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Local Weather

March 4, 2010

8

145th YEAR - NO. 43

SERVING CHESTER COUNTY SINCE 1865

75 CENTS

Seaton named ‘Citizen of the Year’

See page 5-A

Drs. Linder, McCarver to wrestle for charity Dr. Timothy Linder and Dr. Brian McCarver have agreed to be a part of Memphis Wrestling this Friday night, March 5, at CCHS. The doctors are lifelong fans of Memphis Wrestling and offered their participation to help the Carl Perkins Center. “I would love to be body slammed by The King,” said McCarver of the chance to face Jerry “The King” Lawler in the ring. “I watched Memphis Wrestling every Saturday when I was a kid and I’m a big fan. I have an autographed picture of him in my office.” Linder said that he, too, was a childhood fan and has followed the careers of Lawler and Superstar Bill Dundee. “I have great respect for both of these men and what they’ve accomplished in the ring,” Linder said. “I’d jump at the opportunity to face them. I know that we’ll get killed, but it will be something I’ll always remember.” To date Friday’s card includes The New Nature Boy Kevin White, Su Yung, Grand Master Sexay Brian Christopher, Phil Hickerson, Spellbinder, Matt Boyce, Steve O, Patrick Smith, Albino Rhino, Michael Gilbert, Koko B Ware and Cody Melton. In the Final Confrontation, Jerry the King Lawler will face Superstar Bill Dundee in the ring. See DOCTORS, Page 3-A

High School Musical – Jr. set for stage Thurs. thru Sat. Every one has dreams. Some dream of being the star basketball player, or a member of the science decathlon. Others muse about playing the lead in the school musical. But what happens when these dreams collide or rival cliques get involved? That is the premise of Chester County Middle School’s theatrical production of a recent Disney television movie “High School Musical.” The local show is being called “High School Musical Jr.” Performances are set for 7 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, March 4-6, at Williams Auditorium at the Middle School, 634 East Main St. Admission is $10 for reserved seats, $8 for adults, and $5 for students and children. Lead actors for the presentation are Abbie Bayless, Drew Greenway, Jonathan Vince, Mary Emilee Lussier, Candice See DAVIDSON, Page 3-A

A very surprised and humbled Dwain Seaton accepted one of the year’s top honors at last Tuesday night’s Chamber of Commerce Annual Membership and Awards Banquet. Seaton was named ‘Citizen of the Year’ among his family, colleagues and peers and said it was hard to put into words to explain how he felt to receive this recognition. “It was such a great honor,” exclaimed Seaton. “It was a tremendous surprise, my wife was just as surprised as I was.” Seaton said the award was particularly special because his father was once a ‘Citizen of the Year’ recipient several years ago. Ironically, Seaton said he is most proud to be a citizen of Chester County, because of the way community members band together in times of need. Seaton, himself, is always willing to step up to the plate when charity comes into play, most See CHAMBER, Page 11-A Photos by Holly Roeder, Independent

Above: An emotional Dwain Seaton accepts the Citizen of the Year at the Henderson/Chester County Chamber of Commerce annual Membership and Awards Banquet. Presenting the award is Neal Smith.

Left: Chamber members Jason and Dawn Bramblett representing the Bramblett Group await to be served by Chamber board members. The Bramblett Group unveiled a new promotional video of Henderson and Chester County that will be posted on the internet to highlighting the community.

CCHS HONORS Top Ten percent announced Megan Fowler and William Bishop were named last week as the Valedictorian and Salutatorian of the Chester County High School Class of 2010. Fowler leads the top 10 percent of the class with an average of 98.6818, just edging out Bishop’s average of 98.6170. Fowler, Bishop and the rest of the Class of 2010 will graduate May 17 in ceremonies scheduled for Freed-Hardeman University’s Loyd Auditorium. The complete list of top 10 percent, followed by their grade average, include: No. 16 – Paul Gaters, 95.8444 No. 15 – Peyton Stewart, 95.8863 No. 14 – Cody Cooper, 95.9512 No. 13 – Katelyn Woodham, 95.9574 No. 12 – Theresa Jones, 95.9772 No. 11 – Hollie Shea Garland, 96.2619

No. 10 – Katie Hall, 97.0952 No. 9 – Mallory Hudson, 97.4489 No. 8 – Faranah Manjiyani, 97.5306 No. 7 – Patrick Haltom, 97.5813 No. 6 – Stephany Doss, 97.5957 No. 5 – Shelby Henson, 97.6136 No. 4 – Katelyn Dee, 98.0000 No. 3 – Whitney Frix, 98.0238 No. 2 – William Bishop, 98.6170 – Salutatorian No. 1 – Megan Fowler, 98.6818 – Valedictorian Fowler is the daughter of Danny and Maureen Fowler. She plans to attend the University of Mississippi and major in either English or journalism. She has been very active in clubs and activities such as Beta Club, FCCLA, Academic Decathlon, Eagles’ Eye, National Honors Society, Mu Alpha Theta and Future Teachers. Fowler also is co-

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Megan Fowler, left, and William Bishop have been named valedictorian and salutatorian respectively of the 2010 graduating class at Chester County High School. writer of the CCHS News column in the Chester County Independent. One of her favorite moments from school was her recent participation in the Academic

Decathlon, helping the team to a state second place finish for the second straight year. “I can honestly say that nearSee TOP TEN, Page 2-A

Decathlon team named second in Tennessee For the second year in a row the Chester County High School Decathlon team has ranked among the best across the state, placing second in the Tennessee Academic Decathlon competition, advancing them to the national online competition that will be held in April. The state competition was held Feb. 18-20 at Austin Peay University. “This team has shown tremendous work as they have prepared for the competition and many students and staff have aided in support for our representative team,” remarked Principal Troy Kilzer. “We are very proud of their accomplishments and their position to represent See DECATHLON Page 3-A

Photo by Julie Pickard, Independent

Pictured are, front row, left to right: Lindsey Elkins, Lydia Creech, Sunny Lloyd, and Piper Davis. Middle: Grace Lowery, Megan Fowler, Morgan Williams, Kristen Rice, Micah Mitchell, and Brandon Macario. Back: Molly Plyler (coach), Josh Moore, Timothy Williams, Grey Davis, Elliot Debons, and Daniel Busby.


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

The top 10 percent of the graduating class of 2010 at Chester County High School were announced last week. In numerical order they include, sitting from left: Megan Fowler, William Bishop, Whitney Frix, Katelyn Dee, Shelby Henson, and Stephanie Doss; and back row: Patrick Haltom, Faranah Manjiyani, Mallory Hudson, Katie Hall, Hollie Shea Garland, Theresa Jones, Katelyn Woodham, Cody Cooper, Peyton Stewart, and Paul Gaters.

From Page 1-A

Top 10 ly each and every person in my life has touched or inspired me in some way,” said Fowler. “From my parents with the example of love and honesty they set, to my grandparents with their wisdom and love for life, to my teachers with their patience and the joy they draw from children, to my friends who simply make me laugh and make the struggle of life that much brighter, I find inspiration in each of these pieces in my life, and I would not be the person I am without each and every one of them.” Bishop is the son of

Doug and Donna Bishop. He plans to attend the University of Tennessee at Martin to major in Animal Science, with a focus on pre-vet. He then plans to complete a Veterinarian Medicine degree. His favorite high school memories include FFA trips and competitions, and winning the Washington D.C. Youth Leadership trip last summer. “My parents and grandparents have always encouraged me to do my best and have been very supportive,” said Bishop. He also mentioned his late aunt, Dolores Rowlett, as well as Robert Crouse, as individuals who have inspired him to do his best in all his endeavors.

Submitted photo

New car unveiled at HPD Henderson Police Chief Tommy Davis stands before the newly unveiled black and white patrol unit. Davis said one of the unit’s was ‘on its last leg’, it was time to purchase a new one, and it was perfect timing to change the overall look. “Most people were calling us post office cars, because of the stripes. Several departments are now going back to the black and white colors again.” In time, he hopes to change the entire fleet over to this ‘throwback’ look. “That’s going to take a lot of years to do it. We can only buy a couple of cars every couple of years, and sometimes we can’t even do that.” Davis said the unit was purchased through the drug fund and emphasized, “it didn’t cost the taxpayers a dime and it is not a painted car, but a new one.” He noted a new unit has not been purchased since 2007.

CRIMESTOPPERS Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons involved in the theft of 17 calves on Old Jacks Creek Road Monday, Feb. 22. If you have any information about this and or any other crime.

989-2787


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

Connor, Watkins, added to HPD payroll Staff Writer

CONNOR

WATKINS

academy in Cleveland, which should narrow down the estimated costs a bit, however, he will have to challenge the post test at the Donelson academy, and if he does not pass, will still have to go through the 10-week course. Connor is scheduled to leave for his training soon. Connor is a Chester County native, a 1994 Chester County High School graduate, and a prior Henderson business owner. He is married and has two children. “I’ve always had an interest in law enforcement,” said Connor. “I look forward to working in my hometown and serving the people of Chester County, helping the other guys make it safe, a place where people want to live.” Watkins also is a native Chester Countian, a 1998 CCHS graduate, and a 2005 graduate of Lambuth University. Most recently, Watkins was employed as a probation officer for adult felons in Jackson. “I’ve always had a desire to do law enforcement,” he said. “I’m most looking forward to being

an influence in my hometown and being able to make a difference in my hometown. There’s something special about that. Chief Davis reported choosing Connor and Watkins from among 36 applicants, more than twice as many as usual. “What I look for, I strive to hire local people who grew up here, have family here, have ties here, who I think want to stay here,” said Davis, “because it is so tough to replace somebody,” (referencing the estimated $35,000 cost of a new hire’s first year). As far as the two who made the cut, “They’re both local people who grew up in Chester County. “I know their families. Both are good Christian people,” continued Davis. “I think they’re both levelheaded guys. I look forward to working with them.” Importantly, Davis added, the new officers will not be strangers; much of the community already knows them. “We’re moving toward community oriented policing,” he said, “serving the community.”

Benefit for Cagle family was impressive By Holly Roeder Staff Writer

The yard sale and bake sale held Saturday to benefit the family of fallen Henderson Police Captain Dennis Cagle was deemed a huge success. A large portion of the

community turned out to donate, shop and visit, and local businesses joined in as well. A special thanks goes to the businesses and all those in the community who donated both items and their time for the ben-

efit, and especially to the First United Methodist Church, who donated the use of their facilities for the sale. The Henderson and Chester County community has once again proven to be very generous.

Love In Stereo launches Sunday Love In Stereo, a budding nonprofit group based in Henderson, will host a launch party beginning at 7 p.m. Sunday, March 7, at 122 Main Street (formerly The Village Eatery). The free event will provide information related to

From Page 1-A

Musical

By Holly Roeder Brandon Connor and Weston Watkins are the new faces on Henderson’s police force, hired as a result of a department shortage at the end of 2009. Ronnie Faulkner left the department to work with TBI in the summer, and the department lost Captain Dennis Cagle from injuries sustained during a December attempted burglary. The absence of these officers created two positions, said Henderson Police Chief Tommy Davis. Davis approached the Henderson Board of Mayor and Aldermen early in January to request permission to hire two new officers, indicating two open positions, the deployment of one officer in the National Guard, and a very strong possibility of losing two additional officers to other positions in the near future. Davis explained the importance of hiring sooner rather than later, to give ample time to train new officers. “I can’t hire them and put them on the street tomorrow, as in other departments,” Davis said, detailing the amount of training involved before an officer is ready to work solo. Typically, he added, that takes about a year, and measures to about $35,000 in training costs, salary and benefits, for each new officer. In Watkins’ case, he has already completed a certified law enforcement

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the Haiti relief efforts, and how those interested can be involved. There will be a coffee bar, snacks and live music by Joel Rakes (www.joelrakes.com) and Shaky Voices (www.myspace.com/shaky voices).

For more information about Sunday night’s event or to learn how to be involved, log on to www.loveinstereo.com Love In Stereo is about people using creativity and innovation to make a difference in the world.

Barber, Christian Tucker, Ben Phillips, Houston Holdren, Chase Stanford, Bryan Braden, and Macy Morrison. The show is influenced by the stories in West Side Story and Grease, and written by Peter Barsocchini. The local production has a cast of 39 students out of more than 70 that auditioned. Directors are Ricky Mitchell and Jeff Lewis. Patrons, however, beware – if you get a program with a star on it, you may become a star in the show as well.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Students from Chester County Middle School prepare for their upcoming theatrical production of High School Musical Jr. Performances are scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday through Saturday at Williams Auditorium.

Puppy personals Henderson City Animal Control currently has several dogs available for adoption, including two beagles, a large brindle puppy, a female terrier, a male Shih Tzu or Lhasa Apso, and more. Due to the city’s animal control euthanasia policy, all dogs held at the facility have a limited time to find a home. The adoption fee is $35, $25 of which is refundable upon confirmation of having your pet spayed or neutered following adoption. The other $10 covers vaccinations at Henderson Animal Clinic. If you would like more information regarding any of these pets, call 989-4628.

From Page 1-A

Doctors The doctors’ involvement in Friday’s event is being kept tightly under wraps, but their patients, friends and family won’t want to miss this once-ina-lifetime chance to see the duo wrestle. “We invite everyone to come out and help us raise money for the Carl Perkins Center,” added Linder. “We won’t disappoint you!” Tickets are $8 in advance, $10 at the door, and are available at the Carl Perkins Center and NEO Products. All proceeds from Memphis Wrestling will benefit the Exchange Club – Carl Perkins Center for the Prevention of Child Abuse. Doors will open at 6 p.m. with bell time at 7:30. Concessions will be available. Call 989-7222 for more information.


Life & Style

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FRED AND BETTY (DAVIS) TUCKER

Tucker 50th anniversary Fred and Betty Tucker will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on March 6, 2010, with family, hosted by their children at the Tucker family home. They were married March 6, 1960, at the Luray Methodist Church in Luray. Their marriage has

been blessed with three children, Virginia Doris of Jackson, and Paul Tucker and Michael Tucker, both of Luray. They have three grandchildren, Bowen, Skylar and Scarlett Sage of Jackson. Fred retired in 2001 from the Department of Transportation in Jackson.

On our prayer list are the family of Joye Dismuke and Teresa Colbert and her family. Belated birthday greetings to Tressie Cooper on March 2 and Clayton Skinner on March 3. Happy birthday to Alyson Plunk and Eli Davis on March 6; Sandra Wells, J.C. Emerson and Bill Morrison on March 7;

Wes McPeake, Amy Eaton and Will Murley on March 9; Troy Hemby on March 12; Shondra Murley and Clint Murley on March 14; Jo Price on March 16; Virginia Morrison and Rhonda Tidwell on March 17; Hannah Hemby on March 19; Mae Marsh on March 20; Mary Beshires on March 21; Linda Skinner on March 24; Denise Davidson on March 26; Joanne Osborne on March 27; and Seth Wade on March 28. Call Wanda Cook at 989-3724 or Celia Murley at 989-5300 to report news, and Betty Cooper at 989-7835 to rent the center.

If you see any of these folks, wish them a happy birthday, Sue Harwell on March 4; Pierce Haley on March 6; Dalton Busby and Emily Weatherington on March 8; Hallie Keen on March 9; and Campbell Grisham on March 10. Congratulations to Danny and Jan Johnson who will be celebrating 30 years of marriage on March 8; and to Harold and Carolyn Wright who will also be celebrating an anniversary on March 9. If anyone in the Enville community is looking for fresh farm eggs, that are low cholesterol, you can find brown or green-tobluish-green Araucanian eggs about 1.1 miles off 22-A south at 1260 Carroll Road; just look for the white Fresh Farm Eggs sign. Araucanian eggs, sometimes called Ameraucanas or plain Easter Eggers are better known as the Easter egg. The Enville Volunteer Fire Department will be having their annual Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser along with a cakewalk at 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 13, at the community center. There are reports that six radical groups have been operating in many of our churches. They have been identified as Bin

Sleepin, Bin Arguin, Bin Fightin, Bin Gossipin, Bin Complainin and Bin Missin. Their leader, Lucifer Bin Workin, trained these groups. The plan is to come into the church disguised as Christians and work to discourage, disrupt and destroy. However, there have been reports of a seventh group. A small group, known as, Bin Prayin. Bin Prayin is the only effective counter force in the church. Unlike the other groups, the Bin Prayin group does not blend-in with whatever and whoever comes along. Bin Prayin does whatever is needed to uplift and encourage the Body of Christ. We have noticed that the Bin Prayin group has different characteristics than the others. They have Bin Watchin, Bin Waitin, Bin Fastin, Bin Testifyin, and Bin Longin for their Master, Jesus Christ to return. These groups have been spotted by those who have Bin Goin. As always, remember to pray for the sick, our troops and their families. I hope we choose compassion over indifference; forgiveness over vengeance, and remember to count our blessings and have hope in spite of our circumstances. If you have an event coming up, a birthday, anniversary, or any news, call me at 989-0212 or email me at Envillecommunitynews@ yahoo.com or wildgoosenews@aol.com.

Never leaving their bed a lucky few enjoyed a piano concert over the phone. Playing by ear the caller played two songs on her keyboard for me. After hearing the first song and anxious for the next, it was like playing, “Name That Tune.” Wonder how many Murdell Barker, Betty Dunivan, Jack McAdams, or others guessed correctly, but I’m sure they applauded Loy Jones as she entertained on a Saturday night. For me it was a good-night hug bringing a tender smile - almost as good as momma tucking me into bed with a added kiss. Loy’s mother, Margie Carolyn Bailey McAdams, was musically inclined and raised five kids that could do the same - Ray, Hugh, Gayle, Clyde and Jim toetapped while Toby, Jack, Ruth, Betty and Loy played instruments and sang. As I drifted off to sleep I had a song in my heart, just like Lawrence Welk desired. Thanks for the memory, Loy. It still lingers, so I felt the urge to share the news. Sheila Lott Ryals is raving about all the great information in her Unity Cemetery Book, “Gone, But Not Forgotten.” In her research, genealogist Glenda Nobles Parchman has found unmarked graves, some of which are Ryals! She researches death certificates and adds vital information with hopes of helping families find their lost loved ones. Her dedication instills you are right, whether you think you can or think you can’t! It’s all in the attitude and effort. Glenda thought she could help

others find loved ones, so she went digging. She leaves a legacy that shows success! Glenda finished two cemetery books (a Unity and a City of Henderson), and now has excitedly started a Friendship cemetery book. When she walks the cemetery and finds initials, she wants to know the name for the initials. If years are listed, she digs for month and day. She wants to know their birthday. Glenda knows every person buried had a story. She tried hard to tell it with facts found. Every paid obit contains vital information that can be passed down from one generation to the next. You pay for what you get. Aren’t our loved ones worth it? Isn’t everyone due a monument? Pops Grill opened last week. Ricky and Kathy Tignor Belew and Don and I headed toward Mifflin. Preston Wade earned a good tip for serving hot delicious foods to us. We wish Mark Daniel and his staff the best in their new location. Guess Damon and Tina Ross, Tommy and Regina Tignor, and Danny and Janice Goodwin haven’t heard of “eating in moderation.” Blackberry cobbler doesn’t count in moderation, does it? A year ago, we had 6-13 inches of snow on the ground, so you couldn’t plant an early garden, but so far only snow flurries are predicted this week followed by higher temperatures. Spring gardens are just around the corner. Happy thoughts are being sent to Marsheila Lott; she was able to attend church. Jane Bailey Morris says Bruce Morris is almost ready to go back to work, and Lance Bailey’s dog needs petting while Lance is recovering. Don’s dogs don’t need petting, while he’s back piddling with his tractor, I take care of that.

I hope everyone had a nice week and enjoyed the better weather recently. It has been a hard week for the Goffs. They were able to operate on Granny’s leg Wednesday, but they almost lost her just as they finished. She is stable at this time. Please keep her in your prayers and we appreciate all the prayers, phone calls and visits from my pastor Bro. Paul Roaten and his wife Betty. I want to apologize to Jeremy and Nicole Evans. Their anniversary is March 1 and I didn’t get it in last week. I hope you had a wonderful anniversary. Happy birthday Cecil Murley on March 5 (no he didn’t have a birthday already this year). I had the wrong date reported to me and he corrected me at church the next Sunday. Hope you have a great day. Please continue to remember our sick this week: Jean Murley, Winna Knipper, Gloria Blankenship, Larry Privett, Angela Benfield, Teresa Colbert, Earl Mainers, Peggy Weaver, Raymell and Jim Barnett. Please add Jeremy Evans’ dad, Dennis Evans, to you

list. I talked to Jeremy this morning and he is having a serious medical situation. We wish him the best care and recovery. My cousin Jacky Melton in Chicago has been in really bad health lately. He is doing well in a rehab facility now. Nancy Turner, niece to Doris Siler and Winna Knipper is in serious condition and we want to remember her. She lives in Kentucky. Jean Murley is doing much better and I talked to Gloria Blankenship’s daughter and she is doing well right now. If you have anyone to add to our prayer list, please call me. Remember our shut-ins and elderly. Give them a call or visit. I’m sure they would appreciate it. Also, remember the families that have lost loved ones, may God be ever at your side and grant that each new day will bring its gift of brighter hours. The Ladies Sunday School Class at Bethel Baptist Church has been invited to a brunch at Betty Roaten’s home at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, March 6. If you are part of this class, come and enjoy the fellowship and good food. Quote of the week: These, then, are my last words to you: Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living. And your belief will help create the fact. – William James Have a great week. Call me at 983-0522 with your news, sickness, birthdays, anniversaries, events, etc.

Thursday, March 4, 2010

BEN AND JUDY FLATT

Flatt 50th anniversary Ben and Judy Flatt recently celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. They were married Jan. 25, 1960, at Crossville and came to Henderson, where Ben continued at Freed-Hardeman as a student. They moved into an apartment on Barham Avenue. They left Henderson later in 1960, but returned in 1987 to work with the Henderson

Church of Christ. They continue to live at the corner of Hill and Second, where they have lived for over 22 years. Their children and their families honored them in Nashville the last weekend in January, and they traveled to Pigeon Forge for a few days. The Roby Church of Christ recently honored them with a meal and reception.

Congratulations to Fred and Betty Tucker, who are celebrating 50 years of wedded bliss on March 6. They have lived in the same house all their married life and raised three children. We wish them many more happy years together. Others celebrating anniversaries are Charles and Gayle Williams and Kenneth and Amy Williams on March 6; Jackie and Lola Butler on March 8; and Christopher and Crystal Reddin Wilson on March 10. Congratulations to Nicholas Norwalk. He won first place in form and

second place in sparring in the Kentucky Karate Tournament. On our prayer list this week are Carroll Williams, Bruce Morris, Pam Priddy, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Joanne Joyner, Jean Latham, Faye Carroll, Johnny Hayes, John Kent Sells, Thelma and Lisa Peddy, Phillip Ross, Michael Norwalk, Nancy McCaskill, Joanne Sells, Steve Morris, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Bill and Shirley Gaddy, Carolyn Potter, Donna Crowe, Dianne Wells, Judy Cagle, Maurine Foster, Gathel Latham, Guy Austin, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Birthday greetings to Kenneth Hooper and Tony Hooper on March 5; Joe Lynn Joyner and Jenny Wise on March 6; Brittany Ross and Sammy Ross on March 7; and Lloyd King, Mark Goodson and Gayle Ellington on March 11.

The Sweetlips Store will be open on Sundays from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. beginning March 7. Hopewell Baptist Church will hold revival services March 5-7. There will be different speakers each evening as well as special music. Services will be at 6:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. On Sunday, there will be no Sunday school or morning worship; services will begin at 2 p.m. with a meal to follow. Faith Baptist ladies prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m. March 8, at the home of Barbara Hall. Faith is also announcing its upcoming revival March 21-24. Services will be at 6 p.m. March 21 and at 7 p.m. all other nights. A potluck meal will follow the Sunday service. Bro. David Westmoreland will be the speaker. Everyone is invited. The men’s Bible study will be at 7 p.m. in the loft on March 11 and 25. Way to go Eli Newsom and Makayla Pickett, who

made all A’s. On the prayer list are Sally Gorman, Maurine and David Foster, Shirley Cox, Dorthy Parks, Scott Lewis, Raymell Goff, Judy Shostrand, Lori South, Morgan Segerson, Nancy Kinchen, Mary and Butch Russell, Betty Stout, Grace Moody, Mitzi Crouse, Junior Miller, Marcel Northcott, Teresa Colbert, Chrissy Busby, Cindy Piechocki, Jean Pickett, William Wade, Nell Terrell, and our military and their families. Remember the youth that will be heading to the youth conference, Betty Cooper, Sadie Todd, and Madison and Olivia Springer. Happy birthday wishes to Brenda Moore, Jim Alexander, Pauline Sims, and Jeania Jordan on March 4; Grace Goodwin and Benji Huckaby on March 5; Harold Tedford and Rocky Hopper on March 6; Jessica Huckaby and Addison Tedford on March 7; Sydney Kennedy and Dalton Busby on March 8; and Wes McPeake on March 9. Happy anniversary to Jerry and Brenda Moore on March 4; Bill and Lynne Connor, Ron and Angie Petty, and Sonny and Patsy Newsom on March 7; and Ray and Sherry Cook on March 8.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

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Chester County Independent archives, February 26, 1960

CCHS Honor Students are left to right: Kathy Bailey, Wilbur Goodwin and Johnny Malone, 97.5; John Stewart, 97.28; Donna Harrison, 97.14; Donna Myrick, 97.06; Back row: Lou Nell Johnson, 95.53; Polly Bingham, 94.9; Ann Rowsey and Diane Hall, 94; Doug Enoch, 93.69; Jerry Moore, 93.33; Elaine Latham, 93.28; and Jane Perkins, 93.03.

Only Yesterday ‘John M. Hall Has Prize Hen Pictured On Market Booklet’ From the files of the Chester County Independent February 29, 1940 “Factory Contract Awarded Johnson’s On $41,000 Bid” “Acceptance of a bid of $41,000 by the Johnson Lumber Company of Henderson for construction of the War Memorial factory building here was voted at a special meeting of the joint city-county factory committee. “It calls for construction of a steel frame, hard-brick factory and warehouse 109 by 420 feet to be erected on the Braden tract along Franklin near Mill Street, for the occupancy by a Salant & Salant work shirt plant. Work is expected to start just as soon as weather permits, with the building due to be finished about mid-summer.” “Boys’ Basketball Team Ends Season With Tourney Loss” “The Chester County High School boys’ basketball team went down to defeat before Lexington Thursday afternoon in the opening round of the Fourth District High School boy’s basketball tournament at Jackson, being eliminated from further play by a score of 29 to 13.” “F. F. A. Boys Awarded Silver Belt Buckles At Friday Party” “Presentation of silver belt buckles to outstanding Future Farmers of the Chester County F. F. A. Chapter featured a joint party of F. F. A. members and Home Economics Club girls at the high school gymnasium last Friday night. Nearly 125 were present to enjoy the program. “The prize awards, made by the Chester County Fair Association went to Clyde Smith of Hickory Corner as the outstanding Future Farmer of this year’s senior class, to James Gilbert of Sardis as junior class ‘tops’ in this respect, and to George Seaton of New Friendship as most outstanding Future Farmer in the sophomore class.” “Stork Feathers” “Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Barton of Enville are the parents of a daughter, born Saturday, weighing 8 ½ pounds. She has been named Wanda Rose. “Born Feb. 17, to Mr. and Mrs. Noel Owen of Rives, Mo., a daughter named Patsy Jo Ann. The mother was, before her marriage, Miss Era Massengill of the Shady Hill community. “Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Siler of the Masseyville community are the parents of a baby boy, born Feb. 15.” March 3, 1950 “Henderson Girls Are Champs Of Third District; Boys Win Over Pinson In Exciting Tilt” “Following an exciting, thrill-a-minute game against the Bemis Kittens, the Henderson Eaglettes were recognized as the champions of the Third District. A tall, slender, gold and white trophy with the inscription, ‘District Champions, 1950’ was presented to the captain for the night, Cardale Russom.” “John M. Hall Has Prize Hen Pictured On Market Booklet” “The February issue of the ‘Tennessee Market Bulletin’, just issued from Nashville carries quite a lot of interesting information on Tennessee poultry and the front cover of the well-printed paper has a picture of the prize winning New Hampshire 300 egg hen raised and owned by John M. Halll, owner of Hall Poultry Farm of Henderson. “An interesting story in the Bulletin reveals that the poultry industry in Tennessee is a $50,000,000 per year business.” “Honor Roll Given For Local School” “Twelfth Grade” “4 A’s: Doris Barton, Sue Canaday, Nancy Johnson, Jo Ann McAdams, Virginia Mitchell, Bobby Phillips, Jane Rankin, Patsy Stewart, Peggy Stewart, Oneidia Tucker and Rachel Victory. “Combination A’s and B’s: Cornis Beshires, Virginia Colbert, Joy Caraway, Mary Cook, Dorothy Cooper, Bernice Cox, Gaynell Davis, Billie Jane Hooper, Jeffie Hutcherson, Clint Jones, Mary Alice Phillips, Jo Ann Ray, Thelma Rhodes, Earlene Tucker, Basie Ray Woodruff, Lenell Stanfill. “Eleventh Grade” “4 A’s: Cornelia Ellis, Dan Guinn, Jackie Johnson, Nancy Naylor and Charlotte Peddy. “Combination A’s and B’s: Jo Anne Brewer, Royce Hunter, Gene Ledbetter, Billie Melton, Murray Milliken, Bobbie Sue Newman, Cardale Russom, Mary Tidwell, Jean Wallace, Pat Weaver. “Tenth Grade” “4 A’s: Alene Chalfin, Nancy Dismuke, Joe D. Etheridge, Gene Horn, Jerry Siler, Billie Lou Tarpley and Johnnie Morrison. “Combination A’s and B’s: Crystal Armour, Sylvia Armour, Joyce Bishop, Edward Casey, Mildred Cooley, Karen Garner, Sue Dell Orr, Imogene Ross, Dossie Talley, Joe Talley, Mary Frances Tucker, Bobbie Wilkins and Billy Naylor. “Ninth Grade” “4 A’s: Jerry Gibson, Jean Massey, Martha Phillips, James Wheatley. “Combination A’s and B’s: Thomas Casey, Katy Edgin, Nancy Holland, Ella Frances Hornsby, Marcia Ann Jones, Curtis Lynch, Bobbie Jo Maness, Sarah Frances Naylor, Thelma Patterson, Sylvia Plunk, Patsy Plunk, Kenneth Stumph, Bobby Tucker, McNeva Victory, Lenis Seratt, Jimmy Williams, and Donald Dees.” March 4, 1960 “Our Eaglettes and Bradford Won in Opening Games” “The TSSAA Girls Region 8 Tournament began at the CCHS gymnasium Tuesday night of this week with wins by Henderson and Bradford. In the first game, the Henderson Eaglettes had an easy time defeating Adamsville 58-33. Jan Bray led her teammates with 34 points. Benson added 17 and Barber 7. “Henderson and Bradford will meet in semi-finals Thursday.” “Bon Tres Club Hears Kessler” “Mrs. Fletcher Owen was hostess to the Bon Tres Club and a number of guests at her home on Wednesday afternoon.

FCE Club News By Billie Noles Club Reporter

The Chester County Family and Community Education Clubs met for Winterfest 2010 on Friday, Feb. 26. Welcome and announcements were given by Amy DeLeonRogers, University of Tennessee FCS Extension Agent in Chester County. The devotional was given by Betty Quarles of the Deanburg FCE Club, and Judy Flatt, president of the Town and Country FCE Club. Rogers demonstrated making a colorful and tasty Cranberry Cashew Salad. Flatt gave an interesting food demonstration on preparing Santa Fe Soup. Recipes for both were distributed to those present. An enjoyable luncheon consisting of soup, salad and dessert was served to members and guests. After the meal, Marilyn Maxwell from Southwest Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation

presented an informative program called Seven Steps for Energy Efficiency. She encouraged everyone to complete an Energy Right Home Evaluation questionnaire from Tennessee Valley Authority. Upon receipt of the question-

naire, each person will receive a free kit by mail from TVA which includes items to help lower energy use in the home and save money. Winterfest was a profitable and enjoyable day for FCE Club members in Chester County.


Opinion

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Thursday, March 4, 2010

CAPITOL HILL REVIEW Lawmakers continue to examine budget; General Assembly sees opportunity to ‘return to basics’ Lawmakers continued their examination of the budget this week, amid reports that revenues continue to slide. The state has seen revenues decline for 20 straight months, which is a new record. Despite the dismal numbers, legislators remain focused on their goal of a balanced budget that keeps priorities in place. Based on tentative numbers, the total budget will shrink this fiscal year by roughly $1.5 billion. Analysts say that the state’s sales tax revenue — the primary source of revenue — has dropped sharply over the last 20 months.

“Clawback Payment” could save millions The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced that Tennessee could keep some of the “clawback payments” associated with prescription drug coverage. The temporary change means the state could save roughly $120 million, going a long way in softening the blow of the Governor’s call for $200 million in reductions from TennCare. Some Tennesseans that are a Medicaid-waiver enrollee are also enrolled in Medicare. The federal government requires the state to contribute some of its TennCare funds in lieu of paying twice for the benefits that both programs cover, called “clawback payments.” Temporarily, the federal government will be forgiving those payments, thus saving the $120 million. Tennessee joined several other states in asking the federal government to suspend the payments, because the federal stimulus aid for Medicaid meant the state would have paid less for prescription drugs in the next two budgets. At the end of last week the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services agreed, leading them to temporarily suspend the payments.

Subcommittee approves ‘Pass the bottle’ legislation The ‘Pass the Bottle’ legislation appeared before the House Local Government Subcommittee on Wednesday, eventually winning the approval of the committee. The bill passed with a 5-3 vote. House Bill 2744 would ban open containers in the passenger areas of vehicles, and make a violation a misdemeanor, subjecting a guilty party to a fine. Currently, no driver may consume an alcoholic beverage or possess an open container of such while operating a motor vehicle, but passengers may consume alcohol. The sponsor argued this policy invites drivers to drink as long as there is a passenger to which they can “pass the bottle.” The bill was filed last year and experienced resistance in subcommittees then. Opponents expressed concern over the ability of sober drivers to take friends home who are drinking, and also regarding sporting events, such as University of Tennessee football games. Despite these objections, the sponsor said the state must reform its drunk driving laws. In 2008, an estimated 11,773 people died in drunk driving related crashes. Alcohol-related crashes in the United States cost the public an estimated $114.3 billion in 2000, including $51.1 billion in monetary costs and an estimated $63.2 billion in quality of life losses. People other than the drinking driver paid $71.6 billion of the alcohol-related crash bill, which is 63 percent of the total cost of these crashes. Having won approval from the Local Government Subcommittee, the bill now faces the full House State and Local Government Committee and is scheduled to be heard on March 2.

Lawmakers continue to study traffic cameras; Attorney General opinion released The controversy over traffic cameras continues, and legislation that would place a two-year moratorium on the cameras is being held in the Transportation Committee until April 1. The bill would prohibit city and county governments from signing new contracts for a two-year period, giving the Tennessee General Assembly time to study the issue further. The state’s Attorney General also released an opinion this week that said the cameras are constitutional. A lawmaker asked the Attorney General to decide whether or not the cameras violate the Sixth Amendment’s confrontation clause, which allows the accused to confront any witnesses against them. The AG opinion stated, in response, “The confrontation clause embraces testimonial statements. Photographs are not testimonial statements.”

In Brief… House Bill 2349 would require any member of the General Assembly convicted of a felony related to public office to forfeit their state health benefits. The measure would allow family members who may be covered under the plan to continue utilizing it provided they continue paying the premiums. The bill advanced from the House State and Local Government Committee this week and will next be heard in the Budget Subcommittee. Because the legislation will not cost the state any money, bill sponsors are optimistic it will advance through Finance, Ways and Means. House Bill 3007, which encourages state government efficiency through innovative techniques and public input, moved through the committee system this week and could be set for a vote on the floor as early as next week. House Bill 270, requiring citizenship status to be proven prior to registration to vote was passed out of the House State and Local Government Committee this week.

How humble cast iron skillets helped America

There are many things you can do with a wellseasoned cast iron skillet. Heaven forbid that a skillet be used to do violence. It was never intended as a weapon of war or domestic dispute. Rather, a family’s skillet was second in importance only to the old inherited Bible with its “begets” and birth dates, the quilts sewed by great-great grandmothers and the flintlock Kentucky rifles wielded by pioneers moving west in the 18th and 19th centuries. This great nation might never have been settled without skillets. It is a shame that cooking utensils have never received a share of the credit for America’s settlement and development. Oh, we know of the Bowie knife and its namesake, but most of the long-bladed cutters of this style were never wielded in rage or for self defense – unless you count field dressing a deer or gutting a fish. Like most tools, knives and other utensils were ubiquitous for their many humdrum but vital purposes. Simply put, the ax was as important as a rifle, nails of equal value to bullets and skillets probably more decisive than brass cannon in deciding the future of an infant nation. Now, I admittedly cast a wide net because it’s necessary to include kettles and Dutch ovens, griddles, teapots and roasting pans in my historical praise of cast iron cookware. Taken as a class of utensils, the skillet must be considered the primary representa-

tive. Somewhere rusting in the Rocky Mountains, I am certain, there is a skillet of historical significance that fed and succored a family of pioneers for whom starvation was more of a threat than Sioux scalpers or grizzly bears. From the corn pone and fried bison meat the skillet produced might have come one of the men or women who tamed the frontier. If I wax eloquent, please forgive me. My own favored cast iron skillet was a wedding gift from a wise elderly woman of Appalachian heritage. She knew that electric toasters and Crock Pots would eventually be cast on the junk pile, but a skillet would last. My bride’s eyes, when she beheld the dull metallic gray – and unseasoned — pan, betrayed disappointment. She was, after all, a “city girl” to whom the significance of the gift was slow in dawning. But she soon saw the light. Neither of us today – after 37 years of marriage – can point to anything in the house and declare with certainty that it was a wedding present, except the cast iron pan now black and slick with oils from countless dishes fried or baked to perfection. The inner surfaces of the skillet are smooth and without pits, ebony of almost mirror sheen. Running a finger across the pan’s inside bottom is like stroking a sleek black cat. If you press the fingertip to your tongue, it

would not taste of metal but of past feasts – the oil of life, of meats and breads and nourishment prepared and served with love. But I digress. The purpose of this essay is not to lecture on the proper seasoning of cast iron cookware nor the recipes and dishes that can be produced in such humble utensils. Nay, I need to address a more important issue: the proper cleaning of a black skillet after use. Of all the sins that can be committed, washing a cast iron skillet in soapy water is the worst. Write this advice down and keep it safe: never, ever let soap touch the Olympian surface of your skillet. You will expose its Achilles heel and relegate a heroic utensil to an early death. Your cast iron skillet, whether used to scramble eggs, make Mexican cornbread or fry spring crappie fillets, needs on only water and elbow grease for cleaning. Scalding water in fact, is just the ticket. The metal surface is permeable; it breathes. Don’t suffocate it with soap or cleansers! In the old days, a skillet was treated reverently when dipped in a stream and scraped with sand from the creek. Today, the best practice is to rub the pan with paper towels under the hottest water you can

stand. Make sure every scrap of exposed grease or food debris is scoured away, and spend the next 15 minutes rubbing and drying, rubbing and drying. At the end of the process, your skillet will be clean but with a memory of the last meal. That’s the trick. Never let your cast iron pan forget what sizzled or stewed previously. This racial memory makes a skillet your family heirloom. Long after you are gone, children and grandchildren will share those unforgettable meals of their ancestors in traces of flavor and teases of aroma. Finally, when storing a well-rubbed cast iron skillet, make sure it is given a light wipe with Canola oil (actually, lard is better and in keeping with history, but not politically correct). No better place exists to keep your skillet than the oven. Both my grandmothers kept their metal cooking utensils in the oven. It was handy storage, protected from humidity, dings, dents and scratches. Plus, the oven is a fitting residence for such amazing pieces of cookware. There’s history in that metal, seared by the strength of family, love and the use food and meals as touch points with the individuals who preceded us.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT February 22, 2010 The bull statue in front of Dry Creek Mini Ranch, 1206 Industrial Drive, was reportedly vandalized. According to the report the bull was found damaged, leaning over, propped against some posts. The bull is valued at $2,500. February 23, 2010 A speaker was reportedly stolen from a carport on Sand Ave. According to the report, two white males were seen by a witness putting the speaker into a vehicle and leaving. The car was a light gray

two-door sports car with a spoiler. The speaker system was a Phoenix Gold custom built for two 10inch speakers, and included an amplifier. The system was valued at $600. February 26, 2010 A car hood was reportedly vandalized. The vehicle, parked at Hillview Manor, was allegedly found damaged around 11 a.m. Friday. February 27, 2010 James Gregory Taylor, 46, Selmer, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI) and speeding. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,000 bond. The front cap of a 2002

Free Colorectal Screening The Kirkland Cancer Center at JacksonMadison County General Hospital, along with West Tennessee Healthcare, is offering a free colorectal cancer screening at participating pharmacies in the area. From March 1-12, free hemoccult kits will be available at the hospital pharmacy as well as many other pharmacies in surrounding towns. For more information, call 541-5087 or visit www.kirklandcancercenter.org.

Quarterback Club meeting The Chester County Quarterback Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 4, at Chester County High School.

Lawler and Dundee to headline Memphis Wrestling On Friday, March 5, Jerry “The King” Lawler and Bill “Superstar” Dundee will headline Memphis Wrestling at Eagle Gym. Also on the ticket are Henderson’s own The New Nature Boy Kevin White, Dirty Doug Gilbert, Brian Christopher and The Spellbinder. Wrestlers will also come out to meet the fans and sign autographs during an intermission. Tickets are available at NEO Products and the Carl Perkins Center. Call 989-7222 for more information.

FUMC Pancake Breakfast The First and Trinity United Methodist Men will host their annual Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, March 6, at Wright Hall, First United Methodist Church. Tickets are $4 per plate and include all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage, orange juice and coffee. Carry-outs are also available.

Hee-Haw 2010 The McNairy County Hee-Haw Show will be held Thursday through Saturday, March 46, at the McNairy Central High School Little Theater, and Friday and Saturday, March 1213, at the Marty in Adamsville. All shows start at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for ages 7-12, and free for age 6 and under. All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society.

S-10 Chevrolet Blazer was reportedly stolen from Ken Kitchen’s Used Cars, 472 S Church Ave. The assembly was bright red in color, and valued at $500. March 1, 2010 Thousands of dollars in cash and several other items were reported missing from a residence on W Main St. Items missing included $4,600 in hundred dollar bills, two white gold wedding rings, and a deed to a house. The rings were valued combined, at $1,400. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT

Distribution for food will be from 10-11 a.m. on Saturday, March 20.

American Legion meeting The American Legion will have its regular monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 18, at the Chester County Senior Center. Veterans’ issues will be discussed. Members and veterans are invited to attend. For more information, call Commander Tommy Prince at 989-3384.

SWHRA to distribute Commodities Southwest Human Resource Agency will distribute commodities from 8 a.m. to noon on Thursday, March 25, at the National Guard Armory. No certificates will be accepted after noon. Each person will only be allowed to pick up two households. Pick up your commodities within your assigned time according to the first letter of your last name as follows: A-H 8-9 a.m.; I-P 9-10 a.m.; Q-Z 10-11 a.m. If you are unable to pick up at your assigned time, pick up between 11 a.m. and noon.

Grief Support meeting Shackelford’s Sunrise grief aftercare program will host the free monthly grief support meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 25, in the rear dining room at Southern Oaks Assisted Living in Henderson. The theme will be “How Do We Replace a Mate?” Everyone is invited.

Carl Perkins Dinner and Auction The 11th Annual Carl Perkins Center Dinner and Auction is scheduled for Saturday, March 27, at Freed-Hardeman University’s Sports Complex. Corporate tables are $500, and Friends and Family tables are $250 with all seating eight people. Included in each package is dinner, silent and live auctions and entertainment by internationally acclaimed comedian Stephen Bargatze. To purchase tables or for more information, contact Event Coordinator Janeane Moore at 989-7222.

SWTDD Public Hearing

Bunny Run Car Show

The Southwest Tennessee Development District/Area Agency on Aging and Disability will hold a public hearing on the FY-20112014 Plan of Action at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 9, in the conference room at 27 Conrad Drive, Suite 150, in Jackson.

The 18th annual Bunny Run Car Show is scheduled for April 16-18 with hundreds of street rods, custom cars and trucks from 1972 and prior on display at Jackson Fairgrounds Park. There will also be vendors and a swap meet area at the car show. The Bunny Run is open to the public from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday, April 17, and from 810:30 a.m. on Sunday, April 18. There will also be vendors and a swap meet area at the show. Admission is $4 per person, kids 12 and under are free or with a donation to the Underprivileged Children’s Christmas Shopping Spree. All the gate proceeds go to the charity event that allows needy children in Jackson and Madison County to go on a Christmas shopping spree for gifts and clothes they otherwise would not be able to afford. For more information, call 427-1677 or visit www.bunnyrun.org

St. Jude Mathathon LIFE in Henderson home-schoolers will be participating in the St. Judy Mathathon until March 12. They will be taking sponsors for the math problems they solve to help the children at St. Jude.

Enville VFD Spaghetti Dinner The Enville Volunteer Fire Department will have its annual spaghetti dinner fundraiser at 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 13, at Enville Community Center.

Pink Princess Pageant The Pink Princess Pageant to benefit Relay For Life will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 13, at Tigrett Middle School in Jackson. The pageant is open to girls ages 0-21 and the registration fee is $35 prepaid, $45 at the door. This includes all side categories except Most Photogenic, which is optional and an additional $10. A queen and four alternates will be chosen in each age group. The girl who raises the most money for Relay For Life will be crowned Relay For Life Sweetheart. For entry forms or more information, contact Karley Bond at 731616-5350.

Angel Food Ordering Angel Food is a great way to save money and get good food. Angel Food ordering for March continues until noon on March 15 at the First United Methodist church office in Henderson. You can order online at angelfoodministries.com or at the Gleaners’ House during normal business hours. Online ordering may end early. Cash or food stamps are required for Gleaners’ or church orders. For complete menu and ordering information, go to angelfoodministries.com.

Kindergarten Registration Kindergarten registration for Head Start students will be held 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 20-21, at the Head Start Building at 1495 White Ave. Kindergarten registration will be held from noon to 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 22, and from 8 a.m. to noon on Friday, April 23, at North Chester School cafeteria at 186 Luray Ave. A child must be 5-years old by Sept. 30, 2010, in order to be eligible for kindergarten for the 2010-11 school year. Documents needed during the registration process include the Tennessee Immunization Record or Child Health Record, physical exam record (dated no more than one year prior to the start of school on Aug. 3), birth certificate (official copy), social security card, and proof of residence (example: water bill, electric bill, or rent receipt). For more information about registration, call Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 989-5134 or Ethel Wade at 989-8143. If you have not returned a survey indicating that your child is eligible for kindergarten, call the Board of Education office at 989-5134.

February 24, 2010 5:06 p.m. – 110 E University St., FreedHardeman University, Tyler Hall, hair spray activated alarm. February 27, 2010 1:26 p.m. – 355 University St., FreedHardeman University, Sewell Hall, belt on washing machine was smoking. 8:38 p.m. – 124 E University St., FreedHardeman University, Porter Terry Hall, hair straitener set off alarm. February 28, 2010 2:42 p.m. – 553 Church St., Hiway Wrecker, car on fire. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT February 23, 2010 Stephanie Rene Douglas, 28, Jackson, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $250 bond. February 25, 2010 Annette Brister, 51, 2190 Plainview Road, was arrested and charged with failure to pay child support. She was released from the Chester County Jail on her own recognizance. Sheldon Lloyd Henry, 22, Jacks Creek, was arrested and charged with violation of parole. He is being held in the Chester County Jail. February 26, 2010 Johnny A. Lipford, 30, Finger, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdemeanor. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $700 cash bond. John Matthews, 40, Pinson, was arrested and charged with possession of a schedule II controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of the seatbelt law. He was released from the Chester County Jail on his own recognizance. Bradley Ryan McGill, 25, Pinson, was arrested and charged with possession of a schedule II controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of the open container law. He was released from the Chester County Jail on his own recognizance. February 27, 2010 Anthony Freeman Farley, 55, 1170 Talley Store Road, was arrested and charged with retaliation of a past action and

coercion of a witness. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $2,000 bond. Michelle Denise Rinks, 39, Milledgeville, was arrested and charged with driving on a cancelled/revoked or suspended license. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $300 bond. March 1, 2010 Vincent F. Locklear, 42, 9520 State Route 100 E, was arrested and charged with failure to pay child support. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $350 cash bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT February 24, 2010 1:12 p.m. – 215 Montezuma Road, rubbish fire, Station 1 Volunteer Fire Department responding. February 28, 2010 4:02 p.m. – 765 Carl McGill Road, grass fire, Hearn Chapel Volunteer Fire Department responding. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No Reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT Derick Hurst, Hornsby, pled guilty to driving while license suspended. He was ordered to pay court costs and fines. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Robbie Orlandis Herron, Jr., 20, Jackson, was found guilty of aggravated burglary. He was sentenced to six years in a TDOC facility, at 30 percent release eligibility, receiving credit for pretrial time served, all suspended, and supervised by Community Corrections. He was ordered to pay $500 in fines plus court costs, and ordered to complete 60 hours of community service. He was also found guilty of aggravated

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assault and sentenced to six years in a TDOC facility, at 30 percent release eligibility, receiving credit for pretrial time served, all suspended, and supervised by Community Corrections. He was ordered to pay $500 in fines plus court costs, and ordered to complete 60 hours of community service. Counts are concurrent to each other, and consecutive to a Madison County case. Justin D. Tidwell, Jr., 30, 270 Bolton Lane, was found to be in violation of probation. His probation was revoked and reinstated, sentence to begin anew. He was ordered to successfully complete long-term inpatient treatment, and to stay in jail until a bed is available. Dionti M. Trice, 26, was found to be in violation of probation. His probation was revoked and he was ordered to serve the original sentence imposed, of eight years, receiving credit for time served on this case only. Chris Doyle, 35, 4810 Clifford Road, was found to be in violation of probation. His probation was revoked and he was ordered to serve the original sentence imposed, of 11 months and 29 days, plus 11 months and 29 days, receiving credit for time served on this case only. Zachary Keith Pusser, 20, 8530 Enville Road, was found to be in violation of a deferred probation. He was removed from judicial diversion, sentencing is scheduled for 10 a.m. March 30.


Obituary/Religion

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Obituaries Calvin Denbow Date of Death – Feb. 28, 2010 Calvin Ray Denbow, 52, of Henderson, died Feb. 28, 2010, at his home in the Hickory Corner community. Funeral services were held March 2 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel with Ron Davis officiating. Burial followed at Chester County Memory Gardens. He was born in Indiana and grew up in Henderson, the son of Charles L. Denbow and the late Edna Faye Hodge Denbow. He graduated from Chester County High School in 1976. He married Jan Edgin in 1978, and they made their home in Chester County. Immediately after high school, he began work at International Paper and worked there for 31 years before retiring as a supervisor. He was an active member of the Sanford Hill Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Jan Edgin Denbow of Henderson; two sons, Derrick Denbow (Stephanie) of Lexington and Justin Denbow (Brittney) of Henderson; his father, Charles Denbow of Henderson; a brother, Steven Denbow of Lexington; a sister, Rita Stack of Henderson; and four grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his mother, Faye Hodge Denbow, and a brother, Jerry Denbow. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) March 4, 2010

Joye Hunter Dismuke Sept. 16, 1941 – Feb. 24, 2010 Joye Hunter Dismuke, 68, of Henderson, died Feb. 24, 2010. Funeral services were held Feb. 27 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Johnson Chapel. Burial followed at Trinity Cemetery at Henderson. She was born in Chester County, the daughter of the late Thomas Edward and Dorothy Pauline Ridley Hunter. She graduated from Chester County High School in 1958 and Freed-Hardeman College. She married Fred Dismuke in 1966. Mr. Dismuke died on Feb. 22, 2000. She was a teacher at Chester County Middle School. She was a member of Trinity United Methodist Church in Henderson. She is survived by a son, Kevin Lynn Dismuke (Betsy) of Bradford; two grandchildren, Jeff Dismuke and Chasity Dismuke, both of Henderson; step grandchildren, Bubba Graves and Bethany Graves; and a step great-grandchild, Addy Graves. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) March 4, 2010

Iva Ellis Remillard Date of Death – March 2, 2010 Iva Ellis Remillard, 87, of Henderson, died March 2, 2010. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, March 5, at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Johnson Chapel. Burial will follow at Milledgeville Cemetery. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) March 4, 2010

Church News Revival Services Renewing the Revival In Our Time with Lee Stoneking and Dr. James Hughes will be at 7:30 p.m. March 11-14. There will be day sessions Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday with children’s revival going on simultaneously with Mike and Vickie Oliver at The Springs at Bethel, 3591 Main St. at Bethel Springs. For information, call 645-0086 or visit www.thespringsupc.com

Gospel Singing

Ivan Parker will be in concert at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 12, at Englewood Baptist Church in Jackson. A love offering will be received.

Sign Language Classes The Bethel Springs United Pentecostal Church is offering free Sign Language classes from 6-7 p.m. on Thursdays from March 18-April 22, with a silent supper on April 29. It is suggested that you purchase the book Signing Illustrated -The Complete Learning Guide by Mickey Flodin. For more information, call the church at 934-4755 and leave a message.

Diamond Grove Church of Christ honors minister The Diamond Grove Church of Christ in Beech Bluff honored their minister, Al Price of Henderson, for his 50th anniversary of preaching. Price started his work at this same congregation on Feb. 28, 1960, and returned in 1994. In those intervening years, he preached for Churches of Christ in Texas, Mississippi and Tennessee. He was recognized for his years of service at a special fellowship luncheon on Feb. 28. His sermon was titled, “Some Things I’ve Learned in 50 Years of Preaching.” He is married to Josephine Price.

It is not indigestion It may feel like indigestion, perhaps it subsides, then develops a sensation like a squeezing motion that travels up the spine, as it continues up and under the sternum, on up the throat and then into both jaws. The tightening or pain in the jaws is said to be one of the signals of an AMI (Acute Myocardial Infarction). What causes grief is that these symptoms, including nausea, dizziness, and anxiety is often misinterpreted, misdiagnosed, as other than AMI and a person may be sent home. Symptoms in females are much more subtle. Fortythree percent of women studied report no chest pain. Among females ages 25 to 44, AMIs are the third leading cause of death, among ages 45 to 64, the second cause of death. Many more women than men die of their first (and last) AMI because they didn’t know they were having one and commonly mistake it as indigestion, take some over the counter antacid medication and go to bed, hoping they’ll feel better in the morning when they wake up, which doesn’t happen. ‘’Call 911.’’ In addition, if you can, take an aspirin. Ladies, time is

First Lady Day The Harvest Time Church of God in Christ family will celebrate its first annual First Lady Day, giving honor to Marboline Cherry, at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 21. The church is located at 414 Beechwood St. in Henderson. For more information, call 438-0539 or 787-0232, or email szaaboj@yahoo.com

Free Food Pantry A free food pantry is set up for the needy only from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month, at Montezuma United Methodist Church.

short! Do not try to drive yourself to the ER, get someone to drive you. Do not assume it could not be a heart attack because you have a normal cholesterol count. Research has discovered that a cholesterol elevated reading is rarely the cause of an AMI (unless it is unbelievably high and/or accompanied by high blood pressure). AMI’s are usually caused by long-term stress and inflammation in the body, which dumps all sorts of deadly hormones into your system to sludge things up in there. Pain in the jaw can wake you from a sound sleep. Maintain a regular schedule of physical activity, eat healthy and give support as well as receive support by others is vital also toward overall good health. Sunrise is sponsored by Shackelford Corporation, w w w. s h a c k e l f o r d f u neraldirectors.com

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Early bird service The Henderson Church of Christ worship hour is carried over WFHU 91.5 at 8 a.m. each Sunday. The program includes recorded acappella singing, prayer, scripture reading, and a live sermon.

Prayer requests For special prayer requests or needs call 989-0326 or 9897563. Services at Jacks Creek Apostolic Church are at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Sunday and at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday. The church is located at 150 McAdams Loop in Jacks Creek. Brent Daniel is the pastor.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

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Page 10-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

Henderson boy raises money for Haiti earthquake survivors When 7-year-old Zakary Henson saw news reports of the earthquake in Haiti, he knew that the people would need help His younger sister, Claire, who was making jewelry at the time, may have inspired him. “The best idea I could think of to raise money was to sell jewelry,” he said. His parents, Brian and Erika, agreed to help and after a trip to the mall, he had some inexpensive necklaces and bracelets that he hoped to sell for $3 each to make $50 for relief in Haiti. The next Sunday morning, Zakary, armed with a poster, the jewelry and his grin, headed to First United Methodist Church in Henderson to see if he could accomplish his goal. Nervous about standing in front of the whole church, he made a practice run in the adult Sunday school class his parents attend. He gave his presentation with all

Zakary Henson, of Henderson, raised $175, all in the name of charity by selling jewelry at his church. The funds will benefit Haiti. the enthusiasm you might expect from a kid talking about candy or television, and his concern for the people of Haiti was apparent. The class was very impressed and encouraged him to share his message with the congregation. Going from 15 people in a Sunday school class to 100 plus in worship was not a problem for Zakary.

He invited everyone to purchase some of his jewelry after the worship service. Zakary sold everything in a matter of minutes, and his goal of $50 was more than tripled. He was surprised that he was able to raise $175. Sharing the story afterwards, he said about the amount raised: “P.S. That is a ton of money!”

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

A sign of the times For nearly 60 years, the sign at the corner of Main St. and Washington has read, “First State Bank.” However, after transitioning to Clayton Bank and Trust in 2005, it was changed to reflect that last Wednesday. The sign was first established in 1952. Looking on are Jack Bulliner and Lisa Meyers of Clayton Bank.

Local SWHRA hosts parent workshop day Southwest Human Resource Agency recently hosted an all-day parent workshop informing the parents about the importance of budgeting, healthy nutrition and employment opportunities. The workshops are held monthly and are intended to enrich participants about opportunities and resources at their disposal. At this month’s workshop free groceries were available, including healthy, inexpensive

Photos by Julie Pickard, Independent

Kathryn Avent, West TN Legal Services Counselor, speaks to SWHRA parents about the importance of healthy nutrition eating habits at an all-day parent workshop held at the Henderson office recently.

Parents attending the SWHRA parent day workshop reaped the benefits of free groceries and beneficial information concerning nutrition, budgeting and employment opportunities.

recipes. Carrie Buck, SWHRA assistant director of family and community partnership, informed one employment opportunity that will soon be available to parents concerns the 2010 Census Bureau. For more information, call 989-5192 or 989-5111.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

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Chamber known around the community as the ‘Pork Chop King’ rolling out his jumbo smoker at any opportunity, raising money for an abundance of fundraisers. Seaton has remained a business staple in Chester County for nearly 20 years, running Dwain Seaton Ford. The hometown boy has served on the Lions Club, Carl Perkins Board and has remained on the School Board for 31 years, serving as Chairman for 22 years. “I think we have one of the greatest school systems around, and I’m still serving because I want to give the best education to our children at the least amount of expense to our taxpayers.” The Chamber banquet boasted a record year, with over 200 guests in a t t e n d a n c e . Entertainment was provided by BBQ Festival talent winner and always over-the-top, Stan Crouse and the meal was catered by Southern Class catering. “It was a wonderful night with good food and great entertainment,” said Chamber director Emily Shelton. “We are blessed with so many talented people and extraordinary businesses right here at home.” Phyllis LeCornu and Neil Gaugh both received a standing ovation for their selfless and continuous volunteerism and support of the community. LeCornu was named Volunteer of the Year and Gaugh was awarded the Bobby King award. Other awards were given to Knoell Family Dentistry, New Business of the Year; Radio Shack, Business of the Year; Anvil, Industry of the year. “This was a time to say ‘thank you’ to our chamber members and recognize them for a job well done, as well as, to make them aware of the many benefits of being a chamber member,” said Chamber president Renee Phelps. “With a record attendance and numerous volunteers it is evident that he people of Henderson and Chester County are dedicated to making this community the best place in the world to live, work and play.” Serving on the executive committee for the 2010 fiscal year are Trent Scott, Russell Epperson, Vicki Dickson, and Renee Phelps.

Graduates of the 2009 Leadership Chester class are(Front, L-R) : Brad McDaniel, Holly Roeder, Emily Shelton, Kristen Hicks, Frank Bradford. Back L-R: Ron Means, Amy Eaton, and Lenitta Powers. Above: Accepting on the behalf of Anvil for Industry of the Year is Glenn Harris. Anvil has been in Chester County since the 1960s and was the cornerstone of Magic Valley. Presenting is Mayor Bobby King. Left: Patricia Jones presents Scott and Koreen Edwards, owners of Radio Shack with the Business of the Year Award.

Brian Henson presents Sara and Alex Knoell, owners of Knoell Family Dentistry with New Business of the Year.

Craig Casey presents Neil Gaugh with the Bobby King Award.

Volunteer of the Year Phyllis LeCornu accepts her honor from Vicki Dickson.


Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010


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Thursday, March 4, 2010

Comeback falls short, Lady Lions still No. 2

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

These young ladies have led many cheers for the Freed-Hardeman basketball teams over the last four years, but Thursday they received the cheers of the fans at the Sports Center. They are, from left, seniors Blair Farris, Nicole Smith, Rachel King, and Ginny Morton.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

FHU senior basketball players, from left, Nicole Ozment, Jana Cross, Kirstal Edney, and Tara Deatheridge enjoy the moment as they are honored Thursday following their final regular season contest at the Sports Center.

The Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions battled back from a 15-point second half deficit, but never could even the score in a 79-71 loss at No. 20 Bethel University on Saturday afternoon in the final game of the regular season in McKenzie. The loss sends FHU (23-6, 11-5) into a threeway tie for second place in the TranSouth Conference with Bethel and Trevecca Nazarene University. The Lady Lions, however, won the tie-breaker for the No. 2 seed in the league tournament. The Lady Wildcats held the lead for most of the game on their senior day, playing in front of an energized crowd. Bethel took the lead for good with 13:26 to play in the first half on a Tristian Johnson three-pointer that kicked off a 10-0 run to give the Lady Wildcats a 25-17 lead. The lead grew to as many as 10 points in the first half before Whitney Johnson made a shot at the buzzer to send FHU into halftime down 40-32. After Johnson hit another shot to open the second half, Bethel knocked down threepointers on two of their next six possessions and extended its lead to 12 points at the 17:06 mark. FHU pulled back within five thanks to three straight baskets by Meribeth Boehler, but the Lady Wildcats answered with a 12-2 run to take a 15 point lead (62-47) midway through the second half. The Lady Lions,

though, fought back again and outscored Bethel 18-7 over a six-minute stretch to get within four points with 3:11 to play. The two teams traded baskets before Tristian Johnson nailed a three-pointer to push Bethel back up by seven with two minutes left. Bethel then made its free throws down the stretch to keep FreedHardeman from getting any closer. Boehler and Jana Cross both had big games in the post, scoring 19 and 18 points respectively as they both shot 8-of-12 from the field. Natalie Shumpert added 14 points and 10 rebounds off the bench and Hannah Parsley chipped in with 12.

Post players dominate The Freed-Hardeman Lady Lions got a combined 31 points from posts Boehler and Cross and moved into sole possession of second place in the TranSouth Conference with a 64-51 win over Lyon College on Thursday night in the Sports Center. FHU (23-5, 11-4) moved a game ahead of Trevecca Nazarene after the Trojans lost to Union. Bethel also is a game behind the Lady Lions, who visit the Lady Wildcats on Saturday in the regular season finale. It also marked the final regular season home game for Freed-Hardeman seniors Cross and Tara Deatheridge. The Lady See FHU, Page 2-B

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Maria Bagwell launches a shot Thursday at the FHU Lady Lions defeated Lyon in a TranSouth Conference game at the Sports Center.

Boehler named TS Co-Player of Week Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Senior members of the Freed-Hardeman Lions get due recognition prior to the final regular season home game of their careers Thursday at the Sports Center. From left are Zack Frey, Kirtiss Brown, student assistant Logan Alsup, and Logan Greer.

Lions win 20 again Zack Frey scored over 20 points for the third straight game, and the Freed-Hardeman Lions win 20 games for the third straight season following an 88-68 victory over Bethel University on Saturday afternoon in the final game of the regular season. The win leaves FHU (20-10, 12-4) tied for second place in the TranSouth Conference with MidContinent (Ky.) University. MCU, however, holds the tiebreaker and will receive the No. 2 seed in this week’s conference tournament. The Lions led for nearly the entire game as Bethel only found itself ahead twice, both times by one point early in the first half. FHU went on a 12-1 run following the Wildcats’ second lead to go ahead 22-12 with 10:35 in the half. Bethel scored the game’s next seven points before the Lions again pulled back ahead by double digits and took a 44-34 lead into halftime. The Wildcats pulled back within six points on two occasions early in the second half, but a 14-4 run by FHU gave the Lions a 58-42 lead with 14:22 to play. Seven minutes later, Freed-Hardeman put the

game away with an 11-0 run that made the score 73-52. Frey led all scorers with 23 points while Ken Bingham added 18. Jesse Moulton rounded out the double-digit scorers with 10 points. Vincent Barnes finished one point shy of a double-double, scoring nine and grabbing a career-high 10 rebounds. Point guards Kirtiss Brown and Anthony Sampson did their jobs well, combining for 11 assists against only three turnovers. With the win, the Lions have won 20 games for the third straight season, something that hasn’t been accomplished since the 1999-2000 through 2001-02 seasons.

Lions tame Lyon Frey scored 15 points in the first half and 27 for the game as Freed-Hardeman dominated Lyon College, 97-56, on Thursday night in the Sports Center. The 6-foot-8 senior was key in a 12-3 run that saw the Lions build an 11-point lead with 6:30 left in the first half, scoring eight of FHU’s points during the three-minute stretch. After a Slater Belew putback brought Lyon back within nine points, FreedHardeman closed the half

by outscoring the Scots 15-5 over the last six minutes. Frey then scored the Lions’ first six points of the second half as FreedHardeman continued to build its lead. A 17-4 run midway through the second half all but closed the door on the Scots, with the Lions opening up an 84-48 lead with 7:30 left in the game. Frey’s game-high scoring performance came on 13-of-17 shooting from the field, the 13 field goals tying his season high. Moulton and Sampson each had 12 points and senior Logan Greer added 10. Feb. 25 at the Sports Center Lyon 31-25=56 Freed-Hard. 48-49=97 L – Andy Lee 14, Brandon Cowart 10, Belew 7, Worlow 6, Jackson 6, Glover 5, Kelly 3, Clinton 2, Hopper 2, Cooper 1. FH – Zack Frey 27, Anthony Sampson 12, Jesse Moulton 12, Logan Greer 10, Pearson 9, Bingham 8, Barnes 6, Milewski 5, Brown 4, Ledlow 2. Three-point shots: L – Lee 4, Jackson 2, Kelly, Cowart. FH – Greer 2, Sampson, Brown, Milewski, Pearson, Moulton. Feb. 27 at McKenzie Freed-Hardeman at Bethel Statistics not available

After leading Freed-Hardeman to a 3-0 week, Meribeth Boehler was named the TranSouth Conference Women’s Basketball Co-Player of the Week for the week ending Saturday, Feb. 20. Boehler, a 6-foot-2 post from Ramer, averaged 20.7 points, six rebounds and two steals per game in the three conference wins for the No. 13 Lady Lions. She was the leading scorer for both teams in each of those three contests. For the week, Boehler converted on 25-of-34 field goal attempts for 64.1 percent. The junior is closing in on 1,000 career points, currently sitting on 929. She surpassed 500 career rebounds earlier this month.

MERIBETH BOEHLER

FHU hosting first round games Freed-Hardeman University is hosting first round games in the TranSouth Athletic Conference basketball tournaments, beginning with the women Wednesday, March 3, and the men’s team Thursday, March 4. All games begin at 7 p.m. The Lady Lions finished the regular season in a three-way tie for second place with Bethel and Trevecca Nazarene but were awarded the number two seed via the league’s tie-breaker procedure. They host No. 7 seed Blue Mountain. The Lions also ended the regular season in a tie for second place. The Lions and Mid-Continent each were 12-4 in league play, but Mid-Continent won the tie-breaker. As the No. 3 seed, FHU hosts Martin Methodist.

TranSouth Conference Women’s Basketball Final Regular Season Team 1. Union 2. Freed-Hard. 2. Bethel 2. Trevecca Naz. 5. Lyon 5. Martin Meth. 7. Blue Mtn. 7. Cumberland 9. Mid-Cont.

TS All 16-0 29-1 11-5 23-6 11-5 20-9 11-5 20-9 7-9 17-12 7-9 17-16 4-12 11-19 4-12 8-17 1-15 3-25

TranSouth Conference Women’s Basketball Post-Season Tournament

TranSouth Conference Men’s Basketball Final Regular Season Team 1. Union 2. Mid-Cont. 2. Freed-Hard. 4. Trevecca Naz. 5. Cumberland 6. Martin Meth. 7. Bethel 8. Lyon 9. Blue Mtn.

TS All 14-2 23-7 12-4 19-11 12-4 20-10 11-5 21-9 9-7 11-16 6-10 18-12 5-11 13-17 2-14 6-22 1-15 1-31

TranSouth Conference Men’s Basketball Post-Season Tournament

First Round, March 1

First Round, March 2

No. 9 Mid-Continent at No. 8 Cumberland

No. 9 Blue Mountain at No. 8 Lyon

Quarterfinals, March 3

Quarterfinals, March 4

No. 9/No. 8 winner at No. 1 Union No. 7 Blue Mountain at No. 2 Freed-Hardeman No. 6 Martin Methodist at No. 3 Bethel No. 5 Lyon at No. 4 Trevecca Nazarene

No. 9/No. 8 winner at No. 1 Union No. 7 Bethel at No. 2 MidContinent No. 6 Martin Methodist at No. 3 Freed-Hardeman No. 5 Cumberland at No. 4 Trevecca Nazarene

Semifinals, March 5 At higher seeds

Finals, March 8 At higher seed

Semifinals, March 6 At higher seeds

Finals, March 9 At higher seed


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

From Page 1-B

FHU Lions have gone 48-8 at home in their careers. After Jordin Coleman hit a three-pointer to open the game, FHU scored nine straight points and never trailed the rest of the way though Lyon never let the Lady Lions get comfortable. FreedHardeman slowly built an 11-point lead with 2:41 to play in the first half, but the Pipers closed within six at halftime and then opened the second half by forcing a turnover and converting on the other end to make it a 30-26 game. The Lady Lions, though, scored the game’s next six points and later extended their lead to 13 points after outscoring Lyon 9-2 over a three-

minute stretch. FHU’s lead fluctuated between nine and 14 points for the remainder of the game. Freed-Hardeman made a living at the free throw line, making 27-of-32 on the night and 21-of-26 in the second half. Boehler led all scorers with 18 points on six of seven shooting, while Cross added 13. Parsley chipped in 12. Feb. 25 at the Sports Center Lyon 24-27=51 Freed-Hard. 30-34=64 L – Keshiana Hodges 16, Ashley Waller 11, Ramsey 9, Coleman 5, Fincham 4, Smith 4, Echols 2. FH – Meribeth Boehler 18, Jana Cross 13, Hannah Parsley 12, Johnson 9, Shumper 9, Deatheridge 3. Three-point shots: L – Waller, Coleman. FH – Parsley, Johnson, Shumpert.. Records: L – 17-11 (7-8). FH – 23-5 (11-4). Feb. 27 at McKenzie Freed-Hardeman at Bethel Statistics not available

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Noslen Labrada delivers a hit for the Freed-Hardeman Lions in their baseball game with Huntington College Thursday at Carnes Field.

FHU baseball splits with ranked opponent The hits were still there for the FreedHardeman Lions, but the runs weren’t in an 8-2 loss to No. 16 Union (Ky.) College on Sunday afternoon at Carnes Field, one day after FHU run-ruled the Bulldogs in five innings. FHU collected 10 hits, compared to eight for Union, but drew only one walk and stranded nine runners throughout the game. The Lions (6-5) drew first blood in the bottom of the first inning on a solo

homerun by Noslen Labrada (4). Brian Bullard then followed with a single and Leamond Arthur drew a walk to put FHU on the verge of a big inning. The threat was quickly extinguished, though, when Bullard was picked off and Derek Bush struck out to end the inning. Union scored once in the third and fourth innings to go ahead 2-1, but Joe Mike delivered a two-out RBI single to even up the score. The Bulldogs took the

You Can Play Better Golf Rule 26 – Water Hazards and Lateral Water Hazards First I want to clarify the difference in these two types of marked hazards. A water hazard is marked by Yellow stakes or lines and is usually in the form of a lake, pond or water feature that presents a challenge to cross over. A lateral hazard is marked by Red stakes or lines and generally runs alongside the course of play. Again let me stress that this is a generalization and lateral hazards often have to be crossed during the course of play. Finally, the words ‘water hazard’ imply that there could be water within the boundary of this hazard. When taking relief from one of these ‘hazards’, you must know or be virtually certain that the ball came to rest within the ‘hazard’. Otherwise, you must proceed under rule 27 ‘Lost Ball’. If it is determined that your ball is in the ‘hazard’ you have three options if the area is marked with yellow and five options if the area is marked red. Option 1 Play the ball as it lies (no penalty stroke added) Option 2 Replay from where the original ball was last played. (One stroke penalty) Option 3 Drop behind the hazard keeping the point of entry between you and the hole. (One stroke penalty) Additional options when proceeding under the rules for ‘lateral water hazard’.

JIM MERRY Option 4 Drop within two club-lengths from the point of entry, not nearer the hole (one stroke penalty) Option 5 Drop within two club-lengths from a point on the opposite margin of the hazard that is equal-distance from the hole. (One stroke penalty) Rules 26-2 and 3 address the procedures for relief when the original ball was played under option 1 above and the ball comes to rest in a ‘hazard’ or is lost. You may seek relief outside the hazard under the penalty of an additional stroke. Your point of entry and the spot where the original ball was played are used as possible relief points when proceeding under this rule. Email me at pgajim@gmail.com with the subject line ‘Rules Questions’ if you would like clarification on this or any other rule. In the next few weeks, we will finish up our review of the Rules of Golf and begin to look at ways to improve your game with swing and playing tips. Remember, you can play better golf this season.

lead for good in the top of the fifth, taking advantage of a wild pitch and a balk to plate two runs. The Lions had their chances in the next two innings but stranded two runners both times.

Union (Ky.) run-ruled by Lions Josh Reynolds’ grand slam highlighted a six-run first inning and Amos Bingham was lights-out on the mound as the FreedHardeman Lions runruled No. 16 Union College, 10-0 in five innings, on Saturday afternoon at Carnes Field. All of FHU’s runs in the first inning came with two outs as freshmen Mike and Robert Prieto hit back-to-back RBI singles before Reynolds launched a grand slam for his first career homerun. Those six runs were more than enough for Bingham (2-0), who only allowed two hits and a walk in five innings of work and retired the final eight batters he faced. Brian Bullard hit a sacrifice fly in the second inning to score Labrada and got another RBI on a groundout in the fourth that brought in Derek Bush. Leamond Arthur added a run-scoring single in the fourth to give FHU a 9-0 lead. Reynolds then opened the fifth inning with a triple and Evan Mansell singled him in to send the run rule into effect. The Lions pounded the ball to the tune of 12 hits, including a 3-for-3 performance by Labrada. Prieto, Mansell and Reynolds each had two hits.

Williford, Lions down McKendree The Freed-Hardeman Lions used a three-run fifth inning and got two scoreless innings from Derek Williford in his first appearance of the year in taking a 6-4 win over

McKendree University on Friday afternoon at Carnes Field. The Lions trailed 4-3 heading into the bottom of the fifth before Bullard’s double scored Bush, who reached on an error to lead off the inning, to tie the game. Three batters later, Prieto singled in the goahead run. Williford then entered the game in the top of the sixth in relief of Charlie Overturf (1-0) and retired six of the eight batters he faced, allowing one hit and striking out four in two innings to earn the save.

Two-out runs doom Lions, Thursday The Lions fell behind early and never recovered in an 11-6 loss to Huntington University on Thursday afternoon at Carnes Field. After FHU starter Hunter Newby retired the first five batters he faced, the Foresters rallied to score four runs with two outs in the second inning while taking advantage of a pair of Lion errors. They added three more runs in the top of the fourth to take a 7-0 lead before Freed-Hardeman (4-4) got on the board in the bottom of the inning on an RBI single by Brian Bullard. Bullard came through again in the fifth inning, drilling a three-run homerun - his fourth of the season - to make the score 74. But Huntington responded with two more runs in the top of the sixth, again with two outs, to chase Newby and extend its lead to five runs. The Lions got one back in the seventh on an RBI double by Labrada, but Huntington again answered with a pair of runs in the top of the eighth and kept FHU from getting back into the game afterwards.

Dixie Youth meeting Monday, bids due, signups announced The Chester County Dixie Youth Association will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, March 8, in the courtroom of the Chester County Courthouse. This is a mandatory meeting for anyone wishing to coach this season in the association’s baseball or softball leagues. Sealed bids are due at this time for items such as photos, mowing of fields, trash pickup, concession stand, uniforms, restroom maintenance, etc. Signups are currently underway. Someone will be at the Dixie Youth Park on East Main St. from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 13 to accept the applications. Tryouts are 10 a.m. March 13 for girls’ softball, and 1 p.m. for boys’ baseball. All applications must be in by March 20, rain or shine. A work day at the ball park has also been announced for 7 a.m. Saturday, March 13. All coaches are expected to attend.

Don Meyer to headline SAC Benefit Dinner speaker Freed-Hardeman University recently announced that Don Meyer will be its featured speaker at the 2010 Sports Advisory Council Benefit dinner on April 30. Meyer currently coaches men’s basketball at Northern State University where he is in his ninth season. Prior to coaching at Northern, Meyer coached 24 years at David Lipscomb University, winning an NAIA National Championship with the Bisons in 1996. He has amassed a record of 910-310 over 37 seasons. He currently has the most wins in NCAA men’s basketball history, ahead of names such as Bobby Knight, Dean Smith, and Adolph Rupp. Perhaps one of Meyer’s greatest accomplishments is recently overcoming a life-threatening car crash on Sept. 5, 2008. As a result of the accident, Meyer had to have part of his left leg amputated. While in surgery, the doctors also discovered carcinoid cancer in Meyer’s liver, small intestines and abdomen. Meyer went on to coach the 2008-2009 basketball season at Northern State from a wheelchair. Meyer’s outstanding story has drawn attention from many people across the country. In 2009, Meyer was awarded the Jimmy V Award for Perseverance at the ESPN Espy Awards show. He received a standing ovation from numerous sports stars and coaches after accepting his award with an inspirational speech. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Dan Hughes at 989-6916 or at dhughes@fhu.edu.

A season worth of photos only $10 at the Independent Photo reprints of athletic events covered by the Chester County Independent are available by contacting our office. Prints of high school, junior high, and Freed-Hardeman University games are available along with some Dixie baseball and softball, band performances and other events. Hundreds of photos are available including most that did not run in the newspaper. We can make prints, however, for $10 on a CD or jump drive you can own every photo taken of your sport during a given season. Please note - photos are available for selection Wednesday through Friday only! For more information, call our office at 989-4624.


Page 3-B

EEdduuccaattiioonn

Inside CCHS By Stephany Doss

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Hendrix ‘brings down the house’ at Junior High Black History show

School Reporter

Another week has come and gone at CCHS! Seniors: Project Graduation Snookum’s tickets are being distributed outside the cafeteria during lunch. Participating seniors can turn in ticket stubs and money Wednesday, March 3. Extra stubs should be turned in Wednesday or to Katelyn Woodham as soon as possible. Freshmen or sophomores who are interested in joining the yearbook staff can pick up an application from Mrs. Matheney in room 185. Junior/Senior Banquet fees are due March 12. A list of remaining fees is posted outside the cafeteria. If a student has any questions, he or she may ask Mrs. Kerr. The banquet will be held April 24 at Lambuth University. All CMS students have the opportunity to participate in job shadowing on March 9. Students must have a parent’s permission and have all their teachers’ signatures on the form provided before March 9. Students must also call the school to confirm the job shadow date so that they may be counted present. CMS teachers would like to thank mentors in advance for allowing students to participate. Ms. Hunt’s Business Management classes would like to give special

By Kim Poston East Chester was an exciting place this week. We celebrated Read Across America. Tuesday was hat day. Wednesday was red and white day. Thursday was goofy socks and shoes day. Friday was dress as your favorite Dr. Seuss character day. We have a lot of creative kids and also a lot of great readers. Congratulations to Daniel Geiger. He made it to the 50-point club. Also a big hand to Peyton Anderson, he made it to the 200-point club. Wow! Physical education students are having a blast. They used the rhythm sticks, streamers, and tinikling to practice rhythm to music. I wonder if Coach Brown and Coach Jill have rhythm? Kindergarten students have been learning about presidents and dental health. Jennifer Smith’s class cleaned pennies with a vinegar and salt solution. This went right along with their study of money. The students are using money to “buy” items using the correct amount of money. Kindergarten students will begin a zoo unit during February. First-graders are also learning about money. Teachers would like for parents to practice with their children at home with real coins. Include pennies, nickels, dimes

STEPHANY DOSS thanks to Chester County Bank for providing checkbook covers and transaction registers. Students are completing a “Game of Life” simulation to help them become “financially literate.” Many middle school students will be taking the stage March 4-6 in “High School Musical, Jr.,” presented by the CCHS Drama Department and Chester County Middle School. The play will begin at 7 p.m. at Williams Auditorium. Ticket prices are $8 for adults and $5 for students and children. Reserved seating is available for $10. To order reserved seating, call 608-7702 as soon as possible. Project Graduation will be selling concessions at the play. Please come out and support everyone involved! As always, students are encouraged to take full advantage of the opportunities presented to them. and quarters in each group. Remember practice makes perfect! First-graders are getting ready to read Henry and Mudge at Mrs. Hopper’s House. Some of the first-grade classes are making an “author poster” of Cynthia Rylant who is the author of the Henry and Mudge books. Nancy Burns’s class has been studying Abraham Lincoln and George Washington. Julia Sole, their student teacher, made a 6 foot 4 inch Abraham Lincoln. This was Mr. Lincoln’s actual height. The students have covered it with facts about Honest Abe. Beverly Rogers read the story “The Dot.” They made an “ish” art gallery and it is displayed in the hall. They also read “The Lady in the Moon” and learned about the Chinese culture and the phases of the moon. Wendy Siler’s class won the PE banner for the week of Feb. 22-26. Coach Jill presented it to them. Second-graders are reading “Bad Dog Dodger” this week. They are also studying weather. Amy Tims’ class is growing their own radish plants. They are learning whether seeds grow faster when it is warm or cold. They are also learning about seasonable variables that help plants grow, such as rainfall and length of sunlight exposure. Third-graders are learning about probability in math. They are enjoying activities to see if events are possible, impossible, certain, or likely or unlikely. Rosemary McKnight’s class is writing and illustrating a book about their

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

C.J. Burton, left, joins Jimi Hendrix (Tommy Kirk) as they entertain students at CCJHS by singing “Wild Thing” during the school’s Black History program Friday.

By James A. Webb General Manager

Afros, limbos, and a king meeting a president were all part of the Black History Month celebration Friday at Chester County Junior High. The highlight of the show, arguably, was Coach Tommy Kirk’s resurrection of the late Jimi Hendrix and his iconic song – “Wild Thing.” Kirk,

wearing an afro wig reminiscent of the 1960s or ‘70s, had the students dancing and singing along as the Chester County High School jazz band and guitarists Tom Hay and Junior High Principal Britt Eads played back up. The entertaining show found Kirk venturing into the crowd and was joined in singing by CCJHS student C.J. Burton. Also, an impromptu “limbo” contest featured three CCJHS

Clockwise, from above. Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

During the school���s Black History program Friday, members of the Chester County Junior High choir sing “Wade in the Water,” a traditional spiritual song arranged by Brad Prinz. President Barack Obama “met” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during a video produced by students at Chester County Junior High. The video was presented Friday during the school’s Black History program. Austin Bentley, of the CCHS jazz band, plays a trumpet improvised solo during Chester County Junior High’s Black History Program Friday.

East Chester memories. The book will be sent to Nationwide Learning Inc. and bound into a hardback book. Susan Patterson’s class presented projects which were reports on famous Americans or famous places. They have learned about Harriet Tubman and slavery. They even sang songs about slavery. They celebrated because everyone read and passed AR tests on the last eight sto-

ries in their reading book. We want to welcome Reba Hunt to East as she fills in for Kim Murphy. We hope everyone enjoyed our Relay for Life meal and patriotic program on Tuesday. Don’t forget to go and see the play at CCMS this weekend. It is going to be great! We are proud of the East Chester alumni that are participating. Have a wonderful and safe weekend.

teachers. Earlier in the event, students watched a video produced by CCJHS students in which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is amazed to find that a man of African-American descent is now president of the United States. C.J. Burton played the part of Barack Obama with Dashunda Witherspoon as Michelle Obama. Brandon Jones played King with Adreyana Amos as his

wife, Coretta. Chester County Junior High Chorus, under the director of Clay Canada, sang a traditional spiritual song entitled “Wade in the Water.” And the jazz band played several numbers with improvised solo performances by Austin Bentley on the trumpet, Katie England on the saxophone, Mallory Hudson, and guitarists Kyle Carnett and Jacob Robertson.


Page 4-B COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, march 4, 2010

By Melinda Carroll Jacks Creek Elementary School has been busy lately! We enjoyed a Tennessee Wildlife Resources assembly program on Friday. Vicki Brower’s second-

graders took advantage of the sunny day on Friday and picked up litter on the playground. Kindergarten students in both classes studied weather during Weather Awareness Week. They are reading Dr. Seuss books this week. All of our students are enjoying Read Across America Week. We look forward to seeing our favorite Seuss characters on Friday. Hannah Mayer has reached 50 points in Accelerated Reader. Keep up the good work!

Teachers are encouraging all their students to reach their point goals for Parent Involvement. Third-graders must have at least 30 points and attend two meetings with their parents in order to receive a T-shirt. Second and firstgraders must have 20 points and attend at least two meetings. Kindergarteners must have listened to 50 books read aloud and attended three meetings. The final Parent Involvement meeting is March 23. A PSO meeting

Volunteer recognition

Submitted photo

Chester County Youth Soccer recently received a donation from the Walmart Foundation in honor of an employee volunteer. Amy Williams, right, a volunteer soccer coach in 2009, presents the check to Reneé Thomas, regional treasurer of the soccer league.

will follow. Melinda Carroll’s thirdgraders have been learning all about different cultures. Last Friday they enjoyed breads representing various cultures and even tried eating sushi with chopsticks! Student teacher Beverly Bailey decorated the room with

items from Japan to go along with the reading story Suki’s Kimono. They have also learned how to be entrepreneurs, setting up their businesses of the future. Teachers are working harder than ever to make up for days missed due to inclement weather. We urge our students to get

into the classroom by 8 every morning and stay until 2:50 unless there is illness or emergency. TCAP testing will be the week of April 19. This is the week following spring break. Thanks to the parents for sending us students who really shine at Jacks Creek!

Submitted photos

At left: Jacks Creek Elementary partipated in Culture Day recently. Students enjoyed attempting to eat sushi with chopsticks.

By Sherry Thompson Students of West Chester have been doing some different cardio workouts in physical education lately, such as dancing. Students have learned to do the Cha Cha Slide, the Cupid Shuffle, and the Macarena over the past few weeks. Coach Lewis has also asked that we stress the importance of sending your child to school with the right shoes. If they are going to dress nice, or if they wear boots because of the weather, have them pack their tennis shoes, so they can change into them for PE. Starla Bogard spoke with the classes about dental health during library for Dental Health Month. The boys and girls received toothbrushes compliments of Dr. Bogard. This is a yearly event and we thank Dr. Bogard for his kind contributions, as well as his lovely wife who adds the educational component to the week. We wish to thank the county for the new awning out front to replace the one that was damaged in the snow and ice. It is beautiful and so much safer. We wish to send our prayers and thoughts to Jean Smith, who has been

out since Monday when her father became seriously ill. We hope he will be better soon and she will be back with us. Last Wednesday was a busy day at West Chester with School Picture Day, Assembly Program, and Tornado Drill for Severe Weather Awareness Week. The Assembly program was provided by TVA and taught the children about electricity and energy and how to save it. This week is busy as well. Yearbooks are on sale this week only. They are 52 pages, full color, and hardback. The cost is $32 for standard cover, $37 with personalized cover that includes photo and name. This week is also Dr. Seuss Week and we should have lots of news about that in next week’s article. Uncle Jerry’s fundraising forms are due and look for information coming home soon about an upcoming PTO meeting. Susan Brown’s class had a fun time during a lesson taught by FreedHardeman practicum student Lauren Denison. The students were excited as they worked with bear counters to help them with their addition practice. Kindergarten teachers also want to remind their students of Silly Sock Day on March 4 and Stripes Day on March 5 in celebration of Dr. Seuss Week. A helpful reminder from the teachers of kindergarten students is that you please continue to work with your children at home on addition. It is a valuable skill that they must master before going on. First-grade students are really working hard counting money. Parents

are encouraged to practice with your child counting the change you have in your pockets. Renee Thomas’ class had a special treat last week! Their compliment chain reached the floor and for their good remarks and behavior, they were rewarded with an afternoon surprise treat! Jo Price’s class was excited when Trace Beaver’s dad and mom visited his classroom. Mr. Beaver read a book to the class. The class listened intently to the story and eagerly awaited their turn as Mr. and Mrs. Beaver assisted them in taking the AR test over the story. First-grade classrooms were aglow with color this week as the students made colorful paper lanterns to go along with their reading story “The Lady In The Moon.” Emily Brown’s class had a tasty reading story recently. While reading Mister Bones Dinosaur Hunter, Mrs. Emily’s class dug for fossils (chocolate chips) and enjoyed Scooby snacks (bones). First-graders recently had their final Parent Involvement meeting for the year. The kids entertained parents with Valentines and Presidents Day songs. The teachers discussed TCAP tips and showed the parents some fun study skills that they can put to use at home. First-graders have started learning about money. If you have access to the internet, there are many wonderful websites that involve counting money. Please practice this skill at home! Thanks for all you do for West Chester. WEST – Where Everyone Stands Tall!

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester, Jacks Creek, West Chester Elementary Schools Monday, March 8 Chicken nuggets Or Chilito Mashed potatoes, roll Green peas, salad bar Fruit choice, milk choice Tuesday, March 9 Beef taco or hotdog Pinto beans, trimmings Spanish rice, salad Fruit choice, Milk choice Wednesday, March 10 Hamburger or Manager’s choice Baked tri taters Baked beans Salad bar, trimmings Fruit choice, milk choice Thursday, March 11 Lemon pepper chicken Or ham/cheese chipper Green beans, salad bar Mashed potatoes, roll Fruit choice, milk choice Friday, March 12 Pizza or Turkey/cheese deli Broccoli/cheese, corn Salad bar Orange wedges, milk choice

Chester County Middle School Monday, March 8 Chicken rings or Hotdog Mashed potatoes/gravy Green peas Salad bar, rolls Fruit choice, milk choice Tuesday, March 9 Beef taco/baked scoops Grilled chicken/bun Spanish rice Pinto beans, trimmings

Chocolate chip cookie Orange wedges, milk choice Wednesday, March 10 Hamburger or Ham/cheese sandwich Baked beans Baked tri taters Salad bar, trimmings Fruit choice, milk choice Thursday, March 11 Lemon pepper chicken Or barbecue sandwich Mashed potatoes, rolls Green beans, salad bar Fruit choice, milk choice Friday, March 12 Pizza or Turkey/cheese deli Broccoli/cheese Salad bar, corn Fruit choice, milk choice

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal offered daily Monday, March 8 Chicken nuggets Or hoagie sandwich Green peas, rolls Mashed potatoes Baked apples Fruit choice, milk choice Tuesday, March 9 Beef taco or corndog Spanish rice, corn Pinto beans, trimmings Fruit choice, milk choice

Friday, March 12 Pizza or Turkey/cheese sandwich Broccoli/cheese Salad bar, fries Fruit choice, milk choice

Chester County High School *Cereal offered daily Monday, March 8 Chicken nuggets (2 lines) Salad/pizza/batter bites Mashed potatoes/gravy Black-eyed peas Broccoli/cheese Fries, rolls Fruit choice, milk choice Tuesday, March 9 Chicken fajita (2 lines) or Pizza/fries and Salad/crackers Spanish rice, corn Pinto beans, trimmings Fruit choice, milk choice Wednesday, March 10 Meatloaf (hot bar) or Clux delux (both hot bars) Batter bites Pizza/salad/crackers White beans/ham Macaroni/cheese Mustard greens Baked batter bites Cornbread Fruit choice, milk choice

Wednesday, March 10 Hamburger or Ham/cheese sandwich Baked beans Tri taters, chips Salad bar, trimmings Fruit choice, milk choice

Thursday, March 11 Lemon pepper baked chicken (2 lines) Pizza/fries/salad/crackers Mashed potatoes, rolls Green beans Baked apples Fruit choice, milk choice

Thursday, March 11 Lemon pepper baked chicken Or barbecue/bun Green beans, rolls Tiny whole potatoes Salad bar Fruit choice, milk choice

Friday, March 12 Ham/cheese stromboli Or pizza/tater gems Salad/pizza/tater gems Tiny whole potatoes Green peas, salad Glazed carrots Fruit choice, milk choice


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 5-B

FOR SALE LAND FOR SALE – 137 Wooded Acres with Grassy Lake, Creeks, & Highway Frontage. Deer, Turkey, & Fishing. Good Home Sites. Located on Knuckles Lane, 6 Miles Outside of Henderson. Call for Details, 731608-2205. (TFCC) FOR SALE – From 5 to 15 acres with electricity, driveway, bld. site. (ready to move on). Starting at $18,000 — $175 down — $175 / Month (or Cash). No Restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. 731-989-4859. (TFC)

900 Deanburg Road. $550 / Month. $250 Deposit. No Pets. References Required. 983-5707. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA, 1-car carport. 170 Tony Thomas Lane. $575 / Month. No deposit / lease. 989-4658. (43P) FOR RENT – 2 BR House. References Required, No Pets. $350 / Month. $300 Security Deposit. Days 989-2631, Nights 989-4296. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Mobile Home, Renovated. 731-632-0956. (44P)

FOR SALE – 2-week old, small type Beagle puppies. $50. Call to reserve yours now! 608-6793. (43P)

HOME FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA Home for rent at 481 Crook. $750 / Month. No pets or smoking. $250 security deposit. Call 731-610-0100. (44P)

FOR SALE – Male Cocker Spaniel puppies, 3 months old, CKC registered, $150. Shih-Tzu mix puppies, M/F, $100. Very playful and fun-loving. 731-8796323. (43P)

FOR RENT – 1 BR with stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer. No pets. References required. $300 / Month. $200 Security Deposit. Days 989-2631. Nights 989-4296. (TFC)

FOR SALE – 2005 Fleetwood pop-up camper, 11 ft., sleeps 6, good condition. $4,000. Call 731-427-5094. (43P)

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom mobile home. $295 / Month (includes water). 1825 Sand Mountain Road. United Country Action Realty 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR SALE – 1985 4-Wheel Drive Isuzu. Runs real good, 4wheel drive works real good. Needs a little work. $700 OBO. Call 731-989-9319. (43P)

FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, new paint. 316 Baughn. $375 / Month. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

FOR SALE – Home in Henderson Co. Owner paying closing cost. Contact for Details, 731-608-1983. (46P)

FOR RENT – Commercial Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq ft, basement. $1950 / Month. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

FREE FIREWOOD – Oak, pine, cedar, elm. Freshly cut. You haul. 989-9770. (43P) FOR SALE – New Single Wide Mobile Home. $22,990. Call 4277320. (43C) FOR SALE – $1,000 of Workout Equipment for $500 OBO. 9897291 or 608-1361. (43P) FOR SALE – 2002 Nissan Frontier, V-6, 4x4, Quad Cab, Automatic, New Tires and Rims. $6,500 OBO. 989-3957 or 6080188 or 608-3650. (43P) WHOLESALE MATTRESSES Starting at $79 – Queen Pillow tops, $189 – Twin Metal Beds $79 with Mattress $159. 5-Piece Solid Wood Queen Bedroom Group $399 unfinished. 6Piece Solid Wood Dinette Set $299 unfinished. 731610-1811. (43P) FOR SALE – 1993 Marine Pro 16 Bass Tracker fishing boat, 25 HP Evinrude motor, Minn Kota 46 lb. thrust foot control trolling motor, Hummingbird 565 Fish Finder. $3,500. Call 608-1586. (43P)

FOR RENT NOW LEASING – Hillview Manor Apartments. 1, 2, 3 and 4 BR apartments available. NEW HEAT/AIR CONDITION UNIT. Call 731-989-5203, Mon.Fri., 8-4:30. Equal Housing Opportunity. (TFC) FOR RENT – Home Sweet Home Apartments now offering furnished units. Water, electricity, cable included. 1-Room $125 / Week. 2-Room $175 / Week. Bring yourself and let us worry about the rest! Call Josh at 731-608-6497. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Nice, three story, rustic home! Enville area. $150 per week. 688-5563. (43P) FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA House.

FOR RENT – 1 BR on Hwy 45 South. Newly remodeled. Furnished. $150 / Week with utilities furnished or $350 / Month. 989-3143 or 608-0447. (43P) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA duplex apartment. Appliances furnished with 1 car enclosed garage. Located on Deer Drive. Credit check, references and one-year lease required. No Pets. $300 Deposit. $550 / Month. 989-4979 or 608-4885. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Home. 6560 Old Jacks Creek Road. $275 / Month. $200 Deposit. 989-3839. (44P) MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT – 2 and 3 bedrooms. Jacks Creek area, also pretty mobile home lots available. Good place to live, worth the money. 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom brick duplex, appliances. 421-A Steed. $425 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 2 bath house with appliances in town. $625 / month. 318 Mifflin. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Nice, 2 bedroom, mobile home, double carport, deck, storage building. 590 Loop Road (Deanburg). $375 / Month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 1 Bedroom Apartments. All Utilities Included. Microwave, Stove, Refrigerator Included. $149 plus tax. College Inn 731-989-3043. (48P) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom mobile home. 1845 Sand Mountain

(Jacks Creek). $425 / Month, includes water. United Country Action Realty 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 1 BR apartment, $295. 1157 Shelton Drive. 8799119. (TFC)

HELP WANTED LOG TRUCK DRIVER with good driving record. Call 731-658-5227. (43P) DRIVERS! No Experience? No problem! 14-day local training in Jackson, TN. To earn great pay, benefits, job security. Placement assistance & student tuition loans available. Call 1-800-423-8820 or go to www.drive-train.org for training opportunity with DRIVETRAIN, 119 E.L. Morgan Drive in Jackson. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS CRAWL SPACE PROBLEMS SOLVED! Wood rot, Mold, Insects, Drainage, Ductwork, Insulation. Healthier Home! Lower Bills! Call 731-614-9076. (44P) WILL PAY CASH – By the piece or house full, antiques, collectibles, anything of value. 695-7196. (TFC) LANDSCAPING – Home or Business, Anything You Need. Call Adam at 731-608-7106 for a FREE ESTIMATE! (44P) WANTED LAND OR STANDING TIMBER on 10 acre tracts and larger. Pine & hardwood. Carter Timber & Land. Since 1993. Ted Carter 731-607-0777. (TFC)

STATEWIDES DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198 or www.CourtDivorceService.com (TnScan) TENNESSEE RIVER LOT AUCTION Saturday March 6 at 10 AM, Clifton Tenn. Offering 20 Tennessee River Lots in Decatur & Hardin Counties, Tennessee 10% Buyers Premium. Heritage Auction & Real Estate, TFL#4556 Savannah TN. 731-925-3534 or ERA Crunk Real Estate 931-6765100 Visit www.TonyNeill.com (TnScan) 500 ACRE FARM AUCTION Saturday March 6 at 10 AM, Clifton TN. 250 Acres with $7500 CRP Payments & 100 Acres Rowcrop Savannah River Land, 250 Acres Pasture Reagan TN. Heritage Auction & Real Estate TFL#4556, Savannah TN. 731-

925-3534 or 926-3133 Visit www.TonyNeill.com (TnScan) ALL CASH VENDING! DO you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. 1-888-745-3351 (TnScan) DISH NETWORK $19.99/ MO Free Activation, Free HBO and Free Showtime. Ask about our nocredit promo. 48hr Free Install Call Now 888-929-2580 BuyDishToday.com (TnScan) NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N (TnScan) STOP AND READ THIS. Affordable Dental, Vision and Health Care Plans. Low Cost and low premium plans available for Seniors, Individuals, Families and Businesses. Call 1-800-405-4698 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Become A Citizen Soldier Contact Your Local Recruiter 1-800-GOGUARD (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER- 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance, Free Housing. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) OTR EXPERIENCE DRIVERS UP To $1500 Bonus *Flatbed, Van, Reefer *National/ Regional Fleets *Choose Your Pay Plan *Affordable Benefits Roehl Transport GoRoehl.com 877-7745313 (TnScan) DRIVER CLASS A-CDL COMPANY Drivers & Owner Operators! Excellent Pay & Benefits, Medical Ins., 401(k), Rider Program, Paid Holidays & Vacation. Star Transportation 800416-5912 www.startransportation.com (TnScan) PTL OTR DRIVERS. NEW Pay Package! Great Miles! Up to 41 cpm. 12 months experience required. No felony or DUI past 5 years. 877-740-6262. www.ptlinc.com (TnScan) BIH TRUCKING COMPANY. DRIVER Trainees Needed! No CDL- No Problem! Earn up to $900/ week. Company endorsed CDL Training. Job assistance. Financial assistance. 888-7805539 (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A STRAIGHT TO Solo with 6 Months Experience! OTR, Regional, and Dedicated Runs Available! Also hiring O/O’s & CDL Grads 800564-6973 www.willisshaw.com (TnScan)

DRIVERS- FOOD TANKER DRIVERS Needed OTR positions available Now! CDL-A w/ Tanker Req’d. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter Today! 877-484-3068 www.oakleytransport.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CDL/A FLATBED UP to .41 CPM. Good Home Time. $1,000 Sign-on Bonus. Health, Dental, Vision. OTR Experience Required. No felonies. 800-441-4271 x TN-100 (TnScan) CDL-A: DRIVERS- WE HAVE Lots of Freight! Dry Van & Flatbed. Great Equipment & Pay. Class A-CDL, Good Driving Record Required. Western Express. 888-801-5295 (TnScan) OPIES TRANSPORT HIRING OTR Drivers with 2 years OTR Experience No NYC or HazMat 800-341-9963 www.opiestransport.com (TnScan) NEW CAREER - CDL Training. Cash Price $2,500. Job Placement Assistance Available. Call Today Start Tomorrow! ESD TDS, LLC 866-432-0430 (TnScan) SALES REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED. MOST earn $50K$100K or more. Call our branch office at 901-624-5900. Ask for Joey Hayden or e-mail joey.hayden@insphereis.com. Visit www.insphereis.com. (TnScan) LAKE LOT SALE! 5 acres only $24,900 includes Free Boat Slips! (was $59,900) Sale March 6th! Beautiful mix of woods/ meadows- walk to private fishing lake. Quiet country road, utilities, warranty deed. Low financing. Call now 1-888-792-5253, x3426 (TnScan) LAND OR DEVELOPMENTS WANTED. We buy or market development lots. Mountain or Waterfront Communities in NC, SC, VA, TN, AL, GA, FL. Call 800-455-1981, Ext.1034. (TnScan) ***FREE FORECLOSURE LISTINGS*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low Down Payment. Call Now! 1-800-4466149 (TnScan) ROAD RUNNER DRIVING ACADEMY is now accepting students. Locations in Jackson, TN and Sharon, TN to better serve you. Class A CDL training, student tuition loans and placement assistance available. Fun environment. Free housing at the Sharon location. SHARON - 106 Industrial Park Dr., Sharon, TN 38255 (731) 456-2008 or JACKSON - 2255 A Hwy 70 E., Jackson, TN 38305 (731) 9352500 (Located in the same building as Nationwide Express) (TnScan)

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTRAIN for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 349-5387 (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 91 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 20 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnpress.com. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198 or www.CourtDivorceService.com (TnScan) TENNESSEE RIVER LOT AUCTION Saturday March 6 at 10 AM, Clifton Tenn. Offering 20 Tennessee River Lots in Decatur & Hardin Counties, Tennessee 10% Buyers Premium. Heritage Auction & Real Estate, TFL#4556 Savannah TN. 731-925-3534 or ERA Crunk Real Estate 931-6765100 Visit www.TonyNeill.com (TnScan) 500 ACRE FARM AUCTION Saturday March 6 at 10 AM, Clifton TN. 250 Acres with $7500 CRP Payments & 100 Acres Rowcrop Savannah River Land, 250 Acres Pasture Reagan TN. Heritage Auction & Real Estate TFL#4556, Savannah TN. 731925-3534 or 926-3133 Visit www.TonyNeill.com (TnScan) ALL CASH VENDING! DO you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. 1-888-745-3351 (TnScan) DISH NETWORK $19.99/ MO Free Activation, Free HBO and Free Showtime. Ask about our nocredit promo. 48hr Free Install Call Now 888-929-2580 BuyDishToday.com (TnScan) NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N (TnScan)


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

STATEWIDES STOP AND READ THIS. Affordable Dental, Vision and Health Care Plans. Low Cost and low premium plans available for Seniors, Individuals, Families and Businesses. Call 1-800-405-4698 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Become A Citizen Soldier Contact Your Local Recruiter 1-800-GOGUARD (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER- 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance, Free Housing. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) OTR EXPERIENCE DRIVERS UP To $1500 Bonus *Flatbed, Van, Reefer *National/ Regional Fleets *Choose Your Pay Plan *Affordable Benefits Roehl Transport GoRoehl.com 877-7745313 (TnScan) DRIVER CLASS A-CDL COMPANY Drivers & Owner Operators! Excellent Pay & Benefits, Medical Ins., 401(k), Rider Program, Paid Holidays & Vacation. Star Transportation 800416-5912 www.startransportation.com (TnScan) PTL OTR DRIVERS. NEW Pay

Package! Great Miles! Up to 41 cpm. 12 months experience required. No felony or DUI past 5 years. 877-740-6262. www.ptlinc.com (TnScan) BIH TRUCKING COMPANY. DRIVER Trainees Needed! No CDL- No Problem! Earn up to $900/ week. Company endorsed CDL Training. Job assistance. Financial assistance. 888-7805539 (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A STRAIGHT TO Solo with 6 Months Experience! OTR, Regional, and Dedicated Runs Available! Also hiring O/O’s & CDL Grads 800564-6973 www.willisshaw.com (TnScan) DRIVERS- FOOD TANKER DRIVERS Needed OTR positions available Now! CDL-A w/ Tanker Req’d. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter Today! 877-484-3068 www.oakleytransport.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CDL/A FLATBED UP to .41 CPM. Good Home Time. $1,000 Sign-on Bonus. Health, Dental, Vision. OTR Experience Required. No felonies. 800-441-4271 x TN-100 (TnScan) CDL-A: DRIVERS- WE HAVE Lots of Freight! Dry Van & Flatbed. Great Equipment & Pay. Class A-CDL, Good Driving Record Required. Western Express. 888-801-5295 (TnScan) OPIES TRANSPORT HIRING OTR Drivers with 2 years OTR Experience No NYC or HazMat 800-341-9963 www.opiestrans-

port.com (TnScan) NEW CAREER - CDL Training. Cash Price $2,500. Job Placement Assistance Available. Call Today Start Tomorrow! ESD TDS, LLC 866-432-0430 (TnScan) SALES REPRESENTATIVE NEEDED. MOST earn $50K$100K or more. Call our branch office at 901-624-5900. Ask for Joey Hayden or e-mail joey.hayden@insphereis.com. Visit www.insphereis.com. (TnScan) LAKE LOT SALE! 5 acres only $24,900 includes Free Boat Slips! (was $59,900) Sale March 6th! Beautiful mix of woods/ meadows- walk to private fishing lake. Quiet country road, utilities, warranty deed. Low financing. Call now 1-888-792-5253, x3426 (TnScan) LAND OR DEVELOPMENTS WANTED. We buy or market development lots. Mountain or Waterfront Communities in NC, SC, VA, TN, AL, GA, FL. Call 800-455-1981, Ext.1034. (TnScan) ***FREE FORECLOSURE LISTINGS*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low Down Payment. Call Now! 1-800-4466149 (TnScan) ROAD RUNNER DRIVING ACADEMY is now accepting students. Locations in Jackson, TN and Sharon, TN to better serve you. Class A CDL training, student tuition loans and placement assistance available. Fun environment. Free housing at the Sharon location. SHARON - 106

Industrial Park Dr., Sharon, TN 38255 (731) 456-2008 or JACKSON - 2255 A Hwy 70 E., Jackson, TN 38305 (731) 9352500 (Located in the same building as Nationwide Express) (TnScan)

& Hardin Counties, Tennessee 10% Buyers Premium. Heritage Auction & Real Estate, TFL#4556 Savannah TN. 731-925-3534 or ERA Crunk Real Estate 931-6765100 Visit www.TonyNeill.com (TnScan)

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan)

500 ACRE FARM AUCTION Saturday March 6 at 10 AM, Clifton TN. 250 Acres with $7500 CRP Payments & 100 Acres Rowcrop Savannah River Land, 250 Acres Pasture Reagan TN. Heritage Auction & Real Estate TFL#4556, Savannah TN. 731925-3534 or 926-3133 Visit www.TonyNeill.com (TnScan)

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTRAIN for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 349-5387 (TnScan) YOUR LOW COST ADVERTISING Solution! One call & your 25 word ad will appear in 91 Tennessee newspapers for $265 or 20 West TN newspapers for $95. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnpress.com. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198 or www.CourtDivorceService.com (TnScan)

(TnScan) STOP AND READ THIS. Affordable Dental, Vision and Health Care Plans. Low Cost and low premium plans available for Seniors, Individuals, Families and Businesses. Call 1-800-405-4698 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Become A Citizen Soldier Contact Your Local Recruiter 1-800-GOGUARD (TnScan)

ALL CASH VENDING! DO you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy All for $9,995. 1-888-745-3351 (TnScan) DISH NETWORK $19.99/ MO Free Activation, Free HBO and Free Showtime. Ask about our nocredit promo. 48hr Free Install Call Now 888-929-2580 BuyDishToday.com (TnScan) NEW NORWOOD SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N

TENNESSEE RIVER LOT AUCTION Saturday March 6 at 10 AM, Clifton Tenn. Offering 20 Tennessee River Lots in Decatur

Public Notices SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default having been made in the payment of the debts and obligations secured to be paid by that certain Deed of Trust executed on February 16, 2007, by Martha Freeman Kelley to T. Larry Edmondson’s Office, Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, under Book No. 297, Page 1, (“Deed of Trust”); and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to CitiGroup Global Markets Realty Inc.; and WHEREAS, CitiGroup Global Markets Realty Inc., the current owner and holder of said Deed of Trust, (the “Owner and Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; and NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Owner and Holder, and that the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee, or his duly appointed attorneys or agents, by virtue of the power and authority vested in him, will on Thursday, March 18, 2010, commencing at 12:00 PM at the Main entrance of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: All that parcel of land in Chester County, State of Tennessee, as more fully described in Deed Book 238, Page 36, ID# 33M-D-10.00, being known and designated as metes and bounds property described as follows: Tract One: Beginning at the Northwest corner of the intersection of Third and Galbralth Streets, being the Southeast corner of the lot herein described; runs thence North with the West margin of Galbraith Street 160 feet to an iron stake; thence West 70 feet to an iron stake; thence South 160 feet to an iron stake in the North margin of Third Street; thence East with the North margin of Third Street 70 feet to the point of beginning, or which lot is located a new residence. and Tract Two: Beginning at an iron stake in the North margin of Third Street, at the Southwest corner of the Arthur Freeman lot; thence North with the West margin of the Freeman lot 160 feet to a stake at the Northwest corner of the Freeman lot; thence West 40 feet to a stake; thence South 160 feet to the North margin of Third Street; thence East with the North margin of Third Street 40 feet to the point of beginning. Being the same property conveyed to Martha Freeman Kelley by deed from Finis Kelley filed for record in Book 145, Page 436, Registers Office for Chester County Tennessee, dated 1/17/96. See warranty deed in Book 73, Page 654. See also quit claim deed releasing right of reversion in Book 81, Page 9. Property address known as: 327

East Third Street, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 By fee simple deed from Zula Freeman by Freeman Kelly, POA as set forth in Book 238 Page 36 dated 05/29/2003 and recorded 07/29/2003, Chester County records, State of Tennessee. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 327 East Third Street, Henderson, TN 38340 CURRENT OWNER(S): Martha Freeman Kelley The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDERS: N/A OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: N/A All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee c/o IMR Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 (ext.) File No.: 226.0933630TN Web Site: www.jflegal.com

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated May 31, 2006, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded June 2, 2006, at Book 285, Page 193 in Office of the Register

of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by William Richard Yelverton and Kim Yelverton, conveying certain property therein described to John Clark as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for First State Bank and First State Bank’s successsors and assigns; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on April 8, 2010 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING on a point in the south margin of Old Jacks Creek Road and being 25 feet from the center of said road and also being the northeast corner of a 10 foot strip of property conveyed to Ricky Alan Ray; thence with the margin of said road south 87 deg 26 min 10 sec east a distance of 110 feet to a point being the northwest corner of Harold Crumby; thence leaving road with the west line of Crumby south (passing an iron rod at 5 feet) a total distance of 167.93 feet to an iron rod one foot north of a fence and being the southwest corner of Crumby; thence north 89 deg 25 min 02 sec west a distance of 109.9 feet to an iron rod one foot north of said fence and being the southeast corner of above mentioned 10 foot strip conveyed to Ricky Alan Ray; thence with the east line of said 10 foot strip north (passing an iron rod at 166.74 feet) a total distance of 171.74 feet to the point of beginning as surveyed by C.E. Lewis, RLS No. 1380, Jackson, TN on June 12, 1998. Said legal description is the same

description as contained in the previous deed of record. ALSO KNOWN AS: 390 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: William Richard Yelverton; Kim Yelverton The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 817182431 DATED February 19, 2010. WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FHA No. 4823797600 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of

Trust Note dated September 3, 2004, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded September 10, 2004, at Book 257, Page 417 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Steven E. Staggs and Margaret A. Staggs, conveying certain property therein described to Kathy Winstead as Trustee for Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, a New Jersey Corporation; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on March 25, 2010 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Lying and being situated in the Second Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a stake in the center of a gravel road, this point being the northwest comer of James Davis’ tract of land; runs thence in a westerly direction with the northern boundary line of

James Davis’ tract of land 14 chains to an iron stake; runs thence in a northern direction with the severance line of Robert I. Bailey, 4.6 chains to an iron stake; runs thence in a northwesterly direction with the severance line of Robert I. Bailey, 3.7 chains to a stake in the center of said gravel road; thence in a southwesterly direction with the center of said gravel road, 6.4 chains to the point of beginning, containing 2.4 acres, more or less. ALSO KNOWN AS: 185 Figueroa Lane, Jacks Creek, Tennessee 38347 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Steven E. Staggs; Margaret A. Staggs The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700181393 DATED February 26, 2010. WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, March 4, 2010

Mountaintop coal mining, called destructive to people and environment By Randy O’Brien Tennessee News Service

Tennessee environmentalists have new ammunition in their fight against Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining (MRCM) after an article published in “Science” magazine confirming that the practice has cataclysmic effects on plants, animals and people. The article says the effects of MRCM on people include causing lung cancer, chronic heart, lung and kidney disease, and higher mortality rates. Axel Ringe, vice-chair of conservation for the

Tennessee chapter of the Sierra Club, says decapitating mountains to get to seams of coal may be economically expedient, but it’s environmentally foolish. “They drill into the rock and put explosives in and turn the mountaintop into rubble. They continue this process on down until they get to the coal seam that they’re interested in and then they scoop up the coal and they truck it off.” Severe environmental degradation occurs, including the destruction of vast tracts of ancient forest, and hundreds of miles of small

streams are affected. Ringe says that, while required reclamation does take place after the coal is mined, the natural habitat of the area never fully recovers from the effects of minerals exposed by the process. The “Science” article concluded that mountaintop removal permits should no longer be granted. The EPA recently approved an expansion of the largest mountaintop-removal coal mine in West Virginia. The “Science” article is at: www.sciencemag.org.

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