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Chester County Trice inks with FHU Thursday

FEBRUARY 24, 2011 146th YEAR - NO. 42

chestercountyindependent.com

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Proposed bill will silence teacher bargaining rights By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

In Wisconsin, the governor plans to increase health and pension contributions by public employees while eliminating their right to collective bargaining. Coming on the heals of the statewide government gridlock, the future doesn’t look promising for unions and professional associations. Tennessee faces a similar situation, and the Tennessee Education Association isn’t pleased with the outlook for teachers and their negotiation rights. Last week the Senate Education Committee voted to deny teachers the right to negotiate their contracts with local school boards. The bill, which was introduced by Rep. Debra Maggart of Hendersonville, is co-sponsored by District 26 Senator Delores Gresham, and it states: “This bill prohibits any local board of education from negotiating with a professional employees’ organization or teachers’ union concerning the terms or conditions of professional service on or after the effective date of this bill.” The Education Professional Negotiations Act, passed in 1978, gives professional organizations such as the TEA the right to negotiate through representatives and to negotiate in good faith the following conditions of employment: salaries or wages; grievance procedures; insurance; fringe benefits; working conditions; leave; student discipline procedures; and

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion Right to Know Obituaries Babies of 2010 What’s Happening Sports Education Classifieds

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payroll deductions. The bill that faces the state legislature would “remove all rights and requirements under present state law regarding such professional employees, professional employees’ organizations, and negotiations between such organizations and the board of education or the governing body of the charter school.” According to Chester County TEA representative Melinda Carroll, the local chapter has always found bargaining their contract a fruitful means of discussion and deliberation of issues facing teachers and the school system in general. “If it wasn’t for collective bargaining, we wouldn’t otherwise all sit down and talk about what is beneficial to teachers as well as to the system,” Carroll said. Chester County, she explained, was one of the first systems in the state to bargain contracts effectively, and the county has a reputation of having one of the best contracts in Tennessee. While bargaining is See BILL, Page 2-A

Joe Henry (left) appears in court Friday morning. He faces especially aggravated robbery charges in the assault on his elderly uncle Gurley Harris. Henry is being held on $500,000 bond.

Henry arraigned on $500,000 bond in beating of elderly man Joe Allen Henry, 47, appeared in General Sessions court on Feb. 18. He is charged with especially aggravated robbery in connection to the alleged assault of his uncle, Gurley Harris, 84. Judge Larry McKenzie appointed a public defender to represent Henry in the case. He is scheduled for a mental evaluation with Pathways Community Metal Health Center and is being held on $500,000 bond. Last Tuesday, Feb. 15, Harris was found by Henderson police about 10 a.m. at his home at 150 Second St. Officers had gone to Harris’ home on a

welfare check and found him apparently beaten. He was rushed to Jackson-Madison County General Hospital with severe injuries, and was listed in critical condition late Tuesday. Henry was identified as a person of interest in the assault, and he was arrested without incident Wednesday afternoon in Jackson. He remains in custody of the Chester County jail. The Henderson Police Department and the TBI are conducting the investigation. If anyone has information in the case they should call 1-800TBI-FIND (1-800-824-3463), or the HPD at 9892201.

Freeland sentencing CCHS Decathlon postponed until May 23 ranks second in state By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

After being rescheduled once due to snow, the sentencing hearing of John Freeland Jr. was set to begin on Feb. 16; however, Judge Roy Morgan granted a continuance until May 23. Freeland, who was found guilty of first-degree murder, murder in perpetration of especially aggravated kidnapping, especially aggravated kidnapping, and tampering with evidence in the March 2009 shooting death of Carolyn Ward, is eligible for the death penalty. Ward was found shot once in the head on Dry Creek Rd. in Pinson after

See page 5-A Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

TODAY’S WEATHER

Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

John Freeland Jr. awaits sentencing last Wednesday morning. His defense attorneys stated that they were unable to obtain a mitigation expert in time for the hearing, and there-

being kidnapped from a Henderson area business. Her car was later discovered burned in Madison County. Freeland’s attorney Angela Hopson told the judge that the defense hadn’t had time to obtain a mitigation expert. Hopson said that the shortest time needed to acquire an expert would be three months, with a maximum of six. In his opening remarks, District Attorney General Jerry Woodall stated, “This is obviously a very crucial part of the second phase of this trial, and the State does not want jeopardy to attach and this to go up on appeal unless this is rendered.” A mitigation expert would provide evidence for the defendant that would play an integral role in sentencing. Hopson stated that it would be in her client’s best-interest to obtain such an expert prior to the start of the sentencing hearing. The State did not object to Hopson’s request. In fact, Woodall brought the concerns to Judge Morgan before Hopson had the opportunity to request a continuance. “I just don’t want to put this proceeding at risk for appellate purposes,” Woodall continued. Although the court allowed more than the requisite 40 days See FREELAND, Page 3-A

Highway Patrol announces weekend roadblock schedule Tennessee Highway Patrol announced that roadblocks have been scheduled in Chester County for Friday, March 4. According to the announcement by Lt. David Killingsworth of the THP, there will be a drivers license checkpoint at the inter-

section of Old Jacks Creek Rd. and Talley Store Rd. There will also be a sobriety checkpoint on Hwy. 200 in Mifflin. Motorists are advised to drive with care and watch for checkpoints.

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

The CCHS Academic Decathlon team returned from State Competition at Austin Peay this weekend with a second place finish and 34 medals. They will advance to Academic Decathlon National Online Competition in April. Hour upon hour of reading, learning, studying and reviewing, paid off once again for the Chester County High School Decathlon team, as they returned from State Competition this weekend with a second place finish. The team will now begin preparing for the next level as they advance to the Academic Decathlon National Online Competition to be held in April. The weekend’s competition was held at Austin Peay State University and included an online essay prior to arrival, in addition to speeches, questions relating to art, economics, math, social science, language and literature, music, and of course, the Super Quiz. Test questions were based on this year’s theme “The Great Depression,” and the Super Quiz topic was geology. The competition concluded Saturday afternoon with the Oral Super Quiz, in which each

team member goes head to head with one member of each of the other teams to answer five questions. The Oral Super Quiz event is open to the public, increasing the tension and excitement which already surrounds the event. Dates for the national competition are April 12 (essay and art), April 28 (social science, economics, math, and language & literature), and April 29 (music and super quiz). CCHS will be competing in the Medium School Division. The team placed eighth in the National Online Competition last year. The team won 34 individual medals and had a team Super Quiz finish of second place. This is CCHS’s strongest finish to date. The team would like to thank several individuals who See DECATHLON, Page 7-A


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

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Bill effective for achieving adequate pay and benefits for teachers, Carroll added that in her experience the process also encourages the system to put the needs of students first as well, with safety and building maintenance being two important negotiating points. “In Chester County we’ve been very fortunate because the last administration and the present one have been very supportive of us,” she said. Superintendent Cherrie Pipkin added that while, from an administrative standpoint, contact negotiations can be

time consuming and sometimes force an “us against them” mentality, she has been extremely pleased with the way Chester County’s teachers’ association handles bargaining. “They handle it with dignity and have been very gracious,” Pipkin said. She also appreciates the opportunity to speak with teachers about issues that otherwise wouldn’t come up in general discussion. Unfortunately, many administrations and school boards in the state – and the entire country – haven’t experienced the dialogue and smooth negotiation process that Chester County has been fortunate enough to face. The Tennessee School Board Administration

pushed for the bill because of negativity and feeling as though the teacher’s groups and administrations were often working against one another. Under tight state and local budgets, school boards can’t be as flexible and generous with benefits and raises as they have in the past, and that can drive a wedge in the bargaining process. “I like to advocate for teachers,” Pipkin said, “but I have to do so in light of funds, working conditions, and what’s best for students.” If the bill passes, as it seems it might, Pipkin remains optimistic that Chester County won’t see the tremendous effects that some systems will. “Even so, it won’t change the way the board works

with teachers, and the board will continue to be supportive of our teachers.” The ultimate goal of the bill remains unclear, however. In a time when Tennessee schools are facing daunting challenges for teachers and students alike, the bill does nothing to help raise test scores, prepare students for college or high-tech jobs, or give students a global advantage. “I’m concerned about why this is an issue now,” Carroll added. “No one can give me a good reason for why this is sound judgment.” Carroll stated that teachers in District 26 have spoken with Sen. Gresham and asked her to support public education, but at the moment, they

Fenimore resigns from CCMS to take county supervisory position By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

After 14 years as principal of Chester County Middle School Randle Fenimore has decided it is time for him to move on to other challenges. He announced his resignation earlier this month in the school newsletter, but he will remain in his current position until the end of the school year. “I’ve been doing this job for 17 years, and it’s time for me to do something else,” he said. Fenimore was principal of East Chester Elementary for three years before the middle school was established, and he has been the only principal that the newest Chester County school has known. Prior to assuming prinicpalship, he taught fifth grade for eight years. Beginning this summer, he will assume a supervisory position as data analyst for the county. In addition to handling

the data scores for all Chester County schools, Fenimore will also be in charge of testing; supervising attendance and discipline; coordination for hiring, training, and placing substitute teachers; performing evaluations; and supervising the North Chester administrative building. Superintendent Cherrie Pipkin added that as the state will mandate evaluations of all teachers beginning next year, Fenimore will be an excellent middle grades specialist. The hardest part of leaving the middle school, Fenimore said, will be the lack of contact with students. “I have a very strong emotional attachment to my students, and at my new job, I’ll have virtually no contact with students at all.” However, he is excited about his new career move. When Pipkin approached him concerning the position, he admitted that it was the kind of job he recently had been considering. With a wide

RANDLE FENIMORE array of responsibilities, he will have little time to miss his former school. “I like being busy, and I’ve pretty well always stayed busy,” he said. Beginning in March, Pipkin will start a search for a new CCMS principal. Applicants must have school administration and instructional leadership endorsements and/or a Master’s degree in school administration. She hopes to hire from within the system, but ultimately, she will make her decision based on the best fit for

FHU to break ground for science center, name sports center March 4 Freed-Hardeman University will break ground for the Anderson Science Center, an $8 million facility designed to provide laboratory space for FHU’s biology and chemistry departments, and officially name the university’s sports center March 4, according to FHU President Joe Wiley. Groundbreaking for the approximately 22,000 square foot building is scheduled to begin at 11:30 a.m. at the construction site located at the corner of Main Street and Hamlett Avenue. Fleming and Associates, of Memphis, designed the building, and Alliance Corporation, Glasgow, Ky., is the construction management firm. Actual construction is slated to begin near the end of March. The completion is set for summer 2012. Anderson Science Center will house labs for chemistry, biochemistry, biology, microbiology, and anatomy and physiology. In addition to the larger classroom labs, six smaller labs will be devoted to research. Faculty offices and a conference room are also a part of the facility. James T. (Tom) Anderson is the naming donor for the science center. A 1973 graduate of Freed-Hardeman, he is the co-founder and president of Capella

Healthcare, which owns 13 hospitals across the country. Prior to 2005 when he left to found Capella, Anderson was senior vice president for acquisitions and development for Province Healthcare. Capella was named one of “Tennessee’s Top 25 Fa s t e s t - G ro w i n g Companies” last summer by Nashville Business Journal. It was the second consecutive year the Franklin-based company had made the list. It is also listed as one of Tennessee’s 100 largest private companies. In addition to an A.A. from Freed-Hardeman, Anderson holds a B.S. in Accounting from Tennessee Technological State University, and an M.B.A. from Auburn at Montgomery. He has been named to the FHU Board of Trustees. He and his wife, the former Jade Hawkins, also a ’73 alumna of Freed-Hardeman, are the parents of four children. They live in Columbia. The sports center will be named in memory of Carmack R. Brewer at ceremonies beginning at 1:30 p.m. in front of the building. Brewer, a longtime educator in Wayne County, attended FreedHardeman from 1933-35. He was a forward on the school’s basketball team.

Brewer began his career as an educator in a oneteacher school and concluded it as principal of Wayne County Middle School. He and his wife Lorene are the parents of five children, four of whom attended FreedHardeman. In addition, six of his grandchildren and several great-grandchildren are or have been FHU students. Brewer is the uncle of Tom Anderson. “Freed-Hardeman University is home to an outstanding group of young men and women pursuing degrees in the sciences,” Dr. LeAnn Davis, dean of the School of Sciences and Mathematics, said. “A facility of this caliber will not only elevate the quality of our current science programs, but will also allow us to develop essential science programs for the future,” she said. Wiley expressed his gratitude to Anderson saying, “We deeply appreciate Tom’s generosity and his commitment to the university. Freed-Hardeman depends upon the good will of its friends and alumni as we work to provide an excellent education in a Christian environment. This gift will benefit not only our current students, but also the students who will come our way in the future.”

the position. “What we need is a highly qualified manager with a good, strong academic background,” Pipkin said. She is looking for someone with high expectations for faculty, staff, and students – someone who can continue to help the school and the school system make academic strides. “Mr. Fenimore has taken them to high level academically already, and we need someone who can continue to help us improve.” By summer, Pipkin hopes to have a new principal in place so Fenimore can make a smooth transition into his supervisory role.

feel their conversations have been in vain. With Gresham co-sponsoring the bill, local teachers feel as if their ability to negotiate for fair and equitable work and to champion their students’ education has come under attack. In Chester County, approximately 55 to 58 percent of teachers belong to the TEA. The contracts the group negotiates apply to all teachers, whether they are members or not, and Carroll believes that it’s “a useful tool for everybody involved.” Because of the ability to negotiate their contracts, Chester County teachers were able to obtain planning periods and lunch programs that other systems took much longer in acquiring. “However, [Sen. Gresham] doesn’t want to address it with us,” Carroll said. “I would love

for her to give us some valid reasons for this bill. I hope that people are listening to both sides of the issue and not just jumping to conclusions. I know that states are in trouble, but when bills go up and pay is cut, then those people become the working poor.” As labor unions and supports across the nation prepare to launch protests in solidarity with Wisconsin workers, Tennessee looks toward a similar anti-labor fate. Both sides are looking for answers, but the discussion and dialogue between the parties has yet to begin. Right to work states such as Tennessee have been seeing job growth, but when the bargaining power of the unions is taken away, what say do the workers actually have?


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

Tennessee Voices: Lady Bird Imagination Library should remain part of new administration’s budget A Tennessee kindergarten teacher once shared a humbling story with me. On the first day of school, she asked each of her students to bring their favorite book into class the following day. When the children arrived in the morning, books inhand, one little girl stood out: she’d brought the telephone directory – the only printed material in her home. This child’s circumstance isn’t uncommon in Tennessee, as thousands begin their formal education having never even seen a book – much less owned a personal library of up to 60 books before kindergarten. Twelve million deliveries later, something truly remarkable has transpired in The Volunteer State. Amid discouraging news about Tennessee’s educational performance indicators, one area in

which we’ve managed to receive top marks is early childhood—due in part to our unique backing of Dolly’s Imagination Library. Infants, babies, toddlers, preschoolers: all are eligible to receive a monthly delivery of a high-quality, age-appropriate book—at no cost to the family, and regardless of income, thereby serving as a cultural and experiential common denominator among myriad socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. This month, nearly 60 percent of the state’s under-five population will find a book in their mailboxes (214,000); over 200,000 have “graduated.” When Gov. Phil Bredesen partnered with Dolly Parton, he allocated State funds to cover half the $24/per-child annual cost, asking each county to raise the other halfshare. He also established

Delta Kappa Gamma makes donation to Imagination Library

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Melinda Carroll, President of the Delta Kappa Gamma, Theta Chapter, right, presents a check to Scott Whaley, chairman of the Chester County Imagination Library Board of Directors. Delta Kappa Gamma is an organization for key women educators and the chapter is comprised of Chester and south Madison. Imagination Library provides books to local children 0-5 at no charge.

the Governor’s Books from Birth Foundation to handle statewide administration; serve as a resource to countywide non-profit sponsors; and solicit funds from corporations, foundations, and others to support economically-distressed communities – ensuring universal access to these wonderful books. Devoted grassroots volunteers are daily registering children and fundraising for their local programs. These good Samaritans – ranging from business leaders, to health care professionals, to journalists, librarians, teachers and Rotarians – resoundingly affirm that our youth will be better prepared for a 21st Century, global economy through early exposure to books and reading. Evidence is in their corner: a 2007 Tennessee Board of Regents study found that pre-K/kindergarten teachers identified known Imagination Library participants in their classrooms as better prepared to learn. In addition, a national study found that preschoolers who were exposed to books and reading entered school with a 20,000 word listening vocabulary versus 3,000 words for those without a books and reading background. Included among local champions are Governor and First Lady Haslam, who were formidably connected with the Knox County Imagination Library. Mrs. Haslam even held a leadership role as a key philanthropic volunteer. Thanks to the Haslams’ support and that of many others, Knox County boasts an enrollment of three-quarters of their under-five population, an amazing feat for an urbanized area. With its hundreds of thousands of beneficiaries and volunteer stakeholders, Tennessee’s Imagination Library must become an “untouchable” in the Education budget. It subsists on a shoestring in view of the astronomical taxpayer bill for prisons and criminal justice programs, as there’s overwhelming research correlating public investments in early education with

the brain development and literacy skills required to produce wellbalanced, prepared, productive young people, who are more concerned with knowledge and achievement, than they are with getting into trouble and falling behind. Gov. Haslam and the General Assembly should maintain the State’s investment in the Imagination Library, and the GBBF – because early exposure to books and reading is one of the most significant contributors toward our children’s success in school, and in life. Lady Bird is the immediate-past president of the Governor’s Books from Birth Foundation, having served from 2004-2009. Learn more about Tennessee’s statewide Imagination Library at www.GovernorsFoundatio n.org.

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Freeland to acquire mitigation, the defense lagged behind. Based on statements from the State in favor of allowing the defense time to organize their expert, Judge Morgan agreed to go ahead with the continuance, setting May 23 as the new date for the hearing. Hopson told the court that the defense has a mitigation expert on standby that will be able to review the evidence within nine weeks. Freeland is the first of three suspects to stand trial in the case.

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Life & Style

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HEATHER ELISE HOLLAND AND JEREMY ALLEN DURHAM

Holland – Durham engagement Heather Elise Holland of Jacks Creek and Jeremy Allen Durham of Beech Bluff will marry on March 5, 2011, at 2:00 p.m. at Lighthouse Church, 1435 Old Humboldt Road in Jackson. Heather is the daughter of Tony and Andrea Holland of Jacks Creek. Her grandparents are Lance and Ann Wallace Bailey of Luray, and the late Lilburn C. and Velrea Meek Holland of Milledgeville. Heather is a 2007 honor graduate of Chester County High School and a 2010 graduate of Jackson State Community College. She is employed with Davidson Titles in Jackson. Jeremy is the son of Randy and Marie Durham of Beech Bluff. He is the grandson of Lester and Ilene Durham, Neal Loyd, and Jimmy and Roberta Mizell, all of Beech Bluff. Jeremy attended Christian Life Academy in Henderson until it closed and then graduated in 2006 from Gateway. He is an honor graduate of Tennessee Tech Center of Lexington. He is a Mig and Tig Welder with Yield King of Alamo.

Our deepest sympathy goes to the family and friends of Danny Gerald Stanfill. On our prayer list this week are LaVerne Lott, Melba Seaton, Bob Kanazar, Donnie Sells, Allen Miller Jr., Ernie Reeves, Martha Mainord, Loretta Haggard, Joyce Hart, Joanne Sells, Nancy Connor, Pam Priddy, Shirley Rietl, Randy Sells, Michael Berry, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Bobbie Nell Wells, Carolyn Potter, Joanne

Altier, LaVada Howie, Alexis Boggs, Gerald Stanfill, Dianne Wells, Jean Latham, Carroll Williams, John Kent Sells, Ollie Dean Kennedy, Gathel Latham, Shirley Gaddy, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Happy anniversary to Chris and Tosha Grissom on Feb. 25; Charles and Sue Lewis on Feb. 27; Junior and Brenda Ross on March 2; and Charles and Kathy Dyer on March 3. Birthday greetings to Peggy Hooper and Bethany Jones on Feb. 25; Bill Vickrey on Feb. 26; Trish Nichols and Sue Lewis on Feb. 27; Delma Maness on Feb. 28; Henry Miller, Amos Page, Dustin Jones and Betty Tucker on March 1; Dylan Tucker on March 2; and Darrell Jones and Lisa Gregory on March 3.

She carries the spirit of youth into her golden years; she never loses enthusiasm. That sums it up for Murdell Barker. A baker’s dozen enjoyed an evening at Whiskers. The guests were Joel and Janis McCall; Marva and Eric Sain with April and Emily; Molly and Tim Forderhase with Amanda, Alex and Anna; and Hope Forderhase, Tim’s mother. The candles couldn’t match the glow on Murdell’s face. Dressed in pink and so pretty, she and family enjoyed birthday cake and four additional miniature caramel cakes delivered from two Jacks Creek friends who love her and her chocolate pie. The deacons at Unity Church prepared a loving feast and sang to “Twenty of the best women” they know. What a lovely gesture to extend love to dear friends at church. Bill Ledbetter in

Arizona received a call from Jim Ruth after he saw Bill’s phone number in the newspaper. Now it is your turn to call your friend. Gather tidbits and share with me. Bill loves to hear from home. Surely someone will set up a reunion for those born from 19251929 and went to Chester County High School. I will help you, if you call me 989-7485. Bill’s number is 623-587-1042 or cell 623-692-9870. Give him a call, and then call Jim Ruth at 901-288-3358. He loves to keep up with Chester County folks. Little girls are made of sugar and spice. Local folks are taking turns nibbling on this pink bundle of love. Tim and Mindy’s little Kaylee Taylor is home for two weeks with grandparents, Terry and Sharon Boothe. Standing in line with arms outstretched are Traci, Cassie, and Tessa Duck, and Amber and Darren Jones. Tim’s parents, Charlie Taylor and Lynn Purdue from Lafayette, are simply waiting patiently to stretch their arms. A special hug is waiting for a Murfreesboro cousin, Gail

We would like to send our sincere condolences to the family and friends of Danny Stanfill who passed away Friday, Feb. 18. Happy birthday wishes go to Parker Herndon on Feb. 24; Carolyn Wright on Feb. 25; Annie Massengill on Feb. 27; and Brenda Todd and Neely Fletcher on Feb. 28. Happy anniversary to Larry and Tammie Martin on Feb. 27; Jimmie and Debbie Martin on March 1; and Lynn and Sarah Canaday on March 2. The Enville Community Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 1, at the community center. The boys and their instructors from Youth Town of Tennessee will be our guests. This will be a very informative and heartfelt presentation, as they will be sharing stories as to what the Youth Town has done for them. Everyone is urged to attend. The Senior Lunch is at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, March 2. If anyone is looking for a hunter, yard watcher, or just a loving pet, there are Jack Russell puppies that were born on Dec. 11; they are adorable, smart, and finally old enough for a

new home. There are only three females left. For more information, call 608-3499. I would like to say thank you to the gentleman who stopped to help me Monday when the brakes on my car locked up. I was on my way to a funeral and thought I wouldn’t make it. It is so nice to live in a community where people look out for each other. Thank you so much for your kindness. The CCHS Band Boosters will be having a yard sale starting at 7 a.m. on Saturday, March 5, at Chester County Junior High School. This will be to raise money for their St. Louis trip in April. All donations will be appreciated. They would like to invite everyone to come by and remember, “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure.” Maybe I shouldn’t say junk, because I have found some really good stuff at yard sales. Call 879-6075 for more information. Hope to see you there. The Enville Volunteer Fire Department would like to invite everyone to come to the Spaghetti Supper Fundraiser at 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 12 at the community center. The cakewalk will be at 6:30 p.m. “You can’t live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you.” – John Wooden Have a great week, and call me with your news at 989-0212.

Talmadge Murley, who will be having a birthday soon, is shown with his great-grandson, Odin Mosier; granddaughter, Ashley Mosier; and son, Randy Murley. This is four generations of the Murley family. (Richard) Turner. Sharon says she and Gail are cousins by blood, but sisters in their hearts. Bulldozing has pushed a local Jacks Creek couple into “50 plus” years of marriage. Ann looks like a “First Lady” to Lance Bailey. All they need is a white house! Get that dozer ready on Feb. 22. Engraving “Happy Anniversary and Presidents’ Day” shouldn’t take long to scratch into some good topsoil. Presidents’ Day honors President Lincoln and President Washington, and Happy Anniversary honors, Ann and Lance. Prayer has been requested for Lori Thomas, Jacky Maness, Bob Kanizar, Jane Vestal Kanizar and Lois Wilkerson. It was enjoyable playing bingo at Henderson Villa, and envious when Inez Cash called “Bingo” first! The patter of little feet will be happening before long for Henderson County friends, Thomas and Katrina B. Newlin. I attended their wedding, and now they have extended an invitation to

the baby shower. Also, Justin and Tiffany Frank are having a boy! That Tignor family keeps growing. Does this make 13 great-grandkids for Carl and Carnell Tignor? Lucky 13 says a lot for this family. Justin, we’re looking for a “GI-Joe” to mail. Sorry I missed the shower. Our community expresses sympathy to the families of Vonnie Talbott Garner (8-21-24 / 2-1511); Lea Vocat Flinn (520-14 / 2-18-11); Dorothy Glover (12-10-25 / 2-1911), a friend of Dusty- will share photo with Ann Cox; and Danny Stanfill (4-2951 / 2-18-11). Danny, his wife, and I graduated from high school in 1969. Danny was a sweet boy full of fun and life. His parents were well-mannered southern good people; Norman Smith (12-9-30 / 2-20-11), retired manager of the Lexington Airport for more than 40 years; and Wayne Isbell (4-2-43 / 2-20-11). God bless you. “Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.” You are stronger than you realize.

Thursday, February 24, 2011

JERRY AND LAVERN SMITH

Smith 50th anniversary Jerry and Lavern Smith of Milan, formerly of Henderson, are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. They were married on Feb. 21, 1961, in Henderson. They have three children, Tony Smith (Rhonda) and Keith Smith (Wanda), all of Milan, and Susan Smith Holbrook (Lenie) of Athens, Ohio; and six grandchildren, Ashley, Jerica, Ross, Taylor, Adam and Haven. Jerry is retired from Jerry’s Body Shop and Wrecker Service of Milan, and he and Lavern are currently the owners of Jerry’s Auto Sales Storage and Rentals. Lavern is a homemaker. Jerry and Lavern attend Temple Baptist Church.

News from the City

Hello, I hope everyone had a wonderful week as I did. On Sunday evening after church the East and West all-star game was on. I was in the family room with Glorina, Frank Jr., LaWanna, and my husband Frank. Some of them were cheering for the East, and you know I was for the West with Kobe. I realized how blessed I am. Why do I say that? Because we have each other. It’s not always about how much material things you possess, it is about the love you have for your family, friends, and loved ones. On Thursday of last week, my co-worker and I were getting something to eat. While in the store, I spoke to two lovely ladies; I believe their names were Joann and Carolyn, and their smiles were so pleasant. I asked them if they were twins and they said, “no, we are sisters.” I told them I have two sisters and I am the oldest. The point is they are family and out enjoying being with one another. I would like to welcome the new family restaurant, Country Corner Buffet to the City of Henderson. I hope you will do well. Help for senior care is here: Henderson Villa, located at 360 Kindra Drive, is a retirement and assisted living facility and are enrolling clients. For more information, call Kim at 731-435-1219. People of Henderson and surrounding area need to go and support the new businesses and make them feel welcome. Chester County Head

Start is still accepting applications for 3- and 4year-olds. For more information, call 989-2561 or 989-5111. On Friday, Feb. 18, Southwest Head Start hosted its first Job Fair, and it was outstanding! Thanks to the hard work of Carrie Buck, Director of Social Services. There were many positive comments about the event. Many are asking when there will be another one. Keep up the good work. Thank you, Bobby King, for coming out to support us. Cool Spring MBC, will be having a Black History program at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Feb. 27. The public is invited. Forty-seven years ago, there was a couple that said, “I do” on Feb. 22, and they did. Happy anniversary to John and Lillia Cawthon. Happy anniversary to James and Sally Cawthon on Feb 23. I would like to wish Emma Brown McKnight happy birthday Feb. 28; she will be 88. My heart and prayers goes out to the elderly gentleman that was assaulted in his home. Let’s keep him in our prayers. Pray for Bob Kinazar, Genvea Armstrong and Vircie Massengill. Also, pray for our children, our teachers, our family, our men and women that are serving our country, and the incarcerated If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the city, call 989-1907 and leave your message or you may email me at gloria__holiday@msn.co m. On my last note, I would like to say, “A family that prays together will stay together.” I love you.

Lifestyle Pricing The Chester County Independent charges $30 for engagement announcements with photo, wedding announcements with photo, anniversary announcements with photo, and miscellaneous lifestyle photos. There is no charge for birth announcements without photo, but $25 with photo, and $35 for color photo. For more information, call 731-989-4624.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

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Chocolate chip cookies, not just for after school Last weekend, I decided I needed to use the bag of toffee chips in my pantry before they became stale. I thought about pouring them into a pan of brownies, but I wanted to make something more exciting to write about for this column. I don’t really have many recipes that call for toffee, so I don’t really know why I bought the bag of toffee chips to begin with. I guess I thought I might make cookies or candy for the holidays, but I was too busy when Christmas came around. So there they sat. After I found this recipe, I’ve decided that it’s my new “go-to” chocolate chip cookie recipe, and everyone in my office seemed to love them when I let them taste-test. They’re so much better than store bought cookies, even better than the kind made from the pre-mixed rolls of dough. I like knowing what goes into my food – even though I often succumb to pre-packaged food for the sake of convenience. My dough has a tendency to turn out dry and crumbly, so I added ¼ cup milk to the ingredients. Don’t add the milk if your dough shapes easily and stays together while you’re forming it into balls on the cookie sheet. However, if the dough crumbles and has a dry, shapeless consistency, add the milk a tablespoon at a time until it holds its form. Baked goods often respond to the humidity in the air, so be aware of your dough and how it responds. You may find you need to add more liquid on dry days and less on humid ones – my

I am writing this with a heavy heart today. We lost a good friend Friday and went to the funeral Monday. Danny Stanfill had cancer for eight months. He and his family have had a hard time. Danny and Orban were very close. We love his family, His wife Myrna, daughters and their families, Amy, Kevin and Makenzie Howell, Amber, Steven, and Cooper Lay dearly and want to request that you pray for them in their time of sorrow. Danny was a unique man and loved his family as well as all of his many friends. He was very generous and would do anything for his friends. He will be greatly missed by so many people.

favorite bread recipe is notoriously finicky about the weather, and now I only bake it when I know the weather outside is dry and mild. Obviously, these aren’t fat-free, good for the waistline, or low-calorie, but for a treat, they’re the best I’ve found. They do take a little preparation, but if you’re willing to devote a few minutes to do the prep work, you can easily make your own slice-and-bake cookies for later. All you have to do is prepare the dough as directed through step two of the directions, roll into logs about six inches long and two inches in diameter, wrap the rolls of cookie dough in plastic wrap or

waxed paper, and freeze until ready to use. This recipe makes at least three dozen cookies, so it’s perfect to make ahead. Bake a dozen, save the rest, and enjoy with a cold glass of milk. To find additional recipes, check out the “Just a Pinch” column on page 5-A, or visit www.justapinch.com. “Thyme to Cook” is a regular feature in the Chester County Independent. Email your favorite or best recipes to mdunbar@chestercountyindependent.com or mail them to Chester County Independent c/o Mary Dunbar, P.O. Box 306, Henderson, TN 38340.

Toffee Chocolate Chip Cookies Ingredients: 1 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 cup butter, softened 1/2 cup shortening 1/4 cup white sugar 1 egg 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 cups mini semi-sweet chocolate chips 1 (6 ounce) package toffee chips 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 cup milk (if dough is dry, add one tablespoon at a time until sticky) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 2. Mix sugars, margarine and shortening until light and fluffy. Mix in egg and vanilla. Stir in flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Add milk as needed. Stir in chocolate chips and toffee chips. 3. Drop dough by rounded teaspoons onto ungreased cookie sheet. Bake 14 minutes, or until lightly brown. Also, in our community, Doris Pickett has lost her brother, Wayne Isbell. He and his wife Pam moved next door to Doris and Quay about five years ago on Murdaugh Lane. Doris said this was the first time that he had lived in the country and sure did love it. The funeral is Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 11 a.m. at Shackelford Casey Chapel. Please pray for the family during this hard time. Our heartfelt sympathy is with you all. I just heard today that Steve Harris, son of Joe and Ella Harris, passed away and was buried at Pleasant Springs Cemetery Feb. 16. We are sorry for your loss. I live right by the cemetery and still missed it. Get well wishes to Phillip Ragan, Dennis Bain, Freddie Murley Smith, Wayne Warren, Nella Rush, Linda Dowdy, Charles Murley and Mary Lou Miller. If you know of anyone that needs our prayers please call me. Continue to remember our soldiers and their fam-

ilies. Happy birthday to Kimba Harris, Hershell Hopper and Joey Lillard on Feb. 24. Happy 62nd anniversary to Hershell and Clara Hopper. Congratulations! They are at Southern Oaks Assisted Living. I hope they are doing well. Our thought of the week: “If you want to get somewhere, you have to know where you want to go and how to get there. Then never, never, never give up.” – Norman Vincent Peale. This is also Justin Beiber’s philosophy and look where he is. Our community club meeting is March 1. Come and participate in the affairs of our community. If you are new in the community, we’d love to have the opportunity to meet you. Have a great week. My number is 879-9777.

Things have been quiet out our way. I know Cindy is very busy at Sweetlips Greenhouse. I believe April 1 is opening day. That early, we do usually get April fooled! The monthly singing will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 26, at Old Town Full Gospel Church in Savannah.

Hopewell Church is trying to get a cookbook together for their 151st anniversary. Anyone wishing to contribute recipes may contact Nancy Kinchen at 989-7342. Our monthly meal for the month of March is at 6:30 p.m. March 8. We are hoping as the weather gets better a few more will attend. On our prayer list are Spencer Goodwin, Bill Kinchen, Albert Jones, Bob Kanizar, Mary Russell, Butch Russell, Chrissy Busby, Betty Stout, Jim Alexander, Dan Vales, Alyse Reitz, Ernie Merrimen, Donna Murphy, and our military

and their families. Happy birthday to Mamie Morain, Ike Kinchen and Mark Bell on Feb. 24; Christy Gilliam on Feb. 25; Jane Johnson on Feb. 27; Bobby Pickett on Feb. 28; Bill Kinchen on Feb. 29; and Norma McPeake on March 1. Happy anniversary to Paxton and Carol Connor on Feb. 26. If you have news to share, call 989-7523. Thought for the week: Friendship is not created by what we give, but more by what we share. It makes a whole world of things easier to bear. Have a great week everyone!

Center offers free colorectal screening The Kirkland Cancer Center at JacksonMadison County General Hospital, along with the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation, is offering a free colorectal cancer screening at participating pharmacies around West Tennessee. March 1-12 free hem occult kits will be avail-

able for pick up at the pharmacies listed below Most people should begin screening for colorectal cancer at the age of 50. Those with family his-

tory or other risk factors should begin screening at an earlier age. For more information, call the Kirkland Cancer center (731) 541-5087.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

RUSSELL EPPERSON

Living Well By Russell Epperson Columnist

Chester County Independent archives, February 24, 1961

VALENTINE ROYALTY at the P.T.A. Valentine Party held recently at the Henderson Elementary School are left to right: Prince Rex McCallum, son of Dr. and Mrs. O.M. McCallum; Queen Janice Capps, daughter of Mrs. Edward Thomas; King Bill McCall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe McCall; and Princess Joy Brewer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Brewer.

Chester County Independent archives, February 25, 1971

SPEAKING CONTEST WINNERS – Winners of the 4-H Club Public Speaking Contest held Saturday morning at the courthouse are pictured above. First place winners are pictured in the back row, left to right, Nancy King, Kathy Ross, Lisa Holland, Jeff King, and Rickie Trice. Second and third place winners in the front row are, left to right, Brian Peddy (2nd), Terry Carroll (3rd), Richard Steed (2nd), Scott Whaley (3rd), Susan Steed (2nd), Ann Stardivant (3rd), and Mary Lowery (2nd).

Only Yesterday “Court Vote To Pursue Hospital” From the files of the Chester County Independent

college graduates, and wives of FreedHardeman faculty members.”

February 27, 1941 “Henderson Girls Take Championship” “The Chester County High School girls’ basketball team, winners of the Fourteenth District basketball championship, will play their first regional finals game next Tuesday. “The girls’ team has been sparked this year by the high scoring of nearly all of its members. In the tournament, Ora Weaver scored highest with a total of 21 points to her credit in two games. Other totals were McNeva Lancaster, 17, Willie Mae Kirkpatrick, 15, Gladys Woodard, 11 and Dorothy Suggs, 1. “Other girls on the team who have shown up well on the hardwood court are Cavel Nix, Lula Smith, and Mazelle Colston. Imogene Bulliner, Pauline Record and Dorothy Plunk have seen plenty of action during the season.” “Boys Eliminated In Opening Rounds” The Henderson boys fared poorly and were eliminated in the opening rounds of the tourney by Beech Bluff, losing by a score 34 to 36 in an overtime contest.” “Welcome Stranger” “Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Evans of Lenoir City, Tenn., announce the birth of a daughter Tuesday. Mrs. Evans will be remembered here as Miss Agnes Hardeman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T.L. Hardeman of Dyersburg. “Born to Mr. and Mrs. Gorman Moore, of Jackson, a daughter, on Feb. 9, who has been named Mae Elizabeth. Mrs. Moore will be remembered here as Miss Pearline Phillips.” “Fox Hunters to Hold Annual Meet” “The Southern States Fox Hunters’ Association announced plans this week for holding its annual and Bench Show at Chickasaw Park this year. “Colonial Tea Attended by 150 Guests” “An impressive Colonial tea was held Saturday afternoon from 4 until 5:30 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Oscar Foy in honor of Freed-Hardeman girls, thus enabling them to meet local girls. “Mrs. Foy, Mrs. Chloe Finley and Mrs. D.E Mitchell were hostesses to over 150 guests during the afternoon. “The Misses Barbara Finley and Joanne Powers met the guests at the door and introduced them to the receiving line, which included Miss Mary Duanne McDonald, who represented the Henderson girls, and Miss Juanita Treece, representing FreedHardeman girls, and the three hostesses. “Early American music was sung by Mrs. W.B. Powers, accompanied by Mrs. C.M. Foy at the piano, and Ben Adams, Jr., of Tulsa, Okla., who played the violin. “Mrs. Wilson and Mrs. Ruth Hamilton poured at the tea, and were assisted by Mrs. Claud Hall and Mrs. Carlton Morton. Tea and Mount Vernon punch were served by four girls from the college who were dressed in colonial costume. They were, the Misses Ruth Piety, Dorothy Clayton, Marlene Watson, and Ruby Rose. “A patriotic color scheme was carried out throughout the house in honor of George Washington’s birthday. The living and dining rooms were decorated in red, white and blue candies, carnations and snapdragons. “The guest list included all girls enrolled in Freed-Hardeman College, the senior girls in the Chester County High School, recent

February 23, 1951 “Regional Tourney Gets Underway” “Capacity Crowds are Expected” “Beginning next Wednesday night, Feb. 28, and lasting through Saturday night of that week the girl’s tournament of the 8th region will be held in the new high school gymnasium. This is the first time in many years that Henderson has been host to a tournament of that size and when we asked for only one tournament coaches also asked if we would take another one and the following week, beginning March 7 and extending through Saturday night of that that week, the boy’s regional tournaments will be held in the same gym.” “The high school PTA will operate the concession stand in the cafeteria and all proceeds will go into the cafeteria fund to help keep prices down on food served to students. Principal James Williams is asking that all high school PTA members who can do so, donate a hen, rooster, or some eggs for the tournament concessions. He says that he will dress any chicken sent to the school next Monday or Tuesday.” “Births” “Dr. L.C. Smith” “Mr. and Mrs. Erby Julian of Finger announce the birth of a daughter Feb. 14.” “Dr. H.D. Farthing” “Mr. and Mrs. Leo Emerson of Montezuma announce the birth of a son, Jerry Daniel, on Feb. 16.” February 25, 1971 “Court Votes to Pursue Hospital” “In what probably was the shortest session the Chester County Quarterly Court has ever held, all 27 Squires attending the Special Session of the court here Saturday, voted in record time to continue the pursuits of building a Hill-Burton General Hospital for the county. The court convened at 1 p.m. and by 1:25 p.m., the vote was taken and the session was over. “The action taken by the court Saturday is by no means to be misinterpreted to mean that the court voted to build a hospital. It did not. The court voted to give the authority to Judge Hubert Seaton to issue a ‘letter of intent’ to the State Department of Health that the county is considering a hospital...The letter, William R. Leonard, president of the Chester County Bank, explained, in no way obligates the county for any funds for hospital construction. Once the Department of Health receives the letter it will determine if H-B funds are available to the county and if so, ‘freeze’ these funds for the county’s use within a threeyear period.” “The popularity of the proposed hospital among average citizens was reflected in the quick vote by the magistrates to issue this letter and pursue plans for a hospital.” “The quickness of the court caught many persons, both for and against the hospital, by surprise. At least two committees were ready to take reports estimating benefits and costs of building a 50-bed hospital and other individuals were present to also give figures and estimates on why it is not economically feasible to construct a hospital in the county at the present time. Had either of the two groups had the opportunity to present their cases, the session would have lasted much longer.”

Happiness. Scores of library shelves are filled with books claiming to show us a secret path to this elusive place. Philosophers have philosophized, writers have written, and preachers have preached; yet most of us still seem to find it difficult to stay happy most of the time. Well, I wish to now join the ranks, although in a much humbler sense, of those who have formed opinions, doctrines, or theories about the way to obtain happiness. Others. That is the way to happiness. Everything that we do in this world affects someone else. Sometimes it’s easy to wallow in self-pity and think that we are alone, but all that we do is interwoven into others’ lives. So what do others have to do with my happiness? Think to a time when you truly and unselfishly helped someone. Do you remember that feeling of happiness that flooded through you? Serving another is one of the basic tenants in most religions today, and for a good reason: it simply works. Serving others makes you feel better. You feel better about your own state, the state of others, and even the state of the world. We could even take this idea a bit further and say that even just being in the presence of someone else brings us a certain level of happiness. Relationships. Some of the most intense moments of happiness flow from the tangle of relationships we navigate in our short time on this Earth. Forming a lasting bond with someone takes time, energy, and a lot of patience. Very few relationships simply blossom and take root with little to no effort. Marriages take work and dedication. Friendships

require interaction, nurturing, and maintenance. Family relationships require lots of understanding, compromise, and even some moments of discipline. But in the end, the happiness we achieve through these people and their lives is worth the effort and time we committed to them. The happiness we find will be deeper and more meaningful than we might have imagined. I, like all of you, work hard everyday to secure my own happiness. Luckily the source of my happiness flows from those around me. Whether in times of hardship or in times of exuberance, I look to others for the joy that they can provide by their love and support. My hope and prayer for you is that you can find a source of happiness at the end of a good deed or near the end of a carefully worded letter, email, or note to a friend or family member. If you find yourself lonely, don’t be. Others are waiting for you and thinking of you. Reach out to them and embrace the happiness you find there. Enjoy making a new friend this week or choose to have a good laugh with a close friend. As you purpose to find happiness in others this week, you’ll find it easy to live well!

Red Cross informational meeting scheduled in Henderson March 3 The Jackson Area Chapter of the American Red Cross is holding an informational meeting about volunteerism at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 3, at the Senior Center in Henderson, located at 247 E. Main St. The meeting is open to anyone interested in attending. The meeting will focus on the different volunteer positions the Red Cross offers. There are a variety of jobs such as disaster work, teaching, and working with the military and their families. Everyone is invited to come learn about becoming a Red Cross volunteer. Erika Schroeder, C o m m u n i t y P r e p a r e d n e s s Coordinator with AmeriCorps and Red Cross will be giving the presentation and is available to answer any questions. “It’s important that we reach out to our surrounding counties for volunteers,” said Schroeder. “If we have people who are available to help us out, we are even more equipped to deal with the next disaster, as well as being able to spread the word about what we’re doing in other counties.” For more information regarding the meet-

ing and volunteer opportunities in Chester County, call 427-5543 or

e m a i l e r i k a s c h ro e d e r @ re d crossjac.org.

Happy 4th Birthday Camryn Tay! Camryn Tay Pickett celebrated her fourth birthday Saturday, Feb. 12, at Up N Jumpin with family and friends and then celebrated again on the day of her birthday, Feb. 17, at Chuck E Cheese. Camryn is the daughter of Dusty and Carrie Walker of Henderson and Kyle Pickett of Luray. Her grandparents are Anthony and Judy Taylor, Richard and Teresa Walker, and Bobby and Sheryl Pickett, all of Henderson. Many thanks to all that made Camryn’s 4th birthday so special! We love you all!

Pictured are five generations, from left, Thomas Mullins; his daughter, Patsy Stock; great-grandson, Mathew Brink; great-great-grandson, Cannon; and granddaughter, Tracy Harris.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • February 24, 2011 Page 7-A

From Page 1-A

Decathlon the State Competition, and the CCHS top scorer. Piper Davis – copper medals in math, economics, and interview. Piper was also the sixth highest overall scorer in the Honors Division. Zack Lloyd – silver in math and a bronze medal in social science. Zack also won the Academic Decathlon Scholarship. In the Scholastic Division Sunny Lloyd – gold medal in social science; a silver medal in speech, a bronze medal in art and a copper medal for interview. Sunny was also the fourth place overall top scorer in the Scholastic Division. Caitlin Hutcheson – gold medal in super quiz; a bronze medal in essay; and a copper medal in language & literature. Caitlin was also the fifth place overall top scorer in the Scholastic Division. Forrest Vest – sixth highest overall scorer in the Scholastic Division.

helped to make the weekend a success: Troy Kilzer, Demetrius Lockett, David Willis, Angelia Haltom, Harvette Croom, Clay Canada, Ricky Mitchell, Mike Showers, Farris Stout, Sierra Dove, Caleb Dunaway, Grey Davis, Cherrie Pipkin, and the Chester County Board of Education. Additionally, they want to thank all of the Chester County teachers who have played a role in equipping the decathletes with the tools they needed to be successful in Academic Decathlon. Individual Results are as follows: In the Honors Division Lydia Creech – gold medals in language and literature, music and art; silver medals in super quiz, social science, and economics; a bronze medal in math; and a copper medal in speech. Lydia was the second place overall top scorer in the Honors Division, as well as, the second highest scorer participating in

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Second in the state of Tennessee, Chester County High School’s Academic Decathlon team proudly displays their medals and awards. Team members are Lydia Creech, Sunny Lloyd, Joseph Martinez, Piper Davis, Zack Lloyd, Forrest Vest, Caitlin Hutcheson, Lindsey Elkins, and Jon Kanizar. Alternates are Sierra Dove, Rodger Lampley, Caleb Dunaway and Grey Davis. In the Varsity Division Joseph Martinez – gold medals in language & literature, art, economics, and essay; a silver medal in super quiz; a bronze medal in math; and a copper medal in social sci-

ence. Joseph was also the third place overall top scorer in the Varsity Division. Jon Kanizar – gold medal in math; a silver medal in economics; a bronze medal in social science; and a copper medal

in super quiz. Jon was also the sixth highest overall scorer in the Varsity Division. Lindsey Elkins – bronze medal in essay and a copper medal in art. Alternates

Essay

Scores This year the alternates’ essays were scored even though they were not eligible to medal. Rodger Lampley’s essay score was tied with the Scholastic Division’s gold medal winner.

Local job fair draws interest from across West Tennessee By Holly Roeder Staff Writer

The job fair held at Southwest Human Resource Agency’s Head Start building last Friday morning brought both job seekers and businesses from around the area looking to share resources. Attending agencies included Chester County Chamber of Commerce, Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Jackson Generals Major League Baseball, Jackson Career Center, Jackson State Community College, Chester County Adult Education and Emma Hopper Impressive Resumés. UT Martin provided information for the event. The event provided a networking opportunity and included a variety of information, material and even door prizes. Dave Montoya with the Jackson Career Center suggested job seekers always have a resumé on

hand, ready to deliver should the opportunity arrive. Also, if interested in a specific company, he said most companies are listed online with their name followed by .com, such as anycompany.com Attendees were filling out job applications for Jackson Generals who are now hiring for stadium operations, including ticketing, concessions and ushers. An online application may be found at www.jacksongeneralsbaseball.com The Department of Labor Mobile Career Coach will be in Henderson from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. May 18. Henderson-Chester County Adult Education, located at 1449 White Ave., had information on the GED program, which is always open for registration. For more information on this and other free services, contact Thomas Leach at 989-9407.

A variety of agencies provided networking opportunities at the job fair.

Wanda Young came from Savannah to attend the job fair at Head Start Friday. She said the event had provided valuable information and a few leads in her search for a job.

Photos by Holly Roeder, Independent

Mike Smith, Executive Director, addressed the crowd at the SWHRA job fair last Friday morning.

Traffic fatalities decline during Super Bowl weekend Preliminary 2011 Super Bowl weekend traffic fatalities have declined significantly from a year ago with four people killed on Tennessee roadways during the unofficial holiday period. Last year’s Super Bowl weekend resulted in 10 traffic fatalities in the state. The 2011 54-hour Super Bowl period ran from 6 p.m., Friday, Feb. 4 through midnight, Sunday, Feb. 6. According to initial reports, there were four fatal crashes, including a pedestrian and a motorcyclist fatality. Three of the fatalities were alcoholrelated and two vehicle occupants killed were not wearing a seatbelt. “If preliminary reports stand up, the decline in fatalities during this year’s Super Bowl is encouraging,” said Tennessee Highway Patrol Colonel Tracy Trott. “However, it’s disheartening to learn that three of the four fatalities were alcohol-related. We constantly educate and stress the consequences of drinking and driving. The fact that some people still don’t get it…is tragic.” Over the weekend, State Troopers conducted more than 50 sobriety and driver license checkpoints across the state. Fortyfive people were arrested

for driving under the influence. Troopers issued more than 2,600 citations, including 901 for speeding and more than 250 for seat belt and child seat violations. Overall, fatal crashes are down in Tennessee this year. To date, there

have been 70 traffic fatalities, a decline of 27 from this time a year ago. The Tennessee Department of Safety’s mission is (www.tennessee.gov/safety) to ensure the safety and general welfare of the public.

The department encompasses the Tennessee Highway Patrol, Office of Homeland Security and Driver License Services. General areas of responsibility include law enforcement, safety education, motorist services and terrorism prevention.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Farm Bureau to the Rescue Chester County Farm Bureau president Phil Butler, left, presents a donation to Captain James Griswell of the local rescue squad in support of the squad’s life saving activities. Over the last year, Chester County Rescue Squad has responded to several calls for assistance in other counties, many times at the member’s own expense.


Opinion

Page 8-A

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Tea for two and tea for me; the amazing, transcendent power of a good cup of tea I drink coffee in the morning because it’s easy. I’m not much of a coffee snob; I make cups of instant when there is no one around with whom to share a freshly brewed pot of coffee. All I have to do is boil the water, add a teaspoon of coffee, half a teaspoon of sugar, and enough cream to make it turn a lovely khaki color – no fuss. It’s quick, it’s warm, and it’s ready in time for breakfast. When my husband is home, he brews the coffee. He sets the timer the night before, adds the right ratio of coffee to water, and between the two of us, we usually don’t have much to pour out when the pot gets cold. I’ve tried when I’m alone, using his exact ratios, and it always seems bitter and weak. No matter how much or how little I brew, I either have way too much or not enough for one cup. I gave up long ago, especially now that I don’t have a nice little two cup coffee machine anymore. It was just right for me, and a 12-cup carafe is daunting. For me there are situations that call for coffee, and those that call for tea. Most mornings I would prefer tea, but I don’t want to invest the time needed to steep the perfect cup. Mid-morning, I go for tea; late afternoon, it’s time for coffee, unless there’s a snack, and then the anglophile in me demands Tea, as in afternoon Tea, the glorious fourth meal that we Americans sadly lack. When I visit a bookstore with a café, it’s coffee I crave – unless I have a cold, and then nothing is better than hot tea to soothe a sore throat and stuffy nose. I order coffee at coffee shops most of the time, unless they have a specialty tea that I adore, but most of the time the name implies the beverage. And, of course, during dessert coffee is a must. I don’t love coffee; I could live without it if I had tea, but tea is more exacting. It requires time and patience, and I want everything to be just right when I make a cup of tea. Last summer I hosted my first tea party since I outgrew pouring imaginary tea from my miniature ceramic tea set for stuffed bears. It was an official High Tea for some of my best friends, and I went far beyond butter cookies and water, like I used to serve my bears. In England, Tea is, in fact, an extra meal, served between lunch and dinner for purposes of rest and rejuvenation. Many people

consider it an outmoded Victorian sensibility, but I think we could all use a pause in our day to enjoy the pleasure of a nice cup of tea and a biscuit – or cookie, if we must stick to American terms. One of my favorite quotes of all times is from the American writer-turned British subject, Henry James, who writes, “Under certain circumstances there are few hours in life more pleasurable than the hour devoted to the ceremony known as afternoon tea.” I can’t help but agree. Coffee is nice, but it doesn’t soothe and calm the way tea does. Tea, served piping hot in a special cup, lends an air of civility to any circumstance. I chose a tea party for my friends because I wanted us to get lost for a while in the ritual and genteelness of Tea. While the preparation for the party took days of baking, organizing, and arranging, the outcome achieved the calm, relaxed, civility that I had hoped for. Scones, tiny lemon cupcakes, cucumber sandwiches, and clotted cream may sound stuffy and fussy, but paired with a pot of tea and my grandmother’s silverware and china place settings, I felt like we left the 21st Century and forgot our day-to-day worries of life, if only for a moment. I’m sure there are as many debates over how to brew the perfect pot of coffee as there are those who debate how to make the perfect cup of tea, but the coffee aficionados are less vocal – or maybe I’m better at ignoring them. It’s not my intention to lecture on the art of perfecting tea, although George Orwell believed there were “no fewer than 11 outstanding points” for creating the perfect cup of tea. I make my own tea differently depending on the situation: a cup for me or a quick cup with a friend, a bag of tea will do fine; for three or more, I use loose-leaf tea, a warm kettle, a strainer, all the “proper” tea-making assemblage. Regardless of how I prepare it, there is one thing that remains the driving force in my love of tea, and that is tea’s ability to take a moment and transform it from busy to peaceful, from mundane to exceptional. Perhaps I put too many expectations on a simple cup of tea, but for me, that cup often changes my entire outlook on life. As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “There is a great deal of poetry and fine sentiment in a chest of tea.”

Sometimes, slanted news coverage is not so bad

I am a self-confessed Anglophile. From British television comedies to 17th Century English literature, the United Kingdom and its people intrigue me. As an ex-newspaperman, I closely follow the Brits’ journals and tabloids. Their publications make no bones about slanted coverage. It’s part of the hundreds of years of Fleet Street press tradition that, in my opinion, has evolved to unabashedly represent the conflicting political views of the Conservative or Liberal wings of government. Is this necessarily a bad thing? Before writing this, I locked my press association credentials in a drawer and closed the door so

no one could hear this confession. Rather than trumpeting fair, balanced and unbiased coverage that so many American media outlets promise but fail to provide, the English press takes sides. Climate change and energy coverage are examples. British government’s “in for a penny, in for a pound” investment in green technology and clean energy to reduce emissions has resulted in lively news articles, essays and columns: global warming advocate press on one side, climate science skeptical press on the other. Florid writing and speechifying editorials rule the newspaper columns. You must get

Dear Editor, It is difficult not to be concerned about the protest over teacher contracts in Wisconsin. After the breakdown of social order in other countries, the scenes from Wisconsin can make one wonder if America could be next. It would not be so worrisome if the protest was being handled by the people of Wisconsin. However, there are national union leaders exploiting the unrest to gain influence. These leaders have a willing partner in the President of the United States who has, according to “The Washington Post,” unleashed his political machine to help them win and help him regain favor among union members. The frenzied images of swastikas and crosshairs cannot be blamed this time on former Governor Palin. It is times like these that challenge our trust in the good sense of our fellow Americans in Wisconsin who are exercising their rights under the First Amendment.

There are those who have been, are, and will be decent and orderly. There are those who have been, are, and will be boorish and contemptible. However, giving up our rights under the First Amendment, even if they are abused from time to time, is unthinkable. To my fellow citizens in Wisconsin, I offer this advice: Settle this dispute peaceably amongst yourselves. If you need to protest, do so non-violently. Be true to and truthful about your cause; to do less is to dishonor both your cause and yourselves. Regardless of position on the issues, desire and create the best in each situation and person. In all you do, let it bring credit upon yourselves. Never forget, you in Wisconsin, as we in Tennessee, are all neighbors if not friends an almost chosen people of an exceptional nation, endowed with unalienable rights and called to achieve great dreams. Jeffrey H. Blackwood Henderson

used to the way the news is presented and also realize the slant of the publication you’re reading. Global warming skeptical media outlets give space and broadcast time to scientists, economists and policymakers critical of the other side. Many sources of news coddle the climate change consensus crowd. The Telegraph of London, for example, features columnist Christopher Booker, whose witty treatment of governmental global warming hubris provide regular counterpoint to the rah-rah press coverage of other media. He’s had a field day contrasting the Big Freeze, as Brits have named this frigid, snowy winter, with official programs to tap the UK taxpayers and consumers for the cost of global warming avoidance. Booker noted in a recent column that what happens in 2030 and beyond due to rising global temperatures doesn’t register on the actual pain index for Brits suffering through the current icy, miserable winter that the United Kingdom’s official weather service wrongly predicted to be mild. “Another frozen chicken which came home to roost was the crisis confronting many of the eight

million homes now heated by condensing boilers, made compulsory by John Prescott in 2005 as a way of reducing Britain’s carbon footprint,” he wrote. “What Mr. Prescott failed to do was impose, on this tightly regulated industry, any requirement that the pipes to take away the resulting water should not be placed on the outside of buildings.” Meaning many of the pipes froze and burst, leaving homes without heat in December, Booker added. “In Yorkshire alone, British Gas reported 60,000 emergency callouts, at up to £300 a time – costing householders a fortune, thanks to Mr. Prescott’s obsession with global warming.” At least, readers in Britain have access to both sides of the issue. This is in marked contrast to the fixation of U.S. media on “proved” climate change science. What has resulted is the exclusion of voices that question the idea itself or criticize the official policies flowing from such a presumption of irrefutability. We might learn something from our cousins over the Atlantic Ocean. Slant sometimes is the only way to get a full explanation of both sides of an issue.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

Dear Editor, In the first week of the new legislative session, Rep. Debra Maggart (House District 45) and Sen. Dolores Gresham (Senate District 26) have filed two bills that strike at the hearts of Tennessee’s teachers. The Maggart bill (HB 130), if passed and signed into law, will end 32 years of teacher negotiations in this state. For over 100 years before the Educators Professional Negotiations Act became law, teacher compensation was at the whim of school superintendents and local boards of education. Men were paid more than women. Caucasian teachers were paid more than

African-American teachers. Secondary school teachers were paid more than elementary teachers and friends of the ‘right people’ were routinely paid more than their peers. There was no fair and equitable salary schedule. Negotiations changed that. The Gresham bill (SB 102) would replace the ability of teachers to select the teacher representatives to the TCRS Board of Trustees with appointments by the Speakers of the Senate and House of Representatives. Teachers who contribute to the system would have no voice in determining who represents them on

their retirement board. Instead, politicians who are not members of the system would make that determination. As of this writing, no bills have been filed to support teachers in getting the job done in the classroom. Nothing has been introduced that would enhance teaching and learning in our schools and classrooms. Everything talked about so far is about restrictions and loss. It is ironic that this comes at a time when teachers are asked to work harder and smarter in order to help our students achieve ever more rigorous standards. All of us recall a period in our lives that we term the good old days. When we look closely, however, we realize those good old days never really were. In

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT February 16, 2011 Medication was reported stolen from a vehicle on Steed St. Missing medication included 30 Celexa (20 mg) and 60 Alprazolam (1 mg), valued at $10 each. February 17, 2011 Tires and rims were reportedly stolen from a vehicle which was parked at Howell Construction Company. According to the report, the vehicle was found Thursday morning on blocks, with the Wrangler RST tires, valued at $650, and chrome four-hole rims, valued at $750, removed. Officers found a hole had been cut in a nearby fence, allowing entry to the property. Damage to the fence was estimated at $200. Two prescription Percacet 325 mg were reported missing from an apartment at Heritage towers. The pills were valued at $5 each. February 19, 2011 Samantha Jean Wheeler, 24, Finger, was arrested and charged with domestic vandalism, domestic aggravated assault and filing false reports. She is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond. February 20, 2011 A break in was reported at a residence on Hill Ave. According to the report, while the resident was out, someone allegedly gained entry to his home by breaking a window, causing $150 in damage. Missing items included one carton of Winston Lights valued at $45, one coffee can of pennies valued at $10, one half-gallon jar of nickels, dimes and quarters, valued at $25, and prescription medication including Protoniz, Hydrocodone, Metformin HCL, Singulair, Symbicort, Ventolin HFA, Nitrostat, Hydrochlorot, Lisinopril, Plavix, Sulfamethoxazole, Ursodiol, Verapamil, and Xanax, all valued at a $60 copay. Additionally, it appeared that the subject must have left the same way, spilling some of the stolen pennies on the ground outside of the window. CITY OF

HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT February 16, 2011 5:03 p.m. – 144 Hamlet Ave., Freed-Hardeman University, Farrow Hall, steam set off alarm. February 18, 2011 1:51 a.m. – 129 E University St., FreedHardeman Universtiy, Scott Hall, hair dryer set off alarm. February 21, 2011 10:01 p.m. – 330 E University St., FreedHardeman Universtiy, Woods-East Hall, cooking, burnt fish set off alarm. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF DEPARTMENT February 14, 2011 Columbus W. Helton, 52, 338 B Second St., was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdemeanor. He was released from the Chester County jail on furlough. February 16, 2011 A CD player was reported stolen from a vehicle which had been parked on Hwy 45 due to a flat tire. A window had apparently been broken out to provide entry for the theft, causing $75 in damage. The CD player was valued at $200. Joe Allen Henry, 47, 75 Old Finger Road, was arrested and charged with especially aggravated burglary. He is held in the Chester County jail in lieu of a $500,000 bond. Robert Gene Holder, 24, Enville, was arrested and charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. He appeared in Chester County General Sessions Court and was released on supervision. February 17, 2011 Richard Dewayne Jones, 37, Bethel Springs, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released after posting a $1,000 cash bond. Bose Thomas Walker, 18, Jackson, was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections – Misdeanor. He was released from the Chester County jail on furlough. February 21, 2011 Anthony Tony Massengill, 51, 462 Fourth St., was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections –

Misdemeanor, failure to appear, burglary, theft of property $10,000 to $59,999, vandalism and tampering with evidence. He is held in the Chester County jail without bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT February 14, 2011 2:04 p.m. – 2575 N. Pisgah Road, grass fire, Station One Volunteer Fire Department responding. February 15, 2011 3:31 p.m. – 375 Lula Road, woods fire, Roby Volunteer Fire Department responding. February 20, 2011 1:07 p.m. – 180 Haley Cove, field and woods fire, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding. 2:41 p.m. – 945 Beene Road, field and woods fire, Station One Volunteer Fire Department responding. 2:54 p.m. – 180 Haley Cove, field and woods fire, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding. 4:05 p.m. – 180 Haley Cove, field and woods fire, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Christopher J. Williams, 30, 3130 Plainview Road, was found guilty of attempted aggravated robbery and three counts of aggravated assault. For each count, he was sentenced to serve six years in a TDOC facility at 30 percent release eligibility. He was credit for time served pretrial, and was ordered to pay court costs and restitution. All counts are concurrent. Martin M. Anderson, 20, 518 Rex Road, was found guilty of attempted aggravated robbery and three counts of aggravated assault. For each count, he was sentenced to serve six years in a TDOC facility at 30 percent release eligibility. He was credit for time served pretrial, and was ordered to pay court costs and restitution. All counts are concurrent.

Teachers must not return to the “Good Old Days” that never were

the fictional “good old days,” teachers had even lower salaries, no voice in determining education policy, and only a fraction of boys and girls graduated from high school compared to today. Teachers will not sit still while some legislators attempt to take the teaching profession and public education back to a simpler but less effective time. Media reports indicate Gov. Bill Haslam intends to make public education a key component of his agenda. Our experience with the former mayor of Knoxville has shown him to be a thoughtful man. We believe he wants to make a positive difference in public education and the lives of all Tennesseans. We will be meeting with the governor to understand what he wants to accomplish, and we will let him know what teachers believe will be helpful in educating Tennessee’s students. We anticipate working with Gov. Haslam to improve our public schools. Some legislators appear to be preparing to pass anti-teacher and antiTEA legislation because they think they can. They suggest it will return us to the good old days. However, laws with no socially redeeming value are inherently destructive and represent abuses of discretion and power. Tennessee’s teachers will not be silenced. TEA will rise to fight to protect the hard-won rights some misguided forces seem willing to eliminate. Al Mance, Executive Director, Tennessee Education Association

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Cuts in federal funding for public television will cost Americans Dear Editor, Congress will take a critical vote in the next few days to eliminate federal support for local public broadcasting. The vote is part of complicated negotiations over the federal budget and the very real need to bring the national debt under control. On a national level, the question about the budget really comes down to some very basic questions about priorities. What do we believe in as a country? At this critical moment, we should think about what it would mean to cut funding for public broadcasting. What do you lose if the government cuts funding for local public television and radio stations. You lose the shows that expanded your mind as a child, the documentaries that opened up new worlds to you as a student, the non-commercialized PBS news programs that keep you informed on world events and cultures, and programs that expose you to the worlds of music, theater, dance and art as an adult. At the cost of only about $1 per person per year, is it worth the loss? PBS and its member stations are America’s largest classroom, providing educational content that is available to all of America’s children, including those who can’t attend preschool. Research shows children gain valuable skills through our programs, including measurable improvement in literacy score, and children who watched “Sesame Street” obtain higher grades in

The City Ordinance File Title 12, Building Utility, Etc., Codes Chapter 5, Plumbing Code Section 12 – 505. Appendices. The plumbing code herein adopted incorporates the following appendices to the 1997 International Plumbing Code by reference as if fully and completely copied at length herein. Appendix B – Rates of Rainfall for Various Cities Appendix D – Degree of Days and Design Temperatures Appendix E – Sizing of Water Piping Systems Appendix F – Structural Safety (Ord. #322, Dec. 1998)

English, math, and science. In our community, West Tennessee children benefit from our children’s programming and classroom content. For many Americans, PBS is their only opportunity to see a Broadway show, visit a National Park, or have a front row seat at a popular music concert. At a time when funding for music and arts within our schools is being cut, PBS is helping to keep the arts alive today and for generations to come by ensuring that the worlds of music, theater, dance and art remain available to all. The American public has named PBS the most trusted institution among nationally known organizations for seven consecutive years. Most importantly, the American people believe in federal funding for public broadcasting: polls show that Americans rank PBS second only to military defense as an excellent use of their tax dollars. America rightly prides itself as the land of opportunity. We are the nation that encourages people to achieve their full potential. And we should be the country that continues to fund public broadcasting, even in these tough economic times. Public broadcasting is an essential part of who we are as a country, because only public broadcasting gives everyone access to noncommercialized programming that educates, informs and inspires. Monica Shumake, General Manager and CEO, WLJT-DT, Public Television for West Tennessee


Obituary/Religion

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Obituaries Wayne Isbell Date of Death – Feb. 20, 2011 Wayne Douglas Isbell, 67, of Henderson, died Feb. 20, 2011, at the emergency room of Jackson-Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were held Feb. 23 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel with Bro. Paul Roaten officiating. Burial followed at Bethel Cemetery. Mr. Isbell was born and reared in Chester County, the son of the late Marcus Clyde and Essie Mae Clark Isbell. He attended Chester County High School and married Pam Broadway in 1976. Mr. Isbell was employed as a supervisor with Tension Envelope, working in Memphis and Winston Salem, N.C., retiring in 1990 after having worked there 25 years. He later worked with the Jackson Police Department as an intelligence analyst, retiring in 2008. He enjoyed his own wood crafting shop and loved making wishing wells and bluebird boxes for family and friends. Wayne and Pam were faithful caretakers of Wayne’s mother for several years prior to her death. Wayne was a special person. He is survived by his wife, Pam Isbell of Henderson; a son, Kirk Isbell of Memphis; a granddaughter, Amanda Isbell; a brother, Clifford Isbell (Mary Sue) of Henderson; and a sister, Doris Pickett (Quay) of Henderson. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 24, 2011

Dorothy Glover Date of Death – Feb. 19, 2011 Dorothy Lee Morris Glover, 85, of Henderson, died Feb. 19, 2011. Funeral services will be at noon on Saturday, Feb. 26, at Mays and Smith Funeral Home Chapel in Sandersville, Ga., with burial in Brownwood Cemetery in Sandersville. Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel is in charge. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 24, 2011

Robert Charles Cobb Feb. 18, 1954 – Feb. 15, 2011 Robert Charles Cobb, 56, a resident of The Colony, Texas, passed away on Feb. 15, 2011. Funeral services were held Feb. 18 in the Chapel of Dalton and Son Funeral Home. Burial took place Feb. 21 in Hunter Cemetery in Henderson. He was born in Port Hueneme, Calif., to Harold E. and Dorothy A. Cobb. Robert is survived by his wife, Mele Cobb; a son, Edwin Cobb; his mother, Dorothy Skelly; a sister, Gail Cahoone; and a brother, Ricky Lee Cobb. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 24, 2011

Lea Pauline Vocat Flinn Date of Death – Feb. 18, 2011 Lea Flinn, 96, of Henderson, passed away Feb. 18, 2011, at Chester County Healthcare in Henderson. Funeral services were held Feb. 20 at Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Casey Chapel with Dr. Roger Penn officiating. Graveside services will be at 1 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 25, at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Parkersburg, W. Va. She was born and reared in Switzerland, the daughter of the late Benjamin Paul and Josephine Schmidth Vocat. She went to school in Switzerland and France. After schooling, she took up the trade of dressmaking, in which she excelled in the fashion industry. She moved to the United States in 1947. In 1948, she married William Flinn of West Virginia, where they made their home all their married life. Mr. Flinn passed away in 2005. Mrs. Flinn moved to Henderson in August of 2010 to be near her nephew. She loved to garden, read and feed the birds. She was a very hospitable person to everyone she met. She was Catholic in belief. She is survived by six nephews, Stuart Rogers ( Beverly) of Henderson, Brian Rogers (Lora) of Blue Ridge, Ga., Craig Rogers (Missy) of Kennesaw, Ga., Kevin Rogers (Leslie) of Powder Springs, Ga., and Mike Flinn and Patrick Flinn of Texas; a niece, Debbie Flinn of New York; and a sister-in-law, Phyllis Rogers (Will) of Waleska, Ga. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 24, 2011

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Danny G. Stanfill Date of Death – Feb. 18, 2011 Danny Stanfill, 59, died at his home in Luray on Feb. 18, 2011. Services were held Feb. 21 at First Baptist Church in Henderson with Brad Patterson, Jill Wade and Rev. Ronnie Geary officiating. Shackelford Funeral Directors of Henderson – Johnson Chapel was in charge. He attended Chester County Schools and went on to work with people who admired and respected him as an excellent worker. He most recently has worked at Jack Hornsby Electric with a special work family whom he loved. Danny was a member of Mount Pleasant Methodist Church and a member of Henderson Masonic Lodge #485. He served six years in the Tennessee National Guard 4/117 Infantry. Because Danny was a loyal man of his work, he had developed many friendships in his lifetime. He loved and respected all of his friends, and was loved by many as well. He had several special friends who showed their love and concern through his last days. Danny Stanfill was a lifelong member of the Henderson community and a man of many talents, but his true passion was for his family. He was married to Myrna Barnes Stanfill for 38 years. He was a hero to two daughters, Amy Stanfill Howell (Kevin) and Amber Stanfill Lay (Steven). He had two grandchildren who had stolen his heart, Makinsey Howell, 8, and Cooper Lay, 1. He was proud to have another grandson on the way. Danny was the son of Gerald Stanfill and the late Geraldine Stanfill; and a brother to Judy Stanfill and the late Chris Stanfill. Other loving members of his family include Peggy Stanfill, Joe and Clara Sue Stanfill, and Sarah E. Berkel. Danny was a truly loved man who will be missed by many. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 24, 2011

A Spiritual Renaissance By Ronnie McBrayer “Keeping the Faith” W. Ann Reynolds once said, “Anyone who says you cannot see a thought simply doesn’t know art.” For those creative persons who have ever held a brush, camera, pencil, or script in their hand, they know this to be true. Poets, painters, writers, teachers, performers, filmmakers, and communicators of all kind have this unquenchable desire – a calling really – to report back to others their observations, thoughts, and ideas. They just can’t stop themselves from doing this. Like an artesian well, what is on the inside of their hearts and souls comes boiling out, splattering on the canvas and the page, and dancing across the stage or the screen. It is an inescapable burn that must be shared with others that they too will be enlightened and warmed by the artist’s own discovery. The prophet Jeremiah might have called this a “fire in the bones.” So the skillful artist is not necessarily the one with the best thoughts or ideas, the biggest public platform or the one who is a mass of pure talent. It is the one who can communicate his or her ideas to others. It is the one who can translate what is within – the glory and the madness – for others to see, hear, and experience for themselves. We people of faith need more artists in our number. Oh, and I don’t mean the cheese-makers that fill up the shelves of the local Christian bookstores. The parade of greeting cards, neck ties, stationary, wind chimes, monograms, t-shirts, necklaces, charm bracelets, wall hangings, and carvings that spews from commercial Christianity’s warehouses and passes as art is stale, sappy, and downright embarrassing. Bach and Michelangelo would be ashamed. And save us, sweet Jesus, from another bible-verseinscribed-sun-setting landscape portrait or one of those dauntless lighthouses paintings amidst iridescent clouds. I’ve had enough of that smelly limburger as well. Instead, we need a spiritual renaissance. We need genuine artists, those who can skillfully open their souls to communicate their experience of faith. We need people in the pew and preachers from the pulpit who, though they may not be able to use a brush, make a rhyme, play a note, or write a book, they can still creatively and beautifully translate their hearts for the world to read. See, each of us has a unique journey of faith. Each of us has a story to tell and a picture to paint. Each of us has a masterpiece of faith on the inside that could be shared with others. This is art, this is communication, and it is so badly needed today. For while there is a lot of talking, preaching, blogging, conferencing, and shouting in the world of faith, there is not much creative communication. The artists of faith have been replaced by the legalists and the dogmatists. By nature, dogma does not lend itself to creative expression. It is hard and unmoving. It is as closed as a padlocked gate. It refuses to allow doubt or question marks. It is dead and Spiritless. But faith allows for the freedom to speak from what is in the soul. Faith is alive and explorative. Faith is art. And when faith, just like art, is good, it does something that pontificating, Bible-thumping, and fingerpointing can’t do. It makes you want to get in on it. It motivates you to pick up the brush and give it a try for yourself. It causes you to hum along to the music or stop and look at the painting. Yes, faith can do the same as good art, where the objective is not to coax, convert, or condemn, but to simply share the experience of your heart. Of course the only way this will happen is brutal vulnerability. The artist, and people of faith, must take the risk of being criticized, scoffed at, and having their work – the very bearings of the soul – unappreciated. But how much beauty would be robbed from the world if courageous artists did not give their hearts and experiences away to others? It would be a tragedy.

Fire Safety Seminar

required. For those who don’t have transportation, call 608-1038 or 695-9497.

Harvest Time Church of God in Christ, 414 Beechwood St. in Henderson, is hosting a fire safety seminar at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 24. This seminar will empower those who live alone or with family. The seminar will be given by Greg Lipford, a fire safety expert who works with the Henderson Fire Department. For more information, call 438-0539 or 394-4789, or e-mail at szaaboj@gmail.com.

Early bird service

Free Food Pantry A free food pantry is set up for the needy only from 9-11 a.m. on the third Thursday of each month, at Montezuma United Methodist Church. Take Hwy. 45 South from Henderson, turn right on Montezuma Road (across from Estes Church of Christ), the church is located three miles on the right. Drive around to the back of the church. Due to overwhelming response, the requirements for baskets are: must be a Chester County resident; picture ID for all adults; SS cards for the household; proof of residency, household income, custody for children; verification of children’s ages; your actual utility or rental bill; proof of household monthly expenses and loss/crisis (layoff notice or doctors’ excuse); DL may be

The Henderson Church of Christ worship hour is carried over WFHU 91.5 at 8 a.m. each Sunday. The program includes recorded acappella singing, prayer, scripture reading, and a live sermon.

Prayer requests For special prayer requests or needs call 989-0326 or 989-7563. Services at Jacks Creek Apostolic Church are at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Sunday and at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday. The church is located at 150 McAdams Loop in Jacks Creek. Brent Daniel is the pastor.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • February 24, 2011 Page 11-A

Friendship Baptist Church 755 New Friendship Road


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • February 24, 2011 Page 13-A


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Combining education and economic development, REDI reaches out to strengthen rural communities By Mary Mount Dunbar

Fayette, Gibson, Hardeman, Hardin, Haywood, Henderson, Lauderdale, McNairy and Tipton counties. Its goal is to increase education attainment levels across the region by helping high school seniors and nontraditional students meet specific deadlines relative to acquiring financial aid and accessing a postsecondary education. By last fall, more than 500 students and 251 volunteer mentors had already plugged-in. “We try to develop a plan for the students with a checklist of items that need to be done in their senior year,” Hankins explained. “This ranges from researching careers and colleges to taking the ACT, applying to colleges and filling out financial aid forms (especially the FAFSA). We are in a heavy FAFSA season right now. The key to successful financial aid is applying early. Millions of dollars get left on the table by students who qualify but apply late – after funding is gone.” The components of REDI are entrepreneurship, technology, capacity building, and educational/workforce development. REDI isn’t designed to focus simply on education and helping students get to college, but it strives to focus on the community as a whole. By reaching out to entrepreneurs, the pro-

Staff Writer

Education may be the key to success, but that doesn’t apply just to individuals. Communities with higher percentages of college-educated adults have greater levels of success as well. Southwest Tennessee Development District’s Regional Economic Development Initiative, or REDI as the program is popularly known, is helping Chester County and other local communities achieve more through education. “One of the first things a prospective industry looks at is education and labor in a community. They have usually already researched this before they ever come to visit. My background is in economic development. It is vital to have an educated workforce,” said Lisa Hankins, director of REDI. REDI focuses on creating regional collaborations in 12 West Tennessee Counties. Its goal is to create public/private sector partnerships in the region to address issues that affect job creation and quality of life for all citizens. In 2010, it received the Innovation Award for Wo r k f o r c e / E c o n o m i c Development by the National Association of D e v e l o p m e n t Organizations. REDI includes Chester, Crockett, Decatur,

gram can reach a new demographic of potential economic leaders, which is valuable to small communities. Increasing technology will help recruit, train and place workers in online jobs through training coordinated with WIA and Tennessee Career Centers. Capacity building provides leadership training, economic development 101 for city and county officials, and regional strategic planning. REDI measures its success through increased graduation rate, increased numbers of students applying early for financial aid, increased aid awarded to students in the REDI region, and increased educational attainment levels in the region. In the future, increases in col-

lege completion and retention rates and a larger focus on adult learners will also be key elements of success. Last month REDI held a luncheon for the regional legislative group and presented the goals and progress the program has seen since its inception last year. “The advantage of a regional program is strength in numbers,” Hankins added. “Our combined population is 340,350. Instead of one representative and one senator, we have eight representatives and four senators. We drafted a legislative agenda that we presented at this luncheon that asks for support for several items that will be beneficial to the region.” Seventy regional lead-

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Joe Barker, director of Southwest Tennessee Development District (left); Lisa Hankins, director of REDI (center); and Beverly Vos, College Access Coordinator (right) meet with representatives from the 12 West Tennessee counties served by the education and economic outreach that is REDI. During the meeting last Wednesday, SWTDD announced that the Tennessee Higher Education Commission has awarded the program $1.5 million to expand its programs throughout the 22 area high schools that REDI serves. See related story on page 15-A

CAPITOL HILL REVIEW By Steve McDaniel State Representative

Legislative leaders set General Assembly agenda Legislative leaders joined the Governor Thursday at a press conference to announce the specific proposals of their legislative package and to detail the priorities of the House, Senate and new Administration. The package focuses on two core messages of educating a highly trained workforce: one that will attract high quality jobs and identify the best teachers, and creating an environment that keeps teachers in the classrooms across the state. The following are key provisions of the legislative package:

Education

Tenure reform One proposal would extend the probationary period for teachers attaining tenure from three years to five years. The proposal also ties teacher evaluation to tenure eligibility. Charter schools The charter school provision builds on what Republicans accomplished in 2009 by expanding charter schools even more. This proposal provides the Achievement School District with the ability to authorize charter schools within the district. The legislation also removes the cap on the number of charter schools and allows for open enrollment for charter schools. Lottery scholarship The higher education portion of the legislative package will allow the use of lottery scholarship dollars for

summer courses, as well as apply a cap on the number of hours eligible for lottery scholarship funding.

Economic growth As promised, the Governor proposes to tackle tort reform in his legislative package this year. The legislation limits appeal bond to $25,000,000 and caps non-economic damages at $750,000, as well as punitive damages. Republicans believe this reform will do away with the uncertainty that causes businesses to look at States other than Tennessee, which takes away muchneeded job opportunities for Tennesseans. Leaders in the House say these initial steps in transforming state government will lead to more efficiency and effectiveness and deliver excellent customer service.

ers attended, including superintendents, mayors, the president of Jackson State Community College, and representatives and Deans from area satellite campus and technology centers. After two years of planning and prepatation, REDI launched in March 2010. Chester County already has a trained pool of adult volunteers who have agreed to work with students from Chester County High School on their path to post-secondary education. Emily Seaton is the local chair of the program, and she is assisted by Teresa King. Hankins added: “Our mentors make sure the kids are completing their tasks and doing what they are supposed to do, when they are supposed to do it. Encouragement is another big aspect of mentoring. Many of these kids don’t get any at home. Many of them are first generation college students and the entire process is daunting if you are unfamiliar with it. We want to make this

an easy, enjoyable experience for them. Our ultimate goal is to increase the educational attainment levels in West Tennessee. The percentage of adults 24 or older in the REDI region with a bachelor’s degree or higher is 9.65 percent – too low! If we can get more of our people educated, we can recruit better businesses.” Word about REDI is spreading, and Hankins has spoken on behalf of the program across the state of Tennessee and in other states as well. Gov. Bill Haslam has also taken an interest and has met with organizers on several occasions. By putting education and economic development in the same project, REDI has made a name for itself as an innovative and vibrant program prepared to help communities grow and reach greater potential than ever before. For more information about REDI, visit Southwest Tennessee Development District’s website, www.swtdd.org or call 731-669-6402.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • February 24, 2011 Page 15-A

REDI receives THEC Grant totaling $1.5 million to benefit area students Students in West Tennessee have a reason to celebrate. The Tennessee Higher Education Commission has awarded Southwest Tennessee Development District’s Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI) program a $1.5 million “College Access Challenge Grant.” The funding will be distributed over a four year period beginning in April of 2011 and extend until August of 2014. Besides helping with ongoing expenses of assisting more than 1,400 students in 22 area high schools who have signed up for REDI, the grant allows SWTDD the financial resources to hire nine additional employees to provide help and resources to both high school and community college students. The United States Department of Education is the original provider of grant funds to the Tennessee’s Higher Education Commission (THEC). THEC formed a consortium called the

Tennessee College Access & Success Network of eight college access programs across the state. These organizations were the only groups eligible to apply for the College Access Challenge Grant. Six organizations, including REDI, were funded. The purpose of the grant is to enhance the scope and capacity of TCASN member organizations to build, in partnership with regional community colleges, a College Mentor Corps program that best addresses the needs of low-income high school seniors and current college students in each institution’s service area. The College Mentor Corps program is designed to encourage postsecondary persistence, degree attainment and to facilitate the transition between two-year community colleges into four-year institutions. As part of the “College Mentor Corps” seven of REDI’s nine additional employees will be on the frontlines delivering hands-on help to high

FIGHT! Handsome Tim and The Doctor of Doom to make ring appearance

school students through the college exploration, application and enrollment process. The other two positions are for “College Mentor Corps Transition Coaches,” one coach will be at Jackson State Community College and the other at Dyersburg State Community College. These coaches will be tasked with ensuring that students have a smooth transition between high school and community college – as well as from community college to four-year universities. “When we began REDI almost one year ago with a staff of three people, we found very quickly that we were going to be very busy,” says Lisa Hankins, REDI director. “The response to the program has been overwhelming and we want to make sure that we are giving our REDI students the best possible assistance we can. “Adding these nine new positions will help us to do this. We are very honored to have been included in the TCASN consortium and even more honored to be the recipient of its grant funds.” The College Mentor Corps will also provide individualized education planning for participating community college students; monitoring of student progress in achieving individualized education plans; and retention, per-

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Representing Chester County during the REDI conference last week were, from left, Superintendent of Schools, Cherrie Pipkin, Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton, and City of Henderson Mayor Bobby King. REDI is a growing program in West Tennessee designed to influence economic growth by helping students achieve highsistence and student success services for participating community college students. “REDI’s participation in Tennessee’s College Mentor Corp strengthens partnerships between K12 schools, higher education institutions, businesses and community organizations while also providing timely, direct services to students, assisting them in the transition to and completion of higher education,” said Richard Rhoda, Executive Director of THEC, regarding REDI’s participation in the CACG Mentor Corps.

“THEC is proud to partner with fellow Tennessee College Access and Success Network member REDI as they serve the students, families and communities of West Tennessee.” The College Mentor Corps and College Mentor Corps Transition Coach job descriptions will be available on the SWTDD website, beginning on March 1 – as well as on the websites of both community colleges and all 18 school districts in the REDI region. Recent college graduates are preferred.

Applicants must have leadership qualities, strong interpersonal skills, and possess an enthusiastic posture toward college and the benefits of increasing educational attainment. Those interested in applying for the College Mentor Corps should send resumes to: REDI College Mentor Corps, 27 Conrad Drive, Ste. 150; Jackson, TN 38305-2850. Applications will be accepted until all positions have been filled. For more information, call 731.668.6450 or email lhankins@swtdd.org.

Map marks milestone in charting America’s broadband

Photo by Holly Roeder, Independent

Doctors Tim Linder and Brian McCarver will face off as Handsome Tim and The Doctor of Doom Friday, March 4, during the Chester County Exchange Club – Carl Perkins Center annual wrestling event. Will office tension get the best of them?

The King and Superstar to headline Doctors Tim Linder and Brian McCarver, who fought in tag-team matches last year with Jerry “The King” Lawler and Superstar Bill Dundee, will face each other in the ring at this year’s Memphis Wrestling event on Friday, March 4, at Chester County High School Gymnasium. While their time in the ring last year was limited, this year the doctors are training alongside professionals and are ready for their first big fight. “I have been looking forward to this all year,” said Handsome Tim, Dr. Linder’s alter ego. “Dr. McCarver is going down!” The Doctor of Doom is much more low profile than his adversary. While he secretly hopes for a victory, he says he is more focused on the event charity. “I am a member of the Multi-disciplinary Team at the Carl Perkins Center,” said Dr. McCarver. “I believe in supporting the Center in all endeavors and am doing this for the children.” Jerry “The King”

Lawler, The New Nature Boy Kevin White, Bill Dundee, Henderson’s own Spellbinder, Dirty Doug Gilbert, the Albino Rhino, Derrick King, Brian Christopher, Michael Gilbert, Bad Bones Wallace, Cody Melton and many others will also participate. School teacher Michael Showers will emcee and is awaiting doctor’s approval to enter the ring for a match of his own. The event benefits the Chester County Carl Perkins Center for the Prevention of Child Abuse, and doors will open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $8 in advance and $10 at the door and are available now at the Exchange Club – Carl Perkins Center in Henderson and Lexington, at NEO Products, and at Prime Care in both Henderson and Selmer. Each child 12 and under will be admitted free with a paid adult. Concessions will be available. For more information, call the Carl Perkins Center at 989-7222.

Last week, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications & I n f o r m a t i o n Administration (NTIA) launched the National Broadband Map, which marks an important milestone in building the nation’s broadband infrastructure. The product of an intensive and joint effort of the NTIA, FCC, state governments, industry, and non-profits like Connected Tennessee, the map will be a key tool for the American public and policymakers. “Today is a landmark day in the charge to achieve universal broadband deployment across the country,” said Connected Tennessee Executive Director Michael Ramage. “With the National Broadband Map, broadband providers and community leaders across Tennessee and the entire nation will now have a more accurate picture than ever before of unserved areas, population density, and existing service; all with a goal of bringing broadband to the communities in this nation that are on the wrong side of the digital divide. We are proud of the role that Connected Tennessee and our partners with the State of Tennessee played in the creation of the National Broadband Map and are excited to see the positive impact that this powerful tool will have on broadband penetration across Tennessee and across the entire country.” Connected Tennessee, a non-profit, public-private partnership, has played an instrumental role in developing, gathering data, and verifying data for the National Broadband Map. As the broadband mapping agent for Tennessee, Connected Tennessee has

contributed the data of 90 broadband service providers and more than 5,000 community anchor institutions to NTIA. “Very often, access to broadband technology can mean the difference between success and failure for the citizens and communities of Tennessee,” said Ramage. For example, Connected Tennessee surveys have shown that: · Tennessee businesses with a broadband Internet connection have median annual revenues more than two times greater than businesses with dial-up. · More Tennesseans than ever before are enhancing their career skills by pursuing a degree online, rising from 12 percent in 2007 to 18 percent today, a growth rate of 50 percent. · Over the past three years, the number of Tennesseans interacting with healthcare officials online has leapt from 10 percent to 32 percent – a statewide increase of 220 percent. The National Broadband Map also offers several tools for analyzing broadband availability by broadband speed and technology. These tools will be critical to important policy debates. For example, last week, the Federal Communications Commission proposed to redirect up to $1 billion in current federal universal service subsidies to areas the map marks as unserved. Similarly, state and local broadband policymakers will use the map to inform government infrastructure initiatives, planning projects, and adoption programs. Since Connected Tennessee’s inception in 2007, Tennessee has experienced a 35 percent

increase in broadband adoption. Today more than one-half (58 percent) of all Tennessee adults have broadband service at home, which translates into more than 2.7 million Tennesseans. Particularly noteworthy: broadband adoption has grown fastest among Tennessee’s low-income residents (those with incomes below $25,000), minorities and rural residents; all groups specifically targeted by Connected Tennessee’s eCommunity Leadership Teams and the Computers 4 Kids program. The collaborative and largely state-driven approach to broadband mapping has succeeded in boosting broadband availability and adoption. Connected Nation pioneered this approach beginning in 2001 in Kentucky, extending into Tennessee and Ohio in

2007. These achievements led to Congress passing the Broadband Data Improvement Act of 2008, which established similar programs for states and public-private partnerships to gather broadband availability information, verify it, and release it to the public. Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, this program is administered by the NTIA as the State Broadband Data Development Program.


Page 16-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

Severe Weather Awareness Week Feb. 20-26, 2011 TDOT, 511 ready for your call Civitans Honor Clergy Henderson ministers, including co-pastors, associates, and assistants and their spouses will be honored by the Henderson Civitan Club at a come-and-go reception from 5:30-6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 24, at the Hardeman House at 307 White Ave. Civitan International observes February as Clergy Appreciation Month in recognition of ministers’ citizenship building and community service leadership. Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP to 431-4007 or jdtn35@charter.net

Eastern Star fundraiser The local Order of the Eastern Star will host a ham and bean fundraising dinner at the Masonic Lodge on Feb. 25. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and dinner will be from 4-6 p.m. The menu includes ham, beans, slaw, cornbread, dessert, and a drink. Eat in or carry out. Plates are $5 per person.

Short Course in Beekeeping The Jackson Area Beekeepers’ Association is having its annual Short Course in Beekeeping from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 26, at West Tennessee Research Center, 605 Airways Blvd. in Jackson. The cost is $10 for individuals and $15 for families. Lunch is included. For information, call 423-1656.

Purdy Fundraiser The Purdy Fellowship Club invites everyone to an evening filled with food, fun, fellowship and music, beginning at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 26, at the Purdy Community Center on Gann Road at Bethel Springs. A spaghetti supper, coleslaw, bread and drink will be served. The cost is $5. “The Holt Family” will provide entertainment. The Holt’s are a well-known Bluegrass group. All proceeds go to the Community Center. Call 934-4833 or 645-3345 for information.

Youth trap team sign ups Sign ups for the Henderson Gun Club youth trap team will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 26, at the trap range on Hwy. 200. Contact Robin Smith at 608-6000 or Donna Bishop at 608-0086 with questions.

Modern Woodmen of America dinners Modern Woodmen will have its monthly dinners from 4:30-6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 28, and Tuesday, March 1, at Whisker’s Restaurant in Henderson. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Special Needs Athletics Bowling Season Special Needs Athletics is currently in their bowling season until March 7. Special Needs Athletes ages 4 and up now have the opportunity to bowl at 6:30 p.m. every Monday night at the Jackson Bowling and Skating Family Fun Center in Jackson. All sports offered by Special Needs Athletics are free.

eWellness Classes There will be a monthly Lunch and Learn health class every month at the UT Extension office on Crook Avenue. The classes are from noon to 1 p.m. Feb. 28, March 21 and April 25. Everyone is invited to attend this informal class and pick up a Food/Activity Diary. You’ll learn more about UT’s eWellness program and how easy it is for you to participate in this on-line program. eWellness helps track your healthy behaviors and will work with what you’re already doing. For more information, call Amy DeLeon-Rogers at 989-2103, or visit eWellness at http://tnshapesup.tennessee.edu/ewellness/

Library to celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday The Chester County Library will celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday with a party at Storytime at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 1. Be sure and wear Dr. Seuss apparel if you have it. Birthday cake will be served. For more information, contact the library at 9894673.

Memphis Wrestling comes to town Jerry “The King” Lawler, The New Nature Boy Kevin White and many others will come to the Chester County High School Gym on Friday, March 4, for a night of Memphis Wrestling. Tickets will be on sale soon. The event is being organized by NEO Products and benefits the Carl Perkins Center for the Prevention of Child Abuse. For more information, call the Carl Perkins Center at 989-7222.

CCHS Band Boosters Yard Sale The CCHS Band Boosters will have a yard sale starting at 7 a.m. on Saturday, March 5, at Chester County Junior High School. This will be to raise money for their St. Louis trip in April. All donations will be appreciated. They would like to invite everyone to come by. Call 879-6075 for more information.

FUMC Pancake Breakfast The First and Trinity United Methodist Men will host their annual Pancake Breakfast from 6-10 a.m. on Saturday, March 5, at Wright Hall, First United Methodist Church. Tickets are $4 per plate and include all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage, orange juice and coffee. Carry-outs are also avail-

able. Tickets are currently available from any church member and will be available at the door.

Enville VFD Spaghetti Supper The Enville Volunteer Fire Department invites everyone to their Spaghetti Supper Fundraiser at 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 12 at the community center. The cakewalk will be at 6:30 p.m. All proceeds will be used to purchase needed equipment and supplies.

SWHRA to distribute commodities Southwest Human Resource Agency will distribute commodities from 8 a.m.-noon on Thursday, March 17, at the National Guard Armory in Henderson. No certificates will be accepted after noon. New certificates for commodities are issued at the Southwest Community Center at 269 N. Church St. Office hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. MondayFriday. No new certificates will be issued on the day of distribution. No person shall on the grounds of race, color, or national origin be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.

Tennessee 511 is an automated voice response system where motorists traveling in Tennessee can ask for specific roadways or regions and obtain information on road conditions including incidents, major construction activities that make travel safer for everyone. Callers are guided through the menu through a series of requests where they can find out about their routes before they

Volunteers needed for tax season During the tax filing season, about 200 West Tennessee volunteers made taxes less taxing for many in their communities. Trained volunteers helped about 8,000 lower-income individuals and families file their tax returns free of charge through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program and related programs. Many of the VITA volunteers return year after year to help, but new volunteers are needed. Training for the 2011 tax filing season begins soon. This year the need for volunteers is especially great with many tax filers needing to cut expenses and get all the tax breaks that are available. VITA volunteers can register on e-mail at wi.taxprep.volunteer@irs.gov or call 4239526.

Memphis FreeFest 2011 Memphis FreeFest 2011 will be held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, April 9, at Bartlett Station Municipal Center, 5868 Stage Road. Admission, vendor, club and flea market tables are all free. Tables require a $10 refundable deposit; no shows, late shows, and early leaves lose deposit. Cancellations after April 7 lose deposit. There are a limited number of outside tailgate spaces available. All Ham and Non-ham prizes donated; 100 percent of raffle sales donated to LeBonheur Children’s Hospital Memphis. Load in 7-9 a.m. and Load out 3-5 p.m. TalkIn 147.03/63 Repeater – 107.2 Tone. Seminars from noon to 3 p.m. For information, visit FreeFest page at maraonline.org, email freefest@maraonline.org, or call Tony Brignole WA4KHN, abrigno@comcast.net, or phone 901-372-2738.

Senior Centers plan trips The Chester County Senior Center is planning a trip to the Grand Canyon and the Hoover Dam for May 17-27. The cost is $919 per person (double occupancy). A $75 deposit is due upon signing, with the final payment due March 13. For information and reservations, contact Joanne BullinerOsborne at 989-7434. The Selmer Senior Center is sponsoring a trip to Amelia Island, St. Augustine and Jacksonville, Fla. The cost is $599 per double occupancy. The Selmer Senior Center is sponsoring a trip out West for July 23-31, and a Western Caribbean Cruise Oct. 15-23. For more information, call Hollie Knight at 645-7843.

Word Weavers meets each month Word Weavers, a local writing group, meets at 10 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Chester County Library. Word Weavers is a group for anyone interested in writing. Visitors are welcome.

Alcoholics Anonymous The Henderson group of Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 8 p.m. each Tuesday (closed discussion), 8 p.m. on Thursdays (open discussion) and 3 p.m. on Sundays (open discussion and big book). Meetings are now located at First United Methodist Church on North Ave. in Henderson. For more information, call 989-8348.

Recycle cell phones The Chester County Senior Center and the Chester County Solid Waste Department have joined together to recycle cell phones. You may drop them off at Miller’s Big Star, all five convenience centers, or the Senior Center. It helps the environment and is a fundraiser for the Senior Center. Used ink cartridges are also recycled.

the menu of information. Motorists can call 511 from a mobile telephone or a land line to get information. The information is updated every five minutes by the Tennessee Department of Transportation and the Tennessee Highway Patrol.

SkyWarn needs you

Recycle for a Cure Chester County Relay for Life is recycling for a cure this year. The community is being asked to assist with this fundraising event, by dropping off any aluminum cans at the recycling bins at any Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling locations within the county. Also, look for the purple barrels placed around businesses in the area. For additional information, call Teresa at 6952100.

leave on a trip, whether it’s going across town or going across the state. Information also includes weather conditions and locations of rest areas and welcome centers. Callers can also obtain transfers to commercial airports, public transportation, the Tennessee Tourist Development Department and to neighboring states’ 511 systems. Amber Alerts are also included in

SKYWARN® is the National Weather Service (NWS) program to recruit and train storm spotters, who serve as the ears and eyes that can share the “ground truth” with forecasters. SKYWARN® spotters

enhance the storm detection capabilities by identifying and reporting potentially dangerous weather conditions. Despite sophisticated technology in use by NWS, forecasters still rely on storm spotters. Doppler radar may indicate a storm may be producing large hail, damaging winds or even a tornado, but it cannot tell exactly what’s happening on the ground underneath the storm. Anyone can become a volunteer SKYWARN® spotter, if they value the

satisfaction of knowing that their reports result in better warnings which save lives. NWS also has e-spotter – a web based program – that lets spotters send reports online in real time. The e-spotter program is at http://espotter.weather.gov/ SKYWARN® spotter training schedules WFO Memphis and surrounding area: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ meg/?n=skywarn_meetings

Turn Around, Don’t Drown™ Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other severe weather related hazard. The Centers for Disease Control report that over half of all floodrelated drownings occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water. The next highest per-

centage of flood-related deaths is due to walking into flood waters. Why? The main reason is people underestimate the force and power of water. Many of the deaths occur in automobiles as they are swept downstream. Of these drownings, many are preventa-

ble, but too many people continue to drive into flooded roadways. Most flood-related deaths could be avoided if people who come upon areas covered with water followed this simple advice: Turn Around, Don’t Drown ™.

Safety during athletic events Officials responsible for sports events and other outdoor activities often lack an adequate knowledge of thunderstorms and lightning to make educated decisions on when to seek safety. Numerous lightning deaths and injuries have occurred because people made decisions that unknowingly put their lives or the lives of others at risk.

For organized outdoor activities, the National Weather Service recommends that organizers have a lightning safety plan, and that the follow the plan without exception. The plan should give clear and specific safety guidelines in order to eliminate errors in judgement. These guidelines should answer the follow-

ing questions: • When should activities be stopped? • Where should people go for safety? • When should activities be resumed? • Who should monitor the weather and who is responsible to make the decision to stop activities? • What should be done if someone is struck by lightning?

Improving weather radio alerts continues NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS) continually provides forecasts and weather information, weather watches, warnings and other emergency messages to the public and emergency managers through the NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) network. The primary purpose of this sys-

tem is to reliably deliver ALL-Hazard emergency information (warnings) to those people most immediately at risk, with sufficient lead time to allow them to take action to reduce the likelihood of property damage, injury or death. The objective of the Weather Radio

Improvement Program (WRIP) is to update and modernize current NWS dissemination systems to meet current and future stake-holder missions, requirements and needs. The timeline to complete this WRIP across all NWS Weather Forecast Offices is estimated to be by the end of 2012.

Severe Weather Awareness Week Events Throughout the week, the National Weather Service, Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and other supporting groups will conduct educational activities and drills to help people prevent injuries and deaths from tornadoes, damaging winds, flash floods, lightning, and hail. Each day of the week focuses on a specific type of sever weather or on the warning and drill system. Sunday, Feb. 20 – Highlighted the important role of SKYWARN spotters. Monday, Feb. 21 – Hazards of Flooding and

Flash Floods Tuesday, Feb. 22 – Focused on lightning, often called the underrated killer Wednesday, Feb. 23 – Emphasis on tornado safety. A state-wide tornado drill will be conducted on this day. Schools and state, county and other interested agencies are encouraged to participate. If adverse weather threat-

ens, then Thursday will be the alternate drill day. Thursday, Feb. 24 – Severe Thunderstorms are much more frequent than tornadoes in the Mid-South. Straight line winds can reach well over 100 miles per hour and can be devastating. Friday, Feb. 25 – NOAA Weather Radio and Emergency Alert System Day.

Information resources on the Internet National Weather Service (Memphis): www.srh.noaa.gov/meg Tennessee Emergency Management Agency: www.tnema.org Twitter: http://twitter.com/T_E_M_A Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TNDisasterInfo Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/t_e_m_a


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • February 17, 2011 Page 17-A

TN communities see StormReady as good business For more than 20 years, the State of Tennessee has encouraged economic development and community growth through a program known as the ThreeStar Excellence in Community Development. After the Feb. 5, 2008 tornado outbreak in which 33 Tennesseans were killed, it was recognized that emergency preparedness was an area that should not be overlooked as communities grow and expand. Under Governor Phil Bredesen, the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) and the Department of Economic

and Community Development (ECD), which oversees the Three-Star program, began work to add emergency preparedness to the program. Beginning in 2009, a Community Emergency Preparedness focus was added to the Community Development category. Three-Star h e l p s Te n n e s s e e communities grow by developing strategic goals, focusing on strengths, and identifying needs to become better positioned for economic

growth. The incentivebased certification program requires communities to re-certify every year and they must meet tougher criteria to do so, which in turn makes them eligible for escalati n g

Emergency Manager, an active Local Emergency Planning Committee, offer Community Emergency Response Team training, and conduct an annual disaster exercise. In addition, communities will receive extra credit for “Strategic Actions” like earning Emergency Management

amounts of grants. To achieve the emergency preparedness focus, a community must have a certified and full-time

Accreditation Program certification and also gaining StormReady recognition through the National Weather Service (NWS).

Thunderstorms can wreak havoc in Tennessee A severe thunderstorm is a thunderstorm that produces one or more of the following: hail that has a diameter of one inch or larger, winds greater than or equal to 58 mph, and tornadoes. About 10 percent of all thunderstorms in the U. S. meet severe criteria. Severe thunderstorms can occur at any time of year, although the most common time of occurrence is during the spring months of March, April and May. There is also a lesser known secondary season during the fall, in November and

early December. Many people believe that a car is a safe place to be during a lightning strike because of the rubber tires. However, the real reason has nothing to do with rubber tires. The conductive metal frame of the automobile actually protects a vehicle’s occupants during a lightning strike by directing the electrical current around the passenger compartment. There is no electrical field inside a hollow conductive shell, which means the charge from the lightning will travel along

the metal frame and not inside your car. As long as your car has a fully enclosed metal top, and you don’t touch any conductive parts connected to the outside surfaces, you should be safe in your car. Safety tips • Have a plan. Prepare ahead of time so you and your family know what actions to take when severe weather occurs. • Get indoors! There is no safe place outdoors during a thunderstorm. • Stay informed. When severe weather threatens, stay tuned to NOAA

Weather Radio, local television and radio stations, or the National Weather Service webpage at www.weather.gov for up to date information on the weather situation. • Know what county you are in. When a warning is issued, the threatened area will be identified by the counties that contain it. • Have a NOAA Weather Radio. This is the best way to receive the latest and most up to date weather information from the National Weather Service.

Lightning, tornadoes can strike anywhere, anytime Nationwide in 2010, 29 people were killed by lightning. Fortunately, none of those killed were in the Volunteer State. Since 1959, a staggering 3,948 people in the United States, including 140 in Tennessee, have died. As a result, Tennessee is in the Top 5 of states in terms of lightning fatalities. In an average year, 25 million lightning strikes are recorded across the United States alone. Lightning is an incredibly powerful electrical discharge, containing up to 100 million volts of electrical charge and capable of reaching 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

Cloud-to-ground lightning is the result of incredible differences in electrical charge between thunderstorms and the earth’s surface. The sound of thunder travels around one mile every five seconds and is often audible up to 10 miles. If you can see lightning and hear thunder at your location, you are in danger of being struck by lightning and your life is in immediate danger. Rules for Safety Stay away from windows Avoid telephone and electrical appliances (wires connecting to these devices run outside of the home and act as lightning

rods). Don’t wash dishes or take a shower. The pipes will conduct electricity. Unplug computers and other sensitive electrical devices. Surge suppressors may not protect these items if lightning hits close to home. Lightning can strike twice, and often will. A tornado is a violent rotating column of air that extends from the base of a storm cloud to the ground. Some conditions that are conducive for tornado formation include warm, moist, unstable air, strong atmospheric winds that increase in speed and change direction with height, and a forcing

mechanism to lift the air. When a combination of these factors comes together just right, tornadoes form. The most common time of the year for tornado formation in Tennessee is during the spring months of March, April and May, with a secondary tornado season in November and December. Additionally, the afternoon and evening hours are the times of day at which most tornadoes occur, as they are the times at which the maximum heating takes place. However, tornadoes can occur at any time of day and at any point during the year, given the right environment.

May 2010 flooding in Tennessee rates historic, disaster The historic rainfall that occurred in Tennessee the weekend of May 1, 2010 caused flash flooding and river flooding. As a result, 49 counties – more than half of the state – received federal disaster declarations from President Barack Obama. The state suffered a tremendous blow to public infrastructure. The federal Public Assistance program reimbursement to local and state government, and some eligible utilities and non-profits, is estimated to be approximately $600 million. As of February, the number of public assistance projects has reached 6,000 – a figure greater than the combined number of projects from

A severe thunderstorm watch means that conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to develop. These are issued by the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., typically before severe weather is developing. A severe thunderstorm warning means that a severe thunderstorm has either been indicated on radar or witnessed by storm spotters firsthand. Your local NWS Forecast Office issues these when severe weather is developing or occurring.

What is La Niña? Many have likely heard the weather terms “La Niña” or “El Niño” thrown around before but what exactly is La Niña or El Niño? La Niña is characterized by unusually cold ocean temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific. A moderate to strong La Niña pattern is expected through at least the first six months of 2011, so how does this translate to severe weather across the Southeast region, particularly in the state of Tennessee? It is difficult to truly quantify how severe weather events are influenced by La Niña climate patterns. However, recent studies have shown that La Niña patterns result in more significant tornado outbreaks in the Souteast (between the I-40 and I-20 corridors) in the months of January and February, compared to a neutral or El Niño pattern. Typically, the peak severe weather “season” in the Southeast occurs during the months of March, April and May. So during La Niña patterns, severe weather and potential tornado outbreaks can occur earlier in the year compared to normal.

Are you ready for the ShakeOut? With 14 million people living and working near the New Madrid Seismic Zone, a major earthquake could cause unprecedented devastation. What we do now, before a big earthquake, will determine what our lives will be like afterwards. The Great Central U.S. ShakeOut will involve participants in more than eight states, and public advocacy by hundreds of partners. The drill will be held statewide at 10:15 a.m. April 28. Anyone wanting to participate can register (so they can be counted and receive communications) online at http://www.shakeout.org/centralus and at the minimum practice “drop, cover and hold on” at the specified time. It is only a five minute commitment for something that can save your life. It all begins with registering, which is free and open to everyone.

TEMA preps for big disaster This year marks the bicentennial of the last major earthquakes on the New Madrid Seismic Zone. In 1811, a series of earthquakes shook the region, uplifted sections of land that caused the Mississippi River to run backwards and subsiding other areas which created the Reelfoot Lake. This Spring, Tennessee’s emergency managers will try to imagine themselves coping with a quake of nearly identical proportions in order to test the state’s catastrophic planning while participating in the National Level Exercise for 2011. (see NLE 2011 to Focus on Earthquake Risk) The Tennessee Catastrophic Event Annex was developed to increase not only the state’s readiness to a catastrophic earthquake, but to improve regional and national readiness. The annex defines the answers to the question, “What will the State of Tennessee do if an earthquake should impact the western portion of the state tomorrow?”

2011 Exercise to focus on Mid-South earthquake risk all disasters in the state for the previous decade. Final figures will not be available until late 2011. The storms and flooding in May claimed the lives of 24 Tennesseans. More than 10,000 individuals were displaced from their homes; approximately 3,000 homes were either destroyed or

severely damaged. Federal programs – FEMA’s individual assistance and Small Business Administration disaster loans – provided 67,683 individuals with more than $318 million in assistance and 3,697 loans that combined are more than $160 million. The lasting impact of

the flooding will be apparent in many communities as they continue to rebuild and recover from the damage. In Nashville and other counties, local governments are addressing flood zone planning and considering mitigation projects that will reduce the impact of future floods.

Winter tornadoes uncommonly deadly

2002, another night-time tornado outbreak occurred. In all 17 people were killed, and 86 more were injured. An F3 in Cumberland

County was responsible for four of these deaths and 18 of the injuries and an F3 in Morgan County accounted for another seven deaths and 28 injuries.

Research has shown that most of us minimize the threat of tornadoes during the winter, since the traditional tornado season falls in the spring months. So, when tornadoes develop in the winter, people who are not expecting it are unprepared, and thus, in additional danger. More recently, a wintertime tornado outbreak occurred on Feb. 5-6, 2008

Since the inclusion of StormReady to the ThreeStar program, 21 new Tennessee communities have been recognized. “Once the Mayor found out about StormReady becoming a Three-Star Strategic Action, the process moved very quickly,” says Cumberland County EMA Director Keith Garrison, “ThreeStar definitely helped us on our way toward our 2010 StormReady recognition. For more information on Tennessee’s ThreeStar program please visit www.tn.gov/ecd/CD_three _star.html

Watches and Warnings

(the Super Tuesday outbreak), in which 31 Tennesseans lost their lives and another 148 were injured. The longest tornado during that outbreak tracked 49 miles across four counties, and alone was responsible for 22 deaths and 63 injuries. On Nov. 9-10,

On May 16, a major earthquake will rock the midSouth and unleash a level of destruction upon more than eight states. Unlike other forecasts of doom, this prediction is based on the certainty of a National Level exercise scheduled to put local, state and federal officials through the paces of responding to a catastrophic earthquake in the heart of the United States. The Tier I exercise, known as NLE 2011, will simulate the decisions and actions that top officials should be prepared to take in the first 96 hours after such a devastating earthquake. This is the first NLE to focus on a natural hazard, rather than a terrorism-focused scenario. “We know there will not be enough stuff to go around when there are eight states all asking for the same resources,” said Tennessee Emergency Management Agency Director James Bassham. To assist the federal government with prioritizing resources for impacted areas, Tennessee and the other seven states in the Central United States Earthquake Consortium have participated in numerous workshops and planning sessions, including one in Nashville last November with more than 400 participants from federal and state agencies. The NLE 2011 will include activities by local responders, federal and state emergency management officals, private sector partners at multiple venues around the region, as well as in Washington D.C. and various FEMA regional offices. The exercise is designed to assess response and recovery capabilities both nationally and regionally.


Page 18-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011


SSppoorrttss Page 1-B

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Trice signs with FHU Kamara Trice, a star member of the Chester County High School softball team, has signed to play next season for Freed-Hardeman University. Trice signed with FHU head coach Todd Humphry Feb. 15 at CCHS. Trice is one of the Eaglette’s top pitchers and hits with power in the middle of the batting order. Her reasons for choosing FHU were summed up when she stated, “There’s no place like home.”

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Kamara Trice signed last week to play collegiate softball at Freed-Hardeman University. Trice is seated at center with her parents, and from left in back are Chester County head coach Brandon Pipkin, FHU head coach Todd Humphry, and assistant coach Tarrah Tucker.

Dominate start fizzles, Eaglettes eliminated In the first period of their District 14-AA quarterfinal game Friday at Lexington, Chester County’s Eaglettes dominated the basketball game like seldom seen this season. They held the host Lady Tigers without a field goal in the first period, and methodically pulled away in the second period to a 23-11 lead. However, Lexington scored the final eight points before half, then took their first lead of the game late in the third quarter, holding off vain Eaglette attempts at a comeback to win 55-46. CCHS ended its season with a record of 9-16. CCHS head coach Lee Pipkin said the 2010-11 Eaglettes had the ability to play with any team on the schedule but lacked the confidence to put it all together. “Any time we went in to a game with confidence we did well,” Pipkin stated. “The second half tonight we got shaky, and could not respond. We lost focus and forgot the game plan. Chester County could have led by many more early in the game, but hit only one of 12 shots from the field in the first quarter, many from beneath the basket. It was just the mercy the Lady Tigers needed. After the first

period they shot 58 percent from the field while holding the Eaglettes to only 33 percent overall. Also, their pressure defense in the second half rattled CCHS into 21 turnovers. CCHS did have a 29-17 edge on the boards. Kalee Goff of Lexington scored all of her 15 points in the second half to take team-high honors. Dee Dee Jones of CCHS had 18 points and three-pointer, and Tamacha Couch added 10. In the regular season finale Feb. 14 at Somerville, CCHS turned a tie game into a 51-41 victory by out-scoring Fayette-Ware 11-4 in the third quarter. The victory enabled the Eaglettes to tie Lexington for fourth place in the district standings, however, the Lady Tigers won a coin toss for home court, and made good use of it. Final Regular Season Game Feb. 14 at Somerville Chester Co. 6-11-11-23=51 Fayette-Ware 6-11- 4-20=41 CC – Darby Miskelly 10, Tamacha Couch 10, McEarl 7, Jones 7, Sims 2, Amos 2. FW – W. McNeal 9, N. McNeal 5, Moore 7, Morton 5, Hobson 6, Williams 5, Dowell 2, Bonner 2. Three-point shots: CC – Miskelly 2. FW – N. McNeal, Williams. Records: CC – 9-15. FW – 516.

Senior Day Sat. for FHU basketball Freed-Hardeman University will honor its senior basketball players and cheerleaders Saturday as it hosts Bethel University in the final games of the season at 2 and 4 p.m. respectively. The Lady Lions will look to wrap up the No. 2 seed in the TranSouth Conference tournament which gets underway next week. The Lions look to hold on to the number three seed.

Diamond Lions hit the road Freed-Hardeman’s baseball team is on the road this weekend, with three games scheduled Feb. 26-27 at Barbourville, Ky. against Union College. The Lions return home March 1, hosting Belhaven University at Carnes Field.

Lions’ defense dominates to beat Mid-Continent

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Ashley Swope is in good defensive position against Lexington during the District 14-AA quarterfinal game Thursday in Lexington. The hosts won, ending the Eaglettes’ season. District 14-AA Tournament First Round Feb. 17 at Lexington Chester Co. 9-14-17-10=46 Lexington 2-17-17-17=55 CC – Dee Dee Jones 18, Tamacha Couch 10, Alexander 6, Swope 6, Miskelly 4, Amis 2. Lx – Kalee Goff 15, Sparks

12, Arnold 6, Boring 5, Cagle 4, McGill 2, Nichols 2, Thomas 1. Three-point shots: CC – Jones. Lx – Sparks 3, Arnold 2, Boring. Records: CC – 9-16. Lx – 1114. CHESTER COUNTY SEASON COMPLETE

After allowing an average of over 90 points in their last four games, the Freed-Hardeman Lions reversed that trend in a big way on Saturday in a 78-43 win over Mid-Continent University. The win, coupled with a loss by Cumberland University, gave the Lions (18-10, 10-4) sole possession of third place in the TranSouth Conference standings with two games to go. The turning point of Saturday’s game came near the five-minute mark in the first half when FHU, trailing by three, went on an 11-0 run to close the half and take a 31-23 lead into the locker rooms. The Lions played almost flawless defensively during that stretch, forcing five turnovers and allowing no offensive rebounds to a Cougar team that is among the top rebounding squads in the NAIA. Kyle Teichmann led all scorers with 21 points, 17 of which came in the second half. Reginald Gilmore added 11 points off the bench while Jesse Moulton chipped in with 10 points. Freed-Hardeman dominated the boards, out-rebounding MCU 44-30 and grabbing 17 offensive rebounds. Moulton and Teichmann each had nine, while Anthony Sampson dished out seven assists. The Lions return to action at 8 p.m. Thursday, paying a visit to Lyon College.

Late free throw seals win Anthony Sampson’s two free throws with eight seconds left sealed a hard-fought win for the FreedSee LIONS, Page 2-B

South Side sends Eagles packing Chester County came in to the 2010-11 basketball season with very high hopes. Head coach Clay Murley had four starters returning, a good inside game, and experienced ball handlers. One problem – they play in arguably the toughest district in the state. That point became very evident last week as CCHS ended its season with consecutive setbacks to Fayette-Ware and South Side, the later by a 67-47 score on Friday in Jackson in the District 14-AA quarterfinals. “After the game, I told the players that in any other district in the state, we would be going on,”

said Murley. But not in 14AA which features the defending state champs and runners-up, each with multiple state titles over the last decade, and each with sights on another. The talent at the top of the food chain cascaded down the standings, forcing the Eagles to play an elimination game on the road at South Side, and eliminated they were. The Hawks’ defense smothered the Eagles in the first quarter and the hosts raced out to a 26-12 lead in the second quarter. Not going down without a fight, CCHS clawed back on a three-pointer by Tony Phelps just before the See EAGLES, Page 2-B

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Austin Cavaness leaps toward the basket surrounded by most of the South Side defense in the District 14-AA quarterfinals Friday at Jackson.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

Johnson joins 1,000-point club Freed-Hardeman University senior Whitney Johnson became the 27th player in Lady Lion history to score 1,000 career points, surpassing the plateau in the first half of FHU’s 74-66 win over Martin Methodist College on Monday, Feb. 14. Johnson, a 5-foot-4 guard from Lexington, is averaging a career-high 10.3 points per game. She WHITNEY JOHNSON also recorded her 300th assist and 200th steal this season. Her 215 career steals rank fourth all-time in program history, while she also ranks 12th in career assists with 311. Entering the game, she needed five points to get to 1,000 and got there with a three-pointer coming with 13:55 left in the first half. She finished the game with nine points. A three-year starter, Johnson is the second player from her recruiting class to reach 1,000 points. Classmate Meribeth Boehler reached the mark last season. Freed-Hardeman is 21-5 on the season and ranked No. 5 in the latest coaches’ poll.

Diamond Lions hit the road, host Belhaven, Tuesday Freed-Hardeman’s baseball team is on the road this weekend, with three games scheduled Feb. 26-27 at Barbourville, Ky. against Union College. The Lions return home March 1, hosting Belhaven University at Carnes Field. Last weekend, FHU salvaged the final game of a three-game weekend series with Indiana University Southeast, splitting a double-header with the Grenadiers on Saturday falling in the first game, 4-3, before coming back with a 7-5 win in game two. IUS won Friday’s match up, 12-8, to take two of three from the Lions in the series. In game one Saturday, Hunter Newby (1-1) went the distance with a solid seven innings of work but the Lions came up a run short in the end. Newby allowed five hits and one walk while striking out six, but was the victim of three first-inning errors that led to a pair of runs for the Grenadiers. FHU came back with runs in the second and third innings to tie the game, but IUS retook the lead in the fourth by scoring twice on three hits. In game two, the Grenadiers got to Lion starter Charlie Overturf in the sixth inning, chasing him after only retiring one of the six batters he faced. After Drew Stofel worked to one batter and allowed a single, Drew Suttles entered and struck out the last two hitters to leave two runners stranded. In Friday’s affair, Southeast used a four-run first inning to take a lead it would not lose, defeating the Freed-Hardeman Lions, 12-8. The Grenadiers chased Lion starter Gage Franklin (0-1) early after the sophomore surrendered four runs on three hits in just one-third an inning of work.

From Page 1-B

Lions Hardeman, which overcame a barrage of threepointers by the Trevecca Nazarene Trojans to post a 91-87 victory on Thursday night in Nashville. The win snapped a three-game losing streak for the Lions (17-10, 9-4), who remained in a tie for third place in the TranSouth Conference with Cumberland University. The Trojans nailed 14 three-pointers in the game, including eight of their first 11 and four on four straight possessions that constituted a 12-0 run which turned a 10point Freed-Hardeman lead into TNU’s first of the game at 33-31 with 2:42 to play in the first half. Brian Pearson scored FHU’s next four points to give the Lions the lead again, a lead they would hang onto for the first seven minutes of the second half until the Trojans

rolled off nine unanswered points to go ahead 58-54 with 12:00 left. But as they did earlier, the Lions kept the damage minimal by scoring the next four points to tie the game. The score was tied four more times over the next four minutes, the last broken by a Cedric Austin three-pointer with just under eight minutes to play that gave FreedHardeman the lead for good. Teichmann, who missed the first game between the two schools in January, scored a career-high 30 points to go along with 11 rebounds. Austin added 17 points while Sampson had 12 and James Haddix contributed 10. Rudolph and France carried the bulk of TNU’s offensive load scoring 30 and 28 points respectively. Feb. 17 at Nashville Freed-Hardeman 37-54=91 Trevecca Nazarene 35-52=87 FH – Kyle Teichmann 30, Cedric Austin 17, Anthony Sampson 12, James Haddix 10, Pearson 7, Moulton 4, Gravatt 4, Gilmore 4, Milewski 3.

Junior high volleyball Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County hosted Trinity Christian in junior high volleyball Thursday at CCJHS. There was much action in the contests including this return by CCJHS.

Pair of seventeens top Mid-Continent Meribeth Boehler and Brittany Montgomery each scored 17 points as the No. 5 FreedHardeman Lady Lions bounced back from a loss two days earlier with a 7734 win over MidContinent University on Saturday afternoon at the Sports Center. For Montgomery, it was a career high as the freshman went five-of-seven from three-point range scoring all her points in the second half. Boehler scored 13 of her points in the first half, posting a double-double by the break after also grabbing 10 rebounds before halftime. She finished with 11. Neither team started out particularly strong offensively. It took MCU more than nine minutes to score its first points, but FHU (22-6, 11-3) wasn’t able to take advantage by only scoring 10 during the same timeframe. The Lady Lions managed to get things going with eight minutes left in the half, going on a 17-3 run to take a 31-9 lead

TN – Marquise Rudolp 30, Michael France 28, Jeremy Dixon 10, Nyadoro 9, Henry 4, Carden 2, Odour 2, Morris 2. Three-pointers: FH – Austin 3, Sampson, Milewski, Pearson. TN – Rudolph 6, France 5, Dixon 2, Henry. Records: FH – 17-10 (9-4). TN – 11-14 (5-8). Feb. 19 at the Sports Center Mid-Continent 23-20=43 Freed-Hardeman 31-47=78 MC – Butler 9, Ferguson 8, Fraliex 6, Bryant 6, Reid 4, Tillman 3, Bynum 3, Elkins 2, Bowins 2. FH – Kyle Teichmann 21, Reginald Gilmore 11, Jesse Moulton 10, Austin 6, Sampson 6, Milewski 6, Gravatt 5, Haddix 4, Pearson 4, Young 3, Perea 2. Three-point shots: MC – Tillman, Bynum. FH – Austin 2, Milewski 2. Records: MC – 10-18 (3-11). FH – 18-10 (10-4).

with 2:11 remaining and took a 33-12 lead into halftime. Whitney Johnson was the only other FHU player to score in double figures, finishing with 12 points to go along with six rebounds, six assists and three steals. FHU enters the final week of conference play a half-game behind Bethel University with those two teams meeting Saturday to possibly determine the No. 2 seed in the conference tournament. First, however, the Lady Lions visit Lyon College for a 6 p.m. tip-off Thursday.

Turnovers turn game to Vecca Thursday in Nashville, FHU committed a seasonhigh 26 turnovers, seeing a 16-point first half lead disappear in a 64-56 loss to Trevecca Nazarene. It marked the fourth straight game where the Lady Lions (21-6, 10-3) lost on the road at

From Page 1-B

Eagles intermission buzzer, and a 9-2 run to start the second half got the Eagles back within a point, 33-32. However, CCHS was toast from that point on, and came home with a season record of 17-8. Unofficially, the Eagles hit 40 percent from the field, but were outrebounded 27-16 and had 17 turnovers. The Hawks hit 55 percent from the field. “(South Side) played with a different intensity than we did to start the game,” said Murley. “We just did not execute well. “I knew we would be a competitive team this season, (but) the district is so tough,” he continued. “For the most part we played as good as we could. We just had some

Trevecca on a weeknight. Early on, it looked like it would be a good showing for FHU, which built a 29-13 lead due largely to a domination of the boards. But then, the Lady Lions had difficulty controlling the basketball and as a result, the Trojans were able to pull within seven points before FreedHardeman took a 36-27 lead into halftime. Things didn’t get better in the second half as FHU clung to a narrow lead before finally surrendering it with 8:06 left. From that point on, the Lady Lions would not regain the lead. Boehler scored 20 points to lead all scorers, but fouled out with 3:23 to play. FHU’s other posts, Maria Bagwell and Summer Waggoner, each had four fouls as well. Natalie Shumpert was the only other Lady Lion in double figures with 16 points to go along with a game-high 11 rebounds. It was the second-lowbad nights.” In the regular season finale, Feb. 14 at Somerville, the Eagles fell to Fayette-Ware 67-57 in a game that had been postponed three times from Jan. 11. CCHS was down only a point at half-time, but the Wildcats’ Carloss Hart scored 11 points in the fourth period to help his team pull away. Will Jones hit two three-pointers, and Cameron Phelps, in the fourth quarter to keep CCHS close but it was too little too late. Final Regular Season Game Feb. 14 at Somerville Chester Co. 13-11-10-24=57 Fayette-Ware 20- 5-19-18=67 CC – Will Jones 17, Wesley Woods 10, Gilbert 8, Atkins 8, C. Phelps 5, T. Phelps 5, Phillips 4.

est point output on the season for FHU, only behind a 54-point performance in a loss to Columbia College on Nov. 23. Feb. 17 at Nashville Freed-Hardeman 36-20=56 Trevecca Nazarene 27-37=64 FH – Meribeth Boehler 21, Natalie Shumpert 19, Johnson 8, Waggoner 6, Woodward 3. TN – Chelsey Taylor 16, Rachel Bollinger 11, Rachel Raby 10, Elie 8, Majors 5, Wasson 5, Mitchell 4, Van Atta 3, Gleaves 2. Three-pointers: FH – Shumpert 3, Woodward. TN – Taylor 2, Van Atta, Bollinger, Wasson. Records: FH – 21-6 (10-3). TN – 12-12 (9-4). Feb. 19 at the Sports Center Mid-Continent 12-22=34 Freed-Hardeman 33-44=77 MC – Stephanie Malone 12, Daily 8, George 6, Payton 3, Gilbert 3, Martin 2. FH – Meribeth Boehler 17, Brittany Montgomery 17, Whitney Johnson 12, Shumpert 8, Waggoner 6, Bagwell 4, Taylor 4, Dyer 4, Woodward 3, Pate 2. FW – Orlando Bass 21, Carlos Hart, Jr. 14, Bennie Williams 12, Turner 6, Cooper 6, Richardson 5, Tate 2. Three-point shots: CC – Jones 2, C. Phelps. FW – Hart 2, Bass, Richardson. Records: CC – 17-7. FW – n/a. District 14-AA Tournament First Round Feb. 17 at Jackson Chester Co. 9-15-11-12=47 South Side 18-13-13-23=67 CC – Tony Phelps 11, Chris Gilbert 10, Jones 8, Woods 8, Cavaness 6, Turner 2, Atkins 2. SS – Leland Robinson 24, Jalen Barford 11, Merriweather 9, Miller 8, Fuller 5, Smith 4, Marshall 2, Swift 2, Buckley 2. Three-point shots: CC – Gilbert 2, Jones 2, T. Phelps. SS – None. Records: CC – 17-8. SS – n/a. CHESTER COUNTY SEASON COMPLETE


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011 Page 3B


Page 4-B

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Thursday, February 24, 2011

FHU honors students attend state conference at ETSU Several honors students from FreedHardeman University attended and participated in the state honors conference Feb. 18-19 at East Tennessee State University. Four FHU students presented research topics exemplifying honors-quality scholarship based on their interests and studies

at FHU. Kyle Wiser, a senior business management major, presented information concerning his experience on the Clayton Investment Team, dealing with big money investments in a real-life situation. Marianne Sansom, a nursing major, discussed fetal alcohol syndrome and its devastating effects.

Josh Barber, the chair of the Honors College and a junior international business major, brought special attention to Asian discrimination in 20th Century America. Davis Shoulders, a freshman English major, analyzed John Donne’s “La Corona” and the criticisms of Samuel Johnson. Members of the FHU

Honors College take advantage of many opportunities to travel and broaden their horizons. Josh Barber, having attended several trips, said, “Honors trips are always a lot of fun. They’re wonderful opportunities to get to know other Honors College students, and they’re great learning experiences.”

Inside CCHS

FHU School of Biblical Studies launches online journal The Freed-Hardeman University School of Biblical Studies has launched an online academic religious journal. Titled Kingdom, the journal will feature articles by the FHU family of advanced Bible students, Bible faculty and Bible graduates but is not limit-

ed to those authors. Dr. Ralph Gilmore, professor of Bible and of Philosophy, will edit the journal. He said he chose Kingdom as the name because “it is sufficiently broad in scope so as to handle a variety of questions in the areas of religion, theology, the philos-

ophy of religion, ethics, missiology, church history, etc.” Dr. Billy Smith, dean of the School of Biblical Studies, said the school has long wanted to have a journal that would “encourage deeper study and critical thinking in the study of God’s inspired

word.” The School of Biblical Studies intends for Kingdom to be a quarterly publication. The current issue of the journal is available at www.fhu.edu/academics/colleges/biblicalstudies/kingdom.aspx. Articles may be submitted to rgilmore@fhu.edu

FHU history professor co-edits book, highlights General Greene Freed-Hardeman University history professor Greg Massey is the coeditor of a book to be published by University of South Carolina Press. The book, written by 11 historians, is titled “General Nathanael Greene and the American Revolution in the South.” In addition to editing the book, Massey also wrote the book’s concluding essay.

Greene, a self-trained soldier, rose in the ranks to become second only to George Washington. He was one of three generals who served the entire eight years of the Revolutionary War. At the war’s conclusion, he refused to become Secretary of War and settled on “Mulberry,” his estate near Savannah, Ga. Massey’s essay focuses on the latter portion of

Greene’s life when he went from successful general to struggling planter. As a general in the South, Greene had urged planters to free and arm some of their slaves as reinforcements for his army. They refused to do that, but in gratitude to Greene after the successful conclusion of the war, southern state legislatures granted him plantations. Thus, the man who had

FHU to host online youth conference, March 1 Freed-Hardeman University staff member Brad Montague will host an online youth conference at 7 p.m. March 1 in preparation for this summer’s GO! Camp, directed by Montague. The conference, titled “All Together Now,” will focus on Romans 12:12, particularly the phrase, “Be constant in prayer.” Youth groups from across the United States have already committed to the live event. The program, filmed on the FHU campus, features several current students discussing what is meant by being “constant in prayer.” In addition, videos will share some of the ways God is working through youth in America, according to Montague. Content from the video will be available

for download Wednesday morning following the online conference. Organizers hope this material will be used in Wednesday night Bible studies across the nation. Montague, who organized and will direct the conference, hopes the event will “empower and humble” those watching. “This is a reminder that there are a lot of things we can’t do, and that’s where prayer comes in,” he said. “There is a Savior and we have to acknowledge Him.…It is important to know we are not alone.” GO! summer camp is scheduled for June 5-10. Information about the camp and links to the “All Together Now” conference can be found at fhu.edu/go/blog.

urged slaves be freed found himself a struggling planter dependent on slave labor. This paradox is the crux of Massey’s essay. Massey has been a member of the FHU faculty since 1993. He holds a Ph.D. from University of South Carolina. Among the classes he teaches are two in research and writing of history.

by Meghan Black

MEGHAN BLACK The Chester County High School’s Academic Decathlon team went to State Competition this past weekend and took second place. The team also won 34 individual medals and is able to compete in the National Online Competition this April. In the Honors Division, Lydia Creech won gold medals for Language and Literature, Music and Art; won silver medals for Super Quiz, Social Science, and Economics; won a bronze medal for Math; and a copper medal for Speech. Lydia was the CCHS top scorer, second highest scorer at State Competition, and second place overall top scorer in the Honors Division. Also in Honors Division, Piper Davis won copper medals for Math, Economics, and Interview, and she was the sixth highest overall scorer in Honors Division. Zack Lloyd won a silver medal for Math, a bronze medal in Social Science, and the Academic Decathlon Scholarship in the Honors Division. In the Scholastic Division, Sunny Lloyd won a gold medal for Social Science, a silver medal in Speech, and copper medals in Art and Interview; she was also the fourth overall top scorer in the Scholastic Division. Caitlin Hutcheson also competed in the Scholastic Division and won a gold medal for Super Quiz, a bronze medal for Essay, and a copper medal for Language and Literature; she was fifth place overall top scorer in the Scholastic Division. Also in the Scholastic Division, Forrest Vest was the sixth highest overall scorer in this division. In Varsity Division, Joseph Martinez won gold medals in Language and Literature, Art, Economics, and Essay; a silver medal in Super Quiz; a bronze medal in Math; and a copper medal in Social Science. Joseph was the third highest overall scorer in the Varsity Division. Jon Kanizar also competed in the Varsity Division and won a gold medal for Math, a silver medal for Economics, a bronze medal for Social Science, and a copper medal for Super Quiz; he was the sixth highest overall scorer in Varsity Division. Also in the Varsity Division, Lindsey Elkins won a bronze medal for Essay and a copper medal for Art. The alternates’ essays were scored this year though not qualified for medals. Rodger Lampley’s essay score was the same as the scores of Scholastic Division gold medalists. Congratulations to all the members of the team and their sponsor Molly Plyler! Good luck on the National Online Competition in April!


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011 Page 5-B

New FHU summer camp to explore the arts and sciences QUEST, a new academic summer camp to be held June 19-24, at FreedHardeman University, will teach art and science to high school students entering grades 9-11. The name of the camp is an acronym standing for Question, Understand, Explore, Solve, and Think. Art QUEST campers will become acquainted with alternative photo techniques including pinhole photography, cyanotype, and digital editing on the computer, and studio drawing with charcoal including still life drawings and portraits. They will end their week with a gallery show. The science program centers on a CSI theme where students become crime scene investigators. Learning how to diffuse a bomb using robots, exam-

By Tangie Sweatman A lot of exciting things are happening at West! The third-grade classes are preparing for the 2011 West Chester Spelling Bee that will be held on March 24. The first round

Chester County Head Start Center, East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools Monday, Feb. 28 Baked chicken rings Or lowfat corndog Whipped potatoes Seasoned green beans Salad, roll Mixed fruit or fresh fruit Milk choice Tuesday, March 1 Santa Fe pasta or Turkey/cheese sub sandwich Seasoned brown beans Savory baked apples Salad, rolls Peaches, fresh fruit Milk choice Wednesday, March 2 Cheeseburger or Barbecue/bun Baked tater pals Seasoned baked beans Trimmings Pineapple or fresh fruit Milk choice Thursday, March 3 Country fried steaks or Manager’s choice Baked sweet potatoes Steamed green beans Salad, rolls Applesauce or fresh fruit Milk choice Friday, March 4 Pizza or Ham/cheese sandwich Steamed broccoli/cheese Baked batter bites Salad Fruit choice, milk choice

Chester County Middle School Monday, Jan. 31 Popcorn chicken or

ining skeletons, testing poisons, and analyzing blood splatter are among the activities planned for campers. Evening activities will combine the disciplines. Classes will be taught by members of the FHU faculty and FHU students will be counselors. Dr. Barbara England, chairman of the Department of Fine Arts, said she had long searched for ways to “establish artistic outlets for students in the community.” This new summer camp opportunity will provide that outlet for students in the community and West Tennessee. England will direct the art portion of the camp. Dr. Rachel Stevens, assistant professor of biology and director of the camp’s science portion,

said she hopes to ignite interest in the sciences. “Science and math are really useful in everyday life,” she said. “Plus, science and math are fun!” The directors, with the support of Dr. Joe Wiley, president of the university, and Dr. LeAnn SelfDavis, dean of the School of Sciences and Mathematics, hope this summer camp will be a great opportunity to allow high school students in the community and surrounding region become familiar with the university and faculty. The $220 fee for the camp includes lodging, meals, instruction and supplies. Students interested in attending may receive additional information about the camp by emailing quest@fhu.edu.

winners were Sydney Bell, Katelyn Bushart, Alayna Felker and Tyler Meek. The second round winners were Zachary Belew, Alaina Cooper, Kamden Rhodes and Maisy Jarman. There will be three more rounds in the spelldown competition. The third-graders look forward to this special event every year. Heather Melton’s thirdgraders have been learning about famous inventors. They wrote folder book reports and shared them with the class this

week. What would we do without inventions? The students enjoyed learning about Alexander Graham Bell, George Washington Carver, Eli Whitney and others. Second-graders have been studying weather with the reading story “Helen Keller and the Big Storm.” Mary Beth Miller has been teaching American Sign Language to the second-graders. Ask your favorite sevenyear-old some common phrases in sign language and be surprised at what

Country fried steak Mashed potatoes, rolls Green peas, salad Baked apples Birthday cake for January Fruit, milk choice Tuesday, Feb. 1 Ravioli casserole or Ham/cheese sandwich Corn, purple hull peas Salad, Texas toast Fruit, milk choice Wednesday, Feb. 2 Breaded chicken sandwich Or chili cheese Maxwrap Batter bites, salad Baked beans Fruit, milk choice Thursday, Feb. 3 Chicken noodle soup/crackers Or hotdog Mixed vegetables, salad Carrots and pickle spears Grilled cheese Fruit, milk choice Friday, Jan. 14 Pizza or Barbecue sandwich Baked potato, salad California blend Fruit, milk choice

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, Jan. 31 Baked chicken strips Or Hotpockets Cheesy potatoes, rolls Green peas, salad Baked apples Tuesday, Feb. 1 Spaghetti/meat sauce Or pork roast/gravy Mashed potatoes Green beans, salad Coleslaw, rolls Wednesday, Feb. 2 Cheeseburger or hotdog Tater pals, salad Baked beans, trimmings Chocolate chip cookie

Thursday, Feb. 3 Vegetable beef soup/crackers Or manager’s choice Corn, baked tri taters Pickle spears, salad Baby carrots/ranch dip Friday, Feb. 4 Pizza or Tuna salad plates Lima beans, corn Savory wedges, salad

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice or fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Monday, Jan. 31 Chicken rings (2 lines) Or pizza, salad Mashed potatoes, rolls Green peas, baked apples Glazed carrot circles Tuesday, Feb. 1 Spaghetti/meat sauce or Clux Delux/bun/fries Salad/crackers Tiny whole potatoes Green beans, coleslaw Corn, breadsticks

Fair will highlight U of M grad school Are you thinking about obtaining a doctorate, a master’s degree or a graduate certificate? If so, you’re invited to attend the University of Memphis Graduate and Professional Schools’ Recruitment Fair from 1-5 p.m. on Tuesday, March 1 in the Rose Theatre on campus. The fair will offer information about the U of M’s 24 doctoral degrees, 55 master’s degrees, 19 graduate certificates, the education specialist degree, and the juris doctor (law) degree. Prospective students can also meet and talk with graduate faculty and students, learn about financial aid and scholarship/fellowship programs, and apply onsite for graduate school at the U of M. Dr. Ralph Faudree, U of M Provost, the senior academic administrator, will they “say.” Second-grade students have also been studying adverbs in English. In math, they are working on measurement including inches and centimeters. Kelly Crowe’s secondgrade students completed a “classroom field trip” observing and experimenting with objects that were magnetic and nonmagnetic. Emily Brown’s class would like to thank Joshua Kuykendall and his mom, Crystal, for making confetti eggs to share with the class while reading “Mama’s Birthday Present.” The class enjoyed going outside and breaking confetti eggs on each other’s heads! Kindergarten students were treated to a special dental health program by Starla Bogard. She demonstrated teeth brushing and gave each student a toothbrush. We are beginning our spring school fundraiser. We will are taking orders for jackets, polos, duffle bags, tote bags and more. These items can be monogrammed! A colorful brochure was sent home with students with all the details. Share the brochure with family and friends and help support our school! Yearbook sales will be from Feb. 28 through March 4. Prices are $32 for a standard yearbook and $37 for a personalized yearbook. Be looking for yearbook order forms in your student’s folder during that time. As always, thanks for supporting and being a great part of our school! WEST – Where Everyone Stands Tall.

Wednesday, Feb. 2 Cheeseburger or Pizza bar/fries Chili bar/crackers with Pimento cheese sandwich French fries, apple sticks Baked beans Thursday, Feb. 3 Chicken fajita (2 lines) Pizza choice/wedges Fiesta rice Refried beans/cheese Sweet potato casserole Friday, Feb. 4 Fish scroodles Pizza/batter bites Chicken noodle soup/crackers With pimento cheese sandwich And salad Macaroni/cheese White beans, coleslaw Turnip greens, hushpuppies

By Ally Rogers All junior high students have a very helpful opportunity over the next six weeks. Coach Eads has launched a “Math Boot Camp” this week. Math Boot Camp is for ALL junior high students. It will enrich, encourage and challenge students, and serve as an innovative way to teach the standards that will be taught on the TCAP test. It will NOT be a tutoring session or homework help class. Boot camp is held each

be in attendance. The event is free and open to the public. Paid parking is available in the Zach Curlin garage, adjacent to the University

Center. More information is available online at www.memphis.edu/truebluefuture or by phone at 901-678-4212.

Jackson-Madison County General Hospital’s Junior Volunteer Program accepting applications Jackson-Madison County General Hospital’s Junior Volunteer Program is gearing up for new volunteers this summer. Teens, ages 14-18, can apply now for experience in a hospital atmosphere. Junior Volunteers have the opportunity to work in a variety of places in the hospital. The gift shop, waiting areas, and some nursing areas are all possible work spots. Junior Volunteers work four-hour shifts. There are three four-hour shifts each day. All Junior Volunteers are required to work at least four hours per week and 12 per month during June and July. They will be assigned hours according to the needs of the hospital and their availability. Applicants must be 14 years old by June 1 and not more than 18. Applications can be found online at www.wth.org. Click the “Our Hospitals” portal, and then choose Jackson-Madison County General Hospital. On the left-hand side in the brown box is a volunteer section. Click this and then choose the “Just for

Juniors” tab. Along with the online application, applicants must also receive two references from schoolteachers and have at least a 2.5 GPA. A copy of their latest report card and a 250word essay explaining their specific interest in the healthcare field is also required. Deadline for all applications is March 15. All volunteers must also perform a personal interview before being selected to the Junior Volunteer Program. If accepted, all volunteers must attend a mandatory orientation program. The orientation is scheduled for a Saturday in May and will last approximately four hours. Please mail the application and all other documents to: JacksonMadison County General Hospital, Volunteer Services Office, 620 Skyline Drive, Jackson, TN 38301. For more information regarding the Junior Volunteer Program, contact Donna Williams at 731-541-6153 or visit all of the volunteer programs at www.wth.org.

Secret Keeper Girl Live: The Pajama Party Tour Looking for ways your daughter can have both fashion and modesty? Secret Keeper Girl has both of you covered! Secret Keeper Girl is a mother-daughter event where tween girls (age 812) and their moms learn about modesty, purity, and beauty from a biblical perspective. To date, more than 100,000 moms and their daughters have experienced these events. This year’s Pajama Party Tour is full of biblical truths about beauty and modesty while being presented with up-beat worship times, crazy motherdaughter games, and a fabulous fashion show. The outfits show girls (and

their mothers) how to have fun with the latest fashions while still reflecting modesty. Facilitators also discuss peer pressure, internal beauty, and other issues young girls face. The event is sponsored by West Tennessee Women’s Center and will be held at 6 p.m. Friday, March 25, at Fellowship Bible Church in Jackson. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 day of show. Tickets can be purchased at Lifeway Christian Book Store or online at www.itickets.com. For more information call (731) 217-5212 or visit www.secretkeepergirl.com.

WTBC releases Dean’s List The following West Tennessee Business College students from this area maintained a 95 or above average for the past enrollment period ending Jan. 14. They are Susan Boothe, Britney Brown, Aknia Clark, Stephanie Nelson, Tiffany Strain and Felisha Williams. Tuesday and Thursday afternoon from 3:15-5:15 p.m. As an incentive for students who attend at least seven of the 12 sessions, they will be allowed to wear their Boot Camp Tshirt (which is given at the end of camp) and blue jeans each Friday until the school year is over! If your child has not filled out the form to attend, it is not too late! Just stop by the office to pick one up. The volleyball teams have played in three games so far this season. They are undefeated! There are two upcoming home games, one on Monday, Feb. 28, and one on Tuesday March 1. The volleyball season lasts only about a month, so please take time to come and support the Eaglettes! Please continue to ask your student about the

TCAP goals at our school. TCAP tests will be given the Thursday, Friday, Monday and Tuesday following Spring Break (April 14, 15, 18, and 19). Encourage your student to do his/her very best… MORE COWBELL! Yearbooks can still be purchased online (www.smart-pay.com), by phone (1-800-853-1337), or by mail. Please do not send any money to school for these. For any other information, contact Marilyn Davis. THE DEADLINE IS THIS FRIDAY, FEB. 25. Mark your calendars for the following dates: End of nine-week grading period is March 8; report cards will go out on March 17; the CCJHS banquet will be March 25; Spring Break is April 4-8; and school is dismissed for students on April 29.


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

FOR SALE FOR SALE – Shih Tzu Puppies, $300. Call 989-4094. (43P) CLAYTON HOMES Jackson, TN – We sell homeowners insurance. Call Moe at 427-3387. (42C) FOR SALE – 1999 Red F-150, 4Speed Manual Transmission. Call 989-4364 after 4:30. (42P) CLAYTON HOMES Jackson, TN – We buy used mobile homes. Call 427-3388. (42C) FOR SALE – 5-ft disc with a 3 point hitch, manufacturer Rhino, kept in dry, very good condition, $500. Call 983-6060. (42P) FOR SALE – 7 acres on Taylor Trail, city water meter. Call for details. 731-608-2228. (TFC) CLAYTON HOMES Jackson, TN – New homebuyers Hotline. Call 427-3388. (42C) CLAYTON HOMES Corinth, MS – No Down Payment with Land. 4 Bedroom 2 Bath starting at $39,950. Clayton Homes, Corinth, MS. Call 662-287-4600. (TFC) CLAYTON HOMES Jackson, TN – Price guard your new home. $250 dp Layaway. Call 427-3388. (42C) FOR SALE – From 1 to 5 acres as low as $100 down & $100 / month. No Restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. Chester County. 731-989-4859. 7 days a week. (TFC) CLAYTON HOMES Jackson, TN – Now available affordable Gov’t program homes. Call 4273388. (42C) CLAYTON HOMES Corinth, MS. Tax Dollars for Down Payment. See Theater Home at Clayton Homes, Corinth, MS. Call 662-287-4600. (TFC)

FOR RENT FOR RENT – 3 bedroom, 1-1/2 bath house. Carpet, shed, appliances. $625 / month. 471 Woods. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA house near Chickasaw. $500 / Month. $250 Deposit. No Pets. 983-3507. (TFC) FOR RENT – 606 Sanford St., CHA. $400 / Month. $200 Deposit. 989-5304. (42C) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom mobile home. $295 / month (includes water). 1825 Sand Mountain Road. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC)

Building, 117 W. Main St. 3900 sq ft, basement. Will divide. United Country Action Realty. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom brick duplex, appliances, CHA, covered deck. 945 Woodland. $425 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, CHA, oak cabinets, appliances. $395 / month. 367 University. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR Mobile Homes. Jacks Creek area. Good place to live. Worth the money. Senior Discounts. 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – Nice 2 bedroom mobile home, double carport, deck, storage building. 590 Loop Road (Deanburg). $395 / Month. 989-7488. (TFC) APARTMENT FOR RENT – 1 BR, 1 BA, Enclosed Garage, New Paint, New Carpet. White Fern Rd., Beech Bluff. $425. Application, References, Deposit. 731-422-2284 or 431-1755 or 234-2151. (TFC) COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR LEASE – 126 South Washington, Henderson, TN. $800 Monthly. Utilities Included. Excellent for Beauty Salon. Call 731-614-6784. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom brick home, carport, large shady yard. 350 Melodie Circle. $625 / Month. United Country Realty 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – Brick, 1 bedroom duplex, covered patio, storage room, stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer. $325 / Month. 246-B Iris. 989-7488. (TFC)

HELP WANTED FLAT BED DRIVERS WANTED – Experience a must! Must be willing to run miles, if not don’t apply. Call Mark at 9893770 or Gary at 608-3441. (43P)

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED LAND OR STANDING TIMBER on 10 acre tracts and larger. Pine & hardwood. Carter Timber & Land. Since 1993. Ted Carter 731-607-0777. (TFC) WILL PAY CASH – By the piece or house full, antiques, collectibles, anything of value. 695-7196. (TFC)

STATEWIDES

FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $375 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC)

USED SINGLE AND DOUBLE WIDES. Credit under 600 OK! Call Today for Prequalifications and Details. Clayton Homes of Lexington. 731-968-4937 (TnScan)

FOR

NEW USED & REPO HOMES

RENT

Commercial

- Under 600 Beacon OK. Call for FREE Prequal!!! 731-642-6438, ClaytonParis.com (TnScan)

ready to ship. From $4090.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7747 (TnScan)

ADOPTION= THE PROMISE OF a secure home for your unborn child, filled with warmth, compassion & endless love! Expenses paid. Legal/Confidential Kathy & Chris 1-877-274-5156 (TnScan)

HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY: IF you had hip replacement surgery between 2005 - present and suffered problems requiring a second revision surgery you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan)

BIRTHMOTHERWE’LL CARE ABOUT you as you get to know us.. open-minded married couple hoping to become Adoptive Parents. Expenses Paid. Lisa 1-888-324-8934 www.mileslisa.com (TnScan) ADOPT: YOU WILL BE assured we can provide all the love and security your newborn needs. Expenses paid. Please call Cathy and Phil: 1-866-308-0973. www.cathyandphil.info (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198. (TnScan) DO YOU EARN $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted! (TnScan) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan)

DRIVING FOR A CAREER- 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance, Free Housing. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Be A Citizen Soldier Contact A Recruiter 18 0 0 - G O - G U A R D w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS 100% Employee Owned OTR Solo Drivers Home Most Weekends, 1yr w/Class A-CDL, Low Cost Insurance, Free PrePass/EZ Pass, APU’s in all trucks 1-800-6849140 ext2 www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) DRIVERS NEEDED NOW!!! CDL TRAINING AVAILABLE. Get pre-hired today!!!!! Great earnings potential and full benefits. Free Housing during training. Call TTDS Today 865-330-0035 (TnScan)

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-266-0040 (TnScan)

DRIVERS- CDL-A WE PAY More! New Pay Announced! OO’s up to 98¢/mile Co. Drivers up to 45¢/mile Lease purchase available 888-428-5228 AmericanCentral.com (TnScan)

SAWMILLS -BAND/ CHAINSAW -CUT lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. In Stock

“GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified

Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) DRIVER- DAILY OR WEEKLY pay. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Safety bonuses paid quarterly. CDL-A, 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) CALL NOW! BIH TRUCKING Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) TRACTOR OWNER OPERATORS: $1000 Sign-On Bonus! 2,500-3,000 miles/week, $1.36/mile w/FSC, Free Trailers, Paid Tolls, Consistent Miles. South, Southeast, Midwest. 1800-831-8737 (TnScan) DRIVERSFLATBED OWNER OPERATORS Up to $1000 Sign on Bonus Earn $1.85/mi or more! No age restriction on tractors/trailers. CRST Malone 877-277-8756 www.JoinMalone.com (TnScan) EXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED! *Excellent home time *More $$$ *Plenty of miles *Steady Freight Call Prime Inc. Today! 1-800277-0212 www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A FLATBED DRIVERS Needed! Sign On Bonus! Start Up To .43¢ Per Mile. Lease purchase available. Experience Req’d. HornadyTransportation.com 800441-4271 X TN-100 (TnScan) DRIVERS- PAID CDL TRAINING & a Stable Career! No Credit Check! No Experience required! Trainers Earn 49¢/Mile! 888-4177564 CRST Expedited www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan)

DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central We Train and Employ you. Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48¢/Mile Class ACDL Training Regional Locations! (877) 369-7191 w w w. c e n t r a l d r i v i n g j o b s . n e t (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A WE NEED Drivers! Above Average Pay for Above Average Drivers! Teams, Solos & CDL Grads Welcome Call Today! 800-942-2104 Ext. 238 or 243 www.totalms.com (TnScan) DRIVER: FLATBED CARRIER SEEKING Drivers To Haul Southeast Dedicated. Home Every Weekend. Top Pay & Benefits. Taking Care of Drivers for 22+ Years. Call Today: 800-828-6452 (TnScan) DRIVERS EARN UP TO 39¢/mi Home Weekends 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: 1-800572-5489 Susan ext. 227 Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) RUN WITH A LEADER! We offer everything you need: Solid Pay & Benefits, 2011 Tractors, High Miles and Great Hometime. Van - avg $0.35cpm Flatbed - avg $0.39cpm includes bonuses. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888-8015295 (TnScan) WE’RE GROWING! QUICKLY! TEAM Drivers - $Quarterly Bonus$, Pet friendly, Good benefit pkg/home time/equipment, Touch free! CDL-A, good MVR/background, min. 25yrs, 2yrs/OTR. Randall, 1-800-7898451, www.longistics.com (Memphis) (TnScan) DRIVER- POSSIBLE HOME WEEKLY! No Touch Freight! No forced NE/NYC! 6 months experience. No felony/DUI last 5yrs. Solos & Teams Wanted. New Pay Package! 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011 PAGE 7-B CASH FOR DIABETIC TEST Strips. Up to $10 Per Box. Most Brands. Call Tom Anytime TollFree 1-888-685-3266 (TnScan) CHURCH FURNITURE: DOES YOUR church need pews, pulpit set, baptistery, steeple, windows? Big Sale on new cushioned pews and pew chairs. 1-800-2318360. www.pews1.com (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 92 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 20 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) USED SINGLE AND DOUBLE WIDES. Credit under 600 OK! Call Today for Prequalifications and Details. Clayton Homes of Lexington. 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NEW USED & REPO HOMES - Under 600 Beacon OK. Call for FREE Prequal!!! 731-642-6438, ClaytonParis.com (TnScan) ADOPTION= THE PROMISE OF a secure home for your unborn child, filled with warmth, compassion & endless love! Expenses paid. Legal/Confidential Kathy & Chris 1-877-274-5156 (TnScan) BIRTHMOTHERWE’LL CARE ABOUT you as you get to know us.. open-minded married couple hoping to become Adoptive Parents. Expenses Paid. Lisa 1-888-324-8934 www.mileslisa.com (TnScan) ADOPT: YOU WILL BE assured we can provide all the love and security your newborn needs. Expenses paid. Please call Cathy and Phil: 1-866-308-0973. www.cathyandphil.info (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198. (TnScan) DO YOU EARN $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted! (TnScan) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-738-0607, w w w. C e n t u r a O n l i n e . c o m (TnScan) AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-266-0040 (TnScan) SAWMILLS -BAND/ CHAINSAW -CUT lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. In Stock ready to ship. From $4090.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300 N 1-800-661-7747 (TnScan) HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY: IF you had hip replacement surgery between 2005 - present and suffered problems requiring a second revision surgery you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER- 14 Day CDL Training in Jackson TN. 15 Years Training Experience. Great Pay, Student Loans, Grants, Placement Assistance, Free Housing. Drive-Train 119 E.L. Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Be A Citizen Soldier Contact A Recruiter 18 0 0 - G O - G U A R D w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS 100% Employee Owned OTR Solo Drivers Home Most Weekends, 1yr w/Class A-CDL, Low Cost Insurance, Free PrePass/EZ Pass, APU’s in all trucks 1-800-6849140 ext2 www.biggexpress.com (TnScan) DRIVERS NEEDED NOW!!! CDL TRAINING AVAILABLE. Get pre-hired today!!!!! Great earnings potential and full benefits. Free Housing during training. Call TTDS Today 865-330-0035 (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A WE PAY More! New Pay Announced! OO’s up to 98¢/mile Co. Drivers up to 45¢/mile Lease purchase available 888-428-5228 AmericanCentral.com (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) DRIVER- DAILY OR WEEKLY pay. Single source dispatch.

No tractor older than 3 years. Safety bonuses paid quarterly. CDL-A, 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) CALL NOW! BIH TRUCKING Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan) TRACTOR OWNER OPERATORS: $1000 Sign-On Bonus! 2,500-3,000 miles/week, $1.36/mile w/FSC, Free Trailers, Paid Tolls, Consistent Miles. South, Southeast, Midwest. 1800-831-8737 (TnScan) DRIVERSFLATBED OWNER OPERATORS Up to $1000 Sign on Bonus Earn $1.85/mi or more! No age restriction on tractors/trailers. CRST Malone 877-277-8756 www.JoinMalone.com (TnScan) EXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED! *Excellent home time *More $$$ *Plenty of miles *Steady Freight Call Prime Inc. Today! 1-800277-0212 www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A FLATBED DRIVERS Needed! Sign On Bonus! Start Up To .43¢ Per Mile. Lease purchase available. Experience Req’d. HornadyTransportation.com 800441-4271 X TN-100 (TnScan) DRIVERS- PAID CDL TRAINING & a Stable Career! No Credit Check! No Experience required! Trainers Earn 49¢/Mile! 888-4177564 CRST Expedited www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan) DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central We Train and Employ you. Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48¢/Mile Class ACDL Training Regional Locations! (877) 369-7191 w w w. c e n t r a l d r i v i n g j o b s . n e t (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A WE NEED Drivers! Above Average Pay for Above Average Drivers! Teams, Solos & CDL Grads Welcome Call Today! 800-942-2104 Ext. 238 or 243 www.totalms.com (TnScan) DRIVER: FLATBED CARRIER SEEKING Drivers To Haul Southeast Dedicated. Home Every Weekend. Top Pay & Benefits. Taking Care of Drivers for 22+ Years. Call Today: 800-828-6452 (TnScan) DRIVERS EARN UP TO 39¢/mi Home Weekends 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: 1-800572-5489 Susan ext. 227 Sunbelt Transport, LLC (TnScan) RUN WITH A LEADER! We offer everything you need: Solid Pay & Benefits, 2011 Tractors, High Miles and Great Hometime. Van - avg $0.35cpm Flatbed - avg $0.39cpm includes bonuses. CDL-A, 6mo. OTR. 888-8015295 (TnScan) WE’RE GROWING! QUICKLY! TEAM Drivers - $Quarterly Bonus$, Pet friendly, Good benefit pkg/home time/equipment, Touch free! CDL-A, good MVR/background, min. 25yrs, 2yrs/OTR. Randall, 1-800-7898451, www.longistics.com (Memphis) (TnScan) DRIVER- POSSIBLE HOME WEEKLY! No Touch Freight! No forced NE/NYC! 6 months experience. No felony/DUI last 5yrs. Solos & Teams Wanted. New Pay Package! 877-740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com (TnScan)

CASH FOR DIABETIC TEST Strips. Up to $10 Per Box. Most Brands. Call Tom Anytime TollFree 1-888-685-3266 (TnScan) CHURCH FURNITURE: DOES YOUR church need pews, pulpit set, baptistery, steeple, windows? Big Sale on new cushioned pews and pew chairs. 1-800-2318360. www.pews1.com (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 92 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 20 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to www.tnadvertising.biz. (TnScan) USED SINGLE AND DOUBLE WIDES. Credit under 600 OK! Call Today for Prequalifications and Details. Clayton Homes of Lexington. 731-968-4937 (TnScan) NEW USED & REPO HOMES - Under 600 Beacon OK. Call for FREE Prequal!!! 731-642-6438, ClaytonParis.com (TnScan) ADOPTION= THE PROMISE OF a secure home for your unborn child, filled with warmth, compassion & endless love! Expenses paid. Legal/Confidential Kathy & Chris 1-877-274-5156 (TnScan) BIRTHMOTHERWE’LL CARE ABOUT you as you get to know us.. open-minded married couple hoping to become Adoptive Parents. Expenses Paid. Lisa 1-888-324-8934 www.mileslisa.com (TnScan) ADOPT: YOU WILL BE assured we can provide all the love and security your newborn needs. Expenses paid. Please call Cathy and Phil: 1-866-308-0973. www.cathyandphil.info (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT Children $125.00. With Free name change documents and marital settlement agreement. Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./ 7days: 1888-789-0198. (TnScan)

Morgan Drive Jackson TN. 800423-8820. www.drive-train.org (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Up to 100% Tuition Assistance Education, Medical and Dental Benefits Be A Citizen Soldier Contact A Recruiter 18 0 0 - G O - G U A R D w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan)

DRIVERS- PAID CDL TRAINING & a Stable Career! No Credit Check! No Experience required! Trainers Earn 49¢/Mile! 888-4177564 CRST Expedited www.JoinCRST.com (TnScan)

BIG G EXPRESS 100% Employee Owned OTR Solo Drivers Home Most Weekends, 1yr w/Class A-CDL, Low Cost Insurance, Free PrePass/EZ Pass, APU’s in all trucks 1-800-6849140 ext2 www.biggexpress.com (TnScan)

DRIVERS/ CDL TRAINING CAREER Central We Train and Employ you. Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48¢/Mile Class ACDL Training Regional Locations! (877) 369-7191 w w w. c e n t r a l d r i v i n g j o b s . n e t (TnScan)

DRIVERS NEEDED NOW!!! CDL TRAINING AVAILABLE. Get pre-hired today!!!!! Great earnings potential and full benefits. Free Housing during training. Call TTDS Today 865-330-0035 (TnScan) DRIVERS- CDL-A WE PAY More! New Pay Announced! OO’s up to 98¢/mile Co. Drivers up to 45¢/mile Lease purchase available 888-428-5228 AmericanCentral.com (TnScan) “GET UP- DRIVE A TRUCK” Milan Express Driving Academy *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) DRIVER- DAILY OR WEEKLY pay. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Safety bonuses paid quarterly. CDL-A, 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com (TnScan) CALL NOW! BIH TRUCKING Company/ International Truck Driving School Now taking Students! No CDL, No problem! State WIA Program if qualified, or Financing available. 888-7805539 (TnScan)

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Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

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Chester County Independent

Public Notices NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of: Lucille H. Clayton Notice is hereby given that on the 17th day of February, 2011, Letters Testamentary in respect of the Estate of Lucille H. Clayton who died February 4, 2011, were issued to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk and of the above named court within the earlier of four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting, as the case may be) of this notice, or twelve (12) months from the decedent’s date of death, otherwise their claims will be forever barred. This 17th day of February, 2011. Betty Morris Executor Estate of Lucille H. Clayton Clerk Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS: THAT, WHEREAS, by deed of trust dated October 4, 2005, recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 275, page 15, et seq., Andrea McCormick and husband, Jason McCormick did convey in trust to Neal Smith, Trustee, the real estate hereinafter described to secure the payment of the principal sum of $25,000.00, payable to the order of the Chester County Bank, Henderson, Tennessee, evidenced by a certain promissory note described in said deed of trust and being incorporated by reference; and, WHEREAS, said deed of trust provided that in the event of a default in the payment of the indebtedness required to be paid under said note, when the same are due and payable, the entire indebtedness shall, at the option of the owner and holder thereof, become due and payable forthwith; and, WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness, now due, and the owner and holder of said note has declared the entire unpaid balance now due and payable, and has called upon Neal Smith, the nominated Trustee, to foreclose said deed of trust according to the terms and provisions thereof; WHEREAS, a notice of intent to foreclose pursuant to I.C.A. 35-5-117 was mailed on the 15th day of December, 2010, which date was more than sixty days prior to the first publication to debtors last known address. NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as such Trustee under said deed of trust, I will, on Friday, March 18,2011, offer for sale and sell, at the front door of the Courthouse in Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, at 1:30 P.M., to the last, highest and best bidder, for cash in hand and in bar of the equity of redemption, the following described real estate located in CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, more particularly bounded and described as follows, towit: BEGINNING at a fence corner on the north margin of Old Highway 22 (25 feet at right angles from centerline) at the southeast corner of Dennis Lester as recorded in Deed Book 88, page 104, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence with

Lester’s east line north 10’ 36’ 29” west a distance of257.50 feet to a post at Lester’s northeast corner; thence with Lester’s north line south 89’ 12’ west a distance of 15 feet to an iron pin at the southeast corner of F.A. Rhodes; thence with Rhodes’ east line north 12’ 22’ west a distance’ of 103.96 feet to ~ iron pin at the southwest corner of Tract 1; thence north 87’ 28’ 42” east a distance of712.15 feet to a point in the centerline of Jacks Creek on the west line of Chester County Fire Department; thence with the centerline of said creek south 9’ 19’ 38” east a distance of360.35 feet to a point on the north margin of Old Highway 22; thence with the north margin of Old Highway 22 south 67’ 28’ 42” west a distance of685.87 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 5.71 acres, as surveyed by David Hall Land Surveying Company, R.L.S. No. 943, on October 3, 1995. This is the identical real estate conveyed to Jason McCormick and wife, Andrea McCormick from Ray T. Smith and wife, Debra Lynn Smith by Warranty Deed dated May 17, of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in Record Book 252, page 460. Jason McCormick conveyed his interest in the above described real estate by Quit-Claim dated May 26, 2010 of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 341, page 162. INCLUDED IN THE ABOVE DESCRIPTION BUT EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED FROM THIS CONVEYANCE IS THE FOLLOWING TRACT OF REAL ESTATE: BEGINNING at the intersection of the centerline of Jacks Creek with the north margin of Old Jacks Creek road, which point is the original southeast corner of McCormick (252,460); thence, from the point of beginning, and with the north margin of said road, south 87 degrees 28 minutes 42 seconds west 507.63 feet to an iron pin set at the southwest corner of the herein described tract; thence on a new line through McCormick, north 11 degrees 38 minutes 38 seconds west 362.39 feet to a fence post in the south line of Swafford (334,636); thence, with the south line of Swafford, and generally with a fence, north 87 degrees 28 minutes 42 seconds east 522.3 8 feet to a point in the centerline of Jacks Creek; thence, with the centerline of said creek, south 09 degrees 19 minutes 38 seconds east 360.35 feet to the point of beginning, containing 4.23 acres. Said legal description is the same description as contained in the previous deed of record. This is the identical real estate conveyed to Clinton R. Connor from Andrea Louise McCormick by Warranty Deed dated July 9, 2010 of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 341, page 665. Street Address: 7185 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 Liens in favor of the United State or the State of Tennessee: None Map 24, Parcel 39.02, Chester County Tax Assessors Office Other parties interested in this property: None Said sale shall be made subject to any outstanding indebtedness, taxes, or other encumbrances which may constitute a valid prior lien against said property, if any. Said property shall be sold and conveyed by the undersigned as Trustee only, and not further or otherwise, and the buyer shall rely upon his own good judgment and investigation as to the status of title. The right is reserved to adjourn the

day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale IS subject to confirmation by the lender of trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Dated at Henderson, Tennessee, this 7th February, 2011. Neal Smith TRUSTEE

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on March 17, 2011 at 12:00 PM local time, at the south door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Shannon Williams, Carroll Williams, Toby Bushnell, Geraldine Williams, to Angela Boone, Trustee, on May 11, 2006 at Book 284, Page 305; conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee, all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Owner of Debt: CitiFinancial, Inc. The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and encumbrances of record: Described property located in the Fifth (5th) Civil District, Chester County, Tennessee, more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pin in the South right-of-way margin of the Jackson-Mifflin Road, and the West margin of the Old Jackson-Mifflin Road, said point being 30 feet at the right angles from the centerline of the new road, and 12 feet from the centerline of the Old Road; runs thence North 77 degrees 0 minutes West with the South margin of said New JacksonMifflin Road a distance of 242.11 feet to an iron pipe; runs thence South 02 degrees 05 minutes East a distance of 257.40 feet to an iron pipe in the western margin of the Old Jackson-Mifflin Road; runs thence North 48 degrees 10 minutes East with the western margin of said Old Jackson-Mifflin Road a distance of 305.26 feet to the point of beginning. Street Address: 1255 Island Road, Beech Bluff, Tennessee 38313 Current Owner(s) of Property: Toby A. Bushnell and wife, Shannon M. Bushnell The street address of the above described property is believed to be 1255 Island Road, Beech Bluff, Tennessee 38313, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117 have been met. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and

place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com Law Office of Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP 555 Perkins Road Extended, Second Floor Memphis, TN 38117 Phone (901)767-5566 Fax (901)761-5690 File No. 10-010741

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness and obligations secured by a certain Deed of Trust on property currently owned by Richard L. Reed and which Deed of Trust was executed by Richard L. Reed and Kimberly Reed, to Anthony R. Steele, Trustee for Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., and is recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 301, page 646. WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by instrument recorded in Record Book 347, page 446, in said Register’s Office. WHEREAS, the owner of the indebtedness has declared the total amount due and has directed the undersigned to advertise and sell the property described by said Deed of Trust; THEREFORE, this is to give notice that I will on March 4, 2011, commencing at 2:00 p.m., at the Front Door of the Courthouse in Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee cause to be offered for sale and will cause to be sold at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point in the Southwest corner of the property (at a point adjoining the Williams Young property and Beene Road), going East along the property line with the William Young property to a point at a distance of 350 feet, turning North moving to a point at a distance of 250 feet, turning West to a point at Beene Road, and turning South Returning to the starting point at the Southwest corner, containing approximately 2.01 acres. Said property is known as 945 Beene Road, Finger, Tennessee 38334. Included in this Foreclosure Sale is a 1995 Clayton Mobile Home, SER#CLA036317TN. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and covey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above.

If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. R. Bradley Sigler Substitute Trustee 218 West Main Street Jackson, TN 38301

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated May 10, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded May 21, 2007, at Book 300, Page 696 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Ricky Paul Gooch and Delores Ann Gooch, conveying certain property therein described to Robert M. Wilson, Jr as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Countrywide Bank, F.S.B. and Countrywide Bank, F.S.B.’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Shellie Wallace of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on March 10, 2011 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Tract One: Beginning on an old spike in the center of Shiloh Church Road at Larry Bailey Jr.’s northeast corner; runs thence four calls with said road; South 59 degrees 28 minutes East 145 feet; thence South 47 degrees East 142 feet; thence South 17 degrees 55 minutes East 235 feet: thence South 6 degrees 2 minutes 2 seconds West 162.06 feet to the junction of a field road which runs westward four calls: South 84 degrees 14 minutes West 105 feet; thence North 71 degrees 39 minutes West 143 feet; thence North 32 degrees West 91 feet; thence North 69 degrees 22 minutes 27 seconds West 144.53 feet to old metal stake in the center of said field road, in Larry Bailey Jr.’s East line; thence North 19 degrees 34 minutes 47 seconds East with Bailey’s line of 416.82 feet to the beginning, containing a total of 3.5 acres. The Shiloh Church Road is a public road county road and to be considered

50 feet wide in these acres. All public property included is to be excluded. This legal description was supplied by James M. Johnson, Tennessee Land Surveyor Number 498, Lexington, Tennessee, based on a survey made July 18, 1994. The centerline of the field road referred to above is the boundary line of the property hereinabove described. Said field road is a 16 feet wide field road and is to be used by all adjoining land owners, and this conveyance is made expressly subject thereto. This property has a field road included in description and recorded in Deed Book 175, page 573, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Tract Two: beginning at a railroad spike in the center of Roby Shiloh Road, and being in the center of a culvert and being the northeast center of the Larry Bailey 37.06 acre tract; runs thence in a southeastern direction with the center of said Roby-Shiloh Road as follows: South 80 degrees 56 minutes 04 seconds East 101.87 feet; south 75 degrees 18 minutes 22 seconds East 55.56 feet; south 72 degrees 14 minutes 13 seconds East 50.99 feet; South 66 degrees 42 minutes 40 seconds East 58.08 feet to a railroad spike; thence South 19 degrees 34 minutes 47 seconds West passing a power pole and continuing with a marked line in all 570.1 0 feet to an iron pin; thence North 54 degrees 06 minutes 17 seconds West with a marked line 434.01 feet to an iron pin set at the base of a twin poplar; thence in a northern direction with a ditch as follows: North 19 degrees 44 minutes 01 seconds East 27.13 feet; North 57 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds East 70.17 feet; North 42 degrees 53 minutes 17 seconds East 96.29 feet; North 29 degrees 43 minutes 32 seconds East 105.39 feet; North 38 degrees 41 minutes 38 seconds East 160.86 feet to the point of beginning, and containing 3.967 acres, more or less. ALSO KNOWN AS: 1670 Shiloh Church Road, Enville, Tennessee 38332 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Ricky Paul Gooch; Delores Ann Gooch The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726161562 DATED February 10,2011 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee By: Shellie Wallace FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011

Page 9-B


Page 10-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 24, 2011


Chester County Independent 02-24-11