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Chester County FHU art show, Page 16-A A

Thursday

FEBRUARY 7, 2013

Independent

148th YEAR - NO. 40

chestercountyindependent.com

$1.00

Board studying rec. facility improvements By Marney Gilliam Staff Writer

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Storm winds on Jan. 30 deposited an American flag on the lawn of a home in the Glendale Community. (See additional photos, Page 15-A.)

Nine homes gone after Jan. 30 storm By James A. Webb and Mary Mount Dunbar

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

4-A 8-A 9-A 10-A 12-A 1-B 4-B 6-B

High winds including a possible F2 tornado tore through Chester and surrounding counties in the early morning hours of Jan. 30. At least nine homes were completely destroyed in Chester County and four persons injured. According to Henderson-

Chester County Emergency Management Agency Director Johny Farris, the National Weather Service is still assessing the storm. Preliminary information indicates the storm included winds of around 110 miles per hour which ripped along a path mainly from Hwy 200 to the Glendale area in northeast Chester County, along and

See STORM, Page 15-A

The Chester County School Board held a special called meeting Jan. 31 to consider plans for facility improvements and safety options. Jimmy Anderson of Anderson Buchler Architects gave a presentation regarding improvements to a seven-acre parcel of property behind East Chester Elementary School. Proposed improvements would include adding six new tournament level tennis courts, two basketball courts and a volleyball court, baseball practice

fields and fencing, a walkway, a shade pavilion, a three-tenths mile lighted walking track, a pavilion with restrooms and concession area as well as the band area being moved, stretched to 80 yards and fenced. There are 5 alternative proposals with the first proposal/base bid consisting of the new tennis courts, the basketball and volleyball courts, band practice area and the lighting associated with that at an estimated cost of $494,000. Alternate 1 would be the concessions area pavilion with the estiSee BOARD, Page 2-A

FHU joins new league Freed-Hardeman University announced Monday that it has joined the American Midwest Conference for athletics beginning in the fall of this year. The AMC will now have a dozen schools stretching from west Tennessee and Kentucky through Arkansas and Illinois all the way to Kansas City, Mo. FHU spent the last 17 years as a charter member of the TranSouth Athletic Conference. The TranSouth, however, is dissolving due to a variety of factors. For complete story, see page 1-B.

Wade recalls Pearl Harbor attack By James A. Webb Editor

TODAY’S WEATHER

What was your favorite Super Bowl ad of 2013?

The Pearl Harbor attacks of Dec. 7, 1941, have been recounted many times over the last almost 70 years. One of the few still able to tell of those events is a former Chester Countian, Cecil Homer Wade, now living in California. Wade, now more than 90 years of age, was serving in the U.S. Navy, stationed on the USS Nevada. He has a vivid memory of the events of that day. “I was on the beach all night, in Honolulu. I partied all night,” said Wade of the Saturday night before the attacks. “But on the way back on to the ship, a close friend who was a religious type told me – Wade, you should be praying, because something is going to happen. He said he could just feel it.” His friend was correct. As the two buddies were boarding the ship, the announcement was made: “Man your battle stations, on the double.” “They began a countdown, 70, 60, 40, … and when they got to 20 we got ready to fire. The attack was a big surprise. No one was thinking about an

attack.” Unfortunately, Wade’s prophetic friend died within minutes, cut in half by shrapnel. During the attack, Wade suffered serious acid burns, but, “As the Lord would have it, I survived.” When word got back to Henderson that Wade was severely injured, relatives feared and supposed he had died in the attack because they did not hear anymore from Wade for a long period of time. Wade said because of the war he could not get information back to Henderson. When he finally had recovered enough and was granted a leave, he returned home. He knocked on the door of his parents’ home, and his mother came to the door. Upon seeing her son, which she supposed had perished at Pearl Harbor, she fainted. The USS Nevada was the only battleship to get underway after the attack. This made her a target for several See WADE, Page 3-A

Cecil Homer Wade, a graduate of Chester County Training School, served his country with honor in the Navy during WWII.


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Kid President makes national TV debut Internet sensation Kid President appeared on NBC’s Today Show Wednesday, Jan. 30, in his national network

debut. That interview was followed by an appearance Jan. 31 on CNN with Soledad O’Brien. Kid President

Shiloh hosting Valentine’s Day program

Kid President, Robby Novak, of Henderson, appeared on NBC television’s Today Show Jan. 30.

gained exposure this past year promoting Freed-Hardeman University’s annual benefit dinner. It has, however exploded into something much larger. A series of episodes urging viewers “to make the world awesome” and to “be a party” have gone viral on YouTube. The most recent posting, “A Pep Talk,” had been viewed four million times as of Jan. 30. Robby Novak, a third-grader at East Chester Elementary School in Henderson, is Kid President. He is the son of David and Laurie Novak. His

brother-in-law Brad Montague produces the videos. Montague directs the university’s efforts in social media. “We’re overwhelmed and honored that so many have connected with Kid President. We hope it encourages others to take positive action in their lives,” Montague, who directs FHU’s Go! Camp, said. Go! Camp is a serviceoriented week-long effort held each summer at FHU. “It is about empowering kids, helping them to have a voice. That’s what we hope these videos do too.” Kid President told

NBC personalities Al Roker, Natalie Morales and Willie Geist that he and Montague collaborate on the videos. “We do silly stuff. He makes the boring parts; I make the awesome parts,” he said. Novak had helped to promote the previous benefit dinner featuring Bob Newhart. He reprised his role as promoter, this time as Kid President. Since that beginning, he has further developed, defined and promoted the character. Videos may be seen at KidPresident.com or viewed on YouTube.

Children will have the opportunity to participate in a Civil War Valentine’s Day program at 2 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Shiloh National Military Park. Children will gain insight into the history of Valentine’s Day, Valentine cards and how soldiers celebrated the holiday. Each child will construct a Civil War Valentine Card to give to someone special. For more information, contact Heather Smedley at 689-5696.

dents. A motion was passed to get proposed plans for the additions from Jimmy Anderson. Pipkin also talked about the need for cameras, intercoms and a “buzz in” system for the front entrances of all the schools. This would allow for monitoring while at the same time allowing the employee who was monitoring the system to remain at his/her desk and buzz people into the school from there. A motion passed to get specs for such systems. Next, Pipkin discussed the Safety Summit that she and other school officials attended and the ideas she gained from the presentations offered during the Summit such as securing the front entrances and funneling all visitors through those entrances, training all

staff to recognize the body language of someone carrying a gun and working closely with local law enforcement and the community. Finally, the School Board opened the floor to a crowd of parents, students and others who had attended. The Board fielded questions and addressed concerns presented by these parents, former students and current students regarding past and current bullying instances. Pipkin shared the new policy adopted Jan. 11 of this year entitled “Student Discrimination/Haras sment and Bullying/Intimidation and Cyberbulling”. While policy 6.304, as it is also known, is available online, the Board did provide copies for all those in attendance who were interested. The Board also reviewed with those

present the chain of command for reporting complaints: first bring the matter to the attention of the school through speaking with the principal, then if the matter is not resolved take it to the Superintendent, then if the matter is still not resolved the individual may make a request to the Superintendent to be placed on the agenda for the next School Board meeting at which time the School Board will review the complaint. Toward the close of the meeting, Pipkin shared a proactive step that the School Board is thinking of taking to prevent future bullying. An anonymous survey may be handed out that will allow students to answers questions as to whether they have been bullied, where they were bullied, who bullied them and the nature of the

bullying. Pipkin stated that the idea would be that if a person's name comes up three or more times as the bully, that child would be spoken with by school staff. This survey would also allow the school to know where and when the bullying was taking

place. With suggestions of additional cameras being put in the schools or additional school resource officers, this survey would help the Board know how best to allocate funds and where to implement any new devices to best protect students.

Photo by Marnie Gilliam, Independent

From Page 1-A

Board mate being $101,000. Alternate 2 would be the walking trail and all the lighting with an estimate cost of $39,000. Alternate 3 is the baseball practice fields and the fencing associated with those and the little pavilion at an estimated $32,000. Alternate 4 would be the perimeter fencing on the south side and a few additional sections. The total cost of all improvements would be an estimated $687,000. A motion was passed to take bids on the total project as well as each of the separate alternatives. Superintendent Cherrie Pipkin then spoke on the need for additions to East Chester to benefit the special education stu-

Photo by Marnie Gilliam, Independent

The School Board looks at a PowerPoint slide of the proposed improvements to the property behind East Elementary.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

FHU to host education fair Feb. 21 Two businesses cited during beer bust Freed-Hardeman students and alumni interested in the field of education are invited to participate in an education career fair, conducted by FreedH a r d e m a n University’s School of Education and University Career Center. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, in Brewer Sports

Center. Re presentatives from school systems across Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and Kentucky will be available to answer students’ questions. These representatives will be discussing employment opportunities with their school systems. Jim Brown, Director of the

University Career Center, says that the career fair “will give students the opportunity to network with various school administrators, submit resumes to school systems, and inquire about employment opportunities with school systems.” He adds that select school systems will also be holding interviews with students.

From Page 1-A

to service in May 1943. Later the Nevada helped with the Attu action before reporting to the Atlantic. She provided gun protection during the Normandy and Southern France invasions in 1944. The ship went back to the Pacific and provided cover at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. After serving as a target ship at Bikini Island in 1946, the Navy ordered her scuttled in 1948. Wade also served on the carrier USS Breton, CASA 6, CASA 66, and USS Belleau Wood, another carrier. Ironically, the late Ralph Dodson of Henderson was also on the Belleau Wood, yet apparently not at the

same time as Wade. After the war, Wade remained in the service in the Naval Reserves. He was called up several times over the next 20 years. Wade is a graduate of Chester County Training School. After high school graduation, his father wanted him to attend college. “However, I wanted to see the world. It took me a while to talk him in to letting me join the Navy,” Wade stated. After leaving the Navy, Wade worked for the postal service for a short while, started his own janitorial service, and eventually met his future wife in California. They married and together ran a

Wade attacks that left her severely damaged, leading to her beaching by the crew in order to avoid sinking. The Chief Petty officer moved the ship out of the harbor, but later was court-marshaled because they said he did not have the authority to move the ship. “They busted him down in rank, but later gave him a promotion for what he did that day,” according to Wade. After making temporary repairs, the ship went to the West Coast for further repairs. She returned

Grace Baptist ordains new deacons Submitted photo

Grace Baptist Church of Henderson ordained three new deacons Jan. 27. From left are Jimmy Essary, Ian Holl and Robert Freeman. Freeman will turn 90 years of age in May.

On Feb. 1, Investigator Jerry Stansell and Deputy Bradley Crouse, using a confidential informant under the age of 21, conducted an underage beer purchase operation of all stores that sell alcohol in the City of Henderson and Chester County. At Oden’s Amoco, 375 N. Church St., the clerk did not ask for any identification and did sell a six-pack of Bud Light to the informant. The clerk was identified as Melissa R. Garner. She was issued a citation for selling alcohol to a minor and given a General Sessions Court date of 10 a.m. grocery store in the Berkeley area for many years, retiring in 1987. They have been married now for 40 years, and they enjoy living in California. “War was rough, but out of all the battles I was in, I had a chance to make an aroundthe-world trip,” he said. Unfortunately, Wade lost all his metals, photos and other mementos of his military service in a house fire in Detroit where his parents had moved. He still has relatives today in Chester County. And through it all his faith has endured. “I can always say the Lord is good, because he has been good to me.”

on Feb. 8. Henderson Food and Fuel, 3825 U.S. Hwy. 45 N., was also another business that was checked. The informant purchased a sixpack of Bud Light from this store, and the clerk, Hare Ram Shah, did not ask for any identification. He was issued a citation for selling alcohol to a minor and given a General Session Court date of 10 a.m. on Feb. 8. All the other businesses did ask for identification from the informant and did not sell any beer when they saw that the subject was under the legal age of 21.

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Life & Style

Page 4-A

Thursday, February 7, 2013

DePriest appointed as Clayton Bank regional manager Clayton Bank and Trust has appointed Derrick DePriest as West Tennessee Regional Manager. Based out of the bank’s Henderson location, DePriest oversees the bank’s West Tennessee network of branches. With over six years of experience in bank management, DePriest joins Clayton from BB&T where he served as Financial Center Leader IV. He completed BB&T’s Leadership Development Program, a sixmonth training program in Winston Salem, N.C. at BB&T University on the Wake Forest Campus. Born in Jackson, and raised in Henderson, DePriest received a Management Degree from Freed-Hardeman

University in Henderson and an MBA from Gardner-Webb University of Boiling Springs, N.C. “Clayton Bank is excited to have Derrick on its team,” said Vice President of Retail Matt Daugherty. “His years of retail experience and leadership training support the bank’s mission to provide high quality financial services to our clients while promoting economic growth within each community.” Clayton Bank and Trust is a Tennessee-based community bank. It has 15 locations and an asset size over $650 Million. Clayton Bank and Trust’s parent company, Clayton Bancorp, holds two other banks in Tennessee: American City

DERRICK DEPRIEST Bank and Bank of Camden with combined assets of $1.2 Billion.

Hello to my family and friends. It is good to be with you on another day and a new month. I hope each and every one of you had a wonderful week. To all of the thousands of visitors that came to the city of Henderson for the 2013 FHU Lectureship, we would like to welcome you to our city and hope you enjoy your visit. Last week a big storm hit part of our community; be thankful you are alive, because material things can be replaced. Most of the residents at Southern Oaks slept like a baby through the storm, and so did I. The wind howling outside did not put a damper on the activities inside of Southern Oaks. Monday the residents were able to spend some of their Bingo winnings in their own “Country Store” purchasing items such as tooth paste, lotions, hair supplies, puzzles, books, etc., which are in much demand and sell out fast. How they enjoyed going shopping. Mr. Virgil Hooks came and skillfully strummed his acoustic

guitar while singing. The residents seem to know most of his songs and join in singing with him. Janice Haithcoat comes faithfully each and every Tuesday playing familiar songs of old on her piano. On Fridays a group of wonderful young students from FreedHardeman University come, sing spiritual songs and have Bible study. Oh how the residents love the younger generation of Godly people who minister to these precious seniors. On Tuesday Mr. Terry Hearn called Bingo and brought a bag of “loot” with him as prizes. Terry comes once a month to call Bingo and always brings lots and lots of quarters with him, along with his jovial way of calling Bingo. Everyone leaves with something in their pocket from Terry. Wednesday the residents were going to have a group of students from the Junior High School come to participate in a “Trivia Bowl”; however, school was cancelled due to the weather, downed power lines and trees. The residents hope they will reschedule and come soon! Even though school was cancelled on Wednesday, some of the cheerleaders still faithfully showed up to do manicures. The residents appreciate these young teens. Thursday, Tina Martin, LPTA, and Director of Marketing

with Medical Center Home Health, came and talked to the residents about how to prevent falls. She demonstrated the proper way to walk with a walker or cane as well as other ways to help prevent falling injuries. Helping her to educate our residents were Debbie Isbell, RN, and Branch Manager Melodie McGuire, LPTA. Tina will be visiting Southern Oaks twice a month with various topics for the elderly and staff. Thursdays and Fridays are “beauty shop” days, and everyone always has lovely hairdos by the end of the week! On Fridays the Wii Bowling Team, known as “The Strikers,” practice bowling. Each month the seniors from the Senior Citizens Center come and bowl against them for the prized bowling trophy. The winning team gets to keep the trophy for a whole month. The Senior Citizens Center currently has possession of the trophy. The Strikers hope to win it back in February. Practice, practice, practice makes perfect. The best day of the week is Saturday, family day, when friends and family are encouraged to come, watch a movie and eat some hot popcorn with the residents. Sunday Estes Church of Christ came to have church with the residents who do not go out to church. Won’t you stop by and

say HI! The residents and staff would love for you to come. Do not forget there are plenty of activities going on at the Senior Citizen Center this week. Stop by and see what is happening. The city would like to wish you a happy Valentine’s Day. Do not for get to tell someone you love them. The VFW post 4844 will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, in the Senior Citizen Center. All members please come out, and new members are welcome. The city would like to take this time to wish a very happy birthday to all of our loved ones in the nursing home that had a birthday this week. The city sends our condolences to the family of James L. Trice. We are praying for you. Also in our prayers this week are all of our children, our teachers, our family, the sick and shut in, our men and women that are serving our country, and also the incarcerated. Remember to patronize our local businesses. Let’s support our own as much as we can. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, a n n i v e r s a r y, announcements, and things happening in the City, please call 9891907 or send an email to gloria__holiday @msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

Whispering pines, mighty oaks, fruit trees, green cedars, fancy crepe myrtles, and smaller earthly friends stood heroically as long as they could, but finally their roots gave way! The storm was stronger. These trees had a purpose in life. They were hand-planted, perhaps two or three generations back. They became desirable – trees filter; trees slow the wind; they share shade with children swinging from their arms; lawn chairs nes-

tle closely to the trunk; and trees mark territories, or invite neighbors to share a glass of lemonade under their canopy. But in a matter of minutes everything changed for our earthly friends. Some of these wooden friends were beheaded. Their limbs were broken or twisted. Without care they were tossed into air, roofs, homes or buildings. Some were violently shoved down banks or into roads; they were left to the mercy of a chainsaw massacre. Sadly their presence became an interruption – their bodies were in the way. They were moved quickly with hopes someone will need or want their remains. They can perhaps serve another purpose in life – keeping someone warm this winter.

The loud dreaded sound of strong wind, microburst, funnel cloud, or whatever one called the storm, it hit Thursday morning around 1:30 a.m. on Jan.30. Local areas near Jacks Creek were in the path. Holly Springs Road, Well Road, Rabbit Ranch Road, Glendale Road, Clarks Creek Road, Jones Road, Clifford Road, McCall School House Road, Unity, Middlefork, and others were attacked by Mr. Severe Weather as he raced toward Henderson County and Piney Lake. To add insult to injury, light windy snow arrived Jan. 31 around 10 p.m. while workers and families were still in distress. But the weather only worsened when sleet and freezing rain pounded on

damaged areas around 6 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2 for about four hours. Then delicious sunshine arrived and homeowners, crews, and volunteers worked and worked while lapping up warm rays. Insurance adjusters were overworked and stressed too, but time has a way of working everything out, one way or another. I think for all involved it will help to remember, “A day of worry is more exhausting than a week of work.” Crews from H e n d e r s o n , B r o w n s v i l l e , Covington and Jackson were on the scene in many areas. It was so cold, but yet they were working 16 hours daily to get power restored. How did those stiff cold fingers maneuver in this

I hope that everyone in the county that had damage from last week’s storm is recovering. We really had some high winds. I was really afraid that we were going to be blown off this ridge we live on. Happy birthday this week goes to Brad Henson, my son-in-law, Meagan Barnett, my cousin and neighbor, and Raghen Morton on Feb. 6; Larry Rose on Feb. 7; Bobby Tully, Ashley Fish and Alligrace Howell on Feb. 8; Keith Escue and Carolyn Goff on Feb. 9; and Bradly Wells and Leah Lemons on Feb. 12. I will be going to my sister-in-law’s Friday along with my sister and her sisters for an overnight sisters’ party. Can’t wait, but I’ll probably be a party pooper about midnight. Got to have my beauty sleep. Anyway we’ll have a great time. Sandi, you are so thoughtful and a good hostess. Please remember our sick ones: Nella

Rush, Tommy Landers, Sandra Landers, Winna Knipper, James Ballard, Ray Nelson, Carolyn Brasfield, Sandra Dees, Norma Tully and Edra and Benny Barnett, also our shut-ins and ones in the nursing home. They all need our prayers and visits. A good time was had at Bethel Baptist Church Sunday night for the Super Bowl. Our half time football trivia and devotional by Jason Taylor was great. Thanks, Jason. The women and children played games while the men watched the game. If you think Christians don’t have fun, come join us some time. The Big Springs Methodist Church will be having a Valentine Party at 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9. Come join us for fun, games and food. For more information, call 9893347. Fact of the week: Corn dextrin, a common thickener used in junk food, is also the glue on envelopes and postage stamps. Yuck! And it thickens us, too. Quote of the week: “A bend in the road is not the end of the road ... unless you fail to make the turn.” Author Unknown Have a great week!

We are so thankful that the tornado did not cause any death and only a few were injured. There was a great deal of uprooted trees and buildings destroyed. There were three large trees uprooted in our yard and two on our fence. The Holly Springs Methodist Church and cemetery were badly damaged. Sunday we worshipped in the Sanctuary. Chris Grissom had some broken bones, and his R.V. was located in his swimming pool. We want to thank the ambulance service, the Chester County Road Commissioner and employees, the Southwest Tennessee Electric Company, the telephone employees, the Chester County Fire Department, and all the volunteers that helped in many ways. On our prayer list this week are Chris Grissom, LaVelle

Rogers, Sammy Ross, Loy Jones, Adam Wise, Laverne Lott, Pam Priddy, Joanne Sells, Jean Latham, Carolyn Potter, Gayle and Rachel Ellington, Mike Ross, Fred and Paul Tucker, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry, and Minnie Austin, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Josephine Hinson, Carroll Williams, Lisa Peddy, Randy Sells, Gathel Latham, Randy Miller, Joanne Altier, Phillip Ross, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl, Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Teresa Seaton, Clarence Cooper, Charles and Clessie Stovall, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Happy anniversary wishes go to Chris and Tosha Grissom on Feb. 18. Birthday greetings go to Larry Vestal on Feb. 19; Scott McCaskill on Feb. 20; and Dianne Connor on Feb. 21. May God bless everyone. Quote: “Today’s mighty oak is merely a nut that managed to hold its ground.” Please keep calling at 989-4875 with your news in this area. Have a great week!

weather? Many had power by bedtime Saturday night! Weren’t we blessed these teams came to the rescue so fast? Many roads were not passable until crews arrived with chain saws. How many poles did they have to reset? How long does it take to do just one pole? We have to be patient and give thanks for the luxury of electricity and a crew who can repair or replace what is needed. Still, we are sad for the loss each suffered at home.

When Wednesday daylight finally arrived, friends and relatives went to check on friends and relatives. Some brought meals, hot coffee, or moral support. Strong men brought tractors, chainsaws, backhoes or rakes. A preacher, a bulldozer, and even a young girl simply took charge and did what needed to be done. As I witnesses acts of kindness this quote says a lot – “Blessing is not a technique we perform, See JACKS, Page 6-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

The Big Buck Contest was won this year by Jerry Newsom. He bagged a nine-point with a 17 ¾-inch spread. In the Junior Hunter division was Colten Hurst with an eightpoint with a 14-inch s p r e a d . Congratulations guys! Remember our monthly meal will be 6:30 p.m. Feb. 12 at the Center. Bring a covered dish and a drink and come join us. This will be our Valentine’s meal. Let those special people in your life know how much they mean to you every day. Sweetlips Store is once again selling strawberries for Valentine’s Day. To assure you have an order you must place them no later than Feb. 12. You may order chocolate or cream cheese. Last week my grandson was once again complaining about homework and being put on a bad color (system for behavior). I was talking to him, he laid his head down and started crying. A few minutes went by, he lifted his head and

Hickory Corner Community Center will host a Valentine’s Day party on Saturday, Feb. 9, beginning at 6 p.m. with a potluck dinner, followed by the crowning of royalty, and afterwards, everyone will enjoy playing bingo. Please bring prizes for the bingo table. Invite your family, friends and neighbors to come and enjoy a special evening of food, fun and fellowship. The community extends sympathy to the family and friends of Lottie Patterson Tucker, 88, who passed away Jan. 31, 2013. Remember in prayer the sick, our military, their families, our great country, and the folks who suffered damage in last weeks storms. We saw some destruction in McNairy County around Bethel Springs, and were told about 100 homes had some damage, and also some homes in Chester County. We are just so thankful that no one lost their life. Recently Phillip and Judy Cranford visited their son James and Amanda and three grandchildren in Cookeville. They stayed overnight in Gatlinburg and attend-

said, “Grandma, if I was the President, I would make it illegal to put kids on bad colors and give them homework!” I get some kind of remark at least once a week. On our prayer list are Bill Kinchen, Loretta Pickett, Penny Helton, Ernie Merriman, Chrissy Busby, Brenda and Junior Smith, Olivia Springer, Betty Stout, Grace Moody, Norma McPeake, Avery Todd, our military and their families, and all the people affected by the recent storms. I made a trip to Memphis Wednesday morning after the storm. There was debris from my house all the way to the other side of Chickasaw, trees down everywhere. Birthday greetings go out to Nick Moody Feb. 9; Dewayne Keen and Johnnie Smith Feb. 11; Brenda Plunk and Ray (Porky) Cook Feb. 12; Mandy Coats and Kristian Pickett Feb. 14. Will Wade celebrated his seventh birthday with family and friends. He had an Angry Bird theme. If you have news to share call 989-7523. The stew went well. Thanks to everyone who helped in any way and all those who came out to buy. The baked items looked yummy! Hope everyone has a good week. ed “The Hatfields and the McCoys.” Blake Hopper is now performing in that show. An early spring is on the way according to the groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil. When he came out of his dwelling at Gobblers Knob Saturday morning, Feb. 2, he did not see his shadow. Let’s hope that Phil is right! I’ve already seen some golden daffodils blooming and the Bradford pear trees budding.

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Baking a special cake for any occassion I’m not gifted in the area of cake decorating, but my sister-inlaw Elissa is. During a recent visit with her, she made this cake for her mother’s birthday. It’s rich and moist and delicious – a wonderful cake for all occasions. Personally, I have

trouble getting cakes to rise evenly and to not fall, but this recipe really works. I’m also not talented at spreading the frosting evenly all over the cake, but in the right hands, you can have a gorgeous cake. I love baking and making pastries, but

layer cakes are one area that I’ve never spent much time perfecting. Perhaps with more opportunity to practice I would be better, but I know that

there are plenty of people out there who love the art of cake baking and decorating. I hope you’ll try this and love it as much as my family does.

Snickerdoodle Cake Ingredients: Snickerdoodle Cake 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 ½ cups cake flour 1 tablespoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 2 sticks butter, softened to room temperature 1 ¾ cups fine or superfine sugar 4 large eggs, room temperature 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 ¼ cups whole milk, warmed to room temperature Brown Sugar Cinnamon Frosting 4 ½ sticks butter, softened to room temperature 1 cup light brown sugar, packed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 8 to 9 cups confectioner’s sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ½ cup half and half, plus more if needed Directions: For cake: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter and flour two 8- to 9-inch round cake pans. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder, salt and cinnamon. Set aside. Cream together the butter and sugar until fluffy and pale To report news, or rent the Hickory Corner Center, call 989-3315. Have a great week!

in color. Beat the eggs in one at a time, fully incorporating each egg and scraping down the bowl between each addition. Beat in the vanilla. Add about 1/3 of the milk, beat to incorporate, then 1/3 of the flour, again beating to incorporate. Repeat the process, scraping down sides of bowl as necessary, until all of the milk and flour are added and mixed evenly. Divide batter evenly between two pans and bake, rotating midway through, for about 35 minutes or until the cake tests done in the center. Let the cakes cool in the pan on a rack for 5 minutes before turning out onto the racks to finish cooling. To make buttercream: Beat together butter, brown sugar and cinnamon until fluffy and

pale in color. Add 6 cups of the confectioner’s sugar and vanilla extract. Beat, starting on low and moving up to high, until fully incorporated. Scrape down the bowl and add half and half. Beat to incorporate again. Add another 2 cups of confectioner’s sugar and beat, starting on low and moving to high, until fully incorporated. Check the consistency of the buttercream. If it needs to be thicker, add the remaining confectioner’s sugar. If it is too thick, add more half and half a teaspoon at a time, beating after each addion, until it reaches desired consistency. Place a layer of frosting between the two cake layers and frost as desired. Optional: Garnish with whole cinnamon sticks.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

From Page 4-A

Only Yesterday “Editor gives up all effort at reducing” From the files of the Chester County Independent February 2, 1933

“Road Cafe Shot Up” The cafe at the Dixie swimming pool, seven miles south of Henderson on U.S. Highway 45, was shot up at 10 o’clock Friday night by unidentified parties. Seven bullets from a pistol were sent through front doors. The operator, Ed Bryant, was awakened and shot at a car leaving the place. The fire was returned, the bullet passing through the living rooms in the rear of the building near the bed, where members of the family slept. “Colored Folks For Better Homes” Shellie Northcutt, of Henderson, has received notice from Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, President of Better Homes in America, of appointment as Chairman of the Better Homes in America Committee for the colored citizens of Chester County. Every colored family in the community will be interested in the Better Homes movement which was founded with the help of President Hoover in 1922. He served as Chairman of the Board of Directors until he entered the White House, when this chairmanship was taken over by Secretary Wilbur. Better Homes committees are being established throughout the nation to arouse interest in the improvement of homes and to organize local civic groups to help each family to gain information concerning the best ways of taking the next steps in improving their homes. […] Program for the repair of old houses and for the encouragement of remodeling and modernization will receive special emphasis this year. Many improvements of home premises can be made by the family in their own free time. Unemployment labor can be given employment in the

Chester County Independent archives February 2, 1933

making of the more elaborate improvements. All efforts of this sort will help to render homes more healthful and attractive; will help to keep up values of property and serve to enhance the community’s reputation for high standards. Many thousands of homes were improved during the recent campaign, and it is expected that a much larger number of homes will be rendered more convenient and livable by the campaign of 1933.

January 29, 1943

“Private Wyatt Says ‘We’ve a Job to Do’” Camp Van Dorn, Miss. Dear Mr. Johnston: Having just received my first copy of the Chester County Independent since I came into the service, I want to try to express my appreciation and thanks to you for sending your paper to all the boys in service. Reading the paper is almost

Chester County Independent archives February 1, 1963

Chester County High School Seniors who averaged 90 or above during the first seven semesters are seated, left to right: Janice Bingham, Salutatorian; Tommy Scott, Valedictorian; Nancy Wells, third highest; second row, left to right: Nancy McHaney, Sondra Whitten, Myrna Redmon, Shirley Reddin, Brenda Guilliams, Sandra Steed, Ann Parchman, Betty Isbell and Elizabeth Weaver; back row, left to right, Jay Johnson, Clyde Moore, Calvin Austin and Troy Thompson. like talking to friends back home, because there is not a boy in this company from Tennessee. They are all from the North. But they are all right and mighty good pals, although they do not talk with the Southern slang we Southerners do. Whether the folks back home realize it or not, we soldiers have a job to be done and until this job is done, no one in the service or at home, will be able to enjoy the principles and privileges that life affords to a person in a county of Freedom. And the county home newspaper is one way to keep the spirit and courage of a boy in the service built up, just to know all the folks back home are back of him. Although I have been in service about two months, I have found the Army is not as bad as most have heard it was, and life in the Army is only what one makes it. Here’s thanking you again for the paper and wishing you all the luck, success and happiness life can afford. Sincerely yours, PVT. WINDOL L. WYATT “Sausage And Peas” The editor has “given up” all efforts at “reducing.” As good friends continue to bring in the fine products of Chester County farms, our willpower has weakened to the point that resistance is no more. Miss Tressie Cox, our attractive and capable correspondent of the Woodville community, added to our waistline this week when she brought us a sack of mighty fine sausage. Mrs. J.F. Kelley, a loyal friend and reader of the Center Point community, brought in a sack of two varieties of peas. They go mighty good with greens, hog jowl and corn bread. Cold weather is awfully disagreeable to us, but it does have its compensations – hog killing! That good friend, Mrs. Algie Bray of the Friendship community, yesterday sent us a sack of her sausage and a box of backbone and spareribs. We have some fine homemade kraut to go with it, too.

daughter on Jan. 31. She has been named Pamela Kay. Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Burkhead of Pinson are the parents of a son, Tommy Keith, who was born Feb. 1. Mr. and Mrs. Clovis Gary of Pinson are announcing the birth of a son on Feb. 3. He has been named Tony Joe.

February 1, 1963

“New Arrivals” Mr. and Mrs. Bill Graves of North Pekin, Illinois, announce the birth of a son, John Douglas, on Jan. 16. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Major Tucker of North Pekin, and Mr. and Mrs. Leotha Graves of Henderson. Henderson Clinic Born to Harmon and Elsie Jean Ivory of Henderson, a daughter, Carmon Jean, on Jan. 21. Born to Jerry and Anna Hollingsworth of Pinson, a son, Tommy Lee, on Jan. 23. “County Still Snowbound; Thaw Worsens Road Conditions” Most of Chester County remained snow-bound on Wednesday of this week. All schools in the county have been closed since dismissing last Wednesday, due to the icy conditions of the roads. Following the record -13 temperature last Thursday morning, about one-half inch of snow fell on Friday night on streets and roads that were already glazed with sleet, ice and snow which fell last

February 6, 1953

“Big Crowds To Attend Cage Tourney Here” Word comes from many of the towns comprising the Girls 31st District Basketball Tournament that fans by the hundreds intend to invade Henderson for the cage contests that will be played in the C.C.H.S. Gymnasium [...] to decide the 1952-53 champions of this District. The teams comprising the 31st District include Beech Bluff, Bolivar, Henderson, Decaturville, Bemis, Jackson, Lexington, Malesus, Mercer, North Side, Parsons and Pinson [...]. “Births” Steadman-Guy Clinic Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Crouse announce the arrival of a

Chester County Independent archives January 29, 1943

Wednesday morning. Last Saturday afternoon brought freezing rain. Temperatures rose to the low twenties Monday and a bright January sun began thawing the ice. Thawing during the day and freezing at night have kept streets and roads slick making walking or driving hazardous. On Tuesday night temperatures just above freezing were accompanied by a light drizzle and on Wednesday morning city streets and many roads in the county were impassable.

Jacks but a presence we embody. A blessing is not an act we do to someone or something, but a relationship we form with them that enable us all to be embraces in the presence of an unobstructed world.” No way can I know the names of all those who came to help in different communities. Many people went into actions. Tennessee is a volunteer state. People volunteered , or witnessed people helping. Thank you for any act of kindness you were led to do. We are transformed by prayer when our hearts are filled with passion to do the will of God in doing unto others. Your act of kindness touched someone’s heart; plus you and that person slept better. A phone call can also lift a person’s spirit even now. Little Braelyn Ellis was scared during the storm. She trembled for a long time, but she told her grandparents, “Today, tomorrow, yesterday, forever – Jesus will love us.” New Friendship church board will display these words from the mouth of the babe. Lois Wilkenson will be proud to read the Henderson County High School soccer team did a kindness. Coach Kirk Childers set a lifetime example for his team in the Middlefork community. Those making a difference that day were Mrs. Tina Courtwright, Mr. Phil Blakely, Garren Mills, Brandon Belcher, Wesley White, Condra Coley, Bryce Stanfill, Garrett Lowrance, Clint Shannon, Ryan Courtwright, Garren Reeves and Mykul Reeves. Youth gain Christian values by doing for others. It improves their selfesteem while helping them become better leaders. Others will want to follow in their footsteps. Remember their names - they will be doing more in their lifetime to make a difference! The will not forget their coach or this experience, George H. Bishop called to give some information on the Jacks Creek gin. George lives not far from Hilltop. He is married to Dorothy Messer and wanted to share these tidbits. If you recall in last week’s paper Danny Ray Bishop desired photos or information about the Jacks Creek gin. George Bishop is Danny’s uncle. George’s dad, Joe Kent Bishop, ran the steam engine at Jacks Creek gin during the depression. Joe was born May 12, 1890, and died in 1964. He married Cilpha Holland. Cotton was picked in the late summer. Do you remember how hot it was? But just think how hot Joe Bishop’s job was at the gin. Wood was brought in by horse-drawn wagons. Some of the wood was six-feet long. Joe kept the steam engine going. Cotton was baled daily. Hal Christopher was manager, and a young Lee

Stewart worked there too. They were loved and respected. Joe worked at the gin for 17 years. Thought for the moment: Just think of the lumber today in need of being sawed and carried out of the woods in storm damaged communities, but there is no local gin anymore. That life-style is over and those times will not return. Change isn’t always good, is it? Joe didn’t know about air conditioners at that time in his life. Mary Schewe received a nice surprise from Regina Brooks – a good ole banana pudding. Regina’s son-in-law, Mike Clayton, is slowly healing from a severe fall. Keep him in your prayers. Betty Richardson’s great-granddaughter, Lucy Virginia Britt, will turn the mighty age of one on Feb. 11. Trivia – What is the year she will celebrate 88? Is this correct (2-1100)? Wilma Moore Hart “Miss Tabs” turns 82 on Feb. 1. Hope she wears that red dressing gown Don gave her for New Years! Also, Patsy Jones Denton and Andy Maness will turn wiser on Feb. 12. Wayne Moody didn’t catch the fish, but 35 friends and family members enjoyed eating fish with him Saturday, as his 83rd birthday was proudly celebrated. His sister made lots of pictures, so he can enjoy his party again from a bird’s eye view in an album! For the first time since July, 2011, the Pentagon didn’t release any names of our soldiers killed in Afghanistan. God bless the USA and our military. Prayer is requested for storm injured Donald Tignor, Chris Young and Susan, Janis McCall and Steve Fall (Geraldine Thompson’s son-inlaw). Loy Jones is improving and ready to go antiquing. Sheila Elder Cox and Donette Rhodes Ada are waiting for test results to share. Clint Barham returned home Wednesday – “weather” that was good timing or not depends on Clint’s feelings! Ha! Our community expresses sympathy to the families and friends of Jimmy “Skillet” Woodard (223-46 to 1-30-13); Treva Gitchell of Jacks Creek lost her sister, Mary Sue Maness Roberts (4-21-52 to 2-113); Lottie Patterson Tucker (6-5-24 to 1-3113); Henry Rinks (4-440 to 1-19-13); and Richard Bud White (825-30 to 2-4-13). God bless all of you through “storms of life.” Below is a quote I hope you keep. If I can do small things to help you please call me at 989-7485. I will make the effort to come to you. I prayerfully hope these words by Victor Hugo help you, as they did me, especially the last eight words. “Have courage for the great sorrows of life and patience for the small one; and when you have laboriously accomplished your daily task, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Words for the Week: “Now what …” By Junebug

Have you very often been here – everything you ‘had to do,’ is done; and now you have time on your hands to use however you wish? Do you find yourself saying, perhaps even out loud, “Now what …?” It is not often that this unexpected ‘free time’ comes our way, time we don’t already have something in mind that we really want to do. Most often our time is filled with choices alright, but choices of putting what we have to do MOST ahead of what we have to do LEAST, with some things just not getting done at all – isn’t that what tomorrow is for, after all? BUT – once in a while, the ‘Now what …” opportunity, or conundrum, comes our way, and we have to decide how to use it, ‘cause we SURE don’t want to waste it! Sooooooo, what comes into your mind when that happens to you? “If I had the time, I would … what?” Well, it’s wintertime now, so a picnic or a ballgame is out of the question, likely it is too cold to even go for a brisk walk. Is there a movie that just came out you would like to go see … perhaps that is your cup of tea for those afternoons or evenings that you have absolutely free? With everyone else also so busy, it’s hard to ‘grab a bud’ on the spur of the moment to just enjoy time together, perhaps watching TV, going bowling or playing video games. Are there good solutions to the “Now what …” scenario when you are by yourself ? In a word, YES! Receiving letters is such a treat for the recipient, but at times it can be viewed as a chore for the ‘scribbler.’ Texting and email are quick and easy, but there is just something about receiving a handwritten letter – writing letters is a slice of the past – by the time it is received it is history. For many that enjoy writing letters, we just start writing and the pages seem to fill themselves. I have to START saying goodbye at least half-a-page, sometimes much more, before the “real

The sudden shower of sleet and rain early on in the Saturday morning hurt the turnout for the breakfast. Thanks go to the people who did come out. Please remember to call Mrs. Wanda Cook at 989-3724 with your news. You can call me at 989-5300 also. If you can, please attend the Kathy Hollomon Cancer Memorial Valentine Banquet Saturday, Feb. 9 at the First United Methodist Church, Henderson. This event helps Chester County

goodbye” is inked onto the page. Some of my friends loathe, detest, and otherwise thoroughly dislike the THOUGHT of writing a letter – for varied reasons. “I can’t spell.” “I can’t think of anything to say.” “Nobody would enjoy hearing about anything going on in my life.” All these seem like logical reasons, but really, they aren’t!” Receiving a letter ranks even ahead of a phone call to let people know you care about them. I am an “ink-pen filled-from-a-bottle-ofink” letter writer. (It can’t get any more old fashioned than that, unless you go all the way back to a sharpened quill and pressed papyrus!) By no means do I ever finish writing a letter without having to put more ink into the pen. I love to write with blue-black ink – have you ever heard of it? It’s funny what we care about, isn’t it? You can use any pen or pencil you have handy – it really doesn’t matter to the recipient! The point I am ever so slowly getting around to is this. When my daughter moved to New York, we would talk on the phone, email, occasionally text, and occasionally I would write her a letter. On the phone one day she mentioned that she looked forward to receiving my letters. It reminded me of how I felt when I would get a letter from my Mama – soon as I saw the envelope my day was brightened! It did not matter what she had scribbled down, or how I had to squint my eyes to read it. Each one of her letters is still a treasure to me. A gift of her time she had spent with just pen, paper and me! My daughter continued on, telling me that she had saved all the letters I had written to her since she had been in New York. She had put them all in a shoebox in the top shelf of her closet. And she said, “I even noticed Mom, that you ALWAYS use the same stamp on every envelope! So if I just see the stamp, I know it is from you!” I bought a couple years worth of

a special stamp just for her … and she had noticed! (It is a truism; little things CAN mean a lot.) From that conversation on, knowing letters were special to her too, every Thursday morning I start my day writing to her, it’s “our time.” What do I write about you ask? – Usually there is nothing outstanding, no earthshaking event to be relayed – just the routine things of life: happenings, hopes, dreams, encouragements, dealings with discouragements – the things I used to think no one would ever care about – she cares. Just as I still care about what my Mama wrote to me – so does my daughter. Why am I writing about this for you to read? I absolutely believe that people do appreciate RECEIVING letters and WISH friends or relatives would write to them. Most people don’t write letters, because of the time it takes, or perhaps because they have never tried it with a positive attitude, they think they hate to write letters. So how about the next time you have a “What now …” moment, grab pen and paper (any kind of paper – I once wrote a letter on an entire roll of toilet paper and rerolled it back up and mailed it.); just start writing a letter to someone you would enjoy spending this time with. Use your free time just being yourself, talking to them ‘on paper.’ Put that letter, short or long (it mattereth not) into an envelope; write their address on it; and here is THE important thing, put it INTO the mailbox! Odds are you will find that you HAVE enjoyed that visit – once you start writing, ideas may just flow into your mind to tell them about, to ask them about, to remind them about – and because you had the time, your writing is not hurried, is not rushed through, but rather, it is a real ‘slice of your life’ that you have given to them. They, very likely,

cancer victims with expenses. Kathy was a great teacher, she tutored in preparation for a test and was great. Please make this event part of your Valentine feel-good, and pass it on to help others. Call the church at 989-2732. Remember the Henry Rinks family in their loss. Also remember Anthony Bolton this week as he has a procedure done. Remember his wife Jeanette as she helps take care of him. Call your reporter, keep us informed so we can keep you informed. Happy Birthday to Henry Monks and Holly Hemby Feb. 10; Mandy Cooper Futch Feb. 11; Danielle Adkins, Deonna Morrison, Ray Cook, Donna Doyle, Molly McQuire Feb. 12; John

Moore and Randy Cooper Feb. 13; Becky Rowsey Feb. 16; Gayle Cox, Krista Hathcock, and Alice Cook Feb. 17; Anthony Cooper and Judy Greenslade Feb. 19; Bonnie Cook Feb. 21; Celeste Parker Feb. 22; Allen Cook and Peggy Lard Feb. 23; Emily Montgomery Feb. 24; Mason Wells and Sherry Thompson Feb. 25; Kelsey Turner and Tammy Thomas Feb. 26; Wanda Cook Feb. 27; and David Cox and Randi Burke Feb. 28.

will thoroughly enjoy receiving it, opening it and reading it. And if they are anything like the people I write to, they will look forward to hearing from you again. And you know what - if they let you KNOW they appreciated your letter, when you DO have another “What now …” opportunity in your life, it will no longer be a conundrum; you’ll KNOW what you want to do! You CAN find delight in sharing your life with pen and ink … who knows; perhaps you’ll get letters BACK from them! Would you like to have a shoebox holding handwritten letters you can reread at any time? The old saying is true, if you want to HAVE letters, you have to WRITE letters – and mail them. (smile) Keep this little gem of an idea in the back of your mind – be sure you have the few supplies available that are needed – pen, paper, envelope and stamp. Who knows, you might actually enjoy this oldtimey activity of giv-

ing a ‘slice of your life’ to someone who will more than likely appreciate it and save it to reread in the years to come. May your life be filled with “What now …” moments, and may you enjoy each of them, how ever you choose to

use them. Email your ‘words for the week’ suggestion and/or opinion of this week’s article to jpatterson@chestercountyindependent.co m. “Let’s keep life simple, real and fun.” Junebug


Opinion

Page 8-A

Thursday, February 7, 2013

60 Minutes Tackles Times-Picayune By Kevin Slimp Institute of Newspaper Technology

My 13-year-old son received an iPod Touch for Christmas this year. I know my son. Probably as well as I’ve ever known anyone. And I knew, given time, he would lose his expensive gift. In an effort to soften KEVIN SLIMP the blow when the device did turn up missing, I had Zachary create a background screen with the words, “If you find this iPod, please email kevin@kevinslimp.com to let my dad know you have it.” I had to tell you that story, so you would understand the reference to my son a little further down this column. Now for story number two. In the late 90s, I left the newspaper world for a few years to be director of communications for the United Methodist Church in my part of the United States. I had a staff that created publications, online content, P.R. material and a newspaper. Some of the most interesting aspects of my job came under the heading of “crisis communication.” As crisis communication director, I prepared the organization for emergencies we hoped we’d never see. Several thousand professionals made up the clergy and staffs of these congregations and it was my job to be sure they were ready in the event of a “media event.” I was quite adept at getting TV reporters to report just about anything. Newspapers weren’t as quick - you might say “gullible” - to accept everything as the truth, so I generally used television to get information out to the masses. This meant I would create text that ministers and others were to use if called by a member of the media during a crisis. They were always instructed, if the reporter wanted more information than I had provided, to contact me directly. Understanding that story will also come in handy as you read further. So last night I was having dinner with a friend when I got a text that read, “Are you watching 60 Minutes?” “No,” was my immediate response. “They’re saying the newspaper industry is dead. I thought you’d want to know.” Within minutes came an email from Karen Geary of the Paris Post-Intelligencer in West Tennessee. “Did you see 60 Minutes? It’s a story about The Times-Picayune. They’re saying newspapers are dead.” The evening continued like that with texts, emails and calls arriving from concerned viewers near and far. This morning, I found the 12-minute clip online and watched it. Then I watched it again. Then I watched it and took notes. In less than 11 seconds, Morley Safer said, referring to newspapers, “virtually an entire industry in free-fall.” The story, of course, was about the TimesPicayune’s move from a daily to a three-days-aweek publication. I was especially interested because some of the folks in the story were the same folks who contacted me back when the shift was announced. Steve Newhouse declined to be interviewed for the story. That job fell to Jim Amoss, longtime editor of the paper. Safer’s first question to Amoss seemed simple enough. “Did you agree with the decision to start publishing three days a week?” I’m listening to this interview for the fourth time as I write. And for the life of me, I still haven’t heard him answer the question. He gave what sounded to me like a “packaged” response, the kind I might have written years ago. It reminded me so much of my son, when I asked where his iPod was, knowing full well it had been lost. He told me all about the possible places an iPod could be, without coming out and telling me he’d lost it a few days earlier. I felt for him. I wanted Amoss to tell us what he really thought, one way or the other. All I got from listening to his interview was that the industry was grappling with options. Safer equated what was happening to surgery, where all the limbs are amputated and replaced by artificial limbs. In an open letter to Advance, the paper’s parent company, several high profile citizens of New Orleans, including many names that you would know, wrote that “The Newhouses are losing the trust of the community.” David Carr, New York Times reporter, said, “I don’t think they expected the hurricane winds that came against them.” Yet in a radio interview from a few weeks ago, David Francis, business manager for the NOLA Media Group, of which The Times-Picayune is a part, said that New Orleans is “embracing us again.” I called Carl Redman, executive editor of The Advocate in Baton Rouge to ask him about the new daily paper in New Orleans created by the Baton Rouge paper. Redman reports that his group was overwhelmed by the response to the See SLIMP, Page 9-A

The Tennessee General Assembly House of Representatives

CAPITOL HILL REVIEW A weekly wrap-up of legislative news From Representative Steve McDaniel

General Assembly hears State of the State Address Governor unveils budget proposal Governor Bill Haslam delivered his annual State of the State address to a joint convention last week, unveiling his budget for the 2013-2014 fiscal year. Haslam addressed multiple issues during the State of the State; the most prominent include job recruitment and workforce development, investments in both K12 and higher education, lowering taxes, and a continued push to make government more efficient and effective. House lawmakers were pleased with the governor’s priorities and look forward to moving his agenda forward through the legislature. Among the key points in the governor’s speech was a focus on balanced budgets, low taxes, and fiscal responsibility. As Washington, D.C., and other states are mired in partisan gridlock with out of control spending, the governor emphasized that Tennessee has made responsible decisions that will continue to ensure the state is positioned to be a top leader in the country on jobs.

Job Recruitment and Workforce Development

Building on the success of legislation passed during the 107th General Assembly, Governor Haslam’s $32.6 billion balanced budget makes major investments in job recruitment and workforce development, including: $16.5 million budgeted to provide technology and equipment related to workforce development programs for community colleges and technology centers across the state; A new technical education complex at Northeast State Community College in the Tri-Cities to help train for manufacturing related jobs; A much-needed lab building at Nashville State Community College to help train the next generation of

students in Middle Tennessee; and A new state-of-theart technology center in Smyrna that will be managed in conjunction with Nissan to provide training for area businesses looking for high-skilled employees. In addition, the Governor’s budget includes strategic capital investments statewide that will help fund programs to ensure Tennesseans have the skills needed to obtain well-paying, 21st century jobs after graduation.

K-12 and Higher Education Investment

A large portion of the State of the State Address was committed to improving education, an issue that both the Governor and legislators have made a priority. The budget proposal calls for: 100 percent funding for the Basic Education Program (BEP) formula; A $76.9 million increase in K-12 public school funding, including salary increases for K-12 teachers; A school choice program that will allow low-income families who have kids in the lowest-perfor ming schools to attend other schools; $307.3 million committed for capital improvements (buildings and infrastructure) at our higher education institutions; and The investment in an online university focused on improving affordability and access to higher education for the more than 800,000 Tennesseans that have obtained some college credit but have not yet graduated. In addition to these education proposals during the State of the State, Governor Haslam also announced a strategic initiative called “Drive to 55.” This new initiative, the goal of which is to ensure Tennessee has the best-trained workforce in America, will seek to increase the number of Tennesseans that have earned an Associates degree or higher from

32 percent to 55 percent by the year 2025.

Tax Cuts

Multiple tax cuts were passed during the 107th session of the General Assembly, including eliminating the gift tax, lowering the sales tax on food, and phasing out the death tax. Similar to last year, the Governor’s 2013-2014 budget includes additional tax cuts for Tennesseans, including: A further reduction of the sales tax on groceries to a flat five percent; A cut to the Hall Tax which will raise the income exemption level from $26,000 to $33,000 for individuals and $37,000 to $59,000 for joint filers; A plan to fully fund the property tax relief program to help lowincome seniors, veterans, and the disabled; and A further reduction of the death tax that raises the income exemption level from $1.25 million to $2 million. These tax cut proposals by Governor Haslam reflect an agreement with lawmakers to prioritize

the needs of Tennesseans in a fiscally responsible manner that encourages job growth statewide.

Other Budget Highlights

Other highlights of Governor Haslam’s 2013-2014 budget include: A plan to spend $48 million in corrections to compensate our local jails for housing more state prisoners; A proposal to streamline and better utilize the Criminal Gang Enhancement law, making our streets safer; A commitment to add $100 million to the state’s Rainy Day Fund’ A proposal for worker’s compensation reform that will focus on fairness in the system for both the employee and the employer; Upgrading nearly 200 case manager positions in the Department of Children’s Services; $4.3 million for the Montgomery County veteran’s home; and $8 million for a statewide tourism fund to support the work of the tourism commission.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

From Page 8-A

Slimp new daily. They had hoped for a circulation of 10,000 by February 2013. Instead, more than 10,000 subscribed to the newspaper within a week. Between home delivery and single copy sales, The Advocate currently reaches approximately 20,000 homes each day. I tried to reach someone at The TimesPicayune, sending emails to the publisher and several managers, but received no response. Finally, I decided to talk with Rob Curley, deputy editor of the Orange County Register (OCR), whose resume includes more experience in online journalism than anyone I can think of. Rob is a household name and I figured he could give me insight on whatever it is I’m missing related to The Times-Picayune conversion to a non-daily. Instead we spent most of our conversation talking about his new job in Orange County. OCR is one of the 20 biggest papers in the country. Rob has left his role as online guru to serve as one of five deputy editors of the paper. He explained that, since July, OCR has increased its newsroom staff from 185 writers and editors to 300. I could write several columns about the

changes at OCR, but I can sense Rob’s excitement when he discussed his work with America’s “largest community newspaper,” a description credited to Ken Brusic, executive editor. After spending my afternoon interviewing Carl Redman and Rob Curley, I found it difficult to understand why Safer referred to newspapers as “dying.” I found it even harder to understand after reading a story in News & Tech today that six of eight publicly traded newspaper companies showed increases in their stock prices in 2012. Not small increases,

but double-digit increases. I love talking with folks who are excited about working for their newspapers. I visited with two newspapers in Virginia and Kentucky over the past few weeks to work with their staffs. Both papers are doing well and continue to invest in the future. It’s no coincidence that papers that invest in the future thrive. And while the Orange County Register may be America’s largest community paper, you can bet that thousands of community papers will continue to serve their communities and surprise Morley Safer at the same time.

Chester County – Henderson Donation collection for storm victims all this week Members of Finger First Baptist Church are currently collecting donations of items for storm victims. They will be set up all this week at the National Guard Armory in Henderson from 9-10 a.m. or later with appointment. For more information, call Amanda Dubose at 608-0570.

Kathy Hollomon Cancer Memorial Valentine Banquet Feb. 9 The First and Trinity United Methodist Women are again hosting the annual Kathy Hollomon Cancer Memorial Valentine Banquet. It will take place at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Christian Life Center at First United Methodist Church in Henderson. There will be entertainment and a delicious meal, prepared by the ladies, which will include spinach strawberry salad, tenderloin, hash brown casserole, green beans, homemade bread, and assorted desserts. The cost is $15 and all proceeds go to the Kathy Hollomon Cancer Memorial Fund which assists Chester County cancer victims with expenses. For tickets or further information, call the church office at 989-2732 or Melinda Carroll at 989-4073.

Sweetheart’s Valentine Pageant Feb. 9 The Sweetheart’s Valentine Pageant will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Chester County Junior High gymnasium. The pageant is for girls, newborn to 18 years of age. A professional photographer will be set up for pictures. Forms need to be submitted on or before Feb. 6th. Those forms submitted by Feb. 4 will be entered for a drawing to win a free photo package. For more information, contact Amanda at 434-8246. All benefits go to Relay for Life. Contestants will be taking donations, and the contestant bringing in the largest donation will receive the Queen of Hearts trophy.

Word Weavers to meet Feb. 9 The Word Weavers, a local writers’ group, will meet at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Chester County Library. They meet every second Saturday of the month. All visitors and aspiring writers are invited to attend.

Headhugger Hat Group to meet Feb. 18 The Headhugger Hat Group will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18 at the Studio Building behind Henderson Assembly of God church. Please come and bring your hats for the cancer patients to have during this cold weather. If you have questions or need further information, call 608-7303. We thank those who have made donations of yarn and baggies in this ministry in recent weeks.

Henderson - Artifacts needed for CC Museum Leadership Chester County Class of 2011 is still accepting artifacts for the Chester County Museum that will be housed in the Tennessee Room of the Chester County Library. Categories for items that will be accepted are Native Americans, Civil War, farming, industry, education, the Henderson Centennial, or other pieces of history that are prior to 1980. Items donated must be particular to Chester County. For information, contact the library at 989-4673 or check out the museum page on Facebook.

Chester County – Finger Fire Department all you can eat dinner Feb. 9 The Finger Volunteer Fire Department is having an all you can eat catfish, or BBQ chicken, with all the trimmings, plus homemade desserts from 3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9. The cost for the dinner is $10 for adults and $5 for children. All proceeds go toward the operating expenses of the Finger Fire Department.

Chester County – Mifflin Mifflin Family Dance Feb. 7-8 There will be a Mifflin Family Dance, starting at 7:30 p.m. every Thursday and Friday night at 9000 Hwy 200 Luray. Live music features various bands such as Tim Young and Family, the Wolf River Band, and Double Take. Admission is $6.

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Concessions and game room are available. Bring your family and enjoy the evening. For more information, call 989-4460.

All Areas Trips available The Chester County Senior Citizen Center is offering an exciting 10 day trip to Germany and the Czech Republic, including an elegant Elbe river cruise. The tour will leave from Memphis on Nov. 2, 2013, and go from Prague to Germany. While in Berlin you can tour Martin Luther’s home, church, and much, much more. The total cost for this trip is $3,459, which includes everything. A deposit of $500 is due now. For more information, call Joanne Osborne at 989-7434. The Chester County Senior Citizen Center announces a nine day trip to Colorado and the Rocky Mountains on June 1-9, 2013. The cost is $699 per person with double occupancy. (For single occupancy add $240.) Amount due at signup is $75, with the final payment due by March 26. For more information and reservations, call Joanne Osborne at 989-7434. The Selmer Senior Center is sponsoring a seven day trip to Savannah, Ga., and Charleston, S.C. The trip will be April 30 – May 6, 2013. The cost of the trip is $849 each with double occupancy. A $100 deposit is due by Feb. 8 with final payment by March 15. For more information, contact Hollie Knight at 645-7843.

Discover Scotland trip still available The Chester County Senior Center has put together a Discover Scotland tour, departing April 15, 2013 and returning April 24, 2013. Come with us and see the Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace, St. Andrews Dunrobin Castle, Orkney Islands, Loch Ness, Isle of Skye and Armadale Castle. Cost is $3,349 each for a double room. Deposit amount for this trip is now due. For more information, call Joanne at 989-7434.

Henderson County – Reagan Regular Saturday Night Dance Feb. 9 Don’t forget to join us every Thursday and Friday night at 7:30 at the Mifflin family dance. Various bands will be playing, Tim Young with “The Good Time Band,” “Wolf River,” “Double Take,” Sparky, Dave and Stacy with “The Three-Legged Horse,” (Wow they are good. Better than some fourlegged horses.) Even if you don’t dance, come out and enjoy the music and visiting with neighbors and friends. Concessions and game room are available. Bring your whole family. On Feb. 14 we will have a drawing for a gift certificate to Red Lobster for Valentines. For more information, call 989-5867 or 989-4460.

Hardeman County – Bolivar Dinner Theater Feb. 15-16 “It’s a Three Ring Circus,” will be performed Friday and Saturday, Feb. 15 and 16, at The Hardeman County Arts Center, 1580 W. Market St., in Bolivar. It is a southern comedy, a laugh out loud valentine treat, written and directed by Monita Carlin of Bolivar. Dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m., and at 7 p.m. the show begins. Tickets are $25 per person and are available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday, starting Feb. 4 to members, and starting Feb. 11 to the public. For more information, or for tickets, call 658-2787, Visa and MasterCard are accepted.

Madison County – Jackson Coupon Seminar Feb. 26 We are going to be having a Coupon Seminar class at Jackson Center for Independent Living (JCIL), 1981 Hollywood Drive, from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26. Carol Dix, the Sun Snipper, will present tips on shopping using money-saving coupons. Do you want to learn how to save on your Grocery bill? Learn about manufacturer, store and electronic coupons, coupon databases, Internet sites, organizing, and more. Stock up and never pay full price again. There is no fee to attend and handouts will be provided. Bring a friend. Seating is limited, so call Rhonda at 668-2211 to reserve your FREE spot.


Obituary/Religion Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Obituaries Walter Mayfield June 22, 1921 – Jan. 26, 2013 Walter Mayfield departed this life on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013 at the age of 91 Years, 7 Months, 4 Days. Services were held Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 at Estes Church of Christ in Henderson, with Bro. Roy Sharp officiating. Burial followed in the Old Estes Cemetery at Henderson. Arrangements were handled by Shackelford Funeral Directors - Johnson Chapel. He was born in Chester County, son of the late Fritz and Lillie Johnson Mayfield, and attended Schools in Chester County. He was married to Tommie Duberry on Nov. 1, 1941. They made their home in Chester County. He served as a medic in the U.S. Army during WWII. He moved to Chicago in 1954, where he learned his trade as a cobbler, and worked there until 1962. Returning to Henderson, he applied his trade for several years before operating the M & M Truck Stop. He later returned to his cobbling, operating Mayfield Shoes and Repair Shop until retiring and working for Murray Guard in Jackson. He was a life long member of the congregation at Estes Church of Christ. He is survived by his wife Tommie (Duberry) Mayfield of Finger; two daughters, Alma Gordon of Water Valley, Miss. and Anita Mayfield of Finger; a brother, Floyd Mayfield of Henderson; four grandchildren, Terri Lynn, Bobbie, Kyli and Harlee; and 12 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; two sisters, Ruth Patterson and Ruby Rumage; and five brothers, Roy Mayfield, Raymond Mayfield, Garland Mayfield, Homer Mayfield and Buford Mayfield. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013

Henry Rinks April 4, 1940 – Jan. 29, 2013 Alvon Henry Rinks, 72, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Don Cartwright and W.D. McCollum officiating. Burial followed in New Montezuma Cemetery. He was born in Madison County the son of the late Jessie Brownlow and Mabel Louise Burney Rinks. He attended Chester County Schools. He married Irene Maness in 1975. They made their home in the Montezuma Community most of their married life. Mr. Rinks worked for the Chester County Highway Dept. for 36 years in road construction, and retired in 2010. He was Apostolic-Pentecostal in belief. He is survived by his wife, Irene Maness Rinks of Henderson; a son, Robert Gene Rinks, U.S. Army in St. Louis, Mo.; a daughter, Kimberly Rinks Holmes (Michael) of Enville; five grandchildren, Trenton Robert Rinks, Tabatha Holmes, Jessica Holmes, William Holmes and Beau Rinks; three brothers, Junior Rinks, Larry Rinks and Neal Rinks all of Henderson; and three sisters, Lucille Maness of Henderson, Dorothy Hillard of Jackson and Fay Flatt of Henderson. He was preceded in death by his parents; and a brother, Dewayne Rinks. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013

Jimmy ‘Skillet’ Woodward Feb. 23, 1946 – Jan. 30, 2013 James Edward Woodward, 66, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 at his home. Funeral services were Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Ken Kitchen and Billy Joe Naylor officiating. Burial will follow in Old Friendship Cemetery in Chester County. He was born in Madison County and grew up in Chester County on Parrish Street, the son of Rosetta Vaughnell Miller Woodward and the late Clarence Guy Woodward. He attended Chester County Schools. He worked at Johnson’s Esso Station and the Henderson Compress and began working with the City of Henderson Utility Department in 1971 and worked there 35 years, retiring in 2006. Mr. Woodward is survived by his mother, Rosetta Vaughnell Miller Woodward; a sister, Brenda Kelley of Mercer; and a brother, Johnny Woodward of Mercer. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013

Ima Jewel Pearson McCombs

Mary Sue Maness Roberts

May 2, 1931 – Feb. 1, 2013 Ima Jewel Pearson McCombs, 81, passed away Friday, Feb. 1, 2013 at the Hardin Medical Center, Savannah. Funeral services were held Sunday, Feb. 3 at Shackelford Chapel-Savannah with Eric Jones officiating. Burial followed at Milledgeville Cemetery in McNairy County.

April 21, 1952 – Feb. 1, 2013 Mary Sue Maness Roberts of Sardis departed this life on Friday, Feb. 1, 2013 at the home of Brian and Amber Hudson. Funeral services were held Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013 at Shackelford Funeral Directors-Johnson Chapel with Bro. Wade Austin and Bro. Hunter Pusser officiating. Burial followed at the Sweetlips Cemetery in Chester County. She was born in Chester County, the daughter of Thomas Dallas Maness and Margaret Lucille Maness. She was married to the late Dewey Roberts of Sardis, who preceded her in death. She was a health care aide for some time. She was raised Pentecostal. She was loved by the town of Sardis. She is survived by her parents; one daughter, Christy Maness; 11 sisters, Patsy Taylor of Henderson, Judy Jones of Speedway Ind., Irene Rinks of Henderson, Linda Johnson of Sardis, Lorene Smith of Henderson, Kay Cook of Sardis, Nancy Robertson of Morris Chapel, Treva Gitchell of Jacks Creek, Ginger Elder of Lexington, Lisa Maness of Jackson and Tomesa Rogers of Lexington; five brothers, Ronald Maness of Nashville, Ricky Maness of Jackson, Roger Maness of Finger, Danny Maness of Henderson and Luke Maness of Nashville; and numerous nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband; and one brother, Donnie Ray Maness.

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013

Lottie Patterson Tucker June 5, 1924 – Jan. 31, 2013 Lottie Irene Patterson Tucker, 88, passed away Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013 at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Bro. Ronnie Geary officiating. Burial followed in Cave Springs Cemetery in Chester County. She was born and reared in Chester County, the Hickory Corner Community, the daughter of the late Edgar Allen and Allie Mae Cupples Patterson. She attended schools at Hickory Corner. She married Delton “Doc” Tucker in 1941. They made their home in Memphis for a short time and returned to Bethel Springs. She had worked at Salant & Salant Mfg. in Henderson for a few years. She loved quilting, embroidering and gardening. She is survived by a son, Doyle Tucker (Sandy); three daughters, Joyce Mathis (Charles), Peggy Jean Rice (Frank) all of Henderson, and Margaret Locke (Larry) of Bethel Springs; four grandchildren; eight greatgrandchildren; four sisters, Edith Hall of Henderson, Gloria Applegate of Peoria, Ill., Linda Britt of Jackson and Lilah Robinson of Henderson; and a brother, Donnie Richard Patterson of Henderson. She was preceded in death by her husband, Delton “Doc” Tucker in 1987; and five brothers, Alton Patterson, Elmo Cupples, David Patterson, Jerry Patterson and Kenton Patterson. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013

Richard ‘Bud’ White Aug. 25, 1930 – Feb. 4, 2013 Richard Edward ‘Bud’ White, 82, passed away Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 at the West Tennessee Transitional Care in Jackson. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Jimmy Dyer officiating. Burial will follow in Rogers Cemetery at Pinson. He was born and reared in Marysville, Ohio, the son of the late Edward and Olive M. Elliott White. He graduated from Marysville High School in 1948 and attended Miami University in Ohio. He entered the U.S. Army and served in North Korea as a tank sergeant in the 32nd Infantry. He married Marianna Bennett in 1952 and he entered the insurance business with his fatherin-law, at Bennett Insurance Agency in Sidney, Ohio. He continued in the insurance business for 35 years, retiring in 1992. He married Dorothy Suggs McCauley in 1979. They made their home in Sidney, Ohio until 1994 when they moved to Pinson. She passed away in 1997. He continued to make his home in the Diamond Grove Community of Madison County. He was a member of the Pinson United Methodist Church and a life member of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge #568 in Ohio. He loved to fish. He is survived by a son, Dave White (Deirdre) of Denver, Co.; a daughter, Susan White Elsass of Sidney, Ohio; three grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren; and a niece, Malinda Rogers of Charlotte, N.C. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife Dorothy; and a sister, Marilyn Ramella. The family will receive friends at Casey Chapel from 5 until 8 p.m. Thursday. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Feb. 7, 2013


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Estes Church of Christ 3505 Hwy 45 South, Henderson 989-7990

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT January 30, 2013 Jonathan Keith Wilbanks, 31, Shiloh, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $300 bond. January 31, 2013 Kenrick Dewong Rivers, 34, Beech Bluff, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license, simple possession, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,750 bond. A theft of car tags from a 2007 silver Jeep Liberty was reported on White Ave. The estimated cost of the tag is $89.35. A theft was reported on Steed Street. A man and woman reported that their house had been entered and $30 was taken. The entertainment center and television were laying on the floor and the gas wall mount heater had been knocked off into the floor and damaged. February 1, 2013 A student at FreedHardeman reported that his car was damaged by another student who threw a boot at his car as it passed. The boot allegedly knocked a large hole in the front bumper causing an estimated damage of $500. February 2, 2013 Donald Todd Thompson, 43, 111 West Sixth St., was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Laura Camille Thompson, 41, 111 West Sixth St., was

arrested and charged with vandalism. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,000 bond. Joshua Dale Kelley, 23, Blytheville, Ark., was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,500 bond. February 3, 2013 Demetrius Shaunte Wilson, 34, 213 Whitley Ave., was arrested and charged with attempted aggravated burglary, public intoxication, vandalism, possession of burglary tools, and evading arrest. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $25,000 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT January 28, 2013 A theft was reported in the 90 block of Ollie Loop. The victim claims that his garage door opener, a baseball hat valued at $20, leather gloves valued at $20, and Harley Davidson sunglasses valued at $60 were missing from his 1987 Nissan Truck that was parked in his yard. January 29, 2013 Antonio H. Watkins, 33, Jackson, was arrested and charged with violation of probation (general sessions). He is held in the Chester County Jail. No bond is set at this time. January 31, 2013 Dakota Chance Redmon, 18, 995 Ludell Ross Road, was arrested and charged with possession of schedule VI, possession of drug paraphernalia, and m a nu f a c t u re / d e l iv ery/sell of controlled substance. He is held

in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $25,000 bond. February 2, 2013 Michael Dexter Hallman, 24, 2095 Simmons Road, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $500 bond. Lester Earl Robertson, 39, 740 4th St. Apt. A18, was arrested and charged with driving on a canc e l e d / r evo ke d / s u s pended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,500 bond. February 3, 2013 James Stacey Seratt, 33, Finger, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,000 bond. Kimberley Seratt, 36, Finger, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence and leaving the scene of the accident. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $1,250 bond. A theft was reported in the 2000 block of Island Road. The victim reports that three saddles valued at $750 each, two halters made by Clint Anderson valued at $150 and a red and black saddle blanket valued at $50 were taken. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT February 2, 2013 4:57 p.m. -10645 Hwy. 100, Jacks Creek Fire Department responded to a control burn. February 3, 2013 3:09 p.m. - 330 Pump Station Road, Deanburg Fire Department responded to a control burn. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL

SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT January 28, 2013 Tikeya Evans, 521 Luray Ave., was found guilty of theft of property $1,000-$10,000. She was sentenced to three years in the Tennessee Department of Corrections with an alternative sentence imposed of three years probation with credit for time served. The defendant was also ordered to pay costs and restitution. January 29, 2013 Glenda Rene Spencer, 220 Jones Lane, waived hearing, admitted the violation of probation and agreed to the disposition. Her probation was revoked with the defendant to serve 90 days, day for day, in the local jail followed by 28 days in a short term inpatient rehabilitation facility. Eric Arment, 419 Regina Drive, waived hearing, admitted the violation of probation and agreed to the disposition. His probation was partially revoked with the defendant to serve 11 months, 29 days at 75 percent. He is to receive credit for time served on this case only. February 1, 2013 Darnita McNeal, 2190 Plainview Road, admitted the violations of community corrections and requested a hearing regarding disposition. After the hearing the defendant was found to be in violation of community corrections in a substantial way based upon preponderance of the evidence. The court held that there be a full revocation of probation with the defendant to serve the original sentence imposed and receive credit on this case only for time served by incarceration and/or community corrections.

TBI arrest former Haywood deputy The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation last week arrested a former Haywood County Sheriff ’s deputy after he was indicted by the Haywood County grand jury on Monday following a TBI investigation. Charlie Miller, 45, of Brownsville, was indicted on two counts

of official misconduct and one count of patronizing prostitution. The 28th Judicial District Attorney General’s office requested TBI to investigate in November 2012 after receiving allegations that Miller was having a sexual relationship with a female

who had active warrants for her arrest. The investigation revealed that between January 2012 and November 2012, Miller engaged in sex numerous times with a female subject knowing she had warrants on file for her arrest and did not perform his duties as a

police officer to take her into custody. He also paid cash to the female for sex. The investigation was conducted with the Haywood County Sheriff ’s Department. Miller was booked into the Haywood County Jail and released on a $10,000 bond.

Decatur County woman charged with child abuse The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation last week arrested a Decatur County woman for abusing her 10-monthold daughter who is currently recovering at Vanderbilt Medical Center from the injuries inflicted on her as a result of the alleged abuse by her mother. Felecia Kaye Gray, 27, of 81 East Main Street, Decaturville was arrested Jan. 22 and charged with one count of aggravated child abuse and one count of child neglect. Investigators believe that on Jan. 5, Gray was home alone with her 10-month-old daughter, Fiona Gray, and 3-year-old son

when, out of frustration, Felecia Gray grabbed the baby around her waist and violently put her in a crib. The next day a family member noticed the baby was lethargic and was having trouble breathing, and instructed Felecia Gray to take the baby to the doctor. At the continuing insistence of other family members, Felecia Gray carried the baby to the Decatur County General Hospital three days after the incident where hospital staff contacted authorities after they determined the baby had been abused. Fiona Gray was transferred to Vanderbilt Medical

C e n t e r where specialists reported the baby suffered from severe compress i o n injuries and spinal injuries from being slammed onto her seat. She suffered several broken ribs, FELECIA KAYE GRAY damage to her spine Attorney General and was malnour- requested TBI to invesished. Her condition is tigate the child abuse now improving, but allegations. As a result she remains in the hos- of that investigation, pital. Gray was booked into On Jan. 8, the 24th the Decatur County Judicial District Jail on $10,000 bond.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Babies “go red” during heart month at JMCGH To raise awareness about heart disease, all newborns at JacksonMadison County General Hospital are wearing red caps during the month of February. The red caps are in honor of the American Heart Association’s National Go Red Campaign, which heightens the awareness of heart disease. During the month of February, not only will red caps be given to all newborns, all patients on the mother/baby unit and third floor women’s surgery will receive goody bags including information on heart disease. The red caps for babies activity is a first for Jackson-Madison County General Hospital and is designed to remind women to take care of their hearts. Heart disease is the No. 1

killer of women, taking the life of one in three women each year. “These babies will have someone in their lives affected by heart disease, and if the red caps bring attention, that is bringing awareness, and that hopefully will bring a positive change in one’s life,” said Judy Arrington, R.N., Community Educator with the West Tennessee Women’s Center. Sponsors for this awareness activity are West Tennessee Heart and Vascular Center and West Tennessee Women’s Center, both are centers of excellence at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital. The red caps are donated by the Volunteer Auxiliary at JacksonMadison County General Hospital.

Television Listings, Feb. 7-13

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

UT Extension questions and answers: What do piggy banks, chickens and public speaking have in common? By J. Brian Signaigo UT Extension Agent III

Piggy banks, chickens and public speaking - now, that sounds like an unlikely combination. However, the answer is pretty simple – the common denominator is that 4H members may participate in all of these (and much more!). The 4-H Piggy Bank Pageant was the contest during January 4H clubs. 4-H members used their creativity, and a wide variety of materials, to make their piggy banks. Of course, the underlying 4-H message is to understand the concept of “saving” that hopefully starts early in life. Remember from a previous article that representatives from

Regions Bank, Chester County Bank, Clayton Bank and Edward Jones Investments presented money management programs to fourth- and fifth-grade 4-H club members at November 4-H club meetings. Well, the number of piggy bank entries was kinda surprising. There was a total of 246 piggy bank entries – WOW! What was more surprising is that 152 of those entries were from Junior High 4-H members – not characteristic of Junior High 4-H members but VERY uplifting otherwise (and I hope it continues!). In the near future, we’ll have a County 4-H Piggy Bank Pageant to determine the six win-

ners that will be entered in the State 4H Piggy Bank Pageant. Congratulations to all members with entries. I’ll report County contest results as soon as possible. In past years, 4-H Poultry project participants have raised chickens as one of their activities. We used to have enough participants to justify a countywide show and sale. However, in the last decade participation has really declined. Regardless, it’s time to think about it if we’re gonna do it. This is how it works – the 4-H member/family lets me know they are interested. The 4-H member/family buys everything – chicks, feeders, waterers, and

supplies a safe and warm environment. Growing time is from about mid-April to Septemberish. If we have enough participants, we’ll have a show and sale. Pretty simple – call the 4-H office ASAP at 9892103 if you are interested in raising chickens. The 4-H public speaking contest will be the contest for February 4-H club meetings. There are different suggested topics for each grade. The fourth-grade topic is “My Favorite _________,” one to two minutes in length; fifth-grade’s topic is “My Hero” (or role model), two to three minutes in length; sixth-grade topic is a career that they have researched, three to four minutes in

length; seventh- and eighth-grade topic can be on anything, three to four minutes long; and ninth- through 12th-grade topic has to be something related to 4-H. As a matter of fact, the Regional 4-H Public Speaking contest for high school 4H’ers is Thursday, Feb. 7 in Lexington. Good

luck to Chester County’s 10th-grade participant. So, February 4-H clubs can get very interesting! There is absolutely no telling what I’ll hear during 4H members’ speeches. Good luck to all! Keep practicing!!! Call the 4H office at 989-2103 for more information.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

From Page 1-A

Storm north of Jones Road, eventually causing extensive damage in Henderson County. However, Bethel Springs in McNairy County appears to have taken the brunt of the damage. “It appears it was a possible tornado that did not touch down,” said Farris. “But there were likely only straight line winds.” He said information indicates possibly two storm cells that merged in this area while moving at about

80 miles per hour. Chris Grissom said the storm hit quickly at his Holly Springs Road home and was gone before he and his family had a chance to get scared. His initial assessment was that his home was unsalvageable. A garage behind the house just disappeared, and a motor home parked behind his house was lifted up and deposited neatly in their swimming pool. On Jones Road, a tree fell on the Jeannette and Adrian Prather home, but none of the occupants were injured. “We got in the closet

and started praying,” said Jeannette Prather. “It was only by the grace of God that we were not hurt.” County Road Supervisor Jerry King said shortly after 1 a.m. his crews were called out to clear debris from roadways, and they remained on the job continuously until 5 p.m. Additional assistance came from the Chester County Fire Department, Rescue Squad and numerous individuals. According to Farris, nine homes were completely destroyed or are not salvageable, 50 homes suffered 50 percent damage, and

another 47 homes were 10-25 percent damaged. One business, Mifflin Road Storage, had extensive damage, two farm buildings were completely demolished, and three more suffered 50 percent damage. Extensive damage was also reported to Holly Springs Church. Amazingly, only four injuries were reported. Each was the result of a tree falling directly on a home on Glendale Road just north of the intersection with Holly Springs Road. Farris said each of the persons was treated and released at an area hospital.

Most of the damaged homes were covered by insurance with average cost to rebuild estimated at more than $120,000. Farris’ report is being forwarded to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for review for a possible disaster declaration which could result in no or low interest loans from the Small B u s i n e s s Administration. S o u t h w e s t Tennessee Electric M e m b e r s h i p Corporation District Manager Lynn Helton stated that about 3,000 STEMC customers lost power during the storm. By daylight on

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Wednesday morning, crews had power for about half of the effected customers back on, but due to the number of lines and poles down work slowed down after that point. “We got the last people back on about 6:55 p.m. Friday,” Helton said. Working with crews from surrounding communities, STEMC had approximately 100 workers dedicated to restoring power in Chester and Henderson Counties. Helton added that all services have now been restored and lines have been repaired.

Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Volunteers from local fire departments and others used their personal equipment to clear roads in order for Southwest personnel to make it into the area and to help those trapped get out.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Members of the Jeanette and Adrian Prather family clear debris from their Jones Road home following the storm which left one tree on their home.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

A shed once stood over this pile of lawn epuipment at the Chris Grissom Home on Holly Springs Road. Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Volunteers work to clear the debris from a home on McCall School Road.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Friends help Kevin Roeder salvage what is left of his home on Jones Road in the Glendale Community. A roof repairman works atop the Chris Young home on Clifford Road. Notice the front column that is also missing.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

A tree fell through this home on Glendale Road causing injuries to four persons. Blue tarps on the roof of houses became famous across the country following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 in New Orleans. Now many homes in west Tennessee resemble those in Louisiana. Photo by Pat Jones

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Some area churches took damage during Tuesday night’s storm.

This motorhome fit neatly into the swimming pool behind the Grissom home on Holly Springs Road.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Nature is Reconstructed at Freed-Hardeman Freed-Hardeman is currently hosting an art show entitled “ N a t u r e Reconstructed” through Feb. 28 in the University’s Troy Plunk Gallery in the Bulliner-Clayton Arts Center. This show includes creations from three artists: Susan Maakestad, Erin Harmon and Beth Edwards. On Jan. 31, Freed-Hardeman held a reception for and a presentation by these three women. A wonderful spread of tidbits was enjoyed by students, faculty and guests while moving about the gallery

painting things that were “doom and gloom,” her paintings around the time of the Iraq War simply aggravated her “downward spiral with that subject matter,” but then she realized that if she was going to survive, she was going to have to change something about her work. Overnight she decided to start paintings that were more “happy” no matter how she felt. “Painting about happiness turned me into a much more upbeat, optimistic person.” Eventually, she moved outdoors with her subject matter and she

Tennessee which creates gorgeous shapes as it takes over trees and buildings while at the same time being destructive to the environment. She was also inspired by the idea of gardens through history being symbolic as the setting for “spiritual enlightenment, mystical visitation and sexual awakening.” Harmon believes gardens “remove you from the world while somehow making you feel more consensus of the world.” Her focus in this show was floral and garden oriented art that she states “might be a place and a thing at the same t i m e . ” Harmon stated that her collages were “an easy way for me to make that happen. I learned from that and tried to use it in the paintings.” S u s a n Maakestad used to Caleb Cook (freshman, art major) shares his impressions of a paint from painting by Beth Edwards with fellow student, Katie Benson p h o t o (junior, art major). Megan Suter (sophomore, art major) looks graphs that on as she walks through the gallery. she took. She is very savoring a feast for the found how much she interested in urban eyes. “craved nature” and settings and a few While her art con- finds that painting years ago one of her sists of lifelike flowers nature to be a “medita- friends from up north and foliage, Beth tive act.” told her that they were Edwards stated that Erin Harmon moved “inundated with blizshe is “the least typi- from California and zards.” She began to cal person to paint became inspired by wonder what it looked flowers.” About 10 the duel nature of like up there in years ago she was kudzu here in Wisconsin, jumped

online to look at traffic cameras shots from that area “and it was beautiful. The snow c o m i n g down, blurring all the edges of the roads, you could hardly see a thing. It was very peaceful from my office at work. And I was glad I was not driving in it Photos by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent as I have in the past. So Left to right, Susan Maakestad, Erin Harmon and Beth I could Edwards shared with those present their inspiration for the engage with art they have created. this beautiful act of nature in a together for about According to Edwards, disconnected way.” three years. The rea- they are all really She then started col- son they chose each interested in “beauty,” lecting screen shots of other was their shared “nature” and “the various weather condi- interested in watercol- human touch.” The exhibit is free tions from Wisconsin. or. But there is more to connection. and open to the public. She began to refer less their to her photographs and more to the web shots. Her current p i e c e s include blurred images of roadways that seem both lonely and inviting at the same time. These t h r e e w o m e n have been s h o w i n g Students had the opportunity to participate in a question and their art answer session with the artists.


SSppoorrttss Page 1-B

Thursday, February 7, 2013

FHU sports to join American Midwest After spending 17 years as a charter member of the TranSouth Athletic Conference, FreedHardeman University will embark upon a new era as it will join the American Midwest Conference beginning with the fall 2013 athletic seasons. The TranSouth Conference, once among the elite conferences in the NAIA, suffered a rapid loss of membership in the last two years with the departures of Union University

American Midwest Conference Membership for 2013-14 Benedictine-Springfield Columbia Freed-Hardeman Hannibal-LaGrange Harris-Stowe State Lyon Mid-Continent Missouri Baptist Park Stephens Williams Woods Williams Baptist

Springfield, Ill. Columbia, Mo.

Henderson Hannibal, Mo. St. Louis, Mo. Batesville, Ark. Mayfield, Ky. St. Louis, Mo. Parkville, Mo. Columbia, Mo. Fulton, Mo. Walnut Ridge, Ark.

See JOIN, Page 3-B

CCHS to host district tourney Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County Senior Tamacha Couch, right, was honored Jan. 29 at Eagle Gym in commemoration of her reaching the milestone of 1,000 points scored in her high school basketball career. Making the presentation is CCHS coach Lee Pipkin. (CCHS girls’ basketball story on Page 2-B.)

Chester County High School will be the site for the semi-finals and finals of the District 14-AA basketball tournament. First round games in both the girls’ and boys’ are scheduled at home sites of higher seeds, the girls’ at 7 p.m. Feb. 12, and the boys’ at 7 p.m. Feb. 14. Girls’ semi-finals then move to Eagle Gym in Henderson Friday Feb. 15, and boys’ semi-finals Saturday, Feb. 16. Finals are Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 18-19. Region tournament games follow a similar schedule, Feb. 22-28, with the last two rounds at Dyersburg.

Freed-Hardeman Lion baseball begins Friday at Carnes Field The baseball season for Freed-Hardeman University is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m Friday at Carnes Field as the Lions host St. Catharine College of Kentucky in a doubleheader. FHU travels to Williams Baptist for two games Saturday, then returns home for a noon contest Sunday, again with St. Catharine. (See schedule Page 2-B.) Three Lions were named recently among the top NAIA players to watch by Collegiate Baseball. Seniors Robert Prieto and Justin Mackey along with junior Chris Hatfield made the list, and Prieto's picture was featured

on the page. Prieto and Mackey both played big parts in last year's team winning the TranSouth Conference Regular Season Championship. Prieto, a second

baseman from Caracas, Venezuela, hit .417 last season with five home runs and 48 RBI while posting a 1.020 OPS in 57 games. He tied the program's single-season

record for hits with 85 and enters the season needing 31 hits to become the school's alltime hits leader. He is also 11 doubles away from moving into the top spot in that career category as well. Mackey, an outfielder from Sand Rock, Ala., was the team's second-best hitter last year behind Prieto. Mackey batted .374 with 15 doubles and 44 RBI, and had an OPS of .963. He also went without an error in the field. Hatfield, a transfer from Lee University, red-shirted last season but is expected to enter the 2013 campaign as the team's No. 1 starter.

Win over Blue ends Lions’ skid

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

The Freed-Hardeman Lions’ Greg Peak put up a shot in FHU’s victory over Blue Mountain Thursday at the Brewer Sports Center.

The FreedHardeman Lions have had a lot of close calls this season. Of their 14 losses, 12 have been by eight points or less and even some of those games were closer than the final score might indicate. Thursday at the Brewer Sports Center, the Lions found themselves in a familiar spot as the clock hit six minutes in the second half of their conference contest with Blue Mountain College - protecting a lead. FHU lead at that point in each of its last three games, but ran into trouble scoring in the final minutes in See LIONS, Page 3-B

Junior high teams end cage season

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County Junior High girls’ basketball team completed its season last weekend, finishing as the runners-up in the West Tennessee Invitational Tournament. Above, the Junior Eaglettes display their trophy from winning first place in the Best of the West Tournament, hosting by CCJHS.

Chester County Junior High concluded its basketball season last week, placing very well in two tournaments. Thursday at CCJHS, the Junior Eaglettes handily defeated Lexington Middle School to claim the first place trophy in the Best of the West tournament. The Eagles were also victorious over Lexington to claim third place. Paige Pipkin of the Junior Eaglettes was named the event’s Most Valuable Player, with Tatum RussellKeen receiving all tournament honors. Peyton Lynch earned all tournament status for the Junior Eagles. See CCJHS, Page 3-B


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Golf to benefit Relay An 18-hole four-person golf scramble is set for April 13 at Woodland Hills Golf and Country Club, with proceeds benefitting Relay for Life. Taco Bell of Henderson is sponsoring the event with flight payouts beginning at $1,000, and there will be a $10,000 hole-in-one prize. Lunch will be provided at 11 a.m., with tee-off at noon. For more information, contact Denise Kinchen at 989-0063 or 608-2650, or call the country club at 988-5311.

Weight loss challenge offered by Back Pain Clinic Back Pain Relief Clinic is holding a weight loss challenge with a $1,000 prize to launch a new health program. Take Shape for Life (FSFL) is the name of the program, but it is more than a weight loss plan or diet. TSFL is advertised as a program for healthy living that begins with changes in eating and ends with habits for life. Interested participants can call 935-0090 to learn more or to sign up. Deadline is March 1.

Golf Tournaments Date April 13

Event Time Taco Bell - Relay for Life Noon

Location Woodland Hills

Running Date Feb. 23

Race Time Bookin’ it for the Library 9 a.m.

Location CC Library

Freed-Hard. Women’s Basketball Date Feb. 7 Feb. 8 Feb. 14 Feb. 16 Feb. 19 Feb. 22 Feb. 23

Opponent Martin Methodist Morris Bethel Mid-Continent Blue Mountain Voorhees Morris

Time 6:00 6:00 6:00 2:00 2:00 6:00 6:00

Location Pulaski Sports Ctr. McKenzie Sports Ctr. Blue. Mtn., Miss. Denmark, S.C.

Opponent Martin Methodist Bethel Blue Mountain Life

Time 4:00 8:00 8:00 2:00

Location Pulaski McKenzie Blue Mtn., Miss.

Marietta, Ga.

Chester County High Basketball Date Opponent Feb. 5 South Side Feb. 8 McNairy Central*

Time Location 6:00 Jackson 6:00 Eagle Gym * Boys JC game at 4:30 p.m.

Freed-Hardeman Baseball Date Opponent Time Location Feb. 8 St. Catharine, Ky. 3:00 Henderson Feb. 9 Williams Baptist (2) 1:00 Henderson Feb. 10 St. Catharine, Ky. Noon Henderson Feb. 13 Cumberland 2:00 Lebanon Feb. 15 Harris-Stowe State (2) 3:00 Henderson Feb. 16 Harris-Stowe State (2) Noon Henderson Feb. 19 Lindenwood-Belleville (2) 2:00 Belleville, Ill. Feb. 22 Judson (2) 3:00 Henderson Feb. 23 Judson (2) 2:00 Henderson Feb. 26 Belhaven 4:00 Jackson, Miss. Feb. 27 Tougaloo (2) 2:00 Jackson, Miss. Mar. 1 Lindenwood-Belleville 4:00 Henderson Mar. 2 Lindenwood-Belleville (2) Noon Henderson Mar. 5 Cumberland 4:00 Henderson Mar. 8 Tougaloo 4:00 Henderson Mar. 9 Tougaloo (2) Noon Henderson Mar. 12 Union 4:00 Jackson Mar. 13 Belhaven 2:00 Henderson Mar. 15 Blue Mountain 5:00 Henderson Mar. 16 Blue Mountain (2) Noon Henderson Winter Haven, Fla. Tournament, Dates TBA Florence, Ala. Apr. 2 North Alabama 2:00 Apr. 5 Mid-Continent 5:00 Henderson Apr. 6 Mid-Continent (2) Noon Henderson Apr. 9 Union 5:00 Henderson Apr. 12 Blue Mountain 5:00 Blue Mtn., Miss. Apr. 13 Blue Mountain (2) Noon Blue Mtn., Miss. Apr. 17 LeMoyne-Owen (2) 1:00 Henderson Apr. 19 Bethel 5:00 Henderson Apr. 20 Bethel (2) Noon Henderson Apr. 23 North Alabama 5:00 Henderson Apr. 25 Martin Methodist (2) 3:00 Pulaski Apr. 26 Martin Methodist 4:00 Pulaski

Freed-Hardeman Softball Date Opponent Place Feb. 15 Campbellsville * Pulaski Cumberland * Pulaski Feb. 16 Reinhardt * Pulaski Lindsey Wilson * Pulaski Feb. 19 Lyon (2) Henderson Feb. 22 Brewton Parker **Decatur, Ala. Mobile ** Decatur, Ala. Feb. 23 Reinhardt ** Decatur, Ala. Belhaven ** Decatur, Ala. Point ** Decatur, Ala. Mar. 5 Mid-Continent (2) Mayfield, Ky. Mar. 8 St. Tho.-H’ton ^ Orange B., Ala. Mobile ^ Orange B., Ala. Mar. 9 Brenau ^ Orange B., Ala. Faulkner ^ Orange B., Ala. Mar. 10 TBA Orange B., Ala. Mar. 12 Missouri Bapt. (2) Henderson Mar. 14 Bethel (2) Henderson Mar. 15 Davenport (2) Henderson Mar. 18 TBA # Pensacola, Fla. Mar. 19 TBA # Pensacola, Fla. Mar. 20 TBA # Pensacola, Fla. Mar. 29 Williams Bapt. (2) Walnut Ridge Ark. Apr. 4 Martin Meth. (2) Pulaski Apr. 8 Blue Mountain (2)Henderson Apr. 10 Mid-Continent (2) Mayfield, Ky. Apr. 15 Blue Mountain (2)Blue Mtn., Miss. Apr. 18 Bethel (2) McKenzie Apr. 20 Lyon (2) Batesville, Ark. Apr. 23 Williams Bapt. (2) Henderson Apr. 27 Martin Meth. (2) Henderson

First-year Chester County boys’ basketball head coach Tony Lambert continues to emphasize that “it’s a process” that his team must go through in order to secure victories. The Eagles continue that process each week, with progress evident each night out. However, winning games remains just out of the Eagles’ reach. Jan. 29 at Eagle Gym, Chester County played an excellent second half, turning a 21-point intermission deficit into a singledigit margin. Yet Liberty Tech held on to defeat CCHS 71-59. The Eagles also took it on the chin with losses at Bolivar Central Friday, 77-47, and Hardin County Saturday, 70-45. Those three opponents are all among the best teams in West Tennessee year-in and year-out. Against Liberty, Zach Phillips nailed five threes to take game-high honors with 23 points. Jared

Humphry of CCHS battled the Techsters in the post for 17 points. The Eagles host McNairy Central at Eagle Gym in the final regular season contest. The gals’ game begins at 6 p.m. with the guys following thereafter. Jan. 29 at Eagle Gym Liberty Tk. 18-23- 6-24=71 Chester Co. 11- 9-16-23=59 LT – Daniel Hill 16, Waller 11, Crisp 10, Willis 9, Beauregard 9, Taylor 8, Wilbourn 6, Simmons 2. CC – Zach Phillips 23, Jared Humphry 17, J. Phillips 5, Hilton 4, Holloway 4, Clayton 3, Holman 2, Hardee 1. Three-point shots: LT – Willis 3, Wallace, Hill. CC – Z. Phillips 5. Records: LT – 16-6. CC – 320.

Feb. 1 at Bolivar Chester Co. 12-12- 6-17=47 Bolivar Ct. 20-22-13-22=77 CC – Zach Phillips 10, J. Phillips 8, McPherson 5, Humphry 4, Hilton 4, Lindsey 4, Scales 4, Clayton 2, Holman 2, McNeal 2, Stablein 2. BC – Anfernee Kemp 20, Jerrious Sain 14, Dez Robertson 12, Derek Woods 11, C. Woods 9,

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Brendan Clayton eyes a freethrow attempt in the Eagles’ contest with Liberty Tech Jan. 29 at Eagle Gym. Allen 4, Braddock 3, McKinnie 2, Bogard 1, Harris 1. Three-point shots: CC – Z. Phillips 2. B – Braddock Kemp, Sain, Woods. Records: CC – 3-21. B – 15-8.

Feb. 2 at Savannah Chester Co. 11- 5-17-12=45 Hardin Co. 12-22-11-25=70 CC – Z. Phillips 9, Humphry 8, Lindsey 5, Stablein 5,

Clayton 4, Holman 4, J. Phillips 4, Hardee 3, Scott 2, Hilton 1. HC – Jonathan Roach 24, Will Shelton 18, Kelby Wardlow 13, Wilkerson 4, Oswalt 3, Terrant 3, Guyer 2, Johnson 2, Atkisson 1. Three –point shots: CC – Hardee, Lindsey, Z. Phillips. HC – Shelton, Terrant, Wilkerson. Records: CC – 3-22. HC – 18-3.

Loss to Bolivar leaves Eaglettes vulnerable

Sumter, S.C.

Freed-Hardeman Men’s Basketball Date Feb. 7 Feb. 14 Feb. 21 Feb. 23

Victories still out of reach

Time 2:00 5:00 2:00 4:00 3:00 4:00 6:00 10:00 Noon 4:00 4:00 1:00 5:00 9:00 11:00 TBA TBA 5:00 5:00 TBA TBA TBA 1:00 3:00 5:00 2:00 5:00 2:00 1:00 4:00 1:00

* Martin Methodist Meltdown; ** Shorter Classic; ^ Orange Beach Invitational; # West Florida Invitational

Chester County’s girls’ basketball team won two and lost one contest last week, but unfortunately the one loss was a district setback. That left CCHS tied with McNairy Central for second place, each with three district losses. Chester County now finds themselves in a precarious position in the league standings. They could finish anywhere from second to fifth in the district standings dependent up the outcome of games this week. Tuesday the Eaglettes played at fourth place South Side (results too late for this edition), and at 6 p.m. Friday they host long-time rival McNairy in the regular season finale. Two of the Eaglettes’ games came down to last second opportunities. At district leading Bolivar Central last Friday, CCHS lead by four at intermission, and fell behind in the third period. However, they rallied to knot the score in the closing seconds before Bolivar won the contest on a last second shot at the buzzer, 43-41. Iesha Sims led the Eaglettes with a baker’s dozen. Tionne Herron did most of the damage for the “Tigerettes” with 21. Earlier this season, Bolivar won over the Eaglettes in

Henderson by one point when CCHS could not connect on late free throws. On Jan. 29, CCHS hosted Liberty Tech and the Eaglettes destroyed the Lady Crusaders, 54-28 behind Sims’ 23 points. Saturday, Chester County took on Hardin County in Savannah in a makeup contest. With the Eaglettes down one, Couch drove to the basket and was fouled with only two ticks remaining in the contest. She hit both ends of the one and one to give CCHS a 3029 victory.

Jan. 29 at Eagle Gym Liberty Tech 8- 9- 4- 7=28 Chester Co. 19-13-7-15=54 LT – Marcell 8, Leasure 6, Linton 6, Fisher 4, Collins 2, Jones 2. CC – Iesha Sims 23, Tamacha Couch 10, Amos 9, Cox 8. Three-point shots: LT – Linton 2. CC – None.

Feb. 1 at Bolivar Chester Co. 5-13-11-12=41 Bolivar Ct. 4- 9-15-15=43 CC – Iesha Sims 13, Tamacha Couch 12, Miskelly 6, Amos 5, Cox 5. BC – Tionne Herron 21, Taylor 7, Kirk 6, Sain 5, N. Franklin 2, T. Franklin 2. Three-point shots: CC – Miskelly 2, Couch. BC – Herron 6, Sain. Records: CC – BC – 17-5.

Feb. 2 at Savannah Chester Co. 30 Hardin Co. 29 No other information available.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Darby Miskelly of CCHS drives around a pick and heads toward the basket in the Eaglettes’ victory over Liberty Tech, Jan. 29 at Eagle Gym.

DISTRICT 14-AA BASKETBALL BOYS STANDINGS Team 1. South Side 2. Fayette-Ware 2. Bolivar Central 2. Liberty Tech 5. Lexington 6. McNairy Central 7. Jackson Cent. M. 8. Chester County

Dist. 20-2 19-6 15-8 18-7 14-10 10-14 4-20 3-22

All 11-2 9-3 9-3 9-3 5-7 4-8 2-11 0-12

GIRLS STANDINGS Team 1. Bolivar Central 2. Chester County 2. McNairy Central 4. South Side 4. Lexington 6. Liberty Tech 7. Fayette-Ware 8. Jackson Cent. M.

Dist. 17-5 17-8 19-5 15-8 12-10 9-16 6-19 0-22

All 11-1 9-3 9-3 8-5 7-5 4-8 1-11 0-14

Five in doubles, FHU routs Blue All five Lady Lion starters scored in double figures as No. 2 Freed-Hardeman University University won its eighth straight women’s basketball game with a 75-48 victory over Blue Mountain College Thursday night at the Brewer Sports Center. As has been the case many times this season, FHU (21-1, 4-0) jumped out to a quick lead with a 15-4 run to start the game. The Toppers responded with three

straight three-pointers - their only ones of the game - to cut the lead to six. That would be as close as BMC would get. Freed-Hardeman came back with a 14-1 run to turn a tight game into a 33-14 lead with 7:56 left in the first half. The Lady Lions led by as many as 24 before taking a 46-26 lead into halftime. Blue Mountain actually outshot FHU in the half (47.6 percent to 44.4 percent) but made 15

turnovers compared to two for FreedHardeman, which resulted in 24 fewer shot attempts that the Lady Lions took. Neither team shot the ball particularly well in the second half, particularly in the last eight minutes when the two teams combined for just 10 points. FHU led by as many as 31 after a Grace Alonso de Armino basket with 8:30 to play but the Lady Lions ahead 7140. Natalie Shumpert

led the balanced scoring attack with 17 points while Alonso de Armino, Maria Bagwell and Hayley Newby (starting in place of late scratch Amber Alexander) had 12 points and Ashley Tate added 11. The starting five combined to shoot 51.7 percent from the field. Alonso de Armino also posted her third double-double of the season with 10 rebounds and added five of FreedHardeman's 13 steals.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Lady Lion soccer signs Murfreesboro defender CCJHS From Page 1-B

The FreedHardeman University Lady Lion soccer team added another player to its incoming freshman class with the recent signing of Mallory Bowman of Murfreesboro. Bowman, a defender, prepped at Middle Tennessee Christian School where she was the team's rookie of the year in 2009 and

defender of the year in 2010. She also excelled academically, graduating fifth in her class and won several academic awards throughout high school. "Mallory came to our camp in the summer and we were impressed with her abilities," said FHU head coach Jason Elliott. "She is a defender who posi-

tions herself well and reads the game efficiently. The biggest thing that stood out for us is her attitude and work rate. We are confident that she will work hard and be a great teammate. She is a great addition to the student body here at FHU. Bowman is the daughter of Mike and LaNita Bowman.

In the West Tennessee Invitational, the Eaglettes won their

first two games and took home the runnerup trophy after falling in the finals to undefeated Medina. The Eagles finished third after winning the con-

Page 3-B

solation game Saturday afternoon. CCJHS head coaches are Wes Murphy for the girls’ squad and Tommie Kirk for the boys’.

FHU Lady Lion soccer team has added defender Mallory Bowman of Murfreesboro

From Page 1-B

Lions those games and ultimately lost them all including two in overtime to nationally ranked teams. Those experiences may have played a part against Blue Mountain as the Lions were able to hold their lead and snap an eightgame losing streak with a 62-54 win over the Toppers. Freed-Hardeman led by as many as 16 points in the second half, but the Toppers started to make a move, using a sevenzero run to get the lead down to single digits with plenty of time to keep pushing. BMC had a couple more chances to trim the lead further, but the Lion defense stepped up with stops and Ben Meis broke a nearly four-minute scoring drought with a turnaround jumper in the post. FHU got another defensive stop, and Dotson made two free throws after being fouled on a putback to give the Lions a 57-44 lead with 2:49 to play. The Toppers' Jarvis Fisher did his part to keep his team in the game, knocking down a contested threepointer, but the Lions

From Page 1-B

Join and Trevecca Nazarene University for NCAA Division II and Cumberland University for the MidSouth Conference. FHU will rejoin former TranSouth members Lyon College and Mid-Continent University in the AMC, both of which were among the recent departures from the TranSouth. Freed-Hardeman also considered the Southern States Athletic Conference before settling on the American Midwest. "We spent a signifi-

The Lions shot over 50 percent from the

field for the first time since Dec. 3, but turned the ball over a season-high 30 times in a 99-88 loss to Life University at home Saturday. Eighteen of those turnovers came in the second half, as the Running Eagles converted them into 23 points in an effort to hold off a comeback by the Lions. FHU trailed by 10 (48-38) at halftime, but used a 12-2 run early in the second half to tie the game. The Lions eventually pulled ahead by four points at 67-63 with 9:56 to play. But FreedHardeman turned the ball over on its next four possessions while Life scored 10 straight points, the last six of which came on threepointers by Barrington Ferguson and Trey Payne on consecutive possessions. The Running Eagles (13-10, 4-3) also helped their cause by shooting well above their season average from 3point range, making 9of-19 despite shooting 24.4 percent behind the arc for the season coming into the game. Bobby Smith did the majority of the damage on offensive, scoring 30 points on 12-of18 shooting. Latraius Mosley added 18 with four three-pointers for

cant amount of time exploring our options and concluded that the American Midwest Conference was the best fit for our athletics department," said Freed-Hardeman President Dr. Joe Wiley. "The AMC and its member institutions have shown a strong commitment to the values and the success of the NAIA. We will always have fond memories of our time in the TranSouth Conference and look forward to a new era in the American Midwest." The American Midwest Conference began as the Show-Me Conference in 1986 and became the AMC in

1994 with the addition of a school outside of Missouri. FreedHardeman will be the first Tennessee university to join the membership. “On behalf of our presidents, athletic directors, students and fans, I am pleased to officially welcome Freed-Hardeman into the AMC," said C o n f e r e n c e Commissioner Lowell Pitzer. "FreedHardeman is an outstanding academic institution with a strong athletic program. We look forward to having the Lions compete in our conference beginning in 2013-2014." With the addition of

broke Blue Mountain's full-court pressure and Reginald Gilmore finished with a one-handed dunk in transition that served as an exclamation point. Freed-Hardeman pushed the lead back up to 13 points (60-47) with 1:32 left before missed free throws allowed the Toppers to cut the final margin to eight points. The Lions got off to a slow start but finished strong in the first half, turning a 1615 deficit into a 31-25 halftime lead thanks in large part to more hot shooting from Meis. The sophomore made his last four three-point attempts of the half, including a 23footer curling off a screen that beat the halftime buzzer. He scored 14 of his teamhigh 18 in the first half. Gilmore and Dotson helped FHU to an advantage in the post, and especially on the glass where the Lions grabbed 17 more rebounds than did the Toppers. Gilmore finished with 13 points and seven rebounds while Dotson narrowly missed a double-double with 11 points and nine rebounds. Dotson also blocked three shots.

Turnovers

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Peyton Lynch skies over a Lexington defender to score two points for Chester County Junior High in the Best of the West Tournament Thursday at CCJHS. Life. FHU was led by Gilmore, who scored 17 of his 21 points in the second half and was a perfect 11-for-11 from the line. Mark Brown added 17 while Michael Young and Vincent Dotson each had 13.

Narrow defeat to No. 2

The Lions have had several close calls this season. Their game Jan. 29 was no exception in a non-conference game against one of the top teams in the nation. The Lions came within seconds of pulling off an upset of No. 2 Lee University, but ultimately lost in overtime, 73-71. Freed-Hardeman, the AMC will have 12 members. The strength in numbers of the conference and the commitment by those schools to the NAIA were among the draws for FHU Athletic Director Mike McCutchen. “As we considered the options that we had, we were impressed with the commitment that the AMC schools have to the NAIA and to their conference," he said. "We were looking for stability and a conference with a strong history. We feel that the AMC is a good fit for us and that we are a good fit for the AMC.” The conference,

It was the second time in five games that the Lions went to overtime with a top-15 team. On Thursday, FHU lost to then-No. 12 Bethel, 84-77. FHU had a 59-56 lead after two Young free throws with 14 seconds left in regulation, but Chase Dunn tied the game with a threepointer from the right corner with 4.8 seconds left. The Lions had enough time to get the ball down the floor for a shot, but Debrell McLemore's threepoint attempt was blocked to send the game to overtime. Once there, the Lions missed their first four shots as Lee built a 67-60 lead at the 1:47 mark. Jamorris Gaines did the damage, scoring five of the

Flames' first eight points. The Lions led by as many as 12 points in the second half (43-31) before Lee's full-court pressure caused FHU problems. FreedHardeman turned the ball over 17 times in the second half and in overtime, compared to four for the Flames. Lee never led in the second half and only tied the score once, on Dunn's three-pointer that sent the game to overtime. Meis continued his outstanding play as of late, scoring 22 points on six-of-10 shooting from three-point range. Gilmore added 19 points while Isaiah Harrison had 12 off the bench. Lee's Gaines led all scorers with 25 points.

which sponsors 15 sports, has seen its member schools achieve plenty of success on a national level and that trend has continued this year. Columbia (Mo.) currently sits atop the NAIA Men's Division I Basketball Ratings at an undefeated 23-0. Columbia and William Woods (Mo.) are both in the women's basketball top 25. In volleyball, Columbia finished as national runner-up, and Missouri Baptist also advanced to the final site of the tournament. In spring sports preseason polls, William Woods is ranked No. 16 in men's golf and No. 6 in women's golf;

Missouri Baptist is ranked No. 14 in baseball; and Williams Baptist is ranked No. 14 in softball. "Freed-Hardeman is a prestigious institution having served students for nearly a century with an athletic tradition and a culture similar to current AMC members," Pitzer said. "The AMC embraces the mission and purpose of the NAIA as an Association, and the addition of FreedHardeman will enhance our effort as a viable conference where we will continue to serve student athletes who matriculate to our various schools.”


Education

Page 4-B

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Photos courtesy FHU

Youth Town Scorchers led by Lance and Mike Roby took first place in the chili cookoff at FHU Jan. 28.

Three members of Chi Beta Chi at FreedHardeman University taste their organization’s entry in the annual chili cookoff.

Xi Chi Delta team claimed second place in the annual Chili Bowl at Freed-Hardeman University.

Youth Town Scorchers win chili cookoff Approximately 350 persons attended Chili Bowl Numero Seis at Freed-Hardeman University Monday, Jan. 28. The annual

By Cathy Whitehead It’s been a busy week at West. First grade students have been working on writing paragraphs, paying special attention to capital letters, punctuation marks, and the overall meaning of their work. They have also been identifying suffixes in words and the main idea of stories. Mrs. Emily’s students read stories about Groundhog Day, and they made predictions about whether or not the groundhog would see his shadow. They then graphed and wrote about their predictions. Later in the week, they read “The Mitten” and “The Hat,” both by popular children’s author Jan Brett, and compared and contrasted the two stories. In math, first-graders are working on double digit addition and adding three one-digit numbers. They are also still working on adding fluently by taking regular timed tests, which means that students don’t have time to count on their fingers! Parents please let your child read his or her Read Well homework to you each night; they need to read the passage three times and then have you initial the work. Also, please let your child read other books to you. The more they read, the more it helps! Second-graders are enjoying their Read Well work, and some of the classes have read “The Magic School Bus Book - A Trip

event is hosted by the FHU Office of Alumni Relations assisted by the Student-Alumni Association. Youth Town Scorchers led by

Lance and Mike Roby took first place in the chili cookoff. Other winners included Gamma Tau Omega, second; Xi Chi

Through the Human Body.” They learned many interesting facts as they read, and second grade teachers predict that they may have some future doctors in the group! Third grade students read “Rocks in His Head” this past week, a perfect selection after their study of rocks and minerals the week before. In math, third-graders are continuing to take daily timed drills to make sure they have truly mastered their math facts before they go to the middle school. Parents, if your child is not regularly mastering a set of facts, please be sure to practice daily with him or her. Years of math learning is built on rapid recall of multiplication facts, and mastering them now is crucial for success in later grades. Third grade students are diving deeper into the concepts of multiplication and division as they prepare for the upcoming math CRA, and they are regularly practicing their persuasive writing skills to get ready for the u p c o m i n g English/Language Arts CRA. Through Feb. 6 we will be taking orders for this year’s West Chester Elementary yearbook. These hardcover, full color yearbooks include 52 pages of smiles and memories. West Chester’s yearbook is a past National Award winner. Don’t miss your chance to get yours! Please send your order in now. Wednesday, Feb. 6, is the last day to pre-order a personalized book. Late orders will not have the option to personalize. We cannot guarantee that extra books will be available in May. Only those that preorder will be guaran-

teed a yearbook. Guidance lessons are focused on safety and stranger danger. Students are being taught safety rules and how to stay safe when dealing with strangers in public places as well as Internet safety. With Valentine’s Day approaching, many parents want to send flowers, balloons, and other deliveries to their children at school. Though it is a very sweet and touching thing to do to show your child how much you love them, it often leaves other children with hurt feelings. It is West Chester’s school policy that deliveries of personal gifts for students are discouraged. In addition to hurt feelings, these items cause a safety issue on the buses. School board policy states floral gifts and balloons are not allowed on the bus. Please help the school body as a whole and plan your special Valentine’s Day celebration at home with your child. If you would like to bring a special item for every student in the class, you are very welcome to do this. Please check with your child’s teacher to find out how you can help with the class activities. We really appreciate your cooperation with this matter. Please note these important dates: Parent Involvement WinterFest – 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, Valentine’s Day parties – Feb. 14 Presidents’ Day – NO SCHOOL– Monday, Feb. 18 Spring and Group Pictures – Feb. 20 Third Grade CRA Math Test – Feb. 21 Spring FundraiserBegins Feb. 22 STAR Testing – Feb. 25 – Mar. 1

School leaders to meet at FHU for Common Core course Re presentatives from the Tennessee Department of Education will conduct the Common Core Leadership Course for principals Jan. 30 on the campus of Freed-Hardeman University. According to Dr. Sharen Cypress, dean

of the FHU School of Education, between 75 and 100 school leaders are expected to attend the course. The State Board of Education adopted Common Core State Standards in math and English/language arts in July 2010. The initiative is designed to

create a common core of state standards that is relevant and reflects knowledge and skills needed for success in the workforce. The Tennessee Department of Education offers courses across the state to help schools meet the standards.

Delta, third; and University Program Council, fourth. Sodexo, the university’s food service, won the People’s Choice

By Carrie Sells East Chester is very proud of one of its own, Robby Novak, for being Kid President and encouraging us all to make the world a better place. Robby Novak and his brother-in-law, Brad Montague have made a series of Kid President Videos that have been viewed around the world! What started out as a family joke has hit viral proportions! Over 5 million viewers have watched Robby’s latest video where he shares a pep talk with his viewers! Robby and Brad were invited to New York to be interviewed by several famous people. Robby is in Mrs. McKnight’s third grade class and they had a “Watch Party” on Thursday and watched Robby on CNN’s Starting Point with Soledad O’Brien and replayed his appearance on The Today Show! The class enjoyed doughnuts, milk, and juice while they watched Robby. Robby inspired his class to make cards for Gabbi Cook, the girl battling cancer that Robby mentioned in his Pep Talk. Gabbi’s mom attended East Chester. We have also been making a kindness chain where students notice someone doing something kind and write it on a link. We now have 100 links to the chain! Thank you Robby for giving millions a pep talk and inspiring us all! East Chester students received Computers for Education packets to take home this week. Our school will receive 50 cents for each postcard that is filled out correctly. Please take the time to read the directions and fill them out correctly. We use the money we earn from this program to purchase Brainpop and IXL for our students to use. Thank you for your help!

competition and Chi Beta Chi, an FHU social club won the Club’s Choice. Winners of the brownie cookoff were Phi Kappa Alpha,

Sodexo and Theta Nu, respectively. Main Street Fuzion presented the evening’s entertainment.

The Up N Jumpin Night for East Chester is from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8. Please come and join in the fun! This is a great night for students to get together and enjoy time with their friends outside of school. We appreciate your support and we hope to see you there. Our Relay for Life Baked Potato Supper tickets are currently on sale. We will have a PTO meeting after the supper on Tuesday, Feb. 19. Please make plans to attend this supper to help us raise money for Relay for Life. We will also have a Patriotic Program given by the thirdgraders. This is always a special event and the third-graders do such a wonderful job preparing for it and presenting the program. This is one meeting you won’t want to miss! Students will be taking their Winter STAR Assessments the last week of February. We take these tests seriously and we want you to encourage your child to do the best they can. We are very proud of our students and their growth. If you come in the building and look at the display in the hallway you will see how much our students have grown since August. The scores are grouped by grade level. We are working hard in the classroom and in the after school program to give every

child the opportunity to show growth in reading and math. We care about our students! Valentine’s parties will be held on Feb. 14 in each classroom. Don’t forget to sign up with your child’s teacher if you plan on coming to the party. The office staff will be checking names and if your name isn’t on the list, you will not be able to stay. This new rule is for your child’s safety. We want East Chester to be a safe and secure place and we are doing our best to ensure your child’s safety. Thank you for helping us put your child’s safety first! Kindergarten classes are learning short “e.” They are also learning to add numbers in math. Firstgraders are practicing sentence writing with capital letters and end marks. They are also adding one- and twodigit numbers. Second-graders are beginning fractions in math. Third-graders are learning about the U n d e r g r o u n d Railroad and the code songs and signals that slaves sang and used to help them escape to freedom. They are also writing biographies on famous Americans. We are one big, happy family at East Chester and we want to thank you for trusting us with your child/children during these very important years of development.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Chester County Head Start Center,

By Ally Rogers We hosted the “Best of the West” tournament last week. Our teams played outstanding games and a few players achieved some well deserved awards. Paige Pipkin and Tatum Russell-Keen were named to the All-tournament girls’ team and Paige was named the tournament MVP. Peyton Lynch was named to the All-tournament boys’ team. The teams also played in a tournament in Medina the last two weekends. The boys won the first game on Friday and played again on Saturday of the first weekend. They played a consolation game last weekend. The girls won both of their games the first weekend and moved on to the championship game this past weekend. They were first runner up in that tournament! Congratulations to the players and coaches on their hard work and a well played season! We want to welcome two new student teachers to our school. Mr. Matt Kirk is working with Mr. Tommie Kirk in seventh grade Science and Miss Cathy Combs is working with Mrs. Stephanie Hatch in eighth grade Science. I know they will have a very good experience here at CCJHS. Congratulations go to Mrs. Collette Carrabba who was named our Teacher of the Year at CCJHS. She was nominated and voted on by her colleagues. What a great and well deserved honor! Our eighth grade students participated in the annual Writing Assessment this week. It was different this year, as it had to be typed on the computer and submitted online. They have worked very hard preparing for this and we commend the students and teachers for their hard work. Progress reports went out last week. If you didn’t see your child’s report, ask them about it. You may email your child’s teacher or set up an appointment to come and meet with them if you have any questions or concerns. Mrs. Heather Jenkins, our front desk secretary, recently had surgery. She is at home recovering. We wish her well and hope she is back with us very soon. Try-outs for the girls’ volleyball team and the boys’ soccer teams were held last week. We congratulate the players and look forward to their fast approaching seasons. Volleyball is coached by Wes Murphy and soccer is coached by Tommie Kirk and Hunter Callis. Dates to put on your calendar include: Feb. 18 - NO School Feb. 28 - Spring Pictures March 16 - Hillbilly Wedding April 12 - Banquet.

FHU local graduate added Freed-Hardeman University previously released a list of local residents who received degrees during the Dec. 14 commencement ceremony. Also graduating that day was Darian Leath who graduated with a Master of Education in curriculum and instruction. Leath completed her studies July 20, 2012.

East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools and Chester County Middle School *Milk choice offered daily

Monday, February 11 Chicken rings or Hotdog Mashed potatoes, broccoli/cheese Roll Peach cup or Orange wedges Tuesday, February 12 Poppy seed chicken or Bologna sandwich Sweet potatoes, green beans, coleslaw Romaine salad Roll Mixed fruit cup or Apple wedges Wednesday, February 13 Chili with crackers or BBQ pork sandwich Tiny tri taters, corn, baby carrots, pickle spears Romaine Salad Grilled cheese sandwich Orange wedges or Juice choice Thursday, February 14

Chicken fajita or Ham & cheese sandwich Fiesta rice cup, pinto beans, baked apples Romaine salad Lettuce, tomato & cheese Banana or Pineapple Friday, February 15 Pizza or Turkey and cheese wrap Baked krinkle kut fries, glazed carrots Romaine salad Strawberries or Apple wedges

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily

Monday, February 11 Chicken nuggets or Ham and cheese Green peas, whipped potatoes, glazed carrot circles Romaine salad Roll Peaches or Apple, orange, Tuesday, February 12 Chicken fajita or BBQ on bun Seasoned pinto beans, fried rice, fresh corn, trimming Romaine salad Pineapple or Apple, orange

Wednesday, February 13 Hamburger or Corndog Baked beans, baked potato, california blend Lettuce, tomato, pickle slices Romaine salad Applesauce or Apple, orange, banana Thursday, February 14 Spaghetti/meat sauce or Turkey and cheese sandwich Green beans, glazed sweet potato Romaine salad Cheesy garlic breadstick Strawberries or Apple, orange, banana Friday, February 15 Pepperoni pizza or Tuna salad plate Broccoli/cheese, baked krispy french fries Romaine salad Mixed fruit or Apple, orange, banana

Chester County High School

*Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Also, pizza choice each day Monday, February 11 Chicken nuggets (2 lines) Deli Bar, open salad bar Mashed potatoes, blackeye peas, squash, tossed salad Roll

Page 5-B

Pineapple or Apple, orange Juice choice Tuesday, February 12 Spaghetti or Pizza/small salad Salad bar (ham)/crackers Sweet potatoes, green beans, corn, tossed salad Roll Pears or Apple, orange Juice choice Wednesday, February 13 Chicken tetrazzini or Pizza bar/small salad Salad box (turkey)/crackers Diced Potatoes, brown beans, steamed cabbage, small salad Cornbread Peaches or Apple, orange, banana Juice choice Thursday, February 14 Roast turkey & gravy or Pizza, french fries, small salad or Salad box (tuna salad) Mashed potatoes, green peas, glazed carrots, small salad Roll Strawberries or Apple, orange, banana Juice choice Friday, February 15 Fish/hushpuppies or Pizza, small salad Vegetable beef soup/deli bar/open salad bar/crackers White beans, cole slaw, turnip greens, macaroni & cheese Applesauce or Apple, orange, banana Juice choice


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

FOR SALE FOR SALE ~ From 1 to 20 Acre Lots in Chester County. Low Down Payment and Low Notes. No Restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. Call James Simpson at 901-826-8978. 7 Days a Week! 30 Years in Business! Ray T. Smith & Co. Properties (TFC) FOR SALE ~ 6.8 Acres of Land on Peddy Vestal Loop in Henderson TN. $500 Down. $296.22 / Month. See North Henderson Farms for map at boatwrightLC.com or call 662551-0339. (46C) FOR SALE or RENT ~ 3 BR, 1 ½ BA, 1 Level, Nice Flat Yard in Great Neighborhood. Sugar Creek. $600 / Month or $73,000. Call David at 931-698-1664 (Different Area Code). (41P) FOR SALE ONLY ~ 3 BR, 2 BA Doublewide on 7.48 Acres with Storage Building, CHA, Appliances Furnished. $52,000. Call 731-608-0875. (40P) FOR SALE ~ 8 Acres of Land on Keene Cutoff Road and Keene Road west of Enville in Chester County TN. $500 Down. $187.79 / Month. See Sweetlips for map at boatwrightLC.com or call 662551-0339. (46C) FOR SALE ~ 6.5 Acres of Land on Russom Road one mile west off Highway 45, south of Henderson TN. $500 Down. $183.63 / Month. See South Chester Farms for map at boatwrightLC.com or call 662551-0339. (46C)

HOMES FOR SALE SALE – SALE – SALE! Model Displays Must Go ~ New Spacious 4 Bedroom 2 Bath Homes Starting at $43,500 ~ Single Sections Start at $29,500. CLAYTON HOMES ~ Hwy 72 West, Corinth, MS ~ ¼ Mile Past Magnolia Hospital. (7C)

We Can HELP!! Large Selection of Homes to Fit any Budget. WINDHAM HOMES Corinth, MS 1-888-287-6996. (TFC)

FOR RENT HOMES FOR RENT – 2 or 3 BR Houses & Mobile Homes, With or Without Utilities, Monthly or Weekly in Lexington. Call 731-968-9689. (44P) FOR RENT – Large 2 BR Duplex. Call 879-9119. (TFC) FOR RENT or LEASE ~ Restaurant or Retail, Formerly Sawmeal Restaurant. Call 731435-9425. (TFC) FOR RENT – Nice, 2 BR, 2 BA Mobile Home in Town. Text or Call After 6:00 p.m. 731-6081547. (40P) FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $390 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom house on cul-de-sac in town. 380 Kitchen. $595 / month. 989-7488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 1 bedroom duplex, covered patio, washer / dryer. 246B Iris. $325 / month. 9897488. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 BR, 2 BA House. $650. No Pets. Call Candy at 8799119. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Apartment in Town. Newly Redecorated with New Kitchen and Bath, New Appliances. $500 / Month with 6-Month Lease or $475 / Month with 12-Month Lease. Deposit and References Required. Call 695-2039, leave message. (40P) FOR RENT – Large 2 BR Duplex. All Appliances Including Washer & Dryer. In Town. Deposit. NO PETS. $500 / Month. 989-5606 or 608-2013. (TFC)

M AND M LAWNCARE The Grass May Be Greener on the Other Side, But It Still Has to Be Mowed! Mowing, Weedeating, and Blowing. Call 571-8138. (41P) OUR HAUSS ~ Booth Rentals ~ Consignment ~ 2446 Beech Bluff Rd. Nice Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles, Glassware, New Mattress Sets (All Sizes Available). New Merchandise Daily. 731-2340916. (41P) JIM’S TRASH SERVICE ~ $16 / Month. $13 / Month for Senior Citizens. Call 731-989-5732 or 731-879-0662. (47P)

STATEWIDES ADOPT We are a caring, married couple wishing for a precious baby to love and cherish. Nurturing home, beautiful life. Expenses paid. Info: Gina/Walt 1800-315-6957. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Job Training, Monthly Paycheck, Educational Benefits - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) NATIONAL CORPORATION LOOKING FOR Career-Minded Sales People who want to earn $60,000 the first year and move up to $100,000 thereafter Call Lee 888-217-2805 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan)

SPECIAL PURCHASE! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Energy Star Package ~ $29,995 ~ 2x6 Walls, Vinyl Siding, Shingle Roof, Appliances, Poured Concrete Piers, Underpinning & More!! (Limited Offer) WINDHAM HOMES 1-888-287-6996. (TFC)

FOR RENT – Commercial building. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. Will divide. 117 W. Main. Grantham Properties. 989-7488. (TFC)

MOBILE HOME REPOS Statewide, Move-In Ready, 3 & 4 Bedroom, EZ Financing, Call Today! 731-427-3387. (40C)

FOR RENT – Retail / office space. 1250 sq. ft. $500; 1950 sq. ft. $800. 865 Hwy. 45. 989-7488. (TFC)

MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-6452698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan)

MOBILE HOMES – I Must Sell a New Singlewide! 3 Bed, 2 Bath, $29,900, Delivered & Set Up. 731-427-7320. (40C)

FOR RENT – 3 BR, 1 BA House with Laminate Flooring, Tile, No Carpet. $485 / Month. $200 Deposit. 447 Mifflin Ave. Call 928-8689. (40P)

25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-407-5172 (TnScan)

FOR RENT – 606 Sanford St. 2 BR, Kitchen Furnished. $400 / Month. $200 Deposit. 989-5304. (40C)

ATTN CDL-A DRIVERS: Flatbed positions, earn up to 48 cpm with our new Your Choice Pay Plan ™. Great Benefits & Flexible Hometime. 800-6268751. AA/EOE. GoRoehl.com (TnScan)

CREDIT A LITTLE LOW? With a Qualified Income we CAN get you APPROVED on a New Home with a Score as Low as 575 and 10% Down! AND that is With a Fixed Interest Rate! WINDHAM HOMES Corinth, MS 1888-287-6996 (TFC) $500 & A DEED Is All You Need to Purchase a NEW Mobile Home! 3 and 4 Bedroom Homes, EZ Financing! Call Today! 731427-3388. (40C) TAX RETURN SPECIAL: 2013 16 x 80 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Vinyl Siding/Shingled Roof, Thermal Windows, 2” x 6” Walls, Glamour Bath, Black Appliances, and Much More. All for ONLY $287 per Month Plus Escrow. WINDHAM HOMES Corinth, MS, 1888-287-6996. (TFC) HOME BUYING: We Make home Buying a Stress-Free Experience. Over 75 Years Combined Experience in Manufactured Housing. Give us a Call at 1-888-287-6996. WINDHAM HOMES Corinth, MS (TFC) GOT LAND, NEED HOME –

FOR RENT – 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex, Excellent Condition, 1 Year Lease, No Pets. 983-2766. (TFC) FOR RENT – 4 BR, 3 BA, 2 Acres, Shop. $675 / Month. No Pets. Deposit. Call 989-5606 or 608-2013. (TFC) FOR RENT – 211 Sanford Cove. $400 / Month. $200 Deposit. 989-5304. (40C)

MISCELLANEOUS

GOOD OL’ GALS Cleaning Service ~ Does your house or office need to be cleaned but you are just too busy? Let us, the Good Ol’ Gals Cleaning Service do it for you! Please call Amanda or Cynthia at 731-798-9999 or 731-4359501. (40P)

COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Recent graduates with CDL-A welcome. Call 888-691-4472 or apply online at w w w. s u p e r s e r v i c e l l c . c o m (TnScan)

DRIVER - QUALIFY FOR ANY portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079 (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A $5,000 SIGN-ON Bonus For exp’d solo OTR drivers & O/O’s Tuition reimbursement also available! New Student Pay & Lease Program USA Truck 877-5215775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVERS: INEXPERIENCED? GET ON the Road to a Successful Career with CDL Training. Regional Training Locations. Train and Work for Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CLASS A FLATBED Home Every Weekend! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, Full Benefits, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED COMPANY Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance Agents Needed; Leads, No Cold Calls; Commissions Paid Daily; Complete Training; Advancement Opportunities; Heath & Dental Insurance; Guidance in Obtaining License. Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) DOUBLE TAX REFUND UP TO $5,000 For Manufactured and Modular Homes. Easy Terms. Get qualified by phone NOW 870935-1708 (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) NEW & ABANDONED MANUFACTURED HOMES Moved To Your Land - Easy Terms $2,000 Free Furniture Package with purchase of new home! Apply by phone or set an appointment 870-935-1712 (TnScan) ADOPT We are a caring, married couple wishing for a precious baby to love and cherish. Nurturing home, beautiful life. Expenses paid. Info: Gina/Walt 1800-315-6957. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Job

Training, Monthly Paycheck, Educational Benefits - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) NATIONAL CORPORATION LOOKING FOR Career-Minded Sales People who want to earn $60,000 the first year and move up to $100,000 thereafter Call Lee 888-217-2805 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-6452698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-407-5172 (TnScan) ATTN CDL-A DRIVERS: Flatbed positions, earn up to 48 cpm with our new Your Choice Pay Plan ™. Great Benefits & Flexible Hometime. 800-6268751. AA/EOE. GoRoehl.com (TnScan)

DRIVERS - CDL-A $5,000 SIGN-ON Bonus For exp’d solo OTR drivers & O/O’s Tuition reimbursement also available! New Student Pay & Lease Program USA Truck 877-5215775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVERS: INEXPERIENCED? GET ON the Road to a Successful Career with CDL Training. Regional Training Locations. Train and Work for Central Refrigerated (877) 3697191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CLASS A FLATBED Home Every Weekend! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, Full Benefits, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED COMPANY Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance Agents Needed; Leads, No Cold Calls; Commissions Paid Daily; Complete Training; Advancement Opportunities; Heath & Dental Insurance; Guidance in Obtaining License. Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) DOUBLE TAX REFUND UP TO $5,000 For Manufactured and Modular Homes. Easy Terms. Get qualified by phone NOW 870935-1708 (TnScan)

COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Recent graduates with CDL-A welcome. Call 888-691-4472 or apply online at w w w. s u p e r s e r v i c e l l c . c o m (TnScan)

SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan)

DRIVER - QUALIFY FOR ANY portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com (TnScan)

NEW & ABANDONED MANUFACTURED HOMES Moved To Your Land - Easy Terms $2,000 Free Furniture Package with purchase of new home! Apply by phone or set an appointment 870-935-1712 (TnScan)

KNIGHT REFRIGERATED CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079 (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

Public Notices NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated October 8, 2004, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded November 1, 2004, at Book 259, Page 744 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Reginald E. Shaw and Valerie Shaw, conveying certain property therein described to Sheila Boykin Stevenson 215 East Main Street, a resident of Jackson, TN 38301 as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, as nominee for Fremont Investment & Loan, its successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on February 21, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County C o u r t h o u s e , H e n d e r s o n , Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Tract 1: Beginning at an iron stake in the Western margin of a road at a point 998 feet from the Southern margin of U.S. Highway 45 right of way, this point being in the Western margin of 60 feet road connection U.S. Highway 45 and the Old JacksonHenderson Road; runs thence with the Western margin of the same South 0 degrees and 30 minutes West 205 feet to a stake; runs thence West 175 feet to a stake; runs thence North 0 degrees and 30 minutes East 205 feet to a stake; runs thence East 175 feet to the place of beginning. Tract 2: Lot 10, Phase I, Southview Subdivision, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 319 in the Register’s Office of Madison County, Tennessee. Less and Except the portion of the subject property lying in Madison County, Tennessee. ALSO KNOWN AS: 50 Southview Drive, Pinson, Tennessee 38366 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat;

any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Reginald E. Shaw; Valerie Shaw; Fremont Investment & Loan; Mortgage E l e c t r o n i c Registration Systems, Inc as nominee for Fremont Investment & Loan; Mortgage E l e c t r o n i c Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Real Time Resolutions, Inc.; Real Time Resolutions, Inc. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700100472 DATED January 24, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_tcrow_130124_1 050 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE TENNESSEE, CHESTER COUNTY DEFAULT having been made in the terms, conditions and payments provided in certain Deed of Trust executed by Pamela Johnson and Shaun Johnson to Arnold M. Weiss, Trustee dated November 25, 2002 in the amount of $80,750.00, and recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Instrument No. 13614, Deed Book 224, Page 375-394, (“Deed of Trust”); and, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust having been last transferred to LNV Corporation by assignment; and, LNV Corporation, as the current holder of said Deed of Trust (the “Holder”), has appointed as Substitute Trustee the undersigned, , any of whom may act, by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee with all the rights, powers and privileges of the original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; therefore, NOTICE is hereby given that the entire amount of said indebtedness has been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Holder, and the undersigned as Substitute Trustee, or a duly appointed attorney or agents by virtue of the

power and authority vested by the Appointment of Substitute Trustee, will on Thursday, February 21, 2013 commencing at 12:00 PM at the Main entrace of the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee; sell to the highest bidder for cash, immediately at the close of sale, the following property to-wit: Beginning on an iron pin set in the South margin of proposed Fawn Drive, (25 feet from centerline), said point being the Northwest corner of Lot 95; thence with the West line of Lot 95 South 00 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds West 120.00 feet to an iron pin set, said point being the Northwest corner of Lot 57; thence with the North line of Lot 57 North 89 degrees 37 minutes 07 seconds West 92.00 feet to an iron pin set, said point being the Southeast corner of Lot 97 and the Northeast corner of Lot 56; thence with the East line of Lot 97 North 00 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 120.00 feet to an iron pin set in the South margin of proposed Fawn Drive; thence with said margin South 89 degrees 37 minutes 06 seconds East 92.00 feet to the point of beginning and containing .25 acres, and being Lot 96 of the Deerwood Subdivision, as surveyed by C.E. Lewis, R.L.S. #1380 on October 9, 1999. This is the identical real estate conveyed Shaun P. Johnson and wife, Pamela D. Johnson from Gary Davidson and Tim Crowe by Warranty Deed dated November 25, 2002, of record in the Registers Office of Chester County, Tennessee, in Record Book 224, Page 373. Subject to the Declaration of Restrictive Covenants recorded in Record Book 154, Page 388, in the Registers Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Said Restrictive covenants were amended in Record Book 157, Page 238; And, subject to any setbacks, easements and restrictions, etc., as shown on the plat of this Subdivision of Record in Plat Cabinet 1, Section III, Page 24. The foregoing restrictive covenants will run with the land and will be binding on the grantee and the grantees heirs, representatives, successors and assigns. The foregoing restrictive covenants will run with the land and will be binding on the grantee and the grantees heirs, representatives, successors and assigns. Subject to Gas Easement as shown on a plat of this subdivision of record in Plat Cabinet 1, Section III, Page 24 in the Registers Office of Chester County, Tennessee. An easement given to Southwest Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation dated November 6, 1997, of record in the Registers Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 157, Page 734. Parcel ID No.: 34HB18 Map & Parcel No.: 34HB18 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 528 Fawn Drive, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 CURRENT OWNER(S): Shaun P. Johnson and Pamela D. Johnson SUBORDINATE LEINHOLDERS: N/A OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: N/A All

right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, however, the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The sale will be held subject to any unpaid taxes, assessments, rights-ofway, easements, protective covenants or restrictions, liens, and other superior matters of record which may affect said property; as well as any prior liens or encumbrances as well as priority created by a fixture filing; and/or any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. If the U.S. Department of Treasury/IRS, the State of Tennessee Department of Revenue, or the State of Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development are listed as Interested Parties in the advertisement, then the Notice of this foreclosure is being given to them and the sale will be subject to the applicable governmental entities` right to redeem the property, as required by 26 U.S.C § 7425 and T.C.A. § 67-1-1433. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the holder of the Deed of Trust. The notice requirements of T.C.A. §35-5-117 were satisfied prior to the first publication of the Notice of Substitute Trustee`s Sale. Substitute Trustee reserves the right to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. THIS LAW FIRM IS ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. MCC TN, LCC 3525 Piedmont Road NE, Six Piedmont Center, Suite 700 Atlanta, GA 30305 (404) 373-1612 www.mccurdycandler.com File No. 10-22111 /CONV

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE RE: ADOPTION OF: DOMINICK ALAN WHITMAN, dob: 11-2-2011, SANDY SHALENA BROOKS PETITIONERS, VS. UNKNOWN FATHER OF DOMINICK ALAN WHITMAN, DEFENDANT, DOCKET NO, 2013-AA41 FILED TIME: 10:45 AM JAN 11, 2013 CORNELIA HALL CLERK AND MASTER PUBLICATION NOTICE TO: UNKNOWN FATHER OF DOMINICK ALAN WHITMAN In this Cause, it appearing from the Adoption Petition and Termination

of Parental Rights which is sworn to, that the whereabouts of the Defendant, Unknown Father of Dominick Alan Whitman, is unknown and cannot be ascertained by the diligent search and inquiry made to that end. Unknown Father of Dominick Alan Whitman is therefore, hereby, required to appear and Answer the Adoption Petition and Termination of Parental Rights filed in this Cause against in the Chancery Court of Chester County, Tennessee, within thirty days of the last publication of this Notice and serve a copy of said Answer on Howard F. Douglass, Post Office Box 39, Lexington, Tennessee, 38351, Attorney for Petitioners, within that said time. If you fail to do so this matter will proceed ex parte and your rights will be terminated. It is further Ordered that this Notice be published for four consecutive weeks in The Chester County Independent. This is the 11th day of January, 2013. Cornelia Hall CLERK

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated August 2, 2005, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded August 5, 2005, at Book 272, Page 16 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Melvin H. Alexander, Sr. and Judy B. Alexander, conveying certain property therein described to Wesley D. Turner as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Company; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on February 14, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County C o u r t h o u s e , H e n d e r s o n , Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: First Lot: Beginning at a stake in the South margin of West Third Street, said stake being located 17 feet South of the center line of the same and at the Northwest corner of a lot formerly owned by D.G. Davis and wife; runs thence with the Western line of the same as follows: South 71 feet to an iron stake; South 88 degrees 30 minutes West 40 feet and 2

Page 7-B

inches to an iron stake; South 2 degrees 30 minutes East 200 feet to an iron stake at the Southwest corner of the above-mentioned D.G. Davis lot; runs thence West 84 1/2 feet to iron stake; runs thence North 22 degrees West 123 feet to an iron stake; runs thence North 71 degrees East 62 feet to a stake; runs thence North 134 feet to an iron stake in the South margin of West Third Street 15 feet South of the centerline thereof by a walnut tree; runs thence East with the South margin of the same, 92 feet to the place of beginning. Second Lot: Beginning at an iron stake in the Western line of Irl DeBez at a point 71 feet South of his Northwest corner; runs thence South 16 degrees East with his West line 140.5 feet to an iron stake; runs thence East 39 feet to a stake in the West line of Houston and Otha Carroll; runs thence South with the West line of Houston and Otha Carroll 41 feet to a stake at their Southeast corner; runs thence West 84 1/2 feet to an iron stake; the Southeast corner of the lot conveyed to Ella Bain by Vaudie W. Smith and wife, above described; runs thence North 2 degrees 30 minutes West with the East line of the above described lot 200 feet to an iron stake; runs thence North 88 degrees and 30 minutes East 40.2 feet to the place of beginning. ALSO KNOWN AS: 179 West Third Street, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5-117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Melvin H. Alexander , Sr.; Judy B. Alexander; Heirs of Melvin H. Alexander, Sr., if any; Estate of Melvin H. Alexander, Sr. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700117880 DATED January 16, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_tcrow_130116_1 344 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM0


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Chester County Independent 02-07-13