 2 BA, Double-wide. $25,000. Ready to be moved. Call 731-426-4405. (3P) FOR SALE – Restaurant Equipment. Good Condition. Stainless Steel. Must Sell. Call 607-2644 (Milledgeville). (2P) HOME FOR SALE – in Chester County. Very nice, 3 BR, 2 BA, house on 2 acres. Completely remodeled. Only $98,000! Possible owner financing with 20% down. Call 731-435-9303 for an appointment to see. (4P) FOR SALE – Washer, nearly new, $100. Dryer, $100. Dining Table with 4 chairs, $100. Refrigerator, $70. Call 731-5770042. (1P)

FOR RENT FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq ft, basement. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Large 2-bedroom, 1-bath apartment home. Central heat and air, water furnished. 8 miles south of Henderson. Call 901-848-6684. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek area, nice communi-

ty. No Pets. Senior discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC)

1993. Ted Carter 731-607-0777. (TFC)

FOR RENT – 50’ x 125’ Metal Building. 530 Highway 45 Bypass. Call Eddy Patterson at 731-435-9425. (TFC)

WILL PAY CASH – By the piece or house full, antiques, collectibles, anything of value. 695-7196. (TFC)

COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR LEASE – 126 South Washington, Henderson, TN. $800 Monthly. Utilities Included. Excellent for Beauty Salon. Call 731-614-6784. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom house, carport, appliances, CHA. 629 Luray. $595 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 2 BA Mobile Home near Chickasaw. $350 / Month. $200 Deposit. No Pets. Call 983-5707. (TFC) APARTMENT FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 Bath, Refrigerator, Stove, Dishwasher, With One Car Garage. Fawn Drive. $575 / Month. Years Lease. Deposit $350. References & Application Required. Home: 731-422-2284 or Cell: 731-431-1755 or Cell: 731-234-2151. (TFC) FOR RENT – Brick 1-bedroom duplex, appliances, $300. 246 A Iris. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 109 S. Carolina, Henderson, TN. 2 BR House. $400 / Month. Call 615-7081229. (TFC) FOR RENT – Double-wide Mobile Home near Chickasaw. 3 BR, 2 BA. $450 / Month. $200 Deposit. Absolutely No Pets. Call 983-5707. (TFC) FOR RENT – Large 2-3 BR house. 313 E. Main. $675 mo. United Country Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom mobile home. 1845 Sand Mountain (Jacks Creek). $395 / month includes water. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

HELP WANTED

STATEWIDES ADOPT: 1st TIME MOM & Dad promise your baby security & a lifetime of Love. Expenses paid. Dana & Christopher, 1-888-5405191 (TnScan) AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-266-0040 (TnScan) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) HAPPY JACK® SKIN BALM ™ - Stops itching & gnawing on dogs & cats without steroids! Great for hot spots! Available at your local Farmers Co-op (www.ourcoop.com & www.happyjackinc.com). (TnScan) MEDICAL MANAGEMENT CAREERS START here- Get connected online. Attend college on your own time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 8 0 0 - 4 8 1 - 9 4 0 9 w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) SAWMILLS -BAND/ CHAINSAW -SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Make Money and Save Money In stock ready to ship. Starting at $ 9 9 5 . 0 0 . www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan)

LOVE and TRUTH CHURCH (off of Hwy 45) is seeking to hire a nursery worker. Hours are Sunday 9:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and Wednesday 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Pay is $10 an hour. Please contact Lanissa Finney at 731313-0499 or pick up an application at the church. (2C)

DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $149.00. Includes FREE name change and marital property settlement documents. Bankruptcy $125.00. Wills $49.00. Criminal Expungements $49.00. Power of Attorney $39.00. Call 1-888-789-0198 — 24/7. (TnScan)

FRONT DESK CLERK – Must have at least 3 years experience in hotel. Apply IN PERSON at Americana Inn, 550 Sanford St., Henderson, TN between 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. DO NOT CALL. (2C)

USED DOUBLE-WIDE 2008, Financing Available, Many Factory Close-Outs, Call today 1800-545-8987 (TnScan)

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED LAND OR STANDING TIMBER on 10 acre tracts and larger. Pine & hardwood. Carter Timber & Land. Since

$500.00 DOWN AND A Deed is all you need to start living in your

new Home. To qualified Buyer Call Clayton Homes of Lexington. 731-968-4937 (TnScan) JUST-N-CASE SECURITY, LLC Now Hiring! No experience necessary, Will train. $500-$1000 a Week Employee recognition, Benefits package, Advancement opportunities. Jim Courtney, Mondays 10-3 only (901) 4752885 (TnScan) HOME CARE PERSONAL ASSISTANT: Must have CPR/First Aid certification, Valid Driver’s license, Three months experience home care, Nursing home/caregiving experience with mentally or physically disabled family. Must read/write English. (662) 393-0020 (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) SALES PROFESSIONAL NEEDED. MOST earn $50K$100K or more. Call our branch office at 800-791-4914. Ask for John or email john.liederbach@insphereis.com. (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC. Currently hiring OTR drivers Good equipment, home most weekends Option to run the weekends, good benefits, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-6849140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com. (TnScan) OPIES TRANSPORT NOW HIRING OTR Drivers with 2 years exp. No HazMat, No NYC. 800-341-9963 or apply online at w w w. o p i e s t r a n s p o r t . c o m . (TnScan) OTR DRIVERS NEEDED! MESILLA Valley Transportation Class A CDL w/ 1 Yr Exp Great Miles & Great Equipment Call Tony Davidson @ 888-637-4552 www.m-v-t.com (TnScan) DRIVER- STUDENTS. FREE TUITION at FFE Driver Academy. Earn CDL in 18 days (start to finish). Great career path, constant freight, and pay.

recruit@ffex.net. 855-378-9332. (TnScan) DRIVERS- PAY INCREASE! REGIONAL Van Drivers start at 37cpm w/1 year experience. Training available for drivers w/less experience. Great Benefits/Home Weekly. Call 888362-8608, or visit AVERITTcareers.com. EOE. (TnScan) DRIVER- MANY CHOICES: PART-TIME, Full-time, Casual, Express Lanes, Dry Van, Refrigerated. Weekly or Daily Pay. Local Orientation. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- OWNER/ OPERATORS- SOLO- Team- Fleets $1.28 per mile (includes FSC) 900 mile average length haul, We Have More Freight Than Available Trucks! 1-877-9018591 (TnScan) CALL NOW! INTERNATIONAL TRUCK Driving School/ BIH Trucking Company Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) DRIVERS: REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 38-44 CPM, Class A CDL Required, 6 Months recent Flatbed 1-800-992-7863 ext 160 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) DRIVERS EARN UP TO 39¢/mi Home Weekends 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: 1-800572-5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext. 238 Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! OTR, Regional & Dedicated Runs Up to 50¢ per mile. Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d. 800-942-2104 Ext. 238 or 243 www.totalms.com (TnScan)

DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- NO EXPERIENCE - NO Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to 49¢ per mile! CRST Van Expedited 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A GREAT HOME TIME! Start Up To .43¢ Per Mile. Sign-On Bonus!! Lease purchase available. Experience Req’d. 800-441-4271 X TN-100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan) TWO CENT PAY RAISE Now Offered For New Drivers! Plus 2 day orientation, high miles, excellent equipment, dry van and flatbed freight! $500 Sign-On Bonus for Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888-801-5295 (TnScan) THINK RED FLATBED! $1,000 Average Weekly! Southern, Southwest, Midwest Lanes. Home Weekly. 100+ Safe Rest Locations. CDL-A, 1-Year Verifiable T/T OTR Experience Required. 888.711.6505 D r i v e Av e r i t t F l a t b e d . c o m (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 92 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 20 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) ADOPT: 1st TIME MOM & Dad promise your baby security & a lifetime of Love. Expenses paid. Dana & Christopher, 1-888-5405191 (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011 PAGE 7-B HAPPY JACK® SKIN BALM ™ - Stops itching & gnawing on dogs & cats without steroids! Great for hot spots! Available at your local Farmers Co-op (www.ourcoop.com & www.happyjackinc.com). (TnScan) MEDICAL MANAGEMENT CAREERS START here- Get connected online. Attend college on your own time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 8 0 0 - 4 8 1 - 9 4 0 9 w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) SAWMILLS -BAND/ CHAINSAW -SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Make Money and Save Money In stock ready to ship. Starting at $ 9 9 5 . 0 0 . www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $149.00. Includes FREE name change and marital property settlement documents. Bankruptcy $125.00. Wills $49.00. Criminal Expungements $49.00. Power of Attorney $39.00. Call 1-888-789-0198 — 24/7. (TnScan) USED DOUBLE-WIDE 2008, Financing Available, Many Factory Close-Outs, Call today 1800-545-8987 (TnScan) $500.00 DOWN AND A Deed is all you need to start living in your new Home. To qualified Buyer Call Clayton Homes of Lexington. 731-968-4937 (TnScan) JUST-N-CASE SECURITY, LLC Now Hiring! No experience necessary, Will train. $500-$1000 a Week Employee recognition, Benefits package, Advancement opportunities. Jim Courtney, Mondays 10-3 only (901) 4752885 (TnScan) HOME CARE PERSONAL ASSISTANT: Must have CPR/First Aid certification, Valid Driver’s license, Three months experience home care, Nursing home/caregiving experience with mentally or physically disabled family. Must read/write English. (662) 393-0020 (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) SALES PROFESSIONAL NEEDED. MOST earn $50K$100K or more. Call our branch office at 800-791-4914. Ask for John or email john.liederbach@insphereis.com. (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC. Currently hiring OTR drivers Good equipment, home most weekends Option to run the weekends, good benefits, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-6849140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com. (TnScan) OPIES TRANSPORT NOW HIRING OTR Drivers with 2 years exp. No HazMat, No NYC. 800-341-9963 or apply online at w w w. o p i e s t r a n s p o r t . c o m . (TnScan) OTR DRIVERS NEEDED! MESILLA Valley Transportation Class A CDL w/ 1 Yr Exp Great Miles & Great Equipment Call Tony Davidson @ 888-637-4552 www.m-v-t.com (TnScan) DRIVER- STUDENTS. FREE

TUITION at FFE Driver Academy. Earn CDL in 18 days (start to finish). Great career path, constant freight, and pay. recruit@ffex.net. 855-378-9332. (TnScan) DRIVERS- PAY INCREASE! REGIONAL Van Drivers start at 37cpm w/1 year experience. Training available for drivers w/less experience. Great Benefits/Home Weekly. Call 888362-8608, or visit AVERITTcareers.com. EOE. (TnScan) DRIVER- MANY CHOICES: PART-TIME, Full-time, Casual, Express Lanes, Dry Van, Refrigerated. Weekly or Daily Pay. Local Orientation. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- OWNER/ OPERATORS- SOLO- Team- Fleets $1.28 per mile (includes FSC) 900 mile average length haul, We Have More Freight Than Available Trucks! 1-877-9018591 (TnScan) CALL NOW! INTERNATIONAL TRUCK Driving School/ BIH Trucking Company Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) DRIVERS: REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 38-44 CPM, Class A CDL Required, 6 Months recent Flatbed 1-800-992-7863 ext 160 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) DRIVERS EARN UP TO 39¢/mi Home Weekends 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: 1-800572-5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext. 238 Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! OTR, Regional & Dedicated Runs Up to 50¢ per mile. Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d. 800-942-2104 Ext. 238 or 243 www.totalms.com (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- NO EXPERIENCE - NO Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to 49¢ per mile! CRST Van Expedited 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A GREAT HOME TIME! Start Up To .43¢ Per Mile. Sign-On Bonus!! Lease purchase available. Experience Req’d. 800-441-4271 X TN-100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan) TWO CENT PAY RAISE Now Offered For New Drivers! Plus 2 day orientation, high miles, excellent equipment, dry van and flatbed freight! $500 Sign-On Bonus for Flatbed. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888-801-5295 (TnScan) THINK RED FLATBED! $1,000 Average Weekly! Southern, Southwest, Midwest Lanes. Home Weekly. 100+ Safe Rest Locations. CDL-A, 1-Year Verifiable T/T OTR Experience Required. 888.711.6505 D r i v e Av e r i t t F l a t b e d . c o m (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 92 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 20 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) ADOPT: 1st TIME MOM & Dad promise your baby security & a lifetime of Love. Expenses paid. Dana & Christopher, 1-888-5405191 (TnScan)


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

Public Notices NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default having been made in the payment of the debts and obligations secured by that certain Real Estate Deed of Trust for Tennessee executed on February 21, 1989 by Joseph L. Rush and wife, Vicki V. Rush to Johnny V. Crow, Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Book 110 Page 736, recorded February 21, 1989, (“Deed of Trust”); and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed(s) of Trust is the United States of America, acting by and through the United States Department of Agriculture (“USDA”); and WHEREAS, USDA, the current owner and holder of said Deed(s) of Trust appointed Arlisa Armstrong as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed(s) of Trust; and NOW THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed(s) of Trust by USDA, and Arlisa Armstrong as Substitute Trustee, or duly appointed agent, pursuant to the power, duty, and authorization in and conferred by said Deed(s) of Trust, will on Thursday, May 26, 2011, commencing at 11:00 A.M. at the South door at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest bidder either for cash or 10 percent of the high bid price as a non-refundable deposit with balance due within ten (10) days of sale, (and if such balance goes unpaid, USDA will retain the deposit and re-foreclose) the following described property lying and being in the Seventh Civil District in Chester County, Tennessee to wit: Beginning on a plastic pipe in the west right of way line of Memory Lane black topped road, this point being the northeast corner of Donna Copeland’s property; runs thence north 88° and 1.94 minutes west, 331.61 feet, more or less, to a stake in the east boundary line of Reddin’s property, this point being the northwest corner of Copeland’s property; runs thence north 2° and 28.91 minutes west 150 feet to a stake; runs thence through Garland Mayfield’s property, south 88° and 12.01 minutes east, 345.66 feet to a stake in the west right of way line of Memory Lane black topped road near the west end of culvert and in a small ditch; runs thence with the west right of way line of Memory Lane, south 2° and 52.97 minutes west 150.58 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1.167 acres, more or less., Being the same property conveyed by Garland Mayfield, et ux. and Phil Mayfield, et ux. to Joseph L. Rush and wife, Vicki V. Rush, by deed of record in Deed Book 85, Page 307, in the said Register’s Office. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1470 Memory Lane, Henderson, TN 38340 CURRENT OWNERS: Joseph L. Rush and Vicki V. Rush The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or setback lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed(s) of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. Arlisa Armstrong Substitute Trustee 85G Stonebrook Place Jackson, TN 38305 http//www.resales.usda.gov

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default having been made in the payment of the debts and obligations secured to be paid by that certain Deed of Trust executed on August 24, 2005, by James D. Tomlinson and Regina H. Tomlinson to American Title Co., Inc., Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, under Book No 273, Page 132, (“Deed of Trust”); and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of November 1, 2005, GSAMP Trust 2005-HE5; and WHEREAS, Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of November 1, 2005, GSAMP Trust 2005-HE5, the current owner and holder of said Deed of Trust, (the “Owner and Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117 (i), not less than sixty (60) days prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose was properly sent, if so required; and NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebted-

ness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Owner and Holder, and that the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee, or his duly appointed attorneys or agents, by virtue of the power and authority vested in him, will on Thursday, May 26, 2011, commencing at 12:00 PM at the Main entrance of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: Tract One: BEGINNING on an iron stake in the southern margin of Woodland Drive at the northeast corner of Wayne and Donna DeBez near the north end of a new wire fence; runs thence with the southern margin of Woodland Drive, South 59 degrees 15 minutes East 105.5 feet to a stake in the southern margin of the same, 12.5 feet from the center near the north end of said new wire fence and being 37 feet north of the northwest corner of the Freeman Lot; thence South 18 degrees 30 minutes West passing Freeman’s northwest corner and the southwest corner of Freeman’s Lot and running with a new wire fence 193.5 feet to a corner of the same an interior corner of the Simmons lot; runs thence with the new fence North 73 degrees 24 minutes West 104.5 feet to the corner of Wayne and Donna DeBez; runs thence with said new wire fence North 18 degrees 54 minutes East 219 feet to the place of beginning as surveyed by Hobart K. Qualls, R.L.S #226 on April 16, 1987. Tract Two: BEGINNING on a stake in the east boundary line of John K. Hughes lot; in wire fence, this point being the northwest corner of Guy Austin’s lot; runs thence with wire fence, Hughes’ east boundary line, North 13 degrees 25 minutes east 138.5 feet to an iron stake, a corner chain line fence; this point being the Northwest corner of LA Simmons north boundary line, South 74 degrees 44 minutes East 105 feet to a stake in fence; thence with a new line, South 13 degrees 22 minutes west 141.30 feet to an iron stake, this point being in the north boundary line of Austin’s lot; runs thence with Austin’s north boundary line, North 73 degrees 12 minutes west 105 feet to the point of beginning and containing 0 3372 of an acre, more or less as surveyed by Hobart K. Qualls, R.L.S # 226 on April 16, 1987. Meter and Bounds Being the same property conveyed to James D. Tomlinson and wife, Regina H. Tomlinson by deed from John Lawrence Coolidge and wife, Melba Leona Coolidge filed for record in Book 237, Page 48, Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, dated 07-14-03. Property address known as: 813 Woodland Drive, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, Chester County. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 813 Woodland Drive, Henderson, TN 38340 CURRENT OWNER(S): James D. Tomlinson and Regina H. Tomlinson The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDERS: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as sole nominee for SouthStar Funding, LLC OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: N/A All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee c/o PP Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 File No.: 416.J1001955TN Web Site: www.jflegal.com

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE No. 2010-CV-459, AT HENDERSON DENNY BOND BOYTHA MCCAIN PLAINTIFFS VS. KEITH ROSS, ET AL. DEFENDANTS ORDER OF PUBLICATION It appearing from the complaint, which is sworn to, that the Defendant, Melvin T. Pearson is a United States citizen and that personal service of process cannot be had upon him; it is therefore ordered that publication be made for four (4) consecutive weeks in the Chester County Independent, a weekly newspaper published in Chester, Tennessee requiring the said Defendant to defend a civil action by filing his answer with the Clerk and Master, and by serving a copy of the answer on Larry F. McKenzie, Attorney for Plaintiffs, whose address is P.O. Box 96, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 within thirty (30) days from the date of the last publication of this notice, not including the date of last publication. If you fail to do so, judgment by default may be taken against you and this cause set down for hearing ex parte as to you. Signed this the 15th day of April, 2011

Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on August 24, 2007, EILEEN SOMMERS (DECEASED), by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 305, at Page 351, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Sixth Eight Thousand Eight Hundred Ninety Eight and 50/100 Dollars ($68,898.50), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointment executed on November 1, 2010, and recorded in Record Book 345, at Page 246, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Thursday, May 19, 2011, at 2:00 o’clock p.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situate in the 3rd Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, bounded and described as follows; to-wit: Tract One: BEGINNING at an iron pin set in the north margin of Talley Store Road, which point is located north 84° 54? 21? west 992.63 feet from a fence corner found at the southwest corner of Donald Hutcherson as recorded in Deed Book 88, page 440, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence, from the point of beginning, and with the north margin of Talley Store Road, the following calls; north 84° 54? 21? west 303.54 feet; south 89° 47? 53? west 102.43 feet to an iron pin set at the southwest corner of the herein described tract; thence, on a new line through white, north 2180.59 feet to a point in the centerline of a large ditch, and being in the south line of Pete Creech; thence, with the centerline of said ditch, and the south line of Creech, south 79° 19? 59? east 411.89 feet to the northwest corner of an eleven acre tract; thence, with the west line of said 11 acre tract, south 2130.94 feet to the point of beginning, containing 20.0 acres, as surveyed by Advanced Land Surveying, Inc., R. L. S. #1999, on February 16, 2005. Tract Two: BEGINNING at an iron pin found in the north margin of Talley Store Road, which point is the southwest corner of Anthony Moody and is located the following calls, from the southwest corner of Donald Hutcherson as recorded in Deed Book 88, page 440, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; north 84° 54? 21? west 1296.17 feet; south 89° 47? 53? west 102.43 feet; thence, from the point of beginning, and with the north margin of Talley Store Road, south 89° 47? 53? west 200.00 feet to an iron pin set; thence, on new line through White, north 2218.96 feet to a point in the south line of Pete Creech as recorded in Record Book 139, page 447, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence, with the south line of Creech, south 79° 19? 59? east 203.52 feet to the northwest corner of Moody; thence, with the west line of Moody, south 2180.59 feet to the point of beginning, containing 10.0 acres as surveyed by Advanced Land Surveying, Inc., R. L. S. #1999. It being the same property as that described in a Deed to Create an Estate by the Entireties from Eileen Sommers, to her husband, Wesley L. Hawkins, dated January 9, 2009, and of record in Record Book 323, page 669, in the Register’s Office of Gibson County, Tennessee. Eileen Sommers died in September, 2009 and upon her death, Wesley L. Hawkins became the owner of the entire fee as surviving tenant by the entirety. Map 57, Group 17.06 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 335 Knuckles Road, Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. TRACT ONE AND TWO ARE SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING RESTRICTIONS WHICH WILL RUN WITH THE LAND AND WILL BE BINDING ON THE GRANTEE AND THE GRANTEE’S HEIRS, REPRESENTATIVES, SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS: (1) No mobile homes are allowed, except double-wide mobile homes with a masonry foundation. (2) No fowl, livestock, or other animals, except such customarily domesti-

cated animals as dogs and cats, shall be kept, stabled or penned on any lot or brought onto any lot. All animals must be confined on said lot in accordance with local ordinances and state law. Dangerous or annoying animals shall not be allowed. (3) No inoperable or damaged vehicle shall be parked or maintained on any lot. (4) No business shall be allowed to operate on said premises. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. This property is subject to the restrictive covenants contained in the deeds of record in Record Book 303, at page 328, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, and Record Book 305, at page 349, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. This property is classified and assessed as agricultural, forest or open space land pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 67-5-1001, et seq. The owner of said property may be subject to liability for roll-back property taxes should such property be converted to a use other than that stipulated in Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 675-1001, et seq. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 28th day of April, 2011. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated January 29, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded January 30, 2007, at Book 295, Page 585 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Tommy Turnage and Johnnie Turnage, conveying certain property therein described to John Clark, a resident of Weakley County as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for First State Bank and First State Bank’s successsors and assigns; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on May 19, 2011 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a stake in the Southern margin of the Old Davis Gravel Road, this point being the Northwest corner of a 4 acre tract of land conveyed to James Rose, et ux., on June 14, 1974, by deed of general Warranty from Lessie Davis, of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in Deed Book 62, page 447; runs thence in a Southern direction with the Eastern boundary line of Henry Cupples, 210 feet to a stake at the Southwest corner of said 4 acre tract above mentioned, of which this is a part, this point also being a Northern boundary line of Henry Cupples; runs thence in an Eastern direction with said Northern line of Henry Cupples, 210 feet to a stake; runs thence in a Northern direction 210 feet to a stake in the Southern margin of said Old Davis Gravel Road; runs thence in a Western direction with the Southern margin of said Old Davis Gravel Road 210 feet to the place of beginning, this being the most Western one acre of the 4 acre tract of land conveyed to James Rose, et ux., by Lessie Davis in the above-mentioned deed. Said legal description is the same description as contained in the previous deed of record. ALSO KNOWN AS: 1730 Proctor Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is

subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Tommy Turnage; Johnnie Turnage The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 931205830 DATED April 21, 2011 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated February 23, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded March 2, 2007, at Book 297, Page 162 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Luanne B. Robbins and Thomas R. Byrd, conveying certain property therein described to First American Title Insurance Company as Trustee for Advanced Financial Services, Inc.; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on June 2, 2011 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: The Land located in the County of Chester, and the State of Tennessee: in Deed Book 274, at Page 487, and described as follows: Beginning at a steel post the same being the Southwest corner of the original tract of which this is a part, a common corner with Grissom; thence North 00 degrees 45 minutes East with Stewart’s East Boundary Line 1485 feet to the true Beginning; thence South 75 degrees 15 minutes 22.3 seconds East 1881.88 feet to a nail & cap in the centerline of Miffin-Glendale Road; thence with said road North 17 degrees 24 minutes East 61 feet; North 20 degrees 36 minutes East 50 feet; North 26 degrees 12 minutes East 50 feet; North 33 degrees 36 minutes East 39 feet to a nail & cap; thence leaving said road North 73 degrees 05 minutes 2.2 seconds West 1981.42 feet to the beginning, containing 10.34 acres, and being designated as Lot No. 6 of the C & P County Estate. ALSO KNOWN AS: 3115 Glendale Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Luanne B. Robbins; Thomas R. Byrd; Capital One Bank (USA), N.A. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726136158 DATED May 5, 2011. WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the terms, conditions, and payments provided in a certain Deed of Trust dated SEPTEMBER 3, 2003, executed by ROY G. LOVELL AND TRUDY L. LOVELL, HUSBAND AND WIFE, to M.D. BUNT, Trustee, of record in RECORD BOOK 240, PAGE 428, in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee and to J. PHILLIP JONES, appointed as Substitute

Trustee in an instrument of record in the Register’s Office for CHESTER County, Tennessee, to secure the indebtedness described, the entire indebtedness having been declared due and payable by REGIONS BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO AMSOUTH BANK, being the present owner/holder or authorized agent, designee or servicer of the holder/owner of said indebtedness, has requested foreclosure proceedings to be instituted; and as provided in said Deed of Trust, I, J. PHILLIP JONES, will by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as Substitute Trustee, on FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 2011 AT 12:00 P.M. (NOON), AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE CHESTER COUNTY COURTHOUSE IN HENDERSON, CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, sell to the highest bidder for cash, free from the equity of redemption, homestead, and dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived, and subject to any unpaid taxes, if any, the following described property in CHESTER County, Tennessee, to wit: PROPERTY LOCATED IN THE COUNTY OF CHESTER, TENNESSEE: BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN IN THE SOUTH MARGIN OF THE DRY CREEK ROAD, SAID POINT BEING 25 FEET AT RIGHT ANGLES FROM THE CENTERLINE OF SAID ROAD, SAID POINT BEING NORTH 80 DEGREES EAST A DISTANCE OF 210 FEET FROM THE EAST MARGIN OF THE SMITH TRACT, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE BILLY JACK SHERRILL TRACT; RUNS THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST WITH THE EAST MARGIN OF SAID BILLY JACK SHERRILL TRACT A DISTANCE OF 228 FEET TO AN IRON PIN, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 05 DEGREES EAST A DISTANCE OF 20 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID BILLY JACK SHERRILL TRACT; RUNS THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 210 FEET TO AN IRON PIN; RUNS THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 00 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 228 FEET TO AN IRON PIN IN THE SOUTH MARGIN OF DRY CREEK ROAD; RUNS THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 00 MINUTES WEST WITH THE SOUTH MARGIN OF DRY CREEK ROAD A DISTANCE OF 210 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO THE FIRST DEED OF TRUST OF RECORD IN RECORD BOOK 120, PAGE 359, IN THE REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ROY G. LOVELL AND WIFE, TRUDY L. LOVELL, BY DEED DATED MARCH 29, 1989 OF RECORD IN RECORD DEED BOOK 85, PAGE 460, IN THE REGISTER’S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 115 DRY CREEK ROAD, PINSON, TENNESSEE 38366. MAP 032 PARCEL 016.07 THE SALE OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, AND IS FURTHER SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF ANY TENANT(S) OR OTHER PARTIES OR ENTITIES IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY. THIS SALE IS SUBJECT TO ANY UNPAID TAXES, IF ANY, ANY PRIOR LIENS OR ENCUMBRANCES LEASES, EASEMENTS AND ALL OTHER MATTERS OF RECORD INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE PRIORITY OF ANY FIXTURE FILING. IF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY/ INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, OR THE STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT ARE LISTED AS INTERESTED PARTIES IN THE ADVERTISEMENT, THEN THE NOTICE OF THIS FORECLOSURE IS BEING GIVEN TO THEM, AND THE SALE WILL BE SUBJECT TO THE APPLICABLE GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY, ALL AS REQUIRED BY 26 U.S.C. 7425 AND T.C.A. 67-1-1433. IF APPLICABLE, THE NOTICE REQUIREMENTS OF T.C.A. 35-5117 HAVE BEEN MET. THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY, TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE IN THE EVENT THE HIGHEST BIDDER DOES NOT HONOR THE HIGHEST BID WITHIN 24 HOURS, THE NEXT HIGHEST BIDDER AT THE NEXT HIGHEST BID WILL BE DEEMED THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER. OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. This day, May 9, 2011. THIS IS IMPROVED PROPERTY KNOWN AS 115 DRY CREEK ROAD, PINSON, TENNESSEE 38366. J. PHILLIP JONES SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE 1800 HAYES STREET NASHVILLE, TN 37203 (615) 254-4430 www.phillipjoneslaw.com


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 12, 2011

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John or email john.liederbach@insphereis.com. (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC. Currently hiring OTR drivers Good equipment, home most weekends Option to run the weekends, good benefits, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck. Free retirement program and more. Call 800-6849140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com. (TnScan) OPIES TRANSPORT NOW HIRING OTR Drivers with 2 years exp. No HazMat, No NYC. 800-341-9963 or apply online at w w w. o p i e s t r a n s p o r t . c o m . (TnScan) OTR DRIVERS NEEDED! MESILLA Valley Transportation Class A CDL w/ 1 Yr Exp Great Miles & Great Equipment Call Tony Davidson @ 888-637-4552 www.m-v-t.com (TnScan) DRIVER- STUDENTS. FREE TUITION at FFE Driver Academy. Earn CDL in 18 days (start to finish). Great career path, constant freight, and pay. recruit@ffex.net. 855-378-9332. (TnScan) DRIVERS- PAY INCREASE! REGIONAL Van Drivers start at 37cpm w/1 year experience. Training available for drivers w/less experience. Great Benefits/Home Weekly. Call 888362-8608, or visit

AVERITTcareers.com. (TnScan)

EOE.

DRIVER- MANY CHOICES: PART-TIME, Full-time, Casual, Express Lanes, Dry Van, Refrigerated. Weekly or Daily Pay. Local Orientation. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- OWNER/ OPERATORS- SOLO- Team- Fleets $1.28 per mile (includes FSC) 900 mile average length haul, We Have More Freight Than Available Trucks! 1-877-9018591 (TnScan) CALL NOW! INTERNATIONAL TRUCK Driving School/ BIH Trucking Company Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) DRIVERS: REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 38-44 CPM, Class A CDL Required, 6 Months recent Flatbed 1-800-992-7863 ext 160 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) DRIVERS EARN UP TO 39¢/mi Home Weekends 1 yr

OTR Flatbed exp. Call: 1-800572-5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext. 238 Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! OTR, Regional & Dedicated Runs Up to 50¢ per mile. Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d. 800-942-2104 Ext. 238 or 243 www.totalms.com (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central No Money Down CDL Training Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- NO EXPERIENCE - NO Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to 49¢ per mile! CRST Van Expedited 800-326-2778 www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A GREAT HOME TIME! Start Up To .43¢ Per Mile. Sign-On Bonus!! Lease purchase available. Experience Req’d. 800-441-4271 X TN-100 HornadyTransportation.com (TnScan)

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Chester County Independent 05-12-11