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Chester County CC wins tourney, Page 1-B B Thursday

APRIL 19, 2012 147th YEAR - NO. 50

chestercountyindependent.com

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City gives OK to WiFi park By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Photos by Holly Roeder, Independent

Chi Beta Chi all but swept Makin' Music at Freed-Hardeman University last weekend with their show, "Get Hooked." They took first place in lyrics, blocking and staging, vocals and entertainment value, and the overall sweepstakes win. All six of the university's social clubs competed in this year's competition.

Henderson Board of Mayor and Aldermen met in regular session on Thursday, April 12. The first item of discussion was a problem with well number 10 that has caused it to stop pumping water. Henderson Utility Directory Mark Elkins told the board that it appears that the column pipe of the shaft has broken, preventing water from coming to the surface. Elkins invited well specialist John Hubbard to explain the situation and offer his suggestions for fixing the problem. “This is a fairly common problem with different water chemistry,” Hubbard said. “But the only way to check is to pull

it out of the ground.” In order to pull the shaft out of the well, Elkins and Hubbard agreed that they need a well specialist to do the lifting to avoid damaging additional components. “It’s very critical to have someone familiar with the product do the work,” agreed Alderman Michael Phelps. The shaft removal and repairs are expected to cost between $7,000-$12,000. While the well is out of service, the board voted to go ahead with routine maintenance and chemical treatment, which will bring the total of work needed for the well to $17,000-$18,000. The board voted to allow the See WIFI, Page 2-A

Chi Beta Chi makes best Music Freed-Hardeman University’s Chi Beta Chi took the Makin’ Music sweepstakes last weekend with their entry “Get Hooked.” The group placed first in all but one category. All six clubs competed in the 35th annual production entitled “Tonight, Tonight.” This win was Chi Beta Chi’s seventh in their 20 years of participation, the second most for any of the clubs. Like the other clubs, their five directors had worked on their show for nearly a year. Chi Beta Chi’s directors this year were Jared Hutson from Plano, Texas; Aubrey Davidson from Benton, Ky.; Chelsey Cook from Granby, Mo.; Lana Bridwell from Henderson, Ky.; and Scott Johnson from Tipp City, Ohio. Chi Beta Chi finished first in four of the five categories of judging: lyrics, blocking

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Brent Beshires, building inspector for the City of Henderson, shows the City Board images of the proposed Downtown WiFi Park. The park is part of the Tennessee Downtown grant that Henderson received last year.

Old Main added to National Register

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

and staging, vocals and entertainment value. Gamma Tau Omega’s “Sesame Street” took first place in costume and set design. Xi Chi Delta walked away with the sweepstakes second place for their show “A Tricky Treat,” and Phi Kappa Alpha placed third with “Grave Danger.” The Spirit of Makin’ Music award, given to the club who best exemplifies the spirit of Makin’ Music, went to Xi Chi Delta. Clubs which won various categories include in order of finish: lyrics--Chi Beta Chi, Theta Nu and Xi Chi Delta; blocking and staging—Chi Beta Chi, Sigma Rho and Phi Kappa Alpha; Costume and Set Design—Gamma Tau Omega, Chi Beta Chi and Xi Chi Delta; Entertainment Value— Chi Beta Chi, XI Chi Delta and Phi Kappa Alpha; and vocals—Chi Beta Chi, Xi Chi Delta and Phi Kappa Alpha.

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Fre e d - H a rd e m a n University’s Old Main Administration Building is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, according to Jaime L. Destefano, historic

preservation specialist with the Tennessee Historical Commission. The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official list of cultural resources

TODAY’S WEATHER

Freed-Hardeman University’s Old Main Administration Building is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

worthy of preservation. The cornerstone of Old Main was laid in November 1907 to house the National Teacher’s Normal and Business College. The building was completed in September 1908 in time for the fall term at a cost of $35,000. Despite a grim economic situation in the country including the Panic of 1907, President A.G. Freed and vice president N.B. Hardeman secured $7,000 in cash and J.D. Johnson and J.G. Hardeman directed a joint stock company to secure pledges for the remaining money. Freed and Hardeman eventually assumed responsibility for the entire mortgage. Hubert T. McGee was the architect for the building. A native of Jacks Creek and an alumnus of one of FHU’s predecessor institutions, he also drew plans for the Chester County Courthouse, Hardeman House, Hall-Roland Hall, and most notably, Clarence Saunders’ Pink Palace in Memphis.

Old Main reflects early 20th Century Italian Renaissance Revival and Italianate-style elements. It features a centered, two-story portico with brick arches and Ionic columns, buffcolored brick, limestone keystones, brick quoins, gabled dormers, and domed cupola with bell. The formal architectural design was executed with local craftsmen, local labor and local resources. “The building bears the stamp of the community in which it resides,” Erin Adams, former FHU archivist said. Bricks were kilned on Mill Street and it is believed all timbers were processed on site. According to the registry application, “Henderson citizens Pete Trice, Joe McCorkle and Glen Ledbetter hauled brick from Mill Street for the project. Jess O’Dair, chief carpenter, made the window casings and doorframes. Will Roberts and Walter Thorogood laid the brick See MAIN, Page 9-A


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Wind damages East Chester Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

School employees, at right, survey water damage to electronics in a classroom Monday at East Chester Elementary. The school was closed for two days after high winds ripped apart awnings, damaged the roof, and caused a gas leak. Above, an awning at the rear of East Chester was destroyed in the early-morning wind. School officials were scrambling late Tuesday to have sufficient classroom space available for the return of students on Wednesday. Also, a PTO meeting scheduled for Tuesday night was postponed until tonight, Thursday at 6 p.m.

Parrent-Frank engagement From Page 1-A

WIFI Utility Department to move forward with the repairs under the directorship of Mayor Bobby King. Building inspector Brent Beshires presented plans for the new WiFi park, which will be built on Main Street in the lot formerly occupied by the gazebo. The city moved the gazebo to Gene Record Memorial Park earlier this month. “Basically what’s going to happen is there will be two retaining walls, one centered and one at the lower end,” Beshires said. “There will be some landscaping done in that lot, and four posts, that are going to hold sails, which will give you some shade in that area, and they’re in the process now of picking out the type of blocks that are going to be used there.” The Public Works Department will work on the grading and development of the lot, and funds will be provided by Downtown Improvement grants. According to King, the sails will be replaced on a regular basis and the park will be lit up at night. There will also be tables and chairs so that visitors to the park can access the Internet. “The sails will make it flexible, and you can change the park around for events and to give us a lot of options there,” King said. Logos and colors can be added to sails during various events and special occasions. In other business, Fire Chief Glenn Bryan requested the board’s permission to transfer $4,430 from the fire department’s painting fund to general maintenance in order to replace three five-ton HVAC systems, which have been out for three to four weeks. Due to the age of the systems, HVAC specialists suggested that replacing the units would be the most cost-effective option. The low bid was $4,158, placed by Mike LeCornu. The remaining money transferred will be used for vehicle maintenance. Public Works Director Carter Scales asked the board to consider using hot in place recycling to pave North Ave., Mill St., and Fourth St. this summer. With the new system, the old pavement would be augered up, heated to 350 degrees, combined with new chem-

icals, and then replaced. Scales stated that the city would receive 35 percent savings compared to traditional paving. Paving the three streets would cost $217,000, but the city doesn’t have enough left in the 2011-2012 budget to cover the expenses. The board agreed to think about the situation and bid out the work. Also on the agenda, the board voted to sell surplus property on Gov.deals. The date for the first budget planning meeting has been scheduled for 6 p.m. April 24. Board members also declared April Fair Housing Month.

Mr. and Mrs. Wade Parrent of Eddyville, Ky., are pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Jenni Nicole, to Luke Tyler Frank, the son of Michael and Devenda Frank of Pinson. The bride elect is the granddaughter of Gary and Judy Parrent of Eddyville, Ky., and Mrs. Wilma Shaffer of High Mountain, Mo. The groom is the grandson of the late Robert Jr. and Clark Frank of Henderson, and the late Carl Naylor of Finger and Pauline Naylor of Henderson. Jenni is a 2011 graduate of Murray State with a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness, and minored in Nonprofit Organization. She is a member of Alpha Delta and is employed with Archer Daniels Midland. Luke is a 2010 graduate of Murray State with a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness, and minored in Animal Science. He is a member of Alpha Gamma Rho. He is also employed by Archer Daniels Midland. Jenni and Luke will exchange vows May 5 at The Lodge at Emerald Waters in Mayfield, Ky. Formal invitations will be sent. JENNI NICOLE PARRENT AND LUKE TYLER FRANK


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

RELAY ROSTER Saturday, April 21 – 5K Miles for Memories - starts at No Excuse on Front Street at 8 a.m. for walkers or runners. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. and costs $25. Entry forms available at No Excuse, Clayton Bank and Chamber of Commerce. For info call Anthony Buttrum (608-6669), Mendi Moore (989-2161). April 26 – Stevie's Thirty-One Gifts: Online Fundraiser – Go to www.mythirtyone.com/StevieCookse y. To order for the Relay For Life, under “my events,” there's a party set up as Relay For Life. The deadline is April 26, and orders will be delivered once they come in. Contact Stevie Cooksey. May 3 – Cancer Survivor’s Dinner – at 6 p.m. at Henderson Church of Christ. For cancer survivors and a caregiver/guest. May 12 – Lions Club Pancake Breakfast – at the Senior Citizen’s Center on E. Main Street. 7-10 a.m. $5. Call Beth Naylor at 989-2783. May 18-19 – Relay For Life – 6 p.m. – 6 a.m. at Chester County High School. Come celebrate “More Birthdays – More Memories!” Stay tuned for more details. May 18 – “Mini Parade” at 6 p.m. Line up at 5:45 p.m. in front of Clayton Bank’s Tent. The parade will go around the parking lot at the Chester County High School. Parade is for small motorized or battery operated vehicles such as ATVs/UTVs, Small Trailers, Golf Carts, Children’s battery powered ride on toys, and children’s pull wagons/toys. This year’s relay theme is “More Birthday’s, More Memories.” For more information, contact Mendi Moore at 989-2161 ext 163. THROUGH MAY 15 Paint the Town Purple – Purple bows are showing up all over town.

Contact Beverly Morton at 989-4882 to purchase a bow for $10. You’ve Been Flocked – If you wake up to a yard full of Pink Flamingos, someone made a donation of $25 to Relay for Life, just for you! Please call Denise Kinchen (6082650) or Kristen Bohem (435-9915) of the Taco Bell/D.A.R.C. Team to FLOCK that special person. Luminary Bags – Help illuminate the Relay track with the names and/or photos of special people —You can HONOR Survivors or REMEMBER those we’ve lost to cancer. For a donation of $10, we will place your Luminary on the track for all to see. Call Michelle Cavaness at 608-1391, or Jeri Harris, 879-9688. $5 T-shirts at Clayton Bank & Trust – Youth and Adult Eagle’s Tshirts and Youth Girl’s “Fight Like A Girl” T-shirts. All proceeds benefiting Relay for Life. THROUGH MAY 18 Recycle for a Cure – Through May 18, Relay for Life will receive 50 percent proceeds for aluminum cans and 100 percent for clothing donated through Chester County Solid Waste – Team captain: Amber Greene. 989-9855. Gift card raffle – The Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling Department is selling raffle tickets to win a $100 Wal-mart gift card. Tickets are $1. The drawing will be May 18 at 9 p.m. at Relay For Life. You do not have to be present to win drawing. Tickets will be for sale at the Henderson Convenience Center (just see the attendant on duty) or contact Amber Greene at 731-9899855 and the Budgeting and Finance Office (Shelly Davis) at 159 East Main Street.

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Life & Style

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CRISTINA REGALA ALVIAR RICKEY LYNN BROWN

KRISTIAN LEIGH LOVELL CLINT AARON BOWMAN

Thursday, April 19, 2012

CATRINA JEANNE BARKER JUSTIN (DUCK) JAMES

Alviar -Brown engagement

Lovell-Bowman engagement

Barker-James engagement

Mr. and Mrs. Alfredo Dizon Alviar Sr., of Mandaluyong City, Philippines, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Cristina Regala Alviar to Rickey Lynn Brown of Jackson. Cristina and Rickey have know each other since 2007 and remained friends until December last year when they were blessed with love and wanted to spend the rest of their lives together. Cristina is a graduate of José Rizal University and has been employed with International Spring Industries of Mandaluyong City, Philippines, for over eight years. Rickey is a 1977 graduate of McNairy Central High School in Selmer, and continued his education at Jackson State Community College, Freed-Hardeman University in Henderson, and graduated from the University of Arkansas School of Business, at Fayetteville, Ark. He served as community relations for the City of Jackson and later as transportation supervisor for area industry. They have planned a Christmas wedding ceremony pending the approval of their fiancée visa processing and her arrival in the United States.

Franky Lovell of Gadsden, and Ray and Margie Tunning of Milan, would like to invite family and friends to witness the marriage of their daughter Kristian Leigh Lovell and Clint Aaron Bowman at 4 p.m. on the 28th of April, at Maple Springs Church in Beech Bluff. A reception will follow. Kristian is a graduate of Milan High School and has an associates degree in psychology from Jackson State Community College. She is attending the University of Memphis to become a psychologist, and is currently the Activity Director at Henderson Health and Rehab. Clint is from Beech Bluff, the son of Keith and Cheryl Bowman. His brother, Chad Bowman, is also from Beech Bluff. He is a graduate of Liberty Magnet School in Jackson, and is currently employed at Four Season Nursery. The couple plans to make their home in Beech Bluff.

Mr. and Mrs Stanley Barker of Reagan are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Catrina Jeanne Barker, to Justin (Duck) James, son of Joe and Shelia James. Ms. Barker is a 2004 graduate of Gateway Christian School in Jackson. She is employed at Jackson Madison County General Hospital as a nurse. Mr. James is 2002 graduate of Lexington High School and is currently employed at AAA Cooper Transportation as a P & D Driver. The wedding will take place at 4 p.m. Saturday, April 21, 2012, at Sandridge Baptist Church in Lexington. Reception will follow at Pine Tree Country Club, also in Lexington. Family and friends are invited to join them on this special day.

Get well wishes to Nella Rush, Joyce Stockton, Tommy Landers, Norma Tulley, Winna Knipper, Clifton Mainers, Randie Snider, Earlene Cleek, and Edra and Benny Barnett. Also, my sister Sylvia Heard had surgery so please pray that she will recover soon. Bethel Baptist Church will be sharing the movie “Courageous” with our community at 6 p.m. Sunday, April 22. It is a marvelous movie. Everyone is invited. Please make plans to come. Happy birthday to Danny Hopper on April 18; Eric Landers and Justin Howell on April 19; Bobby Perkins on April 21; Ken Price on April 22; Ashley Hollingshead on April 23; and Tommy Landers, Kay Frost (my

cousin from Chicago), and J.W. Knipper on April 24. I hope you all have a great day! “Age is like underwear ... it creeps up on you!” - quotesscope.com Did you know? - The first attempt to assassinate a president was on Andrew Jackson by Richard Lawrence, a house painter. Both of his guns misfired, however, an event statisticians say could occur only once in 125,000 times. Andrew Jackson then chased Lawrence with his walking stick. RandomHistory.com Quote of the week: “Often people attempt to live their lives backwards; they try to have more things, or more money, in order to do more of what they want, so they will be happier. The way it actually works is the reverse. You must first be who you really are, then do what you need to do, in order to have what you want.” Margaret Young Have a blessed week and live your life forward not looking back at mistakes. Call me at 879-9777 with your news.

There will be a benefit for James Smith, who was injured in a motorcycle accident March 13. He is showing signs of improvement. The benefit will be at Oak Grove Church on Talley Store Road, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 5. They will have a bake sale, Jumper house for the kids, an auction by Don Terry, and a gun and quilt give-a-way (quilt fits full to queen size). They will be selling hamburger ($5) and hot dog ($4) plates. Anyone wishing to donate items for the bake sale or the auction will be greatly appreciated. You may get tickets for the quilt and guns from some of the following people: Regina Brooks (9897739), Pat Barrett Jones (989-3402), Judy Cagel (989-3502 or 983-2571), Kathy Gately (989-2471), Carolyn Mayfield (9894468), Pat Nobles Jones (989-7485), or Phyllis Knolton (602-3019). There may be more things

added to this event later. This event will help with their expenses. Watch the “What’s Happening” article for more information. Remember to love your neighbor; at anytime it could be one of us in need. The Sweetlips Greenhouse has once again gotten two thumbs up and praise from the state of Tennessee Agriculture Department Inspector. Cindy said weather permitting, her little granddaughters will be having a bake sale around 10 a.m. Saturday, April 21. The Faith, Hope and Love monthly food distribution will now be held at the new location on South Church Street at 10 a.m., Saturday, April 21. Faith Baptist Church will be celebrating 30 years with a church-wide homecoming and potluck fellowship Sunday, April 22, following the morning service. There will be no evening service. Come join us. The Wise Ones Sunday school class will be making a trip on Saturday, April 28, to Hagy’s and Shiloh. Meet at the church at 1 p.m. Birthday wishes go out to Morgan Pickett, Taylor Johnson and Rick Babin on April 20; Alan Pickett and

Aunt Shelley Pusser will be baking more cupcakes! Two boys and two girls make a nice family for Mark and Katie Pusser Roberts. Big boy Drake Owen Roberts’ weight can be compared to two sacks of sugar. He was born April 6, 2012. His siblings are Xander (age 5), Alison (age 3), and Emily (age 1). His grandparents are Wayne and Nina Weaver Roberts and Tracey and Lori Richardson Pusser. A single phone call reminded us the Tignor

reunion was Sunday. Two remaining descendants of James “Jim” Manley and Lyde Watlington Tignor, Carl Tignor and Liza Harris, were present to greet a crowd of 64. It was a great meal with good fellowship. Little Gunner Wilson was one of the youngest present. He was more interested in looking for cousins, Johnathan and Graham Carter, but they were probably playing ball at home. Kathy Tignor Belew, Sherry Rush Tignor, Bobby Picket, and I are the same age. It was almost a class reunion. Howard Tignor said one of us looked age 32 – he’s now adored for life by one of us. Thank you for supporting James Smith. He is improving from his motorcycle accident. Rehab is his goal. His yard is being

mowed, but volunteers are still needed – call Regina 989-7739. The fund-raiser will be first Saturday in May at Oak Grove. Come for lunch 11 a.m. till 4 p.m. Buy chances on a gun, rifle, or two quilts. It’s listed in “What’s Happening” in the Chester County Independent. Also, a double fund-raiser will help Dewayne Climer and James in May. Dewayne is home, but still healing. He needs our help. Call me at 989-7485 for more details. Next week the Don Ellis estate sale will close the final chapter of his Tara. His collections will truly be “Gone With the Wind.” Park carefully and buy a memorabilia keepsake. Can you still picture our friend waving goodbye in that “American Pickers” episode? Grief can be private and

heal by itself, but to get the full value of joy you must have someone to divide it with throughout life. Patsy Denton’s mother, Earlene Jones died April 15 of last year. My mother’s birthday is April 16. What a pleasure Patsy visited me in the quiet Dusty Rose Haven from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. We took a stroll down memory Lane. We can still look around and see others who suffer more. Pauline Climer Smith lost two on April 17, 1989 - her husband, Clifford, and her mother, Maudie Alexander. Pauline needs to visit the Haven and share time with Patsy and me. Bring a blanket! Friends are in our thoughts and prayers Hazel Ryan, Carolyn Essary Henderson, Ed Pitts, Imogene Patterson,

Ingleside-Pentagon Club meets Nancy Lofton welcomed members of the Ingleside-Pentagon Club to her lovely home for their April meeting. After President Regina East conducted a brief business meeting and the club creeds were read, co-hostess Janis McCall introduced their guest, Annette McKinnon Frye, from the Merle Norman store in Henderson. Frye spoke briefly about the necessity of skin care, recommending the use of products with sunscreen, antioxidants, vitamins A and E, and peptides. She then showed some popular spring accessories. First were scarves: she demonstrated a variety of

ways to use long loops, fringed triangular waterfalls, and long rectangles. Next, club members enjoyed examining some spring trends in jewelry: wide bracelets, wraparound watches, clip-on pendants, and converters to change pierced earrings to clip-ons. Following the program the hostess served delightful caramel pie; lucky napkin holders were Joan Brown and Glenda Gardner. Members present were Joan Brown, Becky Cyr, Regina East, Glenda Gardner, Junie Gilliam, Beverly Hardin, Nancy Lofton, Janis McCall, Francis Melton, Beth Tatom and Ann Woods.

Debbie Keen on April 21; Chase Pickett, Eli Newsom and Malcom Cupples on April 23; and W. O. Bullman Jr. and Jared Gilliam on April 25. Happy anniversary wishes go out to Rick and Dana Hopper on April 19. On our prayer list are Perry and Hilda Barton, Neal and Bill Kinchen, Ernie Merriman, Betty Stout, Margaret Browder, Arlene Moore, Bobby McEarl, James Smith, Oralee Barham, DeWayne

Climer, Chrissy Busby, Max Pickett, Mary Russell, Talmo and Sue Johnson, and Paul Seeley. Remember also Elizabeth Malone who is undergoing treatment for leukemia, our military and their families, our children and grandchildren, and Wendell Murphy. If you have news to share call 989-7523. Thought of the week; “Fear defeats more people that any other one thing in the world.” – Emerson.

Lavoughan Grissom, Dorothy Wadley and Traci Boothe Duck. Our prayers continue for Lois Wilkinson and Mary Privett. Cards, calls, food and visits will prove we are thinking of them. April candles are blowing in the wind for Casey Essary on April 14, Kathy Tignor Belew on April 21, Virginia Pickens on April 26, and Carolyn Essary Henderson on April 27. Kathy and Carolyn are my age. Call to hear me whisper their age. Our community expresses sympathy to four families. (1) Johnnie Wesley Rushing (7-13-20 to 4-9-12) was the son of Jess and Sarah Ann “Lexter” Cordle Rushing. He lived in Chester County most of his life. He was in the U.S. Army and

served overseas. He sent his army paycheck home to help his mother and family. After the war he married Lucille Thankful Melton; they lived in Chester County most of their lives. Both were buried at Old Friendship Cemetery. They had two children, Kathy and Junior, and four grandkids, Donna Kiggins (deceased), Sandra Day, Richard Marr, and Joey Marr. Their granddaddy lived and died at home. Visitation and funeral were held at home. (2) Wayland Mount (8-2217 to 4-11-12) was a distant relative of Horace Mount. He served in WWII; burial in West Tennessee Veterans Cemetery. Visitation is Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m. (3) Dalton Wallace See JACKS, Page 5-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

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Pounding out the details of making pound cake

JESSICA RENA ROSS PHILLIP CLINT PLUNK

Ross-Plunk engagement Douglas Carrol Ross and Rhonda Gail Ross are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Rena Ross, to Phillip Clint Plunk, the son of Rex Plunk and Melissa Murley and Michael Murley. The bride elect is the granddaughter of Catherine Guinn Phelps, James Roy Ross, and Aaron “Blackie” Phelps. Also recognized are Debbie Sue Wilburn and Margie Nell Jobe. The groom is the grandson R. L. and Nadine Plunk, Babe and Patsy Ruth, and Mack and Sue Murley.

The weekend benefit for Gail Marsh was a big success. If we tried to name every person or family or business to say thank you, we would surely leave someone out. The tremendous outpouring of help and donations is

greatly appreciated. Mrs. Peggy Weaver would like to say how proud she was for all the baked items brought to both locations. She said she had never had so many baked items turned in at one time. Our thanks also go to the other community centers and people who helped out too! Above all, we want to thank Dwain Seaton for his time and effort to grill the pork chops. Mr. Seaton helps anytime he can for people who are in need. Thank you to each and

Happy birthday wishes go to Bobby Durbin on April 19; Debbie Keen and Clyde Jones on April 21; Blane Fletcher on April 22; Gail Durbin and Dave Lytle on April 24; and Tom Hollingsworth on April 25. Happy anniversary to Anthony and Debbie Finley on April 19; Scot and Misty Kendrick on April 21; and Harold and Janice Maness on April 22. The Enville Fire Department will be having their annual Barbecue Fundraiser on Saturday, May 12. The barbecue pork, chicken, and bologna should be ready at 10 a.m. The Enville United Methodist Church will have a bake sale beginning at 8 a.m. on Saturday, May 12. Any donation of pies, or any other baked goods would be appreciated. Have a great week and call 989-0212 with your church news, announcements, birthdays, anniversaries, or anything else you would like to share.

Pound cake is one of the most underrated desserts of modern times. The wonderful thing about pound cake is that it can be dressed up or down or even served plain. You don’t have to have a special occasion for this dessert, and its simple ingredients are generally well received by everyone. With six eggs and a cup of butter, there’s a good reason why pound cake has reputation as a sinful dessert; however, this recipe is lighted up slightly by replacing the typical sour cream with lower fat Greek yogurt. You still get great taste, but there are fewer calories and less fat to contend with. I use a stand mixer when I make this cake, but a handheld mixer will work just fine. Be very careful that you don’t over work your batter, as that will make the cake tough. Pound cake is forgiving, but you want your cake to be fluffy and moist. This is a great cake for sharing. It’s nice to have a cake that you can simply wrap up in foil and take with you without worrying that you’ll mess up the frosting. For potlucks, parties or

every one of you!!! Remember Wayne Rinks, Betty Cooper, Lee Nell King, Mr. Ed Pitts and Renee Phelps in your prayers. Call Wanda Cook (9893724) or Celia Murley (989-5300) with your news, events, birthdays, or anniversaries.

simply a snack, you really can’t go wrong with a nice pound cake. I cut my “test” cake in half, and shared one half with my co-workers and the other half with my family. I didn’t have any leftovers to take home. You might worry that this cake is a bit plain with no glaze and no frosting. I like the simple, no mess concept, but if you want to decorate or spruce it up, fruit is the best way to go in my opinion. For the presentation picture, I topped mine with blackberries, but I know several people who don’t enjoy that berry (which I happened to have in my refrigerator). A fruit syrup would be an excellent way to complement the freshness of the cake without adding too many frills to the pared down appeal of this cake. To make your own fruit syrup, mash 1 to 2 cups of your favorite fruit, such as strawberries or very ripe peaches (pealed). Place the fruit in a small saucepan with half a cup of water and half a cup of

sugar (or to taste), and cook on medium heat, stirring often to release the juices and keep from sticking. Add additional water if syrup is too thick. Allow to cool and pour over cake. You can also serve this cake with canned fruit – or top with ice cream. It’s your cake, and you should add whatever topping you most enjoy. As a quick side note to keep the cake from sticking as you remove it from the pan, slide a knife carefully around the outer edges of the pan and around the center tube. You shouldn’t have to loosen the cake too much if you grease and flour the pan, but it’s good to be cautious, especially when you have additional surface area in the center of the pan that the cake can adhere to. Nothing is more disappointing at the end of a meal than having your hopes of a beautiful dessert crushed by a pile of crumbs and large pieces of your cake remaining stuck to the pan.

Pound Cake

Tignor reunion held at Senior Citizens’ Center The family of Jim Tignor held their reunion Sunday, April 15, at the Senior Citizen Building in Henderson. Those attending were Shelia and Norris Frank, Jimmy and Brenda Reddin, Carl and Carnel Tignor, Gunner, Mattie and Blakely Wilson, Jennie Holmes, Mike Tignor, Jean Tignor,Tommy, Regina and Tatum Tignor, and Billy Mayfield, all of Luray; Lou Tignor,

Sheryl, Bobby, Makayla and Chase Pickett, and Peggy Stanfill, all of Henderson; Barry and Sherry Tignor, Mike Johnson, and Frances Boren, all of Jackson; Robert and Amy Harris, and Elizah and Leahman Harris, all of Beech Bluff; Amy Davis, of Hollow Rock; LeAnn Ashburn, of Medina; Jo Ann and Keith Eason, of Bruceton; Harry and Kay Tignor, of Dyer; Pat and Don Jones, of

Jacks Creek; Dianne Butler, Mike Ware, and Shawn, Misti, Colton and Hallie Nash, all of Cordova; Trey, Leslie, Taylor, Caroline and Griffin Brady, of Eads; Stephen and Kelly Morris, Ashley Breeden, and Ranny and Cornelia Morris, of Huron; and Mark and Andrew Morris, Jacee Pulse, Howard and Jeannetta Tignor, and Kathy and Ricky Belew, all of Lexington.

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sure wish it wasn’t.” A memorial can be made to Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, if you desire to contribute. Call me for address at 989-7485. (4) Patty Armour Higginbottom (6-1-45 to 4-14-12) was born in Henderson and lived in

Savannah. Her parents were Joseph Patrick “Pat” and Robbie Duley Armour. She was the sister of Doris Armour White (Tom Weeks). God bless these families. Pat’s Person of the week: Jean Williams Tignor - she is a true

Jacks (12-3-00 to 4-11-12) was the son of Rodney and Amy Johnson Wallace from Henderson County. His grandparents were Charles and Judy Johnson and Onieda Garner. In the movie, Forrest Gump says – “Momma always said dyin’ was a part of life. I

Ingredients: 1 cup softened butter 2 cups sugar 6 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 teaspoon lemon extract 1 teaspoon black walnut extract 3 cups all-purpose flour 8 ounces plain Greek yogurt Directions: Beat butter with mixer on mediumhigh setting until creamy. Reduce mixer speed to medium and slowly add sugar, beating until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing until yellow friend. She is the same today as she was yesterday. Ask for help, and you have a helper. Get sick, and you’ll have fresh greens and turnips at your door. Go to her home with a sad face, and she’ll repair it. Watch material scraps

is just combined. Add the three extracts and beat until just blended. Add flour to the mixture, slowly alternating with the yogurt. Beat at low speed until just blended after each addition. Grease and flour a 12-cup tube pan. Pour in batter. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 hour and 40 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool cake in pan on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes. Carefully remove from pan and cool completely on wire rack.

become a quilt. Hang with her and laugh till it hurts. She’s a friend who’ll order two ice cream cones. She’s a friend who shows up at the same funeral home visitation you attend. You know she’ll be with you to the end. My

hat is off to Jean, a friend indeed!


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Only Yesterday

News from the City

“Mayor announces official ‘Clean Up Week’” Henderson Clinic Born to Troy Wayle and Ruth Ann Trice of Henderson, a daughter April 10, 1942 on April 4. “Letters To The Editor” Born to Clint and Mildred Burton Maxwell Field, Ala. of Henderson, a daughter on April Dear Mr. Johnston: 11. Here is my many thanks for the “Janice Snyder Is Miss favor you are doing for the boys in Henderson” the United States Armed services. Miss Janice Snyder, daughter of I really appreciate receiving my Mrs. Ruby Ray was named Miss copy of the Chester County Henderson in the annual beauty Independent, as it almost seems revue held Tuesday night in the like a visit back home. CCHS gymnasium. First maid is I wish to mention the Red Cross Miss LaVonna Bannon, daughter of is really doing some nice things for Mrs. Peter Bannon; Second Maid, the patients of the hospital here. As Miss LaVern King, daugher of Mr. for me, the Army work is easy and and Mrs. Elmer King and Alternate the care is wonderful. Maid, Miss Dorothy McEarl, I’ll just say, thanks again! daughter of Mrs. J. W. McEarl. SGT. Wm. C. Barker The new beauty queen was “Mayor Designates Clean Up crowned by last year’s winner, Miss Week” Martha Lee Woods, daughter of Mr. Mayor E. O. Parrish has desigand Mrs. Paul Woods. nated the week beginning April 20 Lloyd Tatum was master of cereas official Clean Up Week. Now is monies and Mrs. Jimmie Horn the time to clean up the basement, played organ music during the the attic, the yard and other spots. revue. To assist citizens in the disposal A beautiful Hawaiian setting had of rubbish, the city will haul all such been created for the revue, with free of charge during the palm trees, leis, an outrigweek of April 27. ger canoe and pretty girls Telephone your request in grass skirts. for trucks to Number 94 ‘61 Junior royalty parand it will receive prompt ticipating in the revue attention – without cost. were King Bill Ward, In an advertisement in Queen Candy Fitts, this issue, City Recorder Marsha Wingo, Bobby and Willard Smith urges citiJeff Casey. zens to separate metal, “Hawaiian natives” rubber, rags and paper were Julianne McAdams, from rubbage. These Gail Terry, Skippy Mount materials are badly needed and Tim Weeks. for national defense and if Mrs. L. O. Hartman you do not care to sell Chester County Independent archives, April 13, 1972 thrilled the audience with them, the city will pick a lovely vocal solo, “Blue them up and turn them CANCER KICKOFF SPEAKER – Joe Spain (left) Hawaii” and special numover to the proper agen- Executive Director of the American Cancer Society in bers were presented by cies. Recorder Smith also Tennessee with headquarters in Jackson, was the printhe CCHS band directed points out that the city has cipal speaker at the Kickoff Dinner of the Chester by John Hollingsworth. a fence ordinance which County Chapter held here last Tuesday night. Pictured April 13, 1972 will be enforced. with Mr. Spain are Tommy Casey (center) President of Approves Complaints of damage to the local chapter, and John H. Tignor, 1972 Fund “Court Budget; Nursing Home gardens by chickens run- Chairman. Addition” ning loose are being In an over-long session received daily at City Hall. Citizens was held last week as the Math which began at 8 a.m. Monday, the with chickens must fence them in, Wits Club had its party on Tuesday Chester County Quarterly Court or suffer a penalty, according to Mr. night. An enjoyable evening was gave its nod of approval for the Smith. had by the guests and members and addition of six rooms on the county “Welcome Stranger” we want to thank Mrs. Davidson, nursing home, building a new counMr. and Mrs. Wilford Jones of the sponsor, for such a fine social. ty library, and gave a tentative O.K. Luray are the proud parents of a The clubs of CCHS are always will- to the proposed $1.30 tax rate recbaby boy weighing 8 pounds who ing to help when called upon and ommended by the County Budget arrived April 9. He has been named last week the Math Wits sold Committee. Budget Chairman H. A. Glinda Ray and is their first child. Easter lilies. The club does this Steed told court members he Mr. and Mrs. Elmo Busby of every year to help the crippled chil- thought the $1.30 tax rate would be Montezuma are the proud parents dren and they thank you for your adequate to operate the county durof a new baby boy who arrived April support. ing fiscal 1972-73, but it might be 14, weighing 9 pounds. He is their April 13, 1962 necessary to “juggle” figures from seventh child. “Court Passes Resolution To the proposed debt service to the April 18, 1952 Erect Nursing Home” county general fund to maintain this “Royalty Chosen At Beauty Members of Chester County rate... Revue Here Tuesday” Quarterly Court meeting in regular It took court members exactly 11 A large crowd witnessed the session here Monday, April 9, minutes to approve the proposed annual Beauty Revue, which was passed a resolution to erect a nurs- $227,495 budget, yet they argued held at the CCHS gymnasium on ing home in Chester County. A among themselves for over an hour Tuesday evening, April 15. The committee was named to select a and a half before turning down revue was sponsored and conductbuilding site, employ an architect requests for beer permits by the ed by the Band Mothers Club. and then report to the Court at the Henderson Elks Lodge and Davy’s Miss Sue Dell Orr, daughter of next meeting of that body in July Grocery... Mr. and Mrs. Russell Orr of [...]. The 25- to 32-bed nursing “County’s Per Capita Income Henderson was chosen Queen. home is not to exceed $125,000 in $1,786 In ‘69; $150 Over ‘68” Miss Patty Sue Moody, daughter of cost. The county has $50,000 earChester County had a per capita Mr. and Mrs. Murrel Moody was marked for this project and will income of $1,786 in 1969, in named first maid. Miss Camille have to finance only $75,000. increase from $1,631 in 1968 and an McCall, daughter of Mrs. Murdell “Births” increase from $232 in 1929, a publiBarker of Henderson was selected Drs. McCallum and Wilson cation from the University of as second maid, while Miss Mary Mr. and Mrs. Sam Jones of Tennessee-Knoxville shows [...]. Nell Guinn, daughter of Mr. and Finger are the parents of a son who Personal income is the current Mrs. Edwin Guinn was chosen as arrived April 11. income of persons from all sources alternate maid. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vernon of before deductions for taxes but In the Junior classification, Jean Decaturville are the parents of a after deduction of contributions to Carolyn Barham, daughter of Mr. son who was born April 3 at Jackson social security, government retireand Mrs. James Barham of General Hospital. He has been ment and social insurance proHenderson, was named Queen with named Thomas Alexander IV. Mrs. grams, said George Kronbach, Buford Carpenter son of Mr. and W. O. Bruce of Henderson is the author of the report […]. Mrs. D. L. Carpenter of Henderson, grandmother and Mrs. Gladys being selected King. Vernon is the baby’s greatgrandmother. Mr. and Mrs. George Nattin Jr., of Baton Rouge, La., are the proud parents of a daughter, Melanie Ann. She is the first granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Nattin. Mrs. Nattin is the former Avanelle Vernon of Henderson. The great-grandmother is Mrs. Gladys Vernon of Henderson.

From the files of the Chester County Independent

Brenda Kay Ellis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ovid Ellis was selected as alternate Junior Queen and Davey Ruth, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lydle Ruth, was named alternate Junior King [...]. The winners will represent Chester County at the Strawberry Festival soon to be held in Humboldt. “C.C.H.S. News” by Gene Horn The graduating class of ‘52 entertained the Parent Teachers Association last Thursday for the last time of their high school career. The same program was presented to chapel Wednesday morning. The program consisted of the Class History by Alene Chalfin, Class Will by Gene Horn, Class Prophecy by Bobbie Jean Thomas and as the prophecy for each student was read they walked across the stage in order for the audience to become acquainted with them. A chorus singing and solo singing was mixed between speeches and the program was concluded with the class singing “Memories” [...]. One of the first social club events

Chester County Independent archives, April 18, 1952

Chester County Independent archives, April 18, 1952

By Gloria Holiday First, I would like to give thanks to the Lord for allowing us to see this day. It is always so wonderful to be with my family and friends here in Chester County or other parts of the world. Yes, our little home town paper is in all parts of the world. The Chester County Head Start program would like to thank Ms. Linda Patterson and her staff for coming out on April 12-13 to register the students in the Head Start Program that are eligible for Kindergarten in the 20122013 school year. If you have a child that will be 5years-old by Sept. 30, you can register your child for Kindergarten from noon until 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19, and from 8 a.m. until noon on Friday, April 20, at North Chester School cafeteria, 185 Luray Ave., Henderson. For more information, contact Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 989-5134. The Chamber Member Luncheon on Friday, April 13, at the Henderson City Hall was outstanding. The topic “What West Tennessee is Doing for Small Business,” was presented by Joel Newman of the Tennessee Small Business Development Center. Emily, the Executive Director of the Chester County Chamber of Commerce, is doing an outstanding job. You know there is always a special place in my heart for the elderly and children, so let’s see what is happening at Southern Oaks. Everyone at Southern Oaks wants to wish Michelle Gatley and Paula Ivy a happy birthday.

They are staff members at Southern Oaks. If you are looking to have fun, laughter, and be around good people, I have a place just for you. Southern Oaks is still looking for individuals to be celebrity bingo callers. If you would like to have a wonderful time on a Tuesday afternoon, call Southern Oaks and volunteer to call bingo. Their celebrity bingo callers last week were Anna Huckaby, a Graduate Assistant for the FreedHardeman girls’ basketball team and James Tankersley, Student Assistant for the FreedHardeman mens’ basketball team. On Wednesday and Thursday the residents of Southern Oaks were treated to Spa Days. Natasha Moore, Activity Director at Southern Oaks, gave residents manicures, pedicures and facials. Even the men enjoyed the pampering. Every one felt so refreshed. Come by and take a stroll on the sidewalk that circles the building and enjoy the beautiful flowers that are blooming all around the facility. If you would like to keep up with all of the happenings at Southern Oaks check out their Facebook page by going to Southern Oaks Assisted Living by Americare. The city would like to take this time to wish a happy birthday to all our loved ones in the Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center who had a birthday this week. Also, happy birthday wishes to Bobbie Keeton on April 24. On the prayer list this week are Danny Brown, Juanita Hall, Linda Swafford and Sandra Day. Remember also to pray for our children, teachers, family, the sick and shut in, our men and women that are serving our country and also the incarcerated. See CITY, Page 14-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Page 7-A

4-H Congress exceeds expectations By Samuel Sides Chester County 4-H Delegate

The 65th annual Tennessee 4-H Congress was held April 1- 4 in Nashville. The theme for congress this year was “ E x c e e d i n g Expectations.” I, Samuel Sides, and Ben Moore were able to serve as the delegates for Chester County. 4-H Congress is by far the best and most enjoyable trip that I've ever had the honor of taking. It was fantastic! This trip opened doors and provided me with the opportunity to do things that most people never get the chance to do. For example, I was allowed to sit in the chairs of our senators and vote on bills. This is not something that I would have never had the chance to do on any other trip. Another great experience was having the opportunity to meet our regional Senator, Delores Gresham, and our regional Representative, Steve McDaniel. Both took time from their busy days to visit with myself and Ben. They were very personable, and they asked us questions about what we planned on doing with our lives, gave suggestions as to how we could see our dreams play out, and seemed honestly interested in our future. Another memorable part of the trip was when our state governor, Bill Haslam, actually took the time to come down and speak with us. That made me realize just how big the event itself was! If the governor of the state would take time out of his day to address the delegates of 4-H Congress, either the event was something very important or we must be special … or maybe it was both! It really meant a lot to me, and will definitely be in my memory forever. There were several general assemblies while at Congress and during those assemblies we had the privilege of hearing some wonderful speakers like Lisa Smartt, a motivational speaker and author. Exceptional entertainment was provided at the assemblies like Belmont Company, an a cappella group from Belmont University that wowed everyone! While we were in our state capital, we had the privilege of listening to the winners of the regional speech contests; there were six finalists all competing for the title of state winner. The speakers all did an amazing job; the state winner in the 12th grade division actually got a standing ovation! It was awe-inspiring; definitely another amazing experience that I will never for-

get. On the last day there, three very memorable things happened. The first thing was our getting to ride on the General Jackson, a paddle-boat named after the general and Tennessee president, Andrew Jackson. During the ride, we were able to look at the beautiful scenery that surrounded us on both sides as we slowly made our way down the Cumberland River. We had amazing entertainment on the boat: the Shotgun Red Show. It was at times both funny and moving. The second very memorable event held that final day was the banquet. It was an amazing formal four-course, where everyone came in their Sunday best. I myself wore a bowtie with my suit coat, and Ben wore a tux. We used formal dining techniques and listened to guest speakers. The state speech winners also had the opportunity to present their speeches one final time to the group. During this final meal, the new 4-H Governor, Speaker of the House, and Speaker of the Senate were installed and commissioned to their respon-

sibilities for the 2013 Tennessee State 4-H Congress. Upon completion of the meal was the third memorable event for the day, the last event during our trip to congress: the dance. Everyone had a blast as we danced until 11:30 p.m., then everyone left for their rooms, as we had to be up by 6 a.m. the next morning to get our luggage loaded for the bus ride home. It was a great experience! I hope to have the opportunity to attend again next year. A 4-H’er only has the opportunity to attend Congress once as a 9th or 10th grade delegate, after that one trip, he or she must earn their way to Congress by winning in the speech contest, the leadership project, citizenship project or Tennessee History Bowl. I’ve already started brushing up on my history facts! I loved 4-H Congress. In keeping with the congress theme, it definitely exceeded my expectations! I will remember it forever! It was a great trip with many wonderful memories that will last a lifetime. Again, thank you so much to our sponsors and our 4-H agents for giving us the opportunity!

Chester County 4-H members Samuel Sides and Ben Moore toured the Tennessee State Capitol during the 65th Annual Tenessee 4-H Congress.

Courtesy photos

Chester County 4-H members Samuel Sides and Ben Moore met with State Senator Dolores Gresham, top photo, and Representative Steve McDaniel, lower photo, during the 65th Annual Tenessee 4-H Congress which took place recently in Nashville.


Opinion

Page 8-A

Thursday, April 19, 2012

All alone together – or how “running away” can help provide some focus I need a place to go to think, away from people and responsibilities. I need a corner to curl up in where I can gather my thoughts and be creative. I don’t crave isolation or silence, but I long for a cozy spot to feed my creativity. In the town where I lived before moving back to Henderson, I was a regular at the local coffee shop. The baristas knew me by name and they knew my favorite drink. I didn’t go there because I was addicted to their coffee or because I regularly met people for coffee dates; I went there because it wasn’t my apartment or my office. I could think, write and work without the formality of the library or the distractions of my home. As a graduate student and teaching assistant, I shared an office with three other graduate students who also taught. We had two desks for the three of us, and our office was on the third floor of an older building on the far side of campus. I kept my scheduled office hours there, but I rarely stayed beyond the hours I set forth on my syllabus. Our one shared computer was slow and buggy. I’m sure it had viruses, and it spent more time out of service than it did actually up and running. I could have taken my laptop – and I occasionally did – but our ancient wooden office chairs weren’t designed for the desks they went with, and it’s difficult to type on an incline. Summertime in our office was sweltering, and winter brought the opposite extreme. Even when the temperature was pleasant, I didn’t want to interfere with my officemates’ time in the office, so I stuck to the hours that I was expected and rarely hung around outside of those times, generally before or after the classes I taught or observed. I worked from home most of the time, but there is only so long that one can sit within the same walls without beginning to feel stir-crazy. When I felt a twinge of claustrophobia or antsyness, I knew that I could go downtown to my favorite coffee shop. It sounds strange, but I often got more work done surrounded by people than I could have alone in my office or at home. Except for rare occasions when the place was overrun by noisy undergraduates and giggly teenagers, it made the perfect environment for studying and work. During midterms and final exams, I often met my friends and co-workers who also had exams to grade and papers to write, and we would work together. Even though grading and writing are traditionally solitary endeavors, it’s encouraging to know that others are working on the

same kinds of issues. When we got frustrated or amused by a student’s answer, we could discuss the problem – or we could simply work in companionable silence. Working alone in my apartment could become lonely, so I would often go out just to see other people, even if I didn’t socialize for long. A change of scenery helps me organize my thoughts, and I found that a few hours spent reading my favorite corner of the coffee shop was usually more productive than the same time devoted to work alone at home. To me, it’s sad that Henderson doesn’t have a place like that. Henderson is a college town, too, and while Freed-Hardeman is a smaller campus than a major state university, it’s not like there aren’t people who would enjoy a place open until 9 or 10 p.m. (maybe 11 p.m. on weekends) to socialize and work. I mention this because I miss having a little home away from home, an office away from the office. I feel the walls start to close in, and I don’t have a place to go. Granted, I’m sure I save money by not having a weekly budget item for small, non-fat raspberry mochas – or chai tea lattes, when the mood struck me – but I feel much more isolated from the community. As a writer, I want to be involved in the community that I write about. I like to watch people and to chat with them for a few minutes. It’s difficult to get the feeling being shut away in an office day in and day out, or even writing from home, which happens frequently since I need to change my environment from time to time in order to be able to write well. It may seem counterproductive to need to be around people to be able to get my creative ideas flowing, but for some reason it works for me. Living in Henderson, I miss that. Even though we have a library and even some fast food places with WiFi, it’s not the same. I crave a comfortable arm chair, the smell of coffee brewing (not burgers and grease), a little table outside in the sunshine, quiet chatter, a table where I can spread out my work, a few regulars who smile and wave when they see me, an artsy feel, a little place that I can nest and be alone without being all alone. As Henderson grows, it would be nice to consider touches such as these. I know not everyone enjoys the coffee shop scene, but they aren’t just for hipsters and students. They bring many cross-sections of the community together, and more togetherness is valuable for community building and encouraging growth in a small town. I just need somewhere I can run away to.

2011 was year of the electric car that wasn’t

Hype for making 2011 the year of an electric car revolution didn’t match the reality. In fact, automakers on schedule to debut all-electric vehicles (EVs) or plug-in hybrid (PHEV) models in the U.S. this year shuddered at Nissan and GM sales figures for the pioneering Leaf and Chevy Volt. For the record, Nissan had sold a total of 8,738 all-electric Leafs (Leaves?) nationwide through November. Sales of the Volt, GM’s muchtouted PHEV, trailed at 6,142 units over the same period. No drum roll is deserved for a paltry total of 14,880 batteryequipped vehicle sales, considering the $7,000 federal tax break offered to buyers and the hysterical media coverage the two models generated.

By contrast, the 2011 Chevy Cruze, a gasoline engine compact with 40mpg capability, not only shocked the automotive world by becoming the best-selling car in America during June but also racked up 215,000 sales through November. What happened? Many pundits blame dismal EV sales on gas prices below $3.50 a gallon. I don’t agree. Had gas been $4.25 per gallon, I believe the Chevy Cruze and its fuel-sipping conventional competitors would have beaten the EVs hands down. The answer has everything to do with acquisition cost. The EV market is becoming known for sticker shock. The elite well-heeled early adopters – celebrities, Silicon Valley technocrats,

upper income professionals wanting to make a statement and zealous environmentalists – might not blink at the Fisker Karma’s $106,000 (base model) price tag or even Fisker’s “EcoChic” option-loaded upgrade, priced at a mere $116,000. But the rest of us clutch our chests like Fred Sanford in the old TV show and wonder about when conspicuous consumption borders on insanity. Volvo will debut an interesting PHEV next year in Europe, the V60 diesel, costing 57,000 Euros or around $75,000 in U.S. dollars. It is uncertain when this model will be available here and how it would sell. The Nissan Leaf currently goes for around $35,000 before the federal tax credit, still pricey for a small car with limited range. Chevy has lowered the price of the base model 2012 Volt to $40,000, but you can get one with all the bells and whistles for $46,000.

Toyota’s 2012 Prius PHEV is intended to build on the success of the Prius hybrid, but it is expected to cost $30,000. Mitsubishi’s MiEV rolls into showrooms this year with bragging rights for being the cheapest EV at $21,625 MSRP after the federal tax incentive. The caveat is that this vehicle is tiny and resembles a Nike sneaker on four wheels. Ugly might be cute and chic in some circles, but it won’t sell cars. The car that sells is the Cruze, base-priced under $17,000. It may be the car that saves GM’s bacon. The same hopes are pinned on the 2012 Dodge Dart, another 40mpg entry due out later this year. Note that buyers of these fuel-efficient vehicles don’t qualify for tax incentives, but it doesn’t seem to matter. A wellmade conventional auto with 35- to 42-mpg performance – priced under $20,000 – seems to be what the average motorists want, not an EV or PHEV.

Capitol Hill Wrap From Representative Steve McDaniel

Tax cuts on the way House passes repeal of Death Tax cuts the food tax

The pocketbooks of all Tennesseans are getting help from the legislature with the passage of two major tax cuts. The House of Representatives last week overwhelmingly approved the repeal of the death tax and the reduction of the food tax on two separate votes. Both bills have long been a major priority for many legislators who believe the bills will help taxpayers keep more of their hard-earned money and place Tennessee on better economic footing. House Bill 3760, the death tax repeal, phases out the death tax over the next four years, to a complete repeal by 2016. House Bill 3761, the food tax cut, lowers the sales tax rate on food from the current 5.5 percent to 5.25 percent, the steepest reduction in many years. The bills are now sent to the Senate for action, which is expected to come in the next week.

Smaller, more efficient government On April 12, the House passed major legislation that will reform how the more than 200 boards and commissions operate within State government. House Bill 2387 is the legislature’s response to Governor Bill Haslam’s review of state boards and commissions. The review determined what duplications and inefficiencies exist within the board and commission structure and sought to determine ways to increase accountability. This bill is consistent with the findings of the review. It includes structural changes to 22 boards and commissions with a focus on performance, accountability, and effectiveness. The legislation merges six boards into three for increased efficiency, eliminates 138 board positions for increased effectiveness, gives a Cabinet level commissioner oversight over five boards for increased accountability, and gives the Governor hiring authority for four

executive directors for increased accountability. The legislation passed the House by a vote of 6626 and now moves onto the Senate for action in that Chamber.

TEAM Act passed

In a major reform move, the House on April 11 approved plans to completely overhaul guidelines for Tennessee government’s hiring processes and agency rules. The legislation, House Bill 2384, known as the TEAM Act, establishes a system that will attract, select, retain, and promote the best applicants and employees based on performance and equal opportunities. The bill ensures these practices are free from coercive political influences and mandates employees to render impartial service to the public at all times. Additionally, the bill would give agencies greater flexibility in personnel management and increase customer-focused effectiveness and efficiency of state government within a best practice environment.

The bill passed on a 7419 bipartisan vote after a thorough debate regarding the merits of the legislation. Supported by Governor Bill Haslam, the bill also allows merit raises for high-performing workers and greater flexibility for poor performance.

Fight against bath salts expanded

House Bill 2645 continues the legislature’s fight against bath salts. The bill adds more than 20 additional synthetic derivatives or analogues of meth to the current Tennessee Code. The bill overwhelmingly passed the House of Representatives in bipartisan fashion, 95-0. The legislation continues lawmakers’ fight to crack down on meth production that is derived from the use of ingredients found in bath salts or Molly’s Plant Food. A wave of illicit drug production and illegal use has swept through parts of Tennessee, where many residents have been See WRAP, Page 9-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Page 9-A

Aging doesn’t mean losing ones marbles To the Editor and concerned citizens in Chester County: I would be very grateful if I could use your “Letter to the Editor” to express a frustration. I have been told that old age is very inconvenient. I will be 93 in a short period of time, and have found how old age can be very inconvenient. I have many diseases

and ailments, but I think I still have all my marbles. On occasion I have visited doctors in Jackson. I am with my niece and she is asked, “How does he feel?” and “How is he doing?” I reminded them that I am the patient. I have been called honey, sweetheart, darling, etc. I remind them that I am none of these. There’s good reason to

think I am old. I am bent over, have trouble walking, tremble at times, and many other signs. But HEY, being old does not necessarily mean missing marbles! To you, that treat me as an adult old person, it is much appreciated. Sincerely, C. O. Hays At Southern Oaks Assisted Living

Cell phone towers needed in county To the Editor and concerned citizens in Chester County: There is a major concern about the cell phone service in the Old Friendship and Hickory

Corner area. There is no tower for AT&T. With your help of calling customer service and turning in a complaint, they will be pushed to add a tower to the community

for those of us that have cell phones instead of landlines. Please take time to call. Thank you in advance. Sincerely, Imogene Naylor

WFHU to promote child abuse awareness Continuing its focus on serving the community, the management of WFHU, FM91 is partnering with the Exchange Club Carl Perkins Center in Chester County to promote Child Abuse Awareness/Prevention Month throughout April. The station is currently creating awareness of the event using airtime, and it is organizing and hosting a forum for the both the FHU campus and the

From Page 1-A

Main and it is believed Roberts also laid the arches in the entrance of the building.” In a 1913-14 school catalog, Freed descried the building as “the finest and the best” college building in the entire South. It contained a large auditorium, library, music rooms, several classrooms, two offices, a bookstore, post office, and lobbies. Today, it houses the university’s School of Arts and Humanities, the school’s archives, and Chapel Hall. Fittingly enough, music is still taught within its confines. Inclusion on the National Register requires that a property be old enough to be considered historic, that it look much as it did in the past, and that it be associated with important events, activities, or developments in the past. Freed-Hardeman plans a fund raising effort to restore Old Main.

From Page 8-A

Wrap rushed to the hospital from the adverse effects of the drug. Various news outlets have even reported on deaths directly linked to the rise in drug use associated with bath salts and Molly’s Plant Food.

Bill passed to combat drunk driving

The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed tough new legislation to combat drunk driving in Tennessee. The legislation, House Bill 2749, is also known as the “ignition interlock” bill. Under the bill, an ignition interlock, which is a machine similar to a breathalyzer, may be

community. The forum will begin at 6 p.m. in Ayers Auditorium Monday, April 23. Dr. Deryl Hilliard will be moderating both the panel discussion and a question and answer forum. Personnel from the Department of Children’s Services from the

Chester/Madison county area will be contributing to the discussion as panelists. Ron Means, FM91 station manager, states, “It should be an informative and beneficial evening.” Students, faculty and the community are encouraged to attend the forum.

Freed hosted career fair Freed-Hardeman University, in cooperation with the Tennessee Association of Broadcasters, hosted a career fair for students interested in employment within the electronic media industry March 27 at FHU’s Memphis campus. More than 40 students seeking employment and/or internship opportu-

nities attended the event. Nine were from FHU. Fourteen media outlets from Middle and West Tennessee attended the career fair. Ron Means, FHU’s radio station manager, called it “a complete success.” Media representatives praised FHU students and the practical experience they already had, Means said.

“What Every Parent Should Know About Bullying to be presented on April 19 Physical, verbal, social and cyber-bullying affects children in every city across the country. A recent poll shows that 40 percent of all sixth-graders in the United States have been bullied in some way. For that reason, the West Tennessee Women’s Center at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital is presenting, “What Every Parent Should Know about Bullying,” from 6:30 p.m.– 8 p.m. Thursday, April 19, at the Carl Grants Event Center at Union University. The program deals with issues around bullying whether your child is the victim or the child causing the problem. Nashville author Jim Williams, known as “Call me Jim,” will encourage and inspire you with his personal story. He explains how cyber bullying, sexual harassment and being in cliques contributes to the problem, and why teen suicide is on the rise. For more information about this free event, call 6607364 or visit www.wth.org and click on “Classes and Events.” Learn more about his dynamic presentation at www.callmejim.org.

Jackson Life Member Telephone Pioneers meeting April 19 The Jackson Life Member Telephone Pioneers will meet at 8:30 a.m, Thursday, April 19, at Perkins Restaurant in Jackson. Bring your used books to be donated to the Jackson Madison County Library's book sale. All retired communications employees and their spouses are invited to attend. For additional information, call 423-0944.

Learn how water exercise can benefit you April 19 Learn how aqua-fitness can benefit you and your whole family! Join the Kirkland Cancer Center for a free program on benefits of exercising in the water, at 6 p.m. April 19. The location is AquaTherapies at 614 Carriage House Drive, Suite E. Each attendee will receive a free pass for five visits and be entered in a drawing for a free 2month membership. For more information, and to register, call the Kirkland Cancer Center at cx541-5087, or go online to www.kirklandcancer.org. This is part of the Kirkland Cancer Center’s ongoing educational series for cancer survivors or anyone interested in good health!

Kindergarten Registration April 19 - 20 Kindergarten registration will be held from noon until 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 19, and from 8 a.m. until noon on Friday, April 20, at North Chester School cafeteria, 185 Luray Ave., Henderson. A child must be five years old by September 30, 2012, in order to be eligible for kindergarten for the 2012-13 school year. Documents needed during the registration process include the Tennessee Immunization Record or Child Health Record, physical exam record (dated no more than one year prior to start of school on August 1), birth certificate (official copy), social security card, and proof of residence (example: water bill, electric bill or a rent receipt). For more information, call Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 989-5134 or Shannon Reed at 989-8110.

Henderson Civitan’s Scholarship Fund having BBQ event on April 20 On Friday, April 20, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. there will be BBQ chicken available for you to pick up at corner of Church and Main, or we will deliver to businesses. The price is $7 for a whole chicken. Proceeds benefit Henderson Civitan's Scholarship Fund.

installed, at the order of a judge, inside a vehicle. Before the vehicle’s engine can be started, the driver first must exhale into the device. If the

breath-alcohol concentration analyzed by the machine is greater than the allowable state limit, the device will prevent the engine from being started.

The Chester County Rescue Squad Spring Arts and Crafts Fair on May 5 The Chester County Rescue Squad is hosting a Spring Arts and Crafts Fair from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 6, at 225 Rebecca Dr., the Rescue Squad building across from the Jr. High School, behind Be Blessed Fashions. Come shop for unique items you can't find anywhere else! It is just in time for graduations and Mother's Day! Admission is free to shoppers and low cost registration fee to exhibitors. For more details and info on how to be an exhibitor, email rescuechester@yahoo.com or call 608-1243 or 608-0078.

Benefit for James Smith set for May 5 Friends and neighbors of James and Loyce Smith are having a benefit from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 5, at Oak Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church on Talley Store Road. Grilled hamburger and hot dog plates will be sold. An auction, cakewalk and other activities are planned. There will be a jumper for the kids provided by Partytime, www.tnpartytime.com, by Brad and Connie Garner. We are selling chances for $2 each or three tickets for $5 for each of the following: two quilts; a Black Powder Knight inline rifle provided by Tommy Prince; and a 9-millime-

ter Smith and Wesson pistol, donated by Robertson Trading Post. Anyone wishing to donate things for the auction or baked goods for the cakewalk are asked to call one of the following people, Pat Barrett Jones (9893402), Judy Cagle (989-3205 or 983-2571), Carolyn Mayfield (989-4460), Pat Nobles Jones (989-7485), Phyllis Knolton (6023019), Kathy Gately (989-2471), or Regina Brooks (989-7739). Everything will be appreciated. Come out and have a good time with your friends and neighbors.

Submit your poem to poetry contest before April 20 Central Point Fine Arts is sponsoring a Poetry Contest which is free and is open to Henderson residents. There are fifty prizes totaling $5,000, with a $1,000 grand prize for the last standing poem. Poems of 21 lines or fewer on any subject and in any style will be judged by the contest director Dr. Joseph Cameron. Entrants should include their name and address on the same page as the poem, and a winners list will be sent to them. Entries must be received by April 20 and can be submitted to Free Poetry Contest, PO Box 3336, Central Point, Oregon 97502; or enter online at www.FreeContest.com. For more information, contact Joseph Cameron at 541-946-8805 or JC1@mighty.net.

Child Abuse Prevention Forum – April 23 April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and community radio station WFHU, FM91, will host a public forum and panel discussion on Child Abuse Awareness and Prevention. The forum will take plat at 6 p.m. Monday, April 23, in Ayers Auditorium in the Brown-Kopel Business Building on FHU’s campus at the corner of Main St. and Hamlett Ave., in Henderson. The forum will feature a panel of speakers from various areas within the Department of Children Services (DCS). Key DCS personnel from both Chester and Madison County will be participating. The public is encouraged to attend. For further information on the forum, contact radio station manager, Ron Means at 731-989-6749.

See the JSCC Student Art Show now – April 23 Jackson State Community College invites the community to the annual JSCC student art exhibit which is on display now through April 23. The exhibit is in JSCC Library and is open Monday-Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.; Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.; and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. This art exhibit is free and open to the community. For more information, email lsmith@jscc.edu.

Freed-Hardeman University Associates rummage sale April 25-28 The Freed-Hardeman University Associates will have a rummage sale at the National Guard Armory from 7:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, April 2527, and 7:30 a.m. to 12 noon on Saturday, April 28. Friday will be 1/2 price day. Saturday come and fill a paper sack with clothes for just $2. All proceeds from the sale will go toward scholarships.

CC Senior Center week’s activities plus Country Fair planned April 27 Activities this week are Thursday-COPE 9 a.m., go to Jackson Oaks 9:45 a.m.; FridaySing-a-long; Monday-San Antonio Trip meeting 9 a.m., Bible study 10 a.m.; Tuesday – Go to Parsons 9:30 a.m. for rook tournament, Blood pressure taken 10 a.m.; Wednesday – Go to Southern Oakes 10 a.m. for singing and visit. Country fair begins at 10 a.m. Friday, April 27. Plate lunches will be $5. Come and enjoy the cakewalks, a pie bakeoff, a quilt show with ribbons awarded and much more. All proceeds will be matched Modern Woodmen of America. All donations greatly appreciated. The Chester County Senior Center has a hot meal served daily at 11:30 a.m. For a reservation, call by 9:30 a.m. the day before. These are for all seniors 60 years of age or older. All the volunteers that deliver homebound meals are appreciated. Come for fitness at 10:30 a.m., or anytime in the fitness room. This is your Senior Center – come and support it. Call 989-7434 for information.

Special Needs Athletics Baseball in Selmer April 30 It’s that time of year again. So dust off those bats and gloves and get ready for some fun! Selmer’s Special Needs Athletics Spring Baseball League will start on Monday, April 30 and the last game will be played on July 9. Games will be played every Monday at 6:30 p.m. at Patriot Park behind the National Guard Armory in Selmer. Special Needs Athletics Spring Baseball League in Jackson will be played on Thursday nights beginning May 10th, with the last game being on July 12. Game times are 5:30, 6:45 and 8 p.m. with all Jackson games played at the West Tennessee Healthcare Sportsplex. For more information or questions, contact Linda Taylor (610-7557).


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Obituary/Religion

Obituaries Johnnie W. Rushing Date of Death – April 9, 2012 Johnnie W. Rushing, 91, died Monday, April 9, 2012, at his home on Sand Mountain Road. Arrangements were made by S & S Chapel Funeral Services in Jackson. He was a war veteran. He is survived by a daughter, Kathy Lynn Marr; a son, Johnny Rushing Jr.; two grandsons, Richard and Joey Marr; a granddaughter, Sandra Day; and a great-granddaughter, Kasha Marr. He was much loved and will be missed very much. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) April 19, 2012

Pauline (Polly) Andrews Ward June 6, 1915 – April 10, 2012 Mrs. Ward, 96, peacefully passed from this life on April 10, 2012, after a brief stay in the Chester County Nursing Home. Funeral services were held Friday, April 13, 2012, in the chapel of Shackelford - Casey Funeral Home in Henderson, with Bro. Richard England and Ray Eaton officiating. Burial followed in Henderson Cemetery. She was born Pauline Andrews on June 6, 1915, in Baldwyn, Miss., the youngest of four children to Walter and Callie Andrews. She married George Calvin Ward, a native of Henderson, in June, 1933. They made their home in Henderson until he went to work for the Department of Defense as an ammunitions inspector. They lived in several states, and in France and Panama during this time. Upon his retirement, they returned to Henderson where they lived until his death in November 1971. Soon after, she moved to Pinson with her daughter and her family, and resided there until January of this year, where she was known as “Big Momma,” “Grandmother Polly,” and “Aunt Polly” to her beloved grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and extended family and friends. She was an excellent cook and loved to crochet. One of the most cherished gifts anyone ever received from her was one of her handmade, crocheted Afghans. However, perhaps the most endearing of her qualities was how inspirational she was to everyone she knew. Always encouraging and with a great sense of humor, she was grateful until her very last day for her family and friends and spoke often of how blessed she was and how good God had been to her. She was a faithful member of Pinson Church of Christ and she will be greatly missed by us all. She is survived by her daughter, Jean Carolyn Ward Ellis of Pinson; her son, George C. Ward Jr. (Pat) of Helena, Ark.; nieces, Alice Wheeler (Alan) of Jackson, Susan Hendrix (Dwayne), and Sandra Steed, all of Henderson; six grandchildren, Dinah Reams (Al) of Jackson, Melinda Ward of Buxton, N.D., Polly Williams (David) of Saltillo, George C. Ward III of Fernley, Nev., Joe Ellis (Sarah) of Henderson, Kerry Ward (Michelle) of Ward, Ark.; 16 great-grandchildren; 11 great-greatgrandchildren; and her special extended family. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, George C. Ward; her sisters, Sarah Steed of Henderson and Bessie Smith of Van Vleet, Miss.; her brother, Edward Andrews of Sheffield, Ala.; brothers-inlaw Hubert Steed and Lawrence Smith; sister- and brother-in-law Z.T. and Worley McCall ; sister-in-law Mary Tilson; and son-in-law Bobby Ellis of Pinson. Pallbearers were Joe Ellis, Al Reams, Andrew Reams, Jason Cowden, David Williams and Dwayne Hendrix. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials be made to Pinson Church of Christ, P.O Box 160, Pinson, TN 38366. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) April 19, 2012

Waylan K. Mount Aug. 22, 1917 – April 11, 2012 Waylan K. Mount, 94, of Adamsville, passed away Wednesday, April 11, 2012. Graveside services were held Thursday, April 19, 2012. Burial was in West Tennessee Veterans Cemetery in Memphis. Shackelford Funeral Directors-Johnson Chapel in Henderson was in charge of arrangements. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) April 19, 2012

Patty Higginbottom June 1, 1945 – April 14, 2012 Patty Higginbottom departed this life on Saturday, April 14, 2012. Services were held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 18, 2012, at First United Methodist Church in Savannah, with Ron Brown officiating. Burial was in Savannah Cemetery. Shackelford Funeral Directors in Savannah was in charge of arrangements. She was born in Henderson on June 1, 1945, the daughter of the late Joseph Patrick and Robbie Mae Duley Armour. She attended Memphis State University and was a cheerleader. She was a homemaker and a member of the First United Methodist Church in Savannah. She attended Delta Airlines Flight School and was employed by Delta as a flight attendant. Patty, an avid bridge player, was a member of the Wednesday Bridge Club, Methodist Bridge Club, and attained Life Master with American Contract Bridge League. She dedicated her life to her family, friends and bridge. She is survived by her husband, Bo Higginbottom of Savannah; a son, Robert Higginbottom II of Memphis; three daughters, Courtney Williams of New York City, N.Y., Leigh Houston (Kent) of Corinth, Miss., and Julie Cronise (Matt) of Savannah; two grandchildren, Andrew Higginbottom of Hattiesburg, Miss., and Callie Anna Cronise of Savannah; a sister, Doris Armour White (Tom Weeks) of Henderson; two brothers, Bobby Armour (Doris) and Tim Armour (Patricia) all of Southaven, Miss.; and a sister-in-law, Lois Grissom of Henderson. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a brother, Joe Armour. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) April 19, 2012

Bethel Baptist Church to show film “Courageous” April 22 Bethel Baptist Church will be hosting a showing of the film “Courageous” at 6 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Admission is free and the public is invited to see this marvelous film.

Homecomings First Baptist Church of Finger will have their homecoming Sunday, April 22. Lunch will be at noon and singing afterward with the Frog Jump Quartet. Everyone is welcome to attend. On May 20, Grace Baptist will celebrate three years since it was constituted as a church. At 9 a.m. they will be blessed by the gospel group, “The Dills.” After the concert, the morning service will be designated for the 2012 building campaign “Windows of Heaven.” After the service, they will have the annual homecoming potluck fellowship dinner. All are welcome to attend.

Youth Revival April 25-27 Unity Baptist Church of Jacks Creek, will host a youth revival nightly at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 25 through Friday, April 27. The guest evangelist will be Hunter Callis. Leading in worship through music will be Adam Wood. Everyone is welcome; the young and the young at heart. The church is located on Hwy 22-A North, 2 miles north of Jacks Creek and Hwy 100. The pastor is Dr. James Huggins. For more information, call the church at 989-5571 or 989-5572.

Beech Springs Baptist Women’s Conference on April 27-28 Beech Springs Baptist Church, located at 675 State Route 22A S., is having a Women’s Conference Friday and Saturday, April 27-28. The Friday service will begin at 6 p.m., followed by a spaghetti dinner. The Saturday morning service will be preceded by breakfast, which will be served at 8 a.m. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Life and love in the mailroom By Ronnie McBrayer Keeping the Faith

While reflecting on the coming Holy Week, I remembered one of my favorite stories, a mythical tale written by Robert Kopp. A young man named Walter went to work for the largest corporation in the world, beginning his corporate career in the basement mailroom. Walter liked his job, but he daydreamed about becoming an executive, maybe even the president of the company. One day in the mailroom Walter saw a cockroach. He went to step on it, but a voice cried up to him, “Don’t kill me! I’m Milton. If you spare me I will grant you all your wishes.” To test the ability of his new-found-talkingfriend, Walter wished to leave the mailroom and become vice president of the company. When Walter came to work the next day he found himself greeted as “Mr. Vice-President.” It was exactly as Milton had promised. This began a meteoric rise for Walter as Milton granted one wish after another until Walter was President of the largest corporation in the world. But one day Walter heard footsteps, strangely, on the roof of his penthouse office. He went outside and found a boy praying. “Are you praying to me,” Walter asked. The little boy answered, “No, I’m praying to God.” Walter was deeply disturbed. He thought he was at the very

top of everything. How could someone – even God – be higher than him? So Walter demanded that Milton the magical, talking cockroach be brought before him. I have one last wish,” Walter said, “and upon granting this wish I set you free for there will be nothing left to ask. I wish to be like God.” The next day when Walter came to work he was back in the mailroom. The New Testament says that Jesus slid down from the infinity of heaven, to the lowest rung of the social ladder; the mailroom of the universe. He became a near untouchable; poverty-stricken, always just a step ahead of starvation; born in a barn with a bastard’s reputation; hated, condemned unjustly, and crucified as a criminal. Jesus emptied himself of all things and “made himself of no reputation,” to show the length to which God’s love will go, and to show us how to love others. He considered becoming human, loving and serving humanity, more important than his comfort and prestige. He chose the mailroom over the penthouse, and to be like God, so must we. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular ecolumns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.

Frog Jump Quartet to sing Sunday, April 29 Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, 6185 Rowsey School Rd., Bethel Springs, invites all to enjoy an evening of praise and worship at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 29, with the Frog Jump Quartet. For more information, call the church office at 6458868 or Pastor Mike Hollaway at 610-1077.

Milan Annual There’s Hope camp meeting April 16-19 The 24th annual “There’s Hope Camp Meeting” will be held April 16-19 at the Immanuel Missionary Baptist Church, Trenton Hwy. 77, Milan. The scheduled services are 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The featured speaker will be evangelist Mike Ragland, from Hayden, Ala. There will also be several featured singing groups. Pastor Douglas Powell will be the camp meeting moderator. All are invited to attend.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

First Baptist Church 504 East Main St. 989-2626

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

FHU history professor discusses meaning of liberty A Freed-Hardeman University history professor delivered the 2012 Anne T. Moore Humanities lecture March 15 at Campbell University in Blues Creek, N.C. Dr. Greg Massey’s lecture was entitled “Past and Present: The Contested Meaning of Liberty in the United States.” Massey focused on the conflict between American

liberty and Christian liberty, using a phrase from the Declaration of Independence and a scripture from the Bible as springboards. For American liberty he relied on the idea that people have an unalienable right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” For Christian liberty he utilized Gal. 5:1, 13-14, where the Apostle Paul

wrote, “Do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another. For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: ‘You should love your neighbor as yourself.’” Using historical examples from the American Revolution to the present, Massey demonstrated how these concepts are in tension. He concluded that

frequently Christians in the United States are more influenced by American liberty than by Christian liberty. Campbell University is a Baptist-affiliated university and has an enrollment of more than 3,000 undergraduate students. Approximately 200 students and faculty members attended Massey’s lecture.

Combine, tractors stolen in sale/scam A Sunshine Road resident reported the theft of a John Deere combine, John Deere tractor with front loader and two Ford tractors with bush hogs from his property Thursday, April 12. According to the Sheriff's report, the victim reportedly was made aware of the theft after receiving a call from a witness who had seen the equipment being loaded onto rollback wreckers. Deputies located the owner of the wreckers who reported he had purchased the farm equipment from a black female who stated it had been left to her by her deceased grandfather, and she wished to sell it. He had paid in cash and with a check. All equipment was returned to its rightful owner, except the combine, which had already been delivered to Triple S Recycling in Selmer, but was still intact and will be retrieved at a later date. An investigation is underway. CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT April 11, 2012 Jeremy Michael Kirk, 24, Laura St., was arrested and charged with aggravated assault. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond. April 12, 2012 Officers responded to Oden's Amoco on N. Church Ave., for a report of gasoline theft. According to the report, someone allegedly pumped $20 in gasoline and left without paying. Officers viewed store video and reportedly identified Gary Hart as the subject driving the vehicle and pumping the fuel. A warrant was issued for his arrest. Gary Lynn Hart, 48, 521 Frankie Lane, was arrested and charged with theft under $500 and driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $1,250 bond. A vehicle was reportedly vandalized while parked at a residence on Steed St. According to the report, some person or persons allegedly scratched offensive language into the hood of the vehicle. A number of silver collectors' coins were reportedly stolen from a residence on Deer Drive. Missing coins included approximately 250 pre1964 half dollars and approximately 80 silver eagle dollars. The coins' value is estimated at $2,000 to $3,000. April 14, 2012 A possible theft attempt was reported at a residence on Second St. According to the report, the resident heard some person or persons on and around his property and called the police department, suspecting they were attempting to remove property from his

porch. Police officers responded and checked the property. No contact was made with the subjects. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT April 11, 2012 10:06 a.m. - 1314 US Hwy 45 N, Los Portales, food on stove. 12:11 p.m. - 110 E. University St., FreedHardeman University, Tyler Hall, false alarm. 8:51 p.m. - 330 E. University St., FreedHardeman University, Woods-East Hall, food on stove. April 13, 2012 7:39 p.m. - 151 E. Main St., Freed-Hardeman University, Colbert Activity Center, false alarm. April 14, 2012 3:05 p.m. - 210 E. University St., FreedHardeman university, Benson Hall, false alarm. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT April 10, 2012 Tools were reported stolen from a construction site on Talley Store Road. According to the report, missing items included two Bostick air nail guns valued at $200 each, two DeWalt cordless drills valued at $150 each, three cordless batteries valued at $50 each, and one DeWalt saw valued at $100. Additionally, a lock was broken for entry, resulting in $75 in damage. Cornelius Lashane Gray, 22, Jackson, was arrested and charged with simple possession. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $750 bond. April 11, 2012 Christopher Blake Burton, 24, 615 Eason Road, was arrested and charged with assault. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Lisa Kaye Jones, 40, Bethel Springs, was arrested and charged with promotion of methamphetamines, initiation of process to manufacture methamphetamines, possession of drug paraphernalia and simple possession. She is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $50,000 bond. Nathan Randall Pickens, 28, Beech Bluff, was arrested and charged with possession of a schedule II controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia, promotion of methamphetamines and initiation of process to manufacture methamphetamines. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $50,000 bond. April 12, 2012 Kati Lynn Johnson, 18, 125 Newsom Ave., was arrested and charged with theft of property $500 or less. She was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $500 bond. April 13, 2012 Marsh Quincy Barham,

44, 358 Baughn St., was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000 to $9,999. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Eric Blake Hollingsworth, 19, Lexington, was arrested and charged with simple possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, contributing to the delinquency of a minor, violation of the open container law, and violation of the drinking age law. Kati Lynn Johnson, 18, 125 Newsom Ave., was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Misdemeanor. She is held in the Chester County jail with no bond. Marcus R. Lewis, 34, 320 Murdaugh Lane, was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000 to $9,999. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $5,000 bond. Steve A. Reeves, 39, Reagan, was arrested and charged with theft under $500. He was released from the Chester County jail on furlough. April 14, 2012 More than $31,000 in jewelry was reportedly stolen from a Wilson School Road residence. Missing items include a ladies' one carat white gold diamond ring valued at $6,000; a charm bracelet valued at $5,000 with six $5 gold pieces; a ladies' certene diamond ring valued at $1,500; ladies' diamond ring valued at $3,500; white gold diamond cross valued at $1,200; three gold bracelets valued at $800, $700 and $600 respectively; two $1 silver certificates; emerald gold cross valued at $900; $20 gold piece necklace valued at $2,250; and $5 gold piece necklace valued at $950. According to the report, there was no sign of forced entry. April 15, 2012 A vehicle on Parker Loop was reportedly vandalized. According to the report, both back door windows had been broken out, resulting in $100 in damage. Matt Nathan Dyer, 40, 308 Meadowbrook Lane, was arrested and charged with violation of probation. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $950 cash bond. Charles Bradley Raines, 27, Memphis, was arrested and charged with child endangerment and driving under the influence (DUI) by allowance. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Roxanne Marie Rhoden, 24, Pinson, was arrested and charged with violation of the open container law, driving under the influence (DUI), violation of the child restraint law, child endangerment and violation of the implied consent law. She was released from the Chester County jail after

posting a $10,000 bond. April 16, 2012 Harold L. Arnold, 33, 253 N. Franklin, was arrested and charged with assault and vandalism. He is held in the Chester County jail. No bond had been set at press time. William Henry Cook, 42, 675 Old Finger Road, was arrested and charged with violation of the open container law and driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,250 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT April 11, 2012 2:50 p.m. - Hwy 22A South, false call, Jacks Creek Volunteer Fire Department responding. April 12, 2012 1:32 p.m. - Hwy 225 and Sunshine Road, grass fire, Station One Volunteer Fire Department responding. 5:09 p.m. - 6555 Roby Road, false call, Roby Volunteer Fire Department responding. 4175 Roby Road, woods fire, Roby Volunteer Fire Department responding. April 15, 2012 7:29 p.m - 2240 Needmore Road, woods fire, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding. April 16, 2012 1:30 a.m. - Roby Road, woods fire, Roby Volunteer Fire Department responding. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT John Edward Carlson, 31, Enville, was found guilty of Count two manufacturing methamphetamine; Count three, possession of drug paraphernalia; and Count three possession of marijuana. Count two: He was sentenced to eight years in a TDOC facility at a 30 percent release eligibility, all suspended and supervised by Community Corrections. He was ordered to pay costs plus $2,000 in fines. Count three: He was sentenced to two years in a TDOC facility, all suspended and supervised, to pay costs plus $2,000 in fines. Count three: He was sentenced to 11 months and 29 days in the Chester County jail, all suspended and supervised, and ordered to pay costs plus $250 in fines. All counts are concurrent with each other, and to be served consecutive to another specified case. Robert Charles Brown, 58, Savannah, was found guilty of rape of a child. He was sentenced to 15 years in a TDOC facility at a 100 percent release eligibility, to serve, receiving credit for time served pretrial, to be placed on sex offender registry, and ordered to pay court costs upon release from TDOC.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

CPC says ‘thank you’ on CAP Day April 25 By Janeane Moore Carl Perkins Center

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month and the Exchange Club – Carl Perkins Centers will focus on “It’s Time to Talk About Child Abuse.” To thank its board members, volunteers and community members the local Center will be cooking hotdogs on court square from 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. on Wednesday, April 25. Everyone in the community is invited to come by for a

free hotdog and drink. “We wanted to do this as a show of appreciation for all the community does for us,” said Chester County Director Clay Jordan. “Chester County is so good to us. We wanted to do something to repay them for always supporting us.” Anyone who purchased a CAP T-shirt should also wear them on April 25. For more information on CAP Month, call the Center at 989-7222.

“Good Touch, Bad Touch” program held at Head Start

Courtesy photos

Carl Perkins Center Director Clay Jordan and Office Manager Janeane Moore presented “Good Touch, Bad Touch” to the students at Head Start on Monday, April 9, as part of Child Abuse Prevention Month. Center staff educated the children on bad touches and what to do if someone tries to touch them inappropriately.

Recognizing Child Abuse Prevention Month

Courtesy photo

City of Henderson Mayor Bobby King and Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton signed a proclamation on April 16 declaring the month of April as Child Abuse Prevention Month. April is national CAP Month and the Carl Perkins Center is celebrating with the theme “It’s Time to Talk About Child Abuse.” For more information on CAP month, call the Center at 989-7222.

Time is right to learn proper parenting Free Carl Perkins classes available weekly By Janeane Moore Carl Perkins Center

Parenting is a journey, and no one has all the answers. But Parenting classes can be a fun and educational way to hone your skills and learn new tricks to keep the little ones in line. “There’s no time like the present for taking these classes,” said Chester County Director Clay Jordan. “We offer them every Monday and they are free of charge. It’s the perfect time to take advantage of them.” The parenting curriculum focuses on communication, community and family resources, discipline and family time. “We focus on the positive aspects of parenting,” he said. “We have a wonderful curriculum that encourages round-table discussions. Participants will learn from not just the teacher, but also the other participants, who are encouraged to share their ideas during class.” The 10-week Parenting curriculum incorporates videos, printed materials and exercises to enhance the parenting experience. At most centers, the County Director either teaches or oversees the Parenting program. Participants will receive a certificate following attendance in 10 classes. Parenting sessions also include information on outlining boundaries and corrective teaching, positive encouragement, setting good examples, parental involvement and developing a routine. “Even the best parent can learn something from these classes,” Jordan added. “The time is right!” Parents do not have to be referred to participate in the class. For more information on the free, 10-week Parenting classes, call 989-7222.

The Carl Perkins Center held a balloon launch at Head Start on April 9 to celebrate Child Abuse Prevention Month. The children were educated on “Good Touch, Bad Touch,” then treated to a balloon launch. The Center also distributed educational books to the children. The CAP theme this year is “It’s Time to Talk About Child Abuse.”

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Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman, the country has already made a $260 billion investment in renewable energy. With facts like those, it’s no wonder why the farm is an example of where the U.S. needs to go Poneman noted. “Make no mistake. We are in a battle for the future, Poneman said. “So the question presented is: are we in this game to secede the future, to secede jobs that are created from renewable energy to others? Or are we going to play to win?” While the celebration

did center on the farm’s official opening, the project is still not completely finished. Project officials noted that an information and welcome center will be built, setting a date for 2013. The center will house Spectrum, which is an educational solar exhibit. And Tennessee Department Of Transportation (TDOT) Commissioner John Schroer said that TDOT will begin working on a way to come to the farm off of Interstate-40 West (I-40) in September. The project will cost approximately $10 million. He also added that TDOT will eventually work on a route to the farm eastbound on

I-40, once the westbound route and welcome center are completed. “Hopefully soon thereafter, we can do the eastbound lanes and the bridge over the solar panels and get people coming from both directions,” Schroer said. “We can tap those 10 million cars that come here and maybe we can help them spend money, and maybe they’ll be at the megasite while they’re at it.” Tennessee Deputy Governor Claude Ramsey took a moment to assure Haywood County that the megasite project in Haywood County would end up becoming a reality in the area. “This is a beginning.

The education facility will come along. And we’ve put $25 million additional money this year for the megasite to create jobs in this part of Tennessee,” Ramsey said. “Governor Haslam couldn’t be here today. He has prior engagements,” Ramsey continued. “But he did ask me to reinforce to you all in this part of the state that the megasite will be built, and we will recruit an industry.” While the megasite seems like a project set in stone, Ramsey did add that it would still take some time to come to fruition. “My final thought on that having done a megasite: be patient,” he said.

pler times. “Cherish all your happy memories, they make a fine cushion for old age.” – Anonymous The Hickory Corner Community Center will

hold their business meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 25. All members are encouraged to attend. If you have news to share, call 989-3315.

The community sends condolences to the family and friends of Fire Chief Kenny Fox, 38, of Decatur County, who gave his life in the line of duty. While fighting a building fire April 7, Mr. Fox died when the roof of the building collapsed on him. He was definitely a hero, as he pushed two young volunteer firefighters, who were brothers, out of danger just before the roof fell in. They both received third-degree burns. Mr. Fox is survived by his wife and three sons. Remember this family in prayer. It is easy sometimes to take our public safety for granted. Our public officials face risks every day protecting our city. Our firefighters, members of the police and sheriff’s departments, and many more who help with accidents, natural disasters, and curtailing criminal activity. Remember them all in prayer, as we remember our military, our country and all who are sick. Happy birthday wishes go out to Matt Cooper on April 19; Sam Kesler Sr. on April 21; William Lutrell and Kayley Hopper on April 23; Mike Edgen on April 26; Jerry Weaver and Abby Daniel on April 27; Jim Cupples, Ann Hardy and Lisa Plunk on April 28; and Tonya Clayton on April 30. Special happy birthday wishes go to Mr. James Sanders, who celebrates his 89th birthday on April 24. Keep him in your prayers, as he is recovering from surgery. Also remember Larry Lard and his family in prayer. Happy anniversary wishes to David and Virginia Morrison on April 21. The Hickory Corner Community welcomes their new neighbors, Troy and Amy Frye, their son Tyler and daughter Josie. They live in downtown Hickory Corner. A few weeks ago, I wrote about Hulon Patterson searching for his old home place in Happy Hollow. This is

“the rest of the story.” Hulon came by recently to let us know he had found the spot where his house used to be. This time he went a different way off Masseyville Road, followed the pipeline down and again found the spring. Remember, it has been over 75 years, everything is grown up with trees, and you can hardly walk through the brush. Hulon made his way along what he thought was the branch. As he walked along, he remembered his mother, Flossie, washing clothes not far from the spring, carrying water to fill the big black wash kettle, and building a fire around it. A few more steps, and sure enough, he was standing on the grounds where his home used to be. He found a few old chimney bricks, an old half-buried jar, and an old piece of tin from the barn. The house was built with a breezeway, the kitchen was on one side and the living quarters on the other. The door had a string tied to it, when pulled it raised the latch to open the door – no need for locks in those days. Where the storm house had been there now was a sunken hole, and across the ditch was where his dad’s watermelon patch had been. As he stood there, he recalled precious memories of long ago, when he was an 8-year-old. One time they had an old rooster that was always flogging his brother Frank. His dad solved that problem – they ate that rooster for dinner! He remembered his mom setting a hen on duck eggs, and later when the baby ducks were getting into the water, the mother hen got all upset, thinking her babies were drowning. As he was leaving, he stopped by the spring to get a drink of fresh running water. His dad had always kept a jug of milk there in the summer, and as his dad was going to work, he always stopped there to get a cool drink of milk. I am so glad Hulon found what he was searching for, and I thank him for stopping and sharing his memories. Many of us today can relate to this story, as we have similar memories of growing up in those sim-

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Solar

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City Remember to patronize our local businesses in town, let’s support our own as much as we can. Chester County Head Start is still accepting applications for 3- and 4year-olds. For more information, call 989-2561 or

989-5111. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City, I need to hear from you, call 989-1907 or e m a i l gloria__holiday@msn.co m. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

TAKE US on vacation Chester Countians will soon be planning exciting destinations around the globe. When you take your trip this summer, be sure to Take Us With You. Just take along a copy of the Chester County Independent, and have your photo taken as you read the paper on the beach, or in front of a wellknown landmark (similar to the photo above). Then submit the photo to the newspaper and we’ll publish it in a special edition next fall. You can also win prizes. For more information, call the Independent at 989-4624.

Chester County students to be featured at April Arts in the Alley Chester County students will be in the spotlight during April’s Arts in the Alley in downtown Henderson, beginning at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 19. The event is hosted by the Henderson Arts Commission in the alley off Main Street beside Frix-Jennings Clinic. While art will be exhibited by Chester County High School students and alumni, several CCHS students will perform. The cast of Hairspray will preview their production that opens the following week. Other featured performers include: The Fill (Matt Lutz, Mitch Naylor, Jacob Robertson, Spencer England and Jake Melaro); an a cappella ensemble (Cullen Bonds, Zakkeus Bonds, Landon Butler and Charleston Croom); the CCHS Jazz Band; Asya Washington; and Ashtyn Walker. CCHS faculty members Ricky Mitchell and Jeff Haltom are working with the Henderson Arts Commission to coordinate these performances. At each Arts in the Alley, vendors sell work that includes items such as sewn crafts, paintings, wreaths, wood cuttings, altered art crafts, handmade soaps and photography. Booth spaces are $15 for non-members and $10 for Henderson Arts Commission members. Membership is $25 annually. The requirement for a having a booth is that the vendor is selling something handmade. Vendors confirmed to

date include: Tracey Snow of LillyKates with jewelry; Linda Kent with handmade knit baby clothes, framed

Lumber and Jones Contractors will serve as celebrity grillers, cooking hamburgers and hot dogs

photography and canvas animals; Amy Washburn Photography; LaVon’s Timeless Treasures with unique decorating items; Kristi Montague taking Polaroid portraits to support the Feed My Starving Children Fund; and Butterfly Vintage with upcycled vintage accessories and hand-painted decor items. During Arts in the Alley, the Freed-Hardeman University Art Guild will be having a one-night-only gallery show. It will be held across the street in the upstairs of the A-1 Realty building. Also, DMK Jewelry designer Deborah Shipp will be at LaVon’s Timeless Treasures on historical Front St. from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. during Arts in the Alley. Shipp, who creates one-of-a-kind statement jewelry, will remain at LaVon’s from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Friday, April 20, and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, April 21. She will share her jewelry designs and make special orders for customers. Employees of Jones

on site for brown bag specials. The meal includes two hot dogs or a hamburger, chips, drink and dessert for $6. The HAC brown bag special helps

offset costs of Arts in the Alley events. The Henderson Arts Commission exists to recognize, educate, enrich and entertain through the arts in Henderson, Chester County and the surrounding area. Arts in the Alley events are planned for third Thursdays throughout the spring, summer and fall. For more information about the event or becoming a vendor, visit http://www.facebook.com/ HendersonArtsCommissi on or contact Jason Bramblett at jason@bramblettgrp.com or 731-989-8019.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

FHU theater presents “The Women of Lockerbie”

Courtesy photo

Freed-Hardeman University students rehearse for this week’s production of “The Women of Lockerbie.” The play, a reminder that love triumphs hate, deals with the plane crash of a highjacked plane over Lockerbie, Scotland. It will be presented in the Black Box Theatre at 7 p.m. on April 19-20 and again at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. on April 21. Tickets may be reserved at fhu.edu/theatre. Seating is limited.

Draw Your Mom Calling all kids! The Chester County Independent would like you to honor your Mom this Mother’s Day by participating in our “Draw Your Mom” contest. We will include our favorites in the May 10 edition of the Independent. Entries may be in color or black and white, and should be submitted on the official entry form to the Independent office at 218 S. Church Ave., or by mail at P.O. Box 306, Henderson, TN, 38340, no later than Friday, May 4.

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Purple beetle eaters, er, traps Purple three-sided insect traps that resemble a box kite can be seen in ash trees from Mountain City to Memphis in the next few months as part of an expanded surveillance program by state and federal agencies. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA, APHIS) and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA) are partnering to survey for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), a non-native, wood-boring beetle that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the eastern United States and Canada. “Trapping is a very important tool for us to know how extensive the infestation is and whether additional control measures are needed to slow it from spreading to new areas,” TDA Plant Certification administrator Gray Haun said. “This year, we are extending our trapping efforts across the state as a part of a national survey program.” The goal of the expanded trapping program is to provide a more complete national assessment and to locate new infestations for possible treatment and quarantine. Nearly 3,500 traps will be placed in trees across Tennessee by state and federal officials and private contractors. The purple traps are coated with an adhesive that captures insects when they land. The color is attractive to EAB, and is relatively easy for people to spot among the foliage. “The triangular purple traps pose no risk to humans, pets, or wildlife; however, the non-toxic glue can be extremely sticky,” said USDA State

Plant Health Director, Yvonne Demarino. “It’s important people understand that the traps don’t attract or pull beetles into an area, but rather they are a detection tool to help find EAB if it is present in the area.” EAB was first discovered in Tennessee in 2010 at a truck stop along I-40 in Knox County. In addition to Knox, five other counties in East Tennessee including Blount, Claiborne, Grainger, Loudon and Sevier are under state and federal quarantines. This means that no hardwood firewood, ash logs, ash seedlings, ash bark and other restricted materials can be moved outside these counties without approval. State plant health officials suspect that EAB entered the state on firewood or ash wood materials

brought in from another state where infestations have occurred. Other pests can also be artificially transported by individuals moving firewood. Citizens and visitors are urged to buy their firewood near where they camp and not transport it from one area to another. At times, traps can be blown out of the trees. To report a trap that is down, contact the national EAB hotline at 1-866-3224512 or visit www.purpleEABsurv ey.info. For more information about EAB in Tennessee, contact TDA at 1-800628-2631 or visit http://www.tn.gov/agr iculture/regulatory/ea b.html. An EAB fact sheet can also be found at http://www.aphis.usda .gov/publications/plan t_health/2012/EAB_s urvey_faq.pdf

Purple three-sided insect traps that resemble a box kite can be seen in ash trees from Mountain City to Memphis in the next few months as part of an expanded surveillance program by state and federal agencies.


Page 16-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Shine On! Solar Farm officially opens By Calvin Carter Brownsville States Graphic

“Earlier, someone asked me ‘when is it going to be turned on?’” University Of Tennessee Research Foundation Project Director Paula Flowers said last Thursday afternoon, during the solar farm’s official opening in Haywood County. “It’s on, okay. It’s generating. It’s live,” she continued to the 200 plus excitable crowd. Flowers’ direct answers preceded a warning to those present at the opening often heard during grammar school field trips. “Look, but don’t touch” she said. Yet the warning wasn’t an attempt to actually protect those 21,000 photovoltaic solar panels, as it was to protect anyone who toured throughout the 25acre site. After all, for roughly a month and a half, the farm has managed to generate 1,311,648 Kilowatt Hours. Project officials say that the facility is capable of generating much more than that, five megawatts of electricity annually to be exact. That’s enough to power 500 homes and offset 250 tons of coal each month. More than 100,000 working hours from Chattanooga-based contractor Signal Energy have gone into completing what is now the largest solar project in the state. Though regarded by many

as a jewel in West Tennessee, it’s a treasure placed in Haywood County, and it’s one that Haywood County Mayor Franklin Smith is proud to have. “In 1986, when I got elected County Executive, I went to orientation and there were about six community executives sitting around the table,” Smith recalled. “And all of our chests were swelled because we were newly elected officials. A gentleman walked up, and he said, ‘I don’t know if ya’ll know this or not, but this

is Franklin Smith. Let me tell you something, there’s a right way, a wrong way and a Haywood County way to do things.’ “Well I’ll tell you this,” Smith continued. “Haywood County did this one right.” The University of Tennessee owns and operates the site, which will be used to not only educate the public about solar energy, but will also serve as a living laboratory on the renewable energy source. For them, the site unveiling served as a link in a 150-year tradition.

“ O n e - h u n d re d - f i f t y years ago, the University Of Tennessee was designed as our state land-grant institution, and we will be celebrating that throughout the state,” University Of Tennessee President Dr. Joe DiPietro said. “And it’s very fitting that sort of the kick off to that year is this event right here with the solar farm. It’s a far cry from what we would have done 150 years ago in rural Tennessee.” Although the school is the owner of the farm, the project was and still is a huge collaborative bank of local, state and federal time, effort and money. This is largely in part due to the farm’s roots with the Volunteer State Solar Initiative, which resulted in $31 million in federal dollars for the project’s construction. Photos courtesy States Graphic, Brownsville

The Solar Farm in Haywood County officially opened last week with a ribbon-cutting attended by area and state officials. When fully-operational, the site will produce enough electricity for up to 500 homes.

Solar-energy is quickly growing Project officials noted that Tennessee has 180 for-profit companies in its solar value chain, employs more than 6,400 people in solar-related industries and has installed approximately 27 megawatts of solar power. Bloomberg New

Energy Finance reported a $137 billion global market in solar energy that grew by more than one third last year. And nationally, the Obama Administration wants the country to double their renewable energy sources in the next four years. According to U.S. Department Of Energy See SOLAR, Page 14-A


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Thursday, April 19, 2012

Chamber golf tournament is April 27 The ninth Annual Henderson/Chester County Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament is at 1 p.m. Friday, April 27, at Chickasaw Golf Course. Lunch begins at noon. Sponsorship packages are available. Naming Sponsor is $400, hole-in-one sponsor is $175 and single hole sponsor is $75. Contact the Chamber if you are interested in being a partner with the Chamber in this event or for more information on the sponsor packages.

QB Club golf tournament is May 25 The annual Chester County Quarterback Club Golf Tournament is slated for 1 p.m. Friday, May 25, at Woodland Hills Country club near Pinson. The four-person scramble is $250 per team. Cash prizes will be paid for each flight. For more information, contact Jason Butler at 697-9342, or Kathy Butler at 697-1683.

Chester County baseball

Eagles go unbeaten, win tournament Chester County went unbeaten late last week to win the Independent-Appeal Baseball Tournament which took place at Adamsville and Selmer. With those victories, CCHS improved to 15-4 overall. In the finals of the I-A event against McNairy Central, the Eagles completed a role they played throughout the tournament of building a lead and holding off a late rally by their opponent. With CCHS ahead 8-3, the Bobcats scored four times in the bottom of the sixth, but Collin McPherson came on in relief to get the win for Jared Humphry, 8-7. Humphry threw five and twothirds innings, and gave way to Levin Cain for the final out of the sixth. McPherson threw a perfect seventh to nail down the trophy. CCHS had runners on base in each of the first two innings but failed to score in each. They broke through in the third after Nathan Nails was hit by a pitch

leading off the inning. Nails came home on an RBI single from Jake Melaro. But McNairy came right back to take the lead with three runs in the bottom of the frame. The Eagles got back on top in the fourth. An error put Heath Graves on base and he stole two bases, followed by a hit from Zach Phillips to score Graves. Brandon Berry drove in Phillips with a two-out single, and McPherson did the same to bring home Berry. CCHS added two more in the fifth on a double by Tanner Beecham and an error, plus a two-out double by Mason Connor. In the sixth, Berry and Malero each walked, scoring later on McNairy errors. At Adamsville on April 11, Chester County pounded Bolivar Central 15-4. Graves drove in four runs, and Taylor Thomas three. Berry was the winner allowing seven hits in five innings. Beecham finished up the final frame.

Cain got the save and Melaro the win April 12 as CCHS held off a late Clarksburg charge 6-4. Berry and Melaro each hit home runs for the Eagles, coming one out apart in the third inning. Thursday against the home team, Adamsville, CCHS again held off a late charge by the

opposition to beat the Cardinals 4-2. McPherson picked up another victory, throwing a complete game with two strikeouts while allowing only two hits and walking three. With the potential tying run at the plate in the See CCHS, Page 2-B

Brandon Berry accepts the Most Valuable Player Award from a tournament official.

Bowden to speak at Benefit Dinner Legendary college football coach Bobby Bowden has been announced as the featured speaker on April 28 at the Freed-Hardeman University Sports Advisory Council Benefit Dinner. Bowden served as the head coach for the Florida State University Seminoles from 1976 to 2009. He guided FSU to 377 victories, two national championships, 12 ACC titles and a top-five finish in the country for 14 straight seasons. The patriarch of college football's most famous coaching family, Bowden remains heavily involved in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, annually awarding The National Bobby Bowden Award to a student-athlete for achievement on and off the field. Bowden was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2006. He and his wife of 61 years, Ann, reside in Tallahassee, Fla. The silent auction begins at 4:30 p.m. and concludes at 6:30 p.m. Dinner will begin being served at 6:30 and a live auction will take place during dinner. Bowden will then deliver the keynote address entitled “Called to Coach” based on his book of the same title and will follow with a question-andanswer session. “We are excited to have a speaker with Coach Bowden's experience and ability. He is in high demand as a speaker and we are very fortunate that he has agreed to be our featured guest,” said FHU Athletic Director Mike McCutchen. “His career speaks for itself and his message is one that can motivate and inspire not only football fans, but anyone who is interested in success in all areas of life. It should be a great evening for all who attend.” For more information call 989-6900.

Courtesy photo

Chester County brought home all the hardware after winning the Independent-Appeal Baseball Tournament last week in McNairy County.

Eagle tennis dominates opposition Chester County High School tennis is enjoying a wonderful season with a deep lineup that consistently puts up good results. CCHS played three matches last week, winning all three in both boys’ and girls’ matchups. CCHS hosted McNairy April 9, pasting the Bobcats 5-2 in boys’ games and 6-0 in girls. Winning girls’ singles matches for the Eaglettes were Krista Hatch, 8-5; Sarah McNeil, 8-6; Katie Knipper, 8-3; and Miriah Denton, 8-2. Natalie Clayton and Hatch won at No. 1 doubles, 8-3. Eagle victories over McNairy came from Austin Daniel, 8-6; Mike Price, 8-0; Ravi Patel, 8-1; and Matt Dilday, 8-2; along with Daniel and Price, 8-0; and Patel/Jesse Fisher, 8-1; in doubles. The next day Chester County hosted Scotts Hill and again each team was victorious. The CCHS guys won 4-0 plus two forfeits. Singles winners were Daniel, 8-3; Price, 8-1; and Patel, 8-1. The only contested doubles match went to Dilday and Fisher, 8-4. Eaglette wins over the SH Lady Lions were from Clayton, Hatch, and McNeil. Clayton and Hatch also won at No. 1 doubles, 8-2; with McNeil and Brittany Rouse squeezing by at No. 2 doubles, 9-8 (7-3). Perfect results in the doubles matches enabled CCHS to defeat Lexington Thursday, 5-3 and 5-1. Daniel and Price edged their opponents 9-8 (10-8), while England and England had a bit easier time of it, winning 8-3. Price, Patel and Dilday took singles matches, 8-0, 8-4, and 8-2 respectively. Singles matches for the ladies of Chester County were won by Piper Davis, Hatch, and Rouse by scores of 8-5, 8-5, and 6-3. Clayton and Davis won at No. 1 doubles 8-2, with Hatch and McNeil doing the same at No. 2 doubles, 8-3. CCHS plays today, Thursday, at North Park in Jackson against Liberty Tech. Their final three regular season matches are all at home at the Freed-Hardeman University courts beginning with Bolivar Central, at 3:45 p.m. Friday.

No. 21 Lions sweep Crowley The No. 21 FreedHardeman Lions scored early and often on Saturday in completing a three-game series sweep of Crowley's Ridge College with a 16-0 win at Carnes Field. The Lions (31-17) scored six times in the first and third innings on the way to their fifth straight win. Robert Prieto (3) and Ben Ihde (2)

each hit home runs in the first inning, Prieto's a three-run shot and Ihde's a two-run blast. Justin Mackey and Jake Francis both delivered two-run singles in the third, while Mark Salisbury had a two-run single in the fourth. Hunter Newby (4-5) picked up the win, allowing no runs over four innings while fanning See FHU, Page 3-B

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Freed-Hardeman’s Jake Frances delivers a pitch in the second game of the Lions’ doubleheader sweep over Lane College April 11 at Carnes Field.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Chester County girls’ softball Eaglettes down Lexington, sit atop district standings

Chester County soccer Submitted photo

Brennan Conaway fights hard for control in the Chester County Eagles high school soccer match at Lexington last week. CCHS lost 2-1.

Chester County took a big step toward advancing in the upcoming district tournament by beating Lexington last Thursday in Lexington. CCHS took down the defending district champs 12-7 in 10 innings. The Eaglettes are now 9-0 in the district, 22-4 overall. Sammie Jo Ivy worked all 10 innings on the mound for Chester County. She and the Eaglettes had a chance to win the game in regulation, but Candace Maness of the Lady Tigers came through with a two-out single to knot the score at five. In the ninth inning, the Eaglettes again took the lead, 6-5, on a leadoff home run by Kirsten Henry, but

unfortunately, Lexington came right back with four hits in the bottom of the frame to even the score. This time, however, Ivy retired Maness on a popup to short, and the game went to the 10th inning. In the 10th, CCHS got to Lexington pitcher Aleira Moore in big way as the first seven CCHS hitters reached base and scored. Lexington put two runs on the board in the bottom of the 10th but that was it. Henry had a big night overall for the Eaglettes with a home run, two doubles, and five runs batted in. Ivy also hit a four-bagger, and Logan McEarl had five-straight hits, including a double, and driving in

one run. April 17 at Selmer, the Eaglettes put a licking on McNairy Central, 7zip! Again it was Ivy with big arm, fanning nine, and giving up only four hits. She struck out the side in the seventh to end the affair. Elantra Cox had three hits in four trips, scored twice and added one RBI. Jana Frye had a perfect night at the plate with four hits in four at bats, scored twice, and plated another runner. Presley Beth Robinson and Kayla Latch each added two hits. The district tournament is scheduled at South Side later in the season.

Trice hits, pitches Lady Lions to victory

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Will Taylor had three early goals as Chester County dominated Riverside Thursday in Henderson.

Kamara Trice hit a key two-run home run to help the FreedHardeman Lady Lions get a split with Martin Methodist College on Saturday in Henderson. The RedHawks (28-16, 12-8) won game one, 7-1, before FHU took the second game, 6-4. Trice's home run, the fourth of the year for the freshman, came in the fifth inning and gave FreedHardeman (19-18, 12-12) a 6-2 lead. MMC threatened in the top of the seventh, taking advantage of two Lady Lion errors to score twice, but Sarah Elizabeth Cousar (13-5) worked out of the jam. In game one, Martin Methodist scored four runs in the top of the first inning and cruised as FHU struggled to move runners against RedHawk starter Chrissy Darnell.

Darnell allowed five hits and one walk over seven innings. Savannah Cole (0-4) took the loss, allowing five runs in five innings pitched.

Trice throws shutout

Trice tossed her first career shutout as the Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions picked up a split in a double-header with Blue Mountain College on April 10 at Blue Mountain, Miss., winning the first game 7-0 before losing the nightcap, 3-2 in eight innings. Trice (2-3) allowed two hits and struck out seven in the win while also going 3-for-3 at the plate with two RBI. Brittany Yates added a pair of singles in the win. The Toppers scored in the bottom of the eighth in the second game to avoid being swept for the season

TranSouth Conference Women’s Softball Standings Through April 15 Team TS All 1. Union 21-3 35-8 2. Trevecca Naz. * 14-6 25-13 3. Martin Meth. 14-8 30-16 4. Cumberland 14-10 24-16 5. Freed-Hardeman12-12 19-18 6. Blue Mountain 10-14 16-22 7. Bethel 8-16 13-19 8. Mid-Continent 8-16 13-19 9. Lyon 5-21 12-19 * Trevecca ineligible in conference

series, handing Cousar a rare loss in the circle. BMC scored in the first and third innings to take a 2-0 lead, but FHU (18-17, 11-11) answered with runs in the fourth and fifth innings to tie the game. Shelby Cummings and Caneisha Turner each had two hits in the loss.

Paxton named SL Pitcher of the Week

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Taylor Hodges passes between the legs of a defender in Chester County’s battle with Riverside Thursday at home.

Jackson Generals’ lefty James Paxton has been named the Southern League Pitcher of the Week for his efforts in the first 11 days of the 2012 season. Paxton made two starts and was 1-0, with a 0.87 ERA striking out 17 and walking just one batter in 10 1/3 innings. The Ladner, British Columbia, Canada native fanned 10 batters in his first start on April 6 against the Barons and struck out seven in his

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CCHS seventh inning, he struck out the number nine hitter, and got the final out as a runner attempted to steal home. CCHS scored quickly in the first inning after Berry led off with a double and came home on McPherson’s RBI single to center. The Eagles threatened in the second and third innings, then added a second run in the fourth when Mason Connor drove home Graves with a two-out single. Three straight two-out hits from Berry, McPherson and Malero plated two more runs in the top of the seventh. In regular season games, on April 9 CCHS hosted Fayette-Ware, winning 9-0 behind the onehit pitching of Colin McPherson who struck out 16 over six innings. Connor finished up with

Photo courtesy McNairy County News

Heath Graves is safe at second ahead of a tag by the McNairy fielder. one-inning of work. Chester County had 11 hits, including 10 singles. Berry had three hits, and Graves and Beecham two each. Beecham also drove in three runs. CCHS made a return visit to Somerville the next day, beating FayetteWare again 13-3. CCHS struck with seven runs in the second inning. Leading hitters included Berry at three-for-five, and Phillips three-for-four. Beecham, Hunter Denbow and Cain added two hits each. Humphry started on the mound for

the Eagles, with the victory going to Brady Clark who shutout the Wildcats over the final four frames. Eagle note: Through April 11, of those CCHS pitchers throwing at least 10 innings or more, McPherson leads the staff in earned run average at .55. He also has 34 strikeouts and 3.78 Ks per walk. Malero has four wins and one loss, McPherson is 30, and Cain and Humphry are each 2-1. Seven different Eagles have at least one victory. Cain and Thomas each have one save.

Courtesy photos

Jake Melaro, Tanner Beecham and Colin McPherson were named to the AllTournament team in the Independent-Appeal tournament last week.

second outing last Thursday against the Smokies. The 23-year-old lefty is rated as the No. 3 prospect for the Seattle Mariners, according to Baseball America.

The Generals conclude the current homestand at 7:05 p.m. tonight, Thursday against Mississippi. They go to Huntsville for a five-game series, before returning home April 25.

JAMES PAXTON


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Special Needs Athletics starts baseball season

CASA golf scramble scheduled May 11 The second annual CASA Golf Scramble is set for May 11 at Bent Tree Golf Club. Proceeds benefit the children served by the Madison County Court Appointed Special Advocates Program. Registration deadline is May 4. Cost is $400 for a four-person team including 18 holes of golf, cart, lunch, goodie bags and prizes. Sponsorships are also available. There is a special Hole-In-One prize of a 2012 Chevrolet Camaro LS. For more information, send an email to Shannon@madisoncountycasa.org.

Each year, Freed-Hardeman University offers a wide assortment of summer camps for interested parties who wish to challenge and extend their abilities to a new level of competition. Cub Camps are for campers entering kindergarten through third grade. The volleyball day camp is for third through sixth grade. The list of camps scheduled for the summer of 2012 include the following: • June 11-14 Baseball Cub Camp • June 4-7 Basketball Cub Camp • June 24-28 Girls Soccer Camp • June 4-8 Baseball Skills Camp • June 5-8 Baseball Fundamentals Camp • June 24-28 Boys Soccer Camp • June 18-20 Volleyball Day Camp • June 25-29 Soccer Cub Camp • June 20-23 Volleyball Boarding Camp • June 24-28 Girls Basketball Camp • July 15-19 Boys Basketball Camp • July 27-28 Girls Basketball Post Camp

Sports Schedules Freed-Hardeman Baseball Location Carnes Field Carnes Field Lebanon Lebanon

Time 6:00 Noon 1:00 2:00

Freed-Hardeman Softball Date Opponent Apr. 19 Cumberland (2) Apr. 23 Lyon (2) Apr. 26 Bethel (2) May 2-4 TranSouth

Location Henderson Batesville, Ark. Henderson Jackson

Time 4:00 2:00 5:00 TBA

Chester County High School Baseball Date Opponent Location Apr. 19 Jackson-SM (j) Eagle Field Apr. 20 Scotts Hill (j) Eagle Field Apr. 21 Scotts Hill (j) Scotts Hill Apr. 23 South Side (j) Jackson Apr. 24 Madison Academic Eagle Field Apr. 25 Hardin County (j) Eagle Field Apr. 26 Lexington Lexington Apr. 27 Middleton (j) Eagle Field Apr. 30 Middleton (j) Middleton (j) Junior Varsity game before

Time 4:30 6:00 Noon 5:30 4:30 6:00 5:30 6:00 6:00

Chester County Boys’ Soccer Date Apr. 19 Apr. 23 Apr. 24 May 1 May 3 TBA

Opponent Location Scotts Hill Scotts Hill Fayette-Academy Somerville Liberty Tech Henderson Madison Academic Henderson McNairy Central Henderson District Tournamey TBA

Date

Opponent

Time 5:00 6:00 5:30 5:30 5:30 TBA

Chester County High Softball Location Time

Apr. 19 McNairy Central Eaglette Field Apr. 24 Lexington (j) Eaglette Field Apr. 26 South Side (j) Jackson April 27-28, North Side Tournament Jackson, TBA May 1 Trinity Christian (j)Jackson (j) Junior Varsity game also

5:00 5:00 7:00

4:30

Chester County High School Tennis Date Opponent Location Time Apr. 19 Liberty Tech North Park 3:45 Apr. 20 Bolivar Central Henderson 3:45 Apr. 23 South Side Henderson 3:30 Apr. 24 Trinity Christian Henderson 3:15 April 30-May1 District Team Tournament TBA May 3-4, 7-8 District Individual Tournament, Conger

Junior boys baseball schedule Date Opponent April 20 Trinity Chr. April 21 Brighton * B-game at 5:30

Location Jackson Henderson

Time 5:00 11:00

Chester County Junior Boys’ Soccer Date Opponent Apr. 20 Trinity Christian Apr. 21 Brighton * B-game at 5:30

Location Jackson Henderson

Time 5:00 11:00

Jackson Generals Baseball Date Apr. 18 Apr. 19 Apr. 20 Apr. 21 Apr. 22 Apr. 23 Apr. 24 Apr. 25 Apr. 26 Apr. 27 Apr. 28 Apr. 29

Opponent Mississippi Mississippi Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee

Location Pringles Park Pringles Park Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Huntsville Pringls Park Pringls Park Pringls Park Pringls Park Pringls Park

So dust off those bats and gloves and get ready for fun, it is time for Special Needs baseball. Selmer’s Special Needs Athletics Spring Baseball League will start on Monday, April 30th and the last game will be played on July 9th. Games will be played at 6:30 p.m every Monday at Patriot Park behind the National Guard Armory in

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FHU

Summer sports camps scheduled at FHU

Date Opponent Apr. 20 Lyon Apr. 21 Lyon (2) Apr. 26 Cumberland (2) Apr. 27 Cumberland

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Time 11:05 7:05 6:43 6:43 4:03 6:43 10:43 7:05 7:05 7:05 6:05 2:05

four. Daniel Wallace, Drew Suttles and Amos Bingham each worked scoreless innings in relief. Mackey, Prieto and Jake Todd all had two hits for the Lions, who tallied 13 as a team and drew five walks.

Hykes hits walk-off slam In Friday’s doubleheader, Hykes hit a two-out, walk-off grand slam to complete the Lions' double-header sweep of Crowley's Ridge, 10-2 and 5-1. Hykes' opposite-field blast, his seventh of the season, saved a quality effort on the mound by Roberto Ferguson (7-0) and kept him unbeaten on the season. Ferguson gave up just three hits and struck out 11. The Lions, though, had equal trouble getting anything going off of CRC starter Tray Malone, getting just three hits through the first six innings. In the seventh, FHU's Kyle Dearing drew a oneout walk, then stole second and advanced to third on an overthrow by Pioneer catcher Shane Fletcher. Mackey and Prieto were both intentionally walked to load the bases. The strategy looked like it might pay off when Mansell popped out, but Hykes delivered on a 2-1 count for the dramatic finish. Andy Southard (9-1) went the distance in game one, allowing six hits and fanning six in picking up his ninth win of the year. His nine wins are the most by a Lion pitcher since Javy Gomez won 10 games in 2008. FHU got on the board early with three runs in the first, taking advantage of wildness by Pioneer starter Zack Combs. Combs walked four batters in the inning, also hitting two and throwing two wild pitches. CRC got two runs in the third, but Southard left the bases loaded to escape further damage and the Lions answered with two runs of their own in the bottom of the inning. Freed-Hardeman added a run in the fourth and four runs in the sixth. Prieto and Ihde each had two hits in the first game while Mackey and Joe Mike both drove in two runs. Dearing swiped a base in each game to bring his TranSouth-leading total to 31.

Selmer. Special Needs Athletics Spring Baseball League in Jackson will be played on Thursday nights beginning May 10, with the last game being on July 12th. All Jackson games are played at the West Tennessee Healthcare Sportsplex with game times being 5:30, 6:45, and 8 p.m.

drawing 12 walks. It also featured a rare appearance in the batting order for a few regular pitchers, including Hunter Newby who went four-for-four with a home run and six RBI. The Lions scored at least four runs in every inning, highlighted by a 10-run fifth. Joe Creasy (1-0) went the distance to pick up the win, striking out 11. Freed-Hardeman picked up where it left off in game two, scoring four times in the first inning and cruising to the sweep. Pete Trollinger had a big game at the plate going three-for-three with a home run and five RBI. Francis (3-0) earned the win, striking out 12.

Stranded runners haunt Lions The Lions had plenty of changes to score, but stranded 10 runners on base in a 2-1 loss to Belhaven University in a non-conference game on April 10. The offensive struggles negated a solid effort by Charlie Overturf (2-5), who allowed two runs on six hits with no walks. Belhaven scored the goahead run in the seventh inning on a one-out squeeze bunt. The Blazers also scored a run in the first inning and the Lions tied the game in the fourth when Kirkland Wheeler led off the inning with a single and came around to

Special Needs Athletics is open to individuals with special needs (developmental or physical) ages 4adult. For more information or questions call, Linda Taylor (610-7557) for information on Selmer games, and for information on Jackson games contact Michael Richerson (394-6675) or Mona DeFord (3431627).

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

A pitch sails over the head of Freed-Hardeman’s Storm Bates April 11 at Carnes Field. FHU destroyed Lane, 35-0 and 150.

TranSouth Conference Baseball Standings Through April 15 Team TS 1. Freed-Hardeman 12-6 2. Bethel 11-7 3. Union 11-8 4. Trevecca Naz. * 9-7 5. Martin Meth. 10-8 5 Cumberland 10-8 7. Blue Mountain 7-11 8. Mid-Continent 6-12 9. Lyon 6-15 * Trevecca ineligible in conference score on an error. FHU had a chance to tie the game again in the eighth inning after Jesse Hykes and Mike delivered consecutive singles with two outs, but Tyler Wilson was retired to stop the threat. The Lions were then retired in order in the ninth as Belhaven closer Josh Clarke picked up his

All 31-17 24-18 26-15 17-18 26-20 26-21 21-23 19-30 26-25

10th save of the season. Freed-Hardeman outhit the Blazers, 10-7, but left the bases loaded in the first and stranded runners in six innings. Mike led the Lions at the plate with three hits while Mackey and Prieto both had two hits. Ten of FHU's 17 losses this season have come by one run.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Lane shortstop McKinsley Marbury leaps in vain to catch a throw from the catcher as FreedHardeman’s Tyler Wilson steals second base in the second game of their twinbill April 11 at Carnes Field.

Offense explodes, double up Lane Official records do not presently exist for singlegame team statistics for the Freed-Hardeman baseball program, but if they did a few would have certainly been set on April 11. The Lions' offense exploded for a combined 50 runs as FHU took a double-header from Lane College (2-25), 35-0 and 15-0, at Carnes Field. Seventeen different Lions recorded hits in game one as FHU pounded out 26 in all while

Junior high baseball Photo by Tammy Lott

LaDerrick Means, shown here, “eats some dirt” but is safe at home in the Chester County Junior Eagles’ recent baseball game.


EEdduuccaattiioonn

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Sliding into summer

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

East Chester Elementary Students were treated to an afternoon at Gene Record Memorial Park Thursday afternoon following the 2012 premier performance of Makin’ Music at Freed-Hardeman University. In addition to playtime at the park, students enjoyed a pizza lunch provided by PTO.

By Ally Rogers Eighth-grade students and their parents are invited to a very informative night hosted by the high school on TUESDAY, APRIL 24. (This is a change from what was mentioned in last week’s article.) You will be able to hear about course selections, graduation requirements, clubs available, and be able to tour the school. This is an event that you will not want to miss! I, along with Mrs. Goff, the High School Guidance Counselor, will be meeting with eighth-grade students this Wednesday and Thursday to begin the process of choosing classes, all forms will be due April 30. If you have any questions, feel free to call me in the Guidance Office at 989-1948. Next week will be TCAP week. We will be testing each morning, Monday-Thursday. Please make sure that your child is here each day with enough rest and that he/she eats a good breakfast, whether at home or at school. Also, each student will need plenty of pencils, so it may be a good idea to check with them about their supplies. This test will count as 15

percent of their final grade and is very important! Encourage them to do their best! Our Junior High will host a night for all 5thgraders to come and visit our school. Coach Eads will speak with students and their parents about our daily routine, classes, clubs, and expectations. Everyone will then get a chance to ask any questions and tour the school building. Make plans to attend t h i s informat i v e meeting, if you have a 5th-grader. Coach Kirk will be having tr y-outs for the Junior H i g h b o y s ’ basketball team Thursday a n d F r i d a y, May 10 and 11. If you know of someone that may want to play, let them k n o w a b o u t t h e s e dates. They will m e e t until 5 p.m. each day.

FHU professor speaks at W. Va. conference A Freed-Hardeman University professor will deliver a lecture dealing with philosophy and apologetics this spring in West Virginia. Dr. Rolland Pack, professor of philosophy and of biblical studies, will speak on “Engaging Moral Philosophy for Contemporary Apologetics” May 10 at Grande Pointe Conference and Reception Center in Vienna, W.Va. The conference is hosted by Warren Christian Apologetics Center. Pack, a former director of the FHU Honors Program, holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Georgetown University. He was a research and teaching fellow of the Kennedy Institute while at Georgetown. He will utilize biblical texts and examples of apologetics to challenge attendees to become better apologists. Lectures from the series will be published under the title “Truth Acknowledges, Rejected and Applied.” Those attending the conference will receive a complimentary copy.

The Junior High boys’ baseball team played games against Trinity Christian, University School of Jackson, and West Middle last week. They will play again against at Jackson Christian on Thursday April 19. It’s been a very exciting season for them. The Junior High boys’ soccer team will play Friday at Trinity and will have a home game Saturday at 11 a.m.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Inside CCHS This Saturday is the night that most of the juniors and seniors have been anxiously anticipating for months: Junior Senior Banquet. The night officially begins at 6:30 p.m. in the high school gym, but pictures will start at 6 p.m. This year’s theme is “The Night That Stood Still” Blackout 2012. The banquet will end at 11 p.m. Have a great, safe night, everybody! This Sunday is the Spring Concert. It will be held at 2 p.m. in Williams Auditorium. Come out and support the band! Next week will be a busy week for sports. Our tennis teams play at 3:30 p.m., at home on Monday against Southside, and at 3:15 p.m. at home on Tuesday. The baseball teams play at 3:30 p.m. Monday at South Side, MEGHAN at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday at home against Madison, at 4:30 BLACK p.m. Wednesday at home versus Hardin County, at Lexington at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, at home versus Middleton at 4 p.m. Our boys’ soccer team will play at 6 p.m. Monday at Fayette Academy, and at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at home against Liberty. The softball team will play at 5 p.m. Tuesday (JV) at home versus Lexington, at 7 p.m. at South Side, and on Friday and Saturday the Northside Tournament. Good luck, teams! The FFA banquet will be held at 7 p.m. April 26 in the high school cafeteria. Don’t forget to go, FFA members. The Academic Decathlon team will be going to a competition from 9:15 a.m. to 2:10 p.m. both days at Freed-Hardeman University on April 27 and 28. Good luck, team! The Chester County High School Theatre Department will be performing Hairspray April 26 – 28. Each show starts at 7 p.m. at Williams Auditorium. Tickets are $10. Come out and support these students! Credit recovery will be available from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 28 at the high school for those who need it. Don’t forget to come if you need it. The Spring Choir Concert will be at 2 p.m. April 29 in City Hall. Show your support for these students by coming! against Brighton. The boys are working extremely hard and their hard work is definitely paying off! Several of our clubs are going on field trips for the end of the year. Make sure you have signed permission slips and get them in by dates requested from club sponsors. Progress reports went

out this past Thursday. Be sure to ask your student about their grades and email or contact the office to schedule an appointment if you have concerns about your child’s grade in their class. It’s not too early to begin thinking about exams. They will be held May 14-16. Please remember to have all fines

paid before that time and make sure, if you need to take care of absences, you do so quickly by getting the appropriate notes or excuses in to the office. Don’t forget to put these important dates on your calendar: April 23-27 – TCAP week April 24 – 8th-grade night at the High School.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Make safety a prom priority

FUNdraiser at West

Courtesy photo

West Chester Elementary recently held its spring catalog fundraiser. Trenton Sweeney (left) was the top seller and earned a party at Up N Jumpin’ and a CC Eagle windbreaker jacket. Evan Hutcherson was the second place winner and received an iPod Touch. Jacelyn Haskins was the third place winner and received a $50 gift card. The students are pictured with their principal, Amy Eaton.

By Rosemary McKnight Busy might be an understatement when one looks at all that has been going on at East Chester Elementary School recently. The staff of WFHU radio came to East Chester on April 11 and read to some of the kindergarten and firstgrade classes. The students enjoyed hearing Joshua Bolen, Stacey Voss, Tabitha Florida, Stacy Verros, Spencer Davidson, Roger Holtin,

By Emily Brown West has been a beehive of activity this past week! Teachers and students in all grade levels have been working to prepare for our upcoming SAT-10 and TCAP assessments that will begin April 23. From reading workshops to test practice and everything in between, students are excitedly preparing for these assessments. Everyone at West would like to extend a heartfelt thanks to Dixie Youth President Mr. Mike Niesler and the Dixie Youth Board for working with our school system and postponing Monday and Tuesday night games on April 23 and 24 to the following Saturday. We also want to encourage parents, coaches, and others not to practice or participate in practice on the nights of April 23, 24, and 25, so that our students are well-rested and prepared for these important tests. Parents, please make sure your child has a good night’s sleep, a nutritious breakfast, and a stressfree morning each day. Success comes from working together to help our students shine! Kindergarten students enjoyed a field trip to the Jackson Municipal Airport on Friday. Students were able to tour the facilities,

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and Ron Means read some of their favorite books. Thank you, WFHU! Thanks also go to Freed-Hardeman University for allowing East Chester’s secondand third-graders to come to the student preview showing of Makin’ Music on April 12. Students were entertained with shows about Sesame Street, birthday celebrations, zombies, a haunted house, nursing home residents, and Peter Pan. Students voted for their favorite show upon returning to school. If East Chester students had been the judges “A Tricky Treat,” the show about a visit to a haunted house would have won first place. The show that featured zombies won second, and Peter Pan was third in student voting. Each student wrote a

paragraph for Ms. Kim telling their favorite part of Makin’ Music. Second-grade classes went to Gene Record Park following Makin’ Music. They enjoyed pizza and the opportunity to play on the playground. Students have learned in social studies that city parks are one of their government services. If that weren’t enough, that evening was East Chester Skate Night at Magic Wheels in Jackson. Several students put on skates and enjoyed the exercise. Jill Egros and Denise Stringfellow were on the skating floor to assist new skaters. Last week was the final STAR assessments. These reading and math tests are taken in the computer lab and are indicators of how well students

see airplanes, and learn more about this transportation hub. The teachers want to thank parents for helping chaperone students. Kindergarten students are continuing to work on their writing skills, and their most recent work is displayed in the halls. We are so proud of the amazing growth these students have made this year! Mrs. Emily Brown’s first-graders would like to thank FHU baseball players Jonathan Soto, Charlie Overturf and Ryan Fares for coming and talking to them about respect and responsibility. It is always nice to have these young men be an example to the kids who look up to them. Firstgraders have been reading and writing about being a detective. Their stories about finding clues and solving mysteries were very creative! They have also been busy learning about money, weather, plants and Earth Day, and of course, reviewing skills. Everyone at West wants to congratulate second-grade teacher Mrs. Kelly Crowe for being selected as WBBJ’s Educator of the Week! The news film crew surprised Mrs. Kelly Thursday morning by dropping by to conduct a brief interview. Be sure to visit the WBBJ website to read more! We also want to congratulate Mrs. Jean Smith, who welcomed a new granddaughter this week. Abigail Leigh and her parents are at home and doing well. Second-grade students are working to review for

their upcoming standardized tests, and the teachers want to encourage parents to have students at school as early as possible each day. Also, parents, please be sure to practice those multiplication and division facts! Third-graders at West had a very busy week. They completed their last Star tests in both reading and math, and their hard work paid off; they were very proud of their scores and growth. Students have also been completing plenty of TCAP-style exercises, so that they will be familiar with the format before the assessments begin. In Mrs. Denise Davidson’s class, students have completed their research project on famous Americans. All third-grade students thoroughly enjoyed their trip to Makin’ Music at FreedHardeman this week. And, congratulations are in order for Mrs. Marti McDaniel, who is the proud grandmother of Giada Marie McDaniel! Don’t forget to mark your calendars for these important dates: April 19-20 – Registration for new kindergarten students at North Chester April 23-27 – TCAP and SAT-10 Testing April 30 – Open House for next year’s kindergarten students April 30-May 1 – Testing of NEW incoming kindergarten students (36 p.m.) May 3 – Kindergarten Awards Program May 11 – Field Day May 16 – Last Full Day of School, Awards Day

There is a bustle of activity that takes place during prom and graduation season. With so much going on, caution often takes a backseat to other issues. However, it is important to keep safety in mind during prom and graduation season. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, more than one-third of alcohol related traffic fatalities involving teenagers occur during the peak prom and graduation months of April, May and June. Prom and graduation are times for celebration. Too often festivities include drugs and alcohol, even for teens who are under the legal drinking age. According to data from the 2005 “Monitoring the Future” study, a survey of U.S. youth, three-quarters of 12th-graders, more than two-thirds of 10thgraders, and about two in every five 8th-graders have consumed alcohol. Many of these underage drinkers participate in binge drinking, where five or more drinks are consumed at one time. Apart from alcohol consumption, many teens view prom night as the

opportunity to lose their virginity or have sex with their date. Although prom can be an important rite of passage in one’s life, it doesn’t necessarily mean there has to be a correlation between leaving high school and losing one’s virginity. All too often teen virgins see themselves in the minority during high school, and many view prom night as a chance to join the perceived majority. Although sex can be a pleasurable act, it carries with it inherent risks, including pregnancy, disease, emotional scarring, and even legal issues. Depending on where a teen lives, there can be age of consent laws that restrict individuals from being intimate until a certain age. Those who don’t comply risk legal action. Alcohol isn’t the only drug of choice popping up at teen social events. Marijuana and cocaine continue to be popular choices, while many other teens are abusing prescription drugs as well. It has become popular to crush and snort pain relief drugs, like oxycodone, to provide a fast high. Instead of meeting up with dealers on the street cor-

ner, many teens get their drugs straight out of their parents’ medicine cabinets. Alcohol consumption, drug use and sex are three separate concerns on prom night. When teens combine alcohol consumption with drug use and/or sexual behavior, the results can be disastrous. Individuals under the influence of alcohol or drugs cannot make sound judgments. They may engage in risky behavior and regret the decisions when they are sober and things cannot be reversed. High schoolers attending prom should keep a few things in mind to be safe and have a good time. • Don’t feel pressured to do anything you don’t want to do. Mingle with the same friends with whom you feel comfortable and enjoy the night. • Set rules for yourself that include no drinking or drugs. • Team up with a friend so that you can get help from him or her should you get into trouble. • Plan to go home after the prom, not to a hotel room. • Enjoy the night and create lasting positive memories.

are projected to perform on TCAP. Individual student reports were printed and sent home for parents to see. Progress reports also went home on Thursday. Students enjoyed Animal Land on Friday. Animal Land is a fundraiser for the library. Students could choose an animal, have it stuffed and buy outfits for it. Speaking of fund-raisers … East Chester’s first Read-a-thon began on Monday. Students were asked to get sponsors to pledge money for time they spend reading. They are counting the minutes they read rather than the number of books read. This helps our school and encourages students to continue to do something they love – READ! The reading period ends April 27. Students will tally up their minutes, collect their pledge money, and bring

the collected money to school by May 3. Trophies for the top three readers will be awarded. East Chester’s PTO met at 6:30 Tuesday evening. Officers for 2012 – 2013 were installed. Parents were then dismissed to classrooms for the final Parent Involvement Program to talk about testing. Thirdgrade parents were especially interested to learn about a newly passed Tennessee law that requires all students to score at the Basic level or above on the reading portion of the TCAP test in order to go to fourthgrade. This year is also the first year that TCAP scores will count as 15 percent of a students’ final grade. TCAP testing begins on Monday, April 23. Parents are urged to have students at school on time throughout the week and to make

sure students eat breakfast. Mike Niesler has announced that Dixie Youth games scheduled for April 23 and 24 will be postponed until Saturday in order for students to rest and do their best on these tests. Up ‘n’ Jumpin’ will host a special night for East Chester this Friday night. It is a chance for students to have fun and get exercise before exercising their brains on TCAP. Kindergarten registration will be held from 12 noon until 7 p.m. Thursday, April 19, and from 8 a.m. until 12 noon Friday, April 20. Parents who have children who will be attending kindergarten next year are urged to go ahead and register their children on these days. As it was stated at the beginning of this article, East Chester Elementary School is a busy place!

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools Monday, April 23 Popcorn chicken Or corndog Mashed potatoes Green peas, rolls Fruit choice, milk choice Tuesday, April 24 Lemon pepper chicken or Manager’s choice Macaroni/cheese Green beans, rolls Wednesday, April 25 Manager’s choice Fruit choice, milk choice Thursday, April 26 Taco soup or Ham/cheese sandwich Tiny tri taters Baby carrots/ranch dip Cheese cup, pickle spears Fruit choice, milk choice Friday, April 27 Pizza or tuna plate Fries, California blend Fruit choice, milk choice

Chester County

Middle School Monday, April 23 Popcorn chicken or Mini corndog Macaroni/cheese, roll Green beans, okra Fruit choice, milk choice Tuesday, April 24 Lasagna/meat sauce or Turkey/cheese sandwich Tiny whole potatoes Brown beans, roll Wednesday, April 25 Cheeseburger or Manager’s choice Baked beans, fries Cheeseburger trimmings Fruit choice, milk choice Thursday, April 26 Pizza or Tuna salad sandwich Batter bites, Lima Beans Fruit choice, milk choice Friday, April 27 Manager’s choice Fruit choice, milk choice

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, April 23 Chicken nuggets or Manager’s choice Mashed potatoes, roll Green beans, salad bar steamed seasoned squash

Tuesday, April 24 Taco soup or Corndog Fries, salad bar Baby carrots, pickle spears Shredded cheese cup Cookies Wednesday, April 25 Cheeseburger or Ham/cheese sandwich Baked beans, fries Thursday, April 26 Manager’s choice Friday, April 27 Manager’s choice

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Also, Stuffed crust pizza served as pizza choice each day Monday, April 23 Manager’s choice Tuesday, April 24 12th-Grade Student Council menu choice Wednesday, April 25 11th-Grade Student Council menu choice Thursday, April 26 10th-Grade Student Council menu choice Friday, April 27 9th-Grade Student Council menu choice


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Miss Relay for Life Pageant The Miss Relay for Life Pageant was held March 17 at Williams Auditorium and sponsored by Clayton Bank & Trust.

In the Baby Miss category, age 0-11 months, winners were, from left: Brooklyn Woods, queen; and MariRyan Howell, first runner-up.

In the Wee Miss category, age 12-23 months: Illyria Barnes, queen; and Kamora Clark, first runner-up.

In the Tiny Miss category, age 2-3 years: Gabriella Klado, first runner-up; and Paige Whitley, queen.

In the Little Miss category, age 4-6 years: Brentlee Burgess, first runner-up; Brooke Thomas, queen; and Blakely Wilson, second runner-up.

In the Petite Miss category, age 7-9 years: Emma Lawson, first runner-up; Briley Thomas, queen; and Ali Stephenson, second runner-up.

In the Junior Miss category, age 10-12 years: Alysa Newland, first runner-up; Milyn White, queen; and Mekenze Wilson, second runner-up.

In the Teen Miss category, age 13-15: Macy Payne, first runner-up; Sara Park, queen; and Hannah Hilton, second runner-up.

In the Miss Teen category, age 16-18: Madison Hurst, first runner-up; Taylor Fortune, queen; and Ashtyn Walker and Courtney Newsom, second runners-up.

By Sarah Hibbett It’s TCAP time in Chester County! Our students and their families and our faculty and staff have worked extremely hard this year to prepare for THE big week! TCAP will be given on Monday, April 23 through Thursday, April 26. A snack will be provided for students each day, and other incentives will be given to encourage their hard work. We deeply appreciate Mr. Mike Niesler and the

Dixie Youth Board of Directors for postponing games that were scheduled during TCAP week. The games that were originally scheduled for Monday, April 23, and Tuesday, April 24, will be moved to Saturday, April 28. This is another great example of how our community cares about our children and promotes excellence in our school system. A huge “THANK YOU” goes out to the FreedHardeman University baseball team for visiting CCMS, and to FHU head baseball coach Jonathan Estes and his wife, Ashley, for arranging this special treat for our students. The players visited every classroom and talked to the students about the importance of school, and

emphasized the three R’s that we focus on at CCMS: “Be Responsible, Be Respectful, and Be Ready to Learn.” The FHU athletes shared examples of how the three R’s are important in their lives as students who are juggling the tasks of getting a college education while practicing and playing ball. Please remember the following dates: April 16-20 – 4-H Week April 20 – TCAP Pep Rally April 23-26 – TCAP Week May 1 – 4th-grade orientation at 3:30 p.m. or 6 p.m. for those who are currently in 3rd-grade May 10 – Day Talent Show May 11 – Field Day May 11 – Night Talent Show


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

FOR SALE NOTICE — Sweetlips Greenhouses NOW OPEN for our 18th Season! Growing 60 Varieties of Tomato Plants, including Heirlooms. Also Pepper and Vegetable Plants, Flowers, Garden Seed, Hanging Baskets, Herbs and More! Open M-F 8-6, Sat. 8-4, and Sun. 12-4. We Close for Severe Weather. 3705 Sweetlips Road, Sweetlips, TN. 989-7046. www.sweetlipsgreenhouse.com. (4C) FOR SALE!! BOOK NOW!! Amish Strawberries. $19 per Flat Starting Monday, April 16th. Country Market 731-608-3345. (TFC)

FOR SALE – A Perfect Home for a Single Senior Who Likes to Live in the Country. House is a 1 BR Efficiency Cabin built by the Amish. Features 1 ½ Acre Lot, Circle Drive, Front Porch, Rear Deck, Storage Barn, Garden Spot, Nice Trees. House is All New, will come with Stove, Fridge, Washer, Dryer, and Amish Style Décor. Ready in About 4 Weeks. Only $39,000! Call 608-2225. (TFC) FOR SALE —- Land and Lots. No Restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. Chester County 731989-4859. (TFC) ANNIVERSARY SALE Who said you couldn’t buy a new home in the 20’s anymore! New, 2 Bedroom Homes Starting at $25,950. New, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Homes Starting at $29,950.

VOTED BEST OF SHOW —Spacious 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath $44,500. All Homes Delivered & Setup on your Lot with Central Air. Hurry! Limited number at these prices. CLAYTON HOMES SUPERCENTER OF CORINTH. Hwy 72 West —- ¼ Mile West of Hospital. (TFC) FOR SALE – Nice Home for Beginners or Retirement. 3 BR, 2 BA, Ready to Move In, On 5 ½ Acres of Good Gardening & Animals, Good Road Frontage. Must See To Appreciate. $62,000 or Make Offer. Call 731-608-1328 or 865-659-1019. (50P) COMPLETE LIVESTOCK DISPERSAL – OVER 350 HEAD. Registered Black Angus. Sunday, April 29, 1:30 PM, Lone Oaks Farm, 10000 Lake

Hardeman Road, Middleton, TN. Call for Catalog 731-376-0011. (51P) FOR SALE – 1993 Mobile Home, 16 x 80, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Kitchen Fully Equipped, Washer & Dryer. $11,000. Call After 5 p.m. 731-989-4418 or 731-610-4563. (50P) IRIS FOR SALE $2.00 Each. Call 610-5791. (51P) KING SIZE BED FRAME FOR SALE – “Athens” Oak King Size Bed Frame, Solid Frame with Decorative Iron Rail on Headboard, $400 OBO. Call or Text 731-343-1594 if Interested. (50P) FOR SALE – Clearance Sale on Display Homes. Save $$ on your

PAGE 7-B

New Home. Double & Singlewides available. Large Selection. WINDHAM HOMES, Corinth, MS. 1-888-287-6996. (TFC)

(52P)

FOR SALE BY OWNER – Mobile Home To Be Moved. In Good Condition and Fully Furnished. 1991 Sunshine, 14 x 60 With Axles and Wheels. Central H / AC, 2 BR, 1 BA, LR, Kitchen. $10,000. Call 731-6104341 for Appointment. (50P)

FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC)

HAPPY JACK MANGE MEDICINE promotes healing and hairgrowth to any mange, hot spot, or dandruff on dogs and horses without steroids! HENDERSONCHESTER COOP. 731-9894621. www.happyjackinc.com.

FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. $1,500. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR RENT

FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 bath, outbuildings, 3 acres in city. $525 / month. 1035 Forest. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 2 BA Mobile Home on Private Lot. 5 Minutes South of Henderson. Available April 1st. Call 731-983-5336. (TFC)


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Public Notices NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of: Delena Bain Notice is hereby given that on the 5th day of April, 2012, Letters of Administration in respect to the Estate of Delena Bain, who died May 31, 2008, were issued to the undersigned by the Probate Court for Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk of the above named Court within the four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or of the posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from decedent’s date of death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This is the 5th day of April 2012 Joyce Hart Co-Administrator Shirley Alexander Brien Co-Administrator By Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of: Earnest Pickett Notice is hereby given that on the 9th day of April, 2012, Letters of Administration in respect to the Estate of Earnest Pickett, who died August 15, 2011, were issued to the undersigned by the Probate Court for Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk of the above named court within the four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or of the posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from decedent’s date of death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This is the 9th day of April 2012 Bessie W. Pickett Administrator By Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Default having been made in payment of the indebtedness described in the Deed of Trust executed by Scotty Adkison, to Craig R. Allen, Trustee, dated February 5, 2008, and duly recorded on April 11, 2008, in Book 313, Page 701 of the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, and assigned to Mid-State Trust IV on April 16, 2008 and recorded on May 12, 2008, in Book 315, Page 122 and further assigned to Wachovia Bank NA formerly known as First Union National Bank on March 9, 2009 and recorded April 6, 2009 in Book 326, Page 716, the holder of the Note described therein, having declared the entire balance due, payable and unpaid, the undersigned as Trustee, will at 11:00 a.m. C.D.T., on May 14, 2012 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Chester County Courthouse in Henderson, Tennessee, in bar of the equities of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other rights and exemptions of every kind, the following improved real estate in the City of Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: Property described in the above-referenced Deed of Trust with Tax ID. 33-12.05 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1126 Tucker Cv. Henderson, Tennessee 38340 Said sale will be made as stated above, free from the homestead and dower rights of the makers of said Trust Deed and in bar of the rights and equity of redemption as provided for therein, and subject to restrictions, conditions, easements and encumbrances superior to said Deed of Trust which affect the above-described property. Said Deed of Trust recites title to said real estate as unencumbered, except as aforesaid, but the sale will be made as Trustee, only, without covenants of warranty or seisin, and subject to any unpaid State, County and City taxes and other assessments or other liens, easements or restrictions. OTHER MONETARY LIENS OF RECORD: NONE The Trustee, at the instructions of the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust, shall have the power to adjourn the foreclosure sale to a date certain without further advertisement. CRAIG R. ALLEN, Trustee 801 Broad Street, Third Floor Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402 (423) 265-0214

IN THE CHANCERY

COURT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE In Re Adoption Of: Audrey Lane Urig, Born 8-11-1994, Wanda Lorene Scott, James L. Scott, No. 2010-Aa-21 and Shannon Michelle Urig Mcearl, Petitioners V. John Doe, Defendant, Notice In the Chancery Court of Chester County, Tennessee at Henderson, Tennessee: It appearing from this bill in this case, which is sworn to, that John Doe cannot be personally served with process. It has been ordered that publication be made for four consecutive weeks in The Chester County Independent a newspaper published at Henderson, in Chester County, Tennessee required the said Respondent to serve an answer upon Lloyd R. Tatum, attorney for the Complainant, whose address is P.O. Box 293, Henderson, TN 38340, on or before the 13th day of June, 2012, next, and make defense to the bill filed in the above cause, which seeks Adoption of Audrey Lane Urig, or otherwise said bill will be taken for confessed and cause proceeded with ex parte. The mother, then known as Shannon Urig, an E-1 in the United States Navy, was 5’7” tall and had blond hair and blue eyes an weighed approximately 110 lbs. The child was conceived at an unknown location between October and December, 1993 at the naval station at Mayport, Florida, or at the Orlando Training Center, Orlando, Florida with one of several unknown white male officers of the U.S. Navy. The name of said unknown white male is not now known. Rule 13 of the Rules of the Supreme Court of the State of Tennessee provides that if a defendant is indigent and unable to afford to hire counsel in a parental rights termination proceeding, a lawyer may be appointed to represent said defendant upon the defendant’s request and at no cost to said defendant. Any appeal of the trial court’s final disposition of the complaint or petition for termination of parental rights will be governed by the provisions of Rule 8A, Tennessee Rules of Appellate Procedure, which imposes special time limitations for the filing of a transcript or statement of the evidence, the completion and transmission of the record on appeal, and the filing of briefs in the appellate court, as well as other special provisions for expediting the appeal. All parties must review Rule 8A, Tenn. R. App. P., for information concerning the special provisions that apply to any appeal of this case. This the 11 day of April, 2012. Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master of said Court Lloyd R. Tatum Attorney for Petitioners

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on May 3, 2012 at 10:00AM local time, at the South door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Phillip Lanzo and Gina Gursky, husband and wife, to Larry F. McKenzie, Trustee, on July 16, 2007 at Record Book 303, Page 355; conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee, all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Owner of Debt: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and encumbrances of record: Described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, more particularly described as follows:First Tract: Beginning at a stake in the Southern margin of a field road which is the boundary line between this tract of land and the property of Luther Kilzer; runs thence with the Southern margin of said field road in a Northeastern direction 434 feet to a stake in the Southern margin of the same; runs thence with the severance line of Marcle Southeast 108 feet to a stake; runs thence with the severance line of Marcle in a Southwestern direction 216 feet to a stake in the center of a ditch; runs thence with the center and meanderings of said ditch in a Northwestern direction to the place of beginning. Second Tract: Beginning at a stake in the Southern margin of a field road, a corner of Luther Kilzer; runs thence South with the Western line of Luther Kilzer 142 feet to a stake; runs thence West with the Northern severance of Katherine Marcle 1330 feet to a stake; runs thence North with the Eastern sever-

ance line of Marcle 400 feet to a stake in the Southern margin of the above-mentioned field road; runs thence East with the Southern margin of said field road 1457 feet to the place of beginning; the above description including a tract of land conveyed to James Parker and wife Sharon Parker by Archie Marcle and wife Katherine Marcle by deed of record in Deed Book 55, Page 350 in the Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee. Third Tract: Beginning at a stake, said stake being North 22 degrees East 39-9/25 rods, a Northwest corner of Jimmy Marcle’s 11.58 acre tract; thence with a fence South 68 degrees and 20 minutes East 46-10/25 rods to a stake and corner of fence; thence North 59 degrees and 25 minutes West 47-20/25 rods to a stake on a fence; thence with said fence South 17 degrees and 35 minutes West 7-12/25 rods to the place of beginning. Fourth Tract: Beginning at a stake and red oak on the West edge of a road; runs thence North 2 degrees West 9-22/25 rods to an iron stake, the Northwest corner of Wesley A. Marcle’s 1 acre tract; thence North 66 degrees and 30 minutes East 18-7/25 rods to an iron stake, the Northeast corner of Wesley A. Marcle, and being a corner of Jimmy Marcle; thence with Jimmy Marcle’s line North 59 degrees and 45 minutes West 7-17/25 rods to a post oak; thence North 52 degrees and 30 minutes West 14-14/25 rods to a stake; thence North 35-5/25 rods to the Northwest corner of Jimmy Marcle’s 11-58/100 acre tract; thence with Jimmy Marcle’s 15-37/100 acre tract, North 22 degrees East 39-9/25 rods to the Northwest corner of said tract, also being the Southwest corner of James P. Parker’s tract; thence with Parker’s West line North 17 degrees and 35 minutes East 712/25 rods to an iron stake; thence North 17 degrees East 23-18/25 rods to an iron stake with post oak pointer on Rowsey’s line; thence with Rowsey’s line South 87 degrees West 79 rods to a stake, hickory red oak; thence South 1 degree and 50 minutes East 129 rods to a stake, red oak, hickory and poplar pointer; thence with the Kilzer land North 86 degrees and 10 minutes East 53-6/25 rods to the beginning. THERE MAY BE A MANUFACTURED HOME LOCATED UPON THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT BE PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID PROPERTY. IN THE EVENT IT IS DETERMINED THAT THE MANUFACTURED HOME IS NOT PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE PROPERTY, IT SHALL BE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PURCHASER TO UNDERTAKE ANY AND ALL LEGAL STEPS NECESSARY TO OBTAIN TITLE TO SAID MANUFACTURED HOME. Street Address: 150 Proctor Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 Parcel Number: 048-006.00 Current Owner(s) of Property: Gina Gursky Lanzo The street address of the above described property is believed to be 150 Proctor Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117 have been met. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office may be a debt collector. This may be an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP 555 Perkins Road Extended, Second Floor Memphis, TN 38117 Phone (901)767-5566 Fax (901)761-5690

lines.com (TnScan)

FOR RENT FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, 3 acres. 765 Cemetery Road, Enville. $495. United Country Realty 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Executive home: 4 bedroom, 3 bath, LR, DR, den, office. 1008 Norchester. $1,200 / Month. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom mobile home, living and family rooms, covered porch. 1070 Old Finger Road. $425 / Month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 BR Mobile Home. Leave Message or Text 608-1019. (50P) LEASE TO OWN – 3 BR, 2 BA House on 2 Acres in Chester County. Call 435-9303 for Details. (51P) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom house, carport, appliances. $600 / month. 730 Mifflin Ext. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes and Houses in Lexington. Weekly With Utilities or Monthly Without. Call 731-968-9689. (51P)

HELP WANTED NEED EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPER – Must have very recent franchise hotel experience, at least 3 years with proper references. Must apply in person between 10 a.m. & 3 p.m. No Phone Calls, Please. Americana Inn ~ 550 Sanford St. ~ Henderson, TN 38340. (50C)

MISCELLANEOUS TURF OBSESSION Landscaping, Lawn Mowing. FREE Estimate! Call 731-989-3560. (51P) FREE ESTIMATES! Are you looking to remodel your kitchen or bathroom? Want someone who has over 15 years experience and guarantees all work? Then call Todd at 731-394-7529 or Trish at 731-394-8990. T L & W Construction. Follow us on Facebook to see photos of our work. (50P) CROSSROADS Lawn Care and Tree Service – Home Maintenance Plus Pressure Washing – Insured in Workers Comp. Call 731616-1565 or visit www.crossroadslawncare.c om (11P) CHILDCARE ~ Available in my home. Stay-at-home mother, 18 years experience and also daycare experience. References available. Call anytime ~ Jamie 731-6167040. (51P) LAWN SERVICES and Bush Hogging. Reasonable Rates, FREE Estimates. Call 731-608-1768, Please Leave a Message if No Answer. (51P)

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TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan)

NEW TO TRUCKING? YOUR new career starts now! * $0 Tuition Cost * No Credit Check * Great Pay & Benefits. Short employment commitment required Call: (866) 604-6119 www.joinCRST.com (TnScan)

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DRIVERS REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available 1-800-9927863 ext.158 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan)

DRIVERS - CDL-A SOLOS & Teams Need More Miles? We’ve got them! Top pay for experience! More Pay w/Hazmat! 800-9422104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.TotalMS.com (TnScan)

SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Call Today! Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 877-3631287 (TnScan) DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 877-603-8325 (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 93 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 23 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) ADOPTION: DEVOTED FAMILY promises to cherish your child unconditionally. Financially secure; expenses paid. Your child is already loved in our hearts! Susan/Patrick 1-877-266-9087. www.susanandpatrickadopt.com (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7890198 24/7 or w w w. P a y 4 D i v o r c e . c o m (TnScan) Feeling older? Men lose the ability to produce testosterone as they age. Call 877-768-8004 for a FREE trial of Progene- All Natural Testosterone Supplement. (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson

25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! at TMC Transportation! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Job ready in 3 weeks! Local CDL Training! 1-888-407-5172 (TnScan) ROADRUNNER DRIVING ACADEMY, CLASS A CDL Training, Student Placement Assistance, Free Housing, $3500.00 Tuition, 3 Week Program, 106 Industrial Park Rd., Sharon TN 38255, 731-456-2008 (TnScan) REWARDING CDL-A CAREER WITH Averitt! 37 cpm w/1+ Year’s Experience! 4-12 Months Experience? Paid Refresher Course Available. 888362-8608 or AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) OWNER OPERATORS WANTED REGIONAL Paid Mileage or Percentage FSC Paid All Miles for Mileage Drivers, $1500 Sign On Bonus Frontier Transport 800-991-6227 w w w. D r i v e F o r F r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS - NEW FREIGHT FOR Refrigerated & Dry Van lanes. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. CDLA, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan)

CLASS-A FLATBED DRIVERS$ - Home Every Weekend, Run S.E. US Requires 1Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & pay Up To .39/mile Call 800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan)

DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A-CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! New pay increases coming soon. Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) OWNER OPERATOR $2,500 SIGN-ON Dedicated Runs, Class-A CDL, Ask about our Greatcare plan options for: Healthcare, Retirement, Wellness & Business Svcs. 866-566-2133 driveforgreatwide.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 888-531-2970 (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

(TnScan) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Call Today! Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 877-3631287 (TnScan) DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 877-603-8325 (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 93 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 23 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) ADOPTION: DEVOTED FAMILY promises to cherish your child unconditionally. Financially secure; expenses paid. Your child is already loved in our hearts! Susan/Patrick 1-877-266-9087. www.susanandpatrickadopt.com (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7890198 24/7 or w w w. P a y 4 D i v o r c e . c o m (TnScan) Feeling older? Men lose the ability to produce testosterone as they age. Call 877-768-8004 for a FREE trial of Progene- All Natural Testosterone Supplement. (TnScan) TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR FUTURE - Driving For a Career - 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS INC New Skill Pay and Top Out Pay. Call Today To See If You Qualify! Currently hiring OTR Drivers Good equipment, home most weekends Option to run the weekends, good benefits which include BlueCross /BlueShield insurance, Assigned trucks and dispatchers, APU’s in every truck Free retirement program and more. Call 800-684-9140 x2 or visit us at www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) DRIVERS

REGIONAL

FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available 1-800-9927863 ext.158 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Now! at TMC Transportation! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Job ready in 3 weeks! Local CDL Training! 1-888-407-5172 (TnScan) ROADRUNNER DRIVING ACADEMY, CLASS A CDL Training, Student Placement Assistance, Free Housing, $3500.00 Tuition, 3 Week Program, 106 Industrial Park Rd., Sharon TN 38255, 731-456-2008 (TnScan) REWARDING CDL-A CAREER WITH Averitt! 37 cpm w/1+ Year’s Experience! 4-12 Months Experience? Paid Refresher Course Available. 888362-8608 or AVERITTcareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) OWNER OPERATORS WANTED REGIONAL Paid Mileage or Percentage FSC Paid All Miles for Mileage Drivers, $1500 Sign On Bonus Frontier Transport 800-991-6227 w w w. D r i v e F o r F r o n t i e r. c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS - NEW FREIGHT FOR Refrigerated & Dry Van lanes. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. CDLA, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800648-9915 (TnScan)

Page 9-B

got them! Top pay for experience! More Pay w/Hazmat! 800-9422104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.TotalMS.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: NO EXPERIENCE? CLASS A-CDL Driver Training. We train and Employ! New pay increases coming soon. Experienced Drivers also Needed! Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) OWNER OPERATOR $2,500 SIGN-ON Dedicated Runs, Class-A CDL, Ask about our Greatcare plan options for: Healthcare, Retirement, Wellness & Business Svcs. 866-566-2133 driveforgreatwide.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED INDEPENDENT Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the trucking business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 888-531-2970 (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan)

NEW TO TRUCKING? YOUR new career starts now! * $0 Tuition Cost * No Credit Check * Great Pay & Benefits. Short employment commitment required Call: (866) 604-6119 www.joinCRST.com (TnScan)

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Call Today! Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 877-3631287 (TnScan)

DRIVERS - CDL-A DRIVE WITH Pride Up to $3,000 SignOn Bonus for Qualified Drivers! CDL & 6mo. OTR exp. Req’d. USA Truck 877-521-5775, www.usatruck.jobs (TnScan)

DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 877-603-8325 (TnScan)

CLASS-A FLATBED DRIVERS$ - Home Every Weekend, Run S.E. US Requires 1Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & pay Up To .39/mile Call 800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan)

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 93 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 23 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan)

DRIVERS - CDL-A SOLOS & Teams Need More Miles? We’ve


Page 10-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, April 19, 2012

Chester County Independent 04-19-12  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 04-19-12

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