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Gazette ‘Bloom’ thrilled to present $51,000 to NICU CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 PG. 3

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By HILARY KLASSEN hklassen@ccgazette.ca Two pint-sized ‘graduates’ of the NICU helped present a $51,000 cheque from ‘Bloom: An Evening of Love’ to the unit on Monday at Royal University Hospital (RUH). Their moms are co-event directors for ‘Bloom’ and were pleased to hand over the results of the fund raising efforts. “We’re absolutely thrilled,” said Amy Novakovski,founder of Bloom. “We had always hoped to hit the $50,000 mark and to hit it in our fifth year is phenomenal. It’s very, very exciting.” Novakovski launched Bloom after her son, Dutch, needed the care of NICU. “They gave me my baby boy. And now he’s doing wonderful.” Bloom is her way of giving back. Co-event director Tina Searcy shares a similar

We had always hoped to reach the $50,000 mark and to hit it in our fifth year is phenomenal.

Amy Novakovski - Founder of Bloom

experience. Her daughter Charlie was born two months premature. The emotions attached to Charlie’s perilous 12 days in NICU are still close to the surface for Searcy. She joined Bloom a year after it was launched. “We exceeded our initial expectations by far,” said Searcy. “Over five years we’ve donated just over $140,000 to NICU in Saskatoon.” Over 300 guests attended the May fund-raising

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NICU ‘graduates’ Charlie (left) and Dutch helped present a cheque for $51,000 from Bloom: An Evening of Love’ to NICU.

Riehl said while basic equipment is covered in their budget, there are many enhancement needs for the unit that are not covered. She said they’ve been working hard in the past couple of weeks, reviewing their equipment needs for the new Children’s Hospital “We’ve been identifying things that we will be bringing with us and not bringing with us. We’re really going to be conscious about how we spend this money and make sure we get something that we’re going to be bringing with us to the new hospital. This is a huge piece of money so it will be great to have something that we will be able to bring with us, and that we’ll be able to say, ‘this is where we got it from’.” Novakovski said Bloom may have a couple of ideas for allocating the funds based on what they’ve seen implemented in other NICU’s in Canada. “This year we’ll maybe make a suggestion for a couple of different things we’d like to see our NICU be able to house. Stay tuned.”

RUH Director of Nursing, Adele Riehl (left), and other RUH staff receive a cheque from Bloom: an Evening of Love. The cheque was presented by Amy Novakovski (green top) and Tina Searcy (right of Amy) on June 20.

gala at the Travelodge. The event has sold out each year and sought expanded venues each year. Searcy said sponsorship is key. “We grew in sponsorship from 14 sponsors last year to 27 this year.” Bloom has maintained and added some exciting new corporate sponsorships, and hopes to continue to grow the event. RUH staff assembled to received the cheque. Adele Riehl, manager of nursing at RUH said the cheque for $51,000 was another great donation. “It’s wonderful, every year it’s more. I was shocked to hear how much they raised this year.”

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Dalmeny town councillor, Matt Bradley, says ‘Feel the Warmth’ speaks for itself

Feel the warmth of Dalmeny’s new logo

By HILARY KLASSEN hklassen@ccgazette.ca Even towns like to freshen up once in a while. For Dalmeny, a fresh face has taken longer than they might have liked. “A town slogan and logo have been long overdue,” said councilor Matt Bradley. Even then, they weren’t in a hurry. They took some time to listen to people. “We started by encouraging the students to make drawings of what they thought a logo for Dalmeny should look like,” said Bradley. “Plus, we asked many in town, including the students, what they thought of Dalmeny, what it meant to live here, what they liked and so on.” Some of the descriptions of Dalmeny that council received included words like, clean, safe, sense of community spirit, neighbourly, spacious, a place for families to

grow, friendly, close to nature and tight-knit relationships. Council then conducted a search for the right company to take all the input and create a logo and slogan for the town of Dalmeny. “After looking at many companies it was decided we would secure the services of Roger Denis of Denis Design Works,” said Bradley. Denis took the concepts and drawings and came back to the logo committee with over 300 rough logo ideas. Council ended up blending the best parts of two different logos to create their end result. “It took a long time to come,” Bradley told residents at a May public meeting, “but ‘feel the warmth’ of Dalmeny.” “Feel the warmth” translates into feeling the warmth of community, feeling the warmth of family,

and feeling the warmth of the sun, in the wide open spaces around the town. “It encompasses the sunset and the sky, the grain of the fields,” said Bradley. The logo and slogan will be used in advertising and correspondence for Dalmeny, and more. The logo captures the sun rising or setting over a wide-open green prairie horizon. It hints of unobstructed views, and that things are not static; ‘things are happening here.’ The colours reflect what we see in nature and suggest a diverse group of people all originating from one place Dalmeny. Bradley said the latest trend in town logos is to have the name written in script. But like many styles, they tend to go out-of style. “The lettering for Dalmeny is solid and easy to read. Its letters have a traditional yet

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The cast members of this year’s RJC musical ‘Rags’ rehearse on June 9

RJC musical set for this weekend By Mackenzie Hientz mackenzie@ccgazette.ca Rosthern Junior College’s (RJC) annual musical is approaching fast as the students have been rehearsing for the past four weeks. This year, the students will be performing the musical production RAGS, and there will be three shows in three nights. The first show is on June 23 and the last performance in on the 25th. The show begins at 7:00 pm all three nights. The musical focuses on new immigrant families from Russia moving to America in the early 1900s. “They come (to America) because for them, it’s the promise land. But when they get here, they experience racism, they experience poverty (and) their experience isn’t exactly what they were promised,” said Richard Janzen, Director of Music and Performing Arts. He also added, that the plot of the play revolves around a young Jewish woman and her son, who came to America six years after her husband had first left for the country to pave

the way. Another key element to the play is the rise of the labour union because a lot of people were working in horrible conditions, such as sweatshops. In the play there is a certain labourer who tries to organize the workers into a union, according to Janzen. “So the whole social change and the social protest begins to happen. It’s all interweaved together as quite a deeply moving story of a family trying to find… their way in a new land,” Janzen said. Janzen believes that some of the people who come to the play might relate to the storyline with their family moving to a new land as immigrants. “I think the people who come see the show will recognize a lot of their own families in this,” said Janzen. “(It relates to) my own family. The main character in this (play), the way she acts, the way she talks, some of her story, I see my own Grandma. She came from Russia in the 20s, so I recognize a lot of the same

things. The same themes of what she faced and having to learn a new language.” Even though this play is based in the 1900s some of the themes still relate to today’s society. “There’s a few times in the play where the rhetoric you hear from the established people who’ve lived in America for a long time, is the same rhetoric you hear coming out of the States right now. Making America great and what it means to do that.” The musical coincides with RJC’s graduation and Janzen expects there to be a lot of people around to see the show. “Class reunions come back for the weekend. So a lot of our audience will be alumni, because it’s homecoming weekend as well,” he said. He also believes that the audience will enjoy the play. “It’s a deeply moving story, that has some tragic elements to it. So it’s going to really draw people into the story and they’ll feel a lot within themselves as they watch it.”

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Report from the

Legislature

Nancy Heppner MLA

MARTENSVILLE-WARMAN CONSTITUENCY

Saskatchewan’s Population Continues to Grow

Saskatchewan’s population grew to another alltime high in the first quarter of 2016, according to the latest figures released by Statistics Canada. There were 1,146,655 people living in Saskatchewan as of April 1, 2016 – up 4,085 from January 1, 2016 and up 16,118 over the past year. Saskatchewan’s population has now grown in every quarter for 10 consecutive years, growing by more than 155,000 during that period. In the previous decade 1996 to 2006, Saskatchewan’s population dropped in 28 of 40 quarters, declining by more than 26,000 people.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 PG. 6

Changes to Compassionate Care Leave Benefits

Saskatchewan employees who need to take time away from work to care for a loved one will soon be eligible to receive up to 28 weeks of job-protected leave – an increase from eight weeks. Saskatchewan will be one of three provinces to increase this leave to match the changes to Employment Insurance, recognizing that families are important and generational needs are changing. For more information on compassionate care leave and other benefits, visit saskatchewan.ca/ business/employment-standards.

Family Matters Program Available Province-Wide

A successful program that has been helping to minimize the effect of separation and divorce on family members, especially children, is now being offered throughout Saskatchewan. Family Matters can help couples work through issues outside of the courts by providing information on child custody, parenting plans, children’s developmental needs and property division. For more information, call 1-844-863-3408 or email familymatters@gov.sk.ca

Government Introduces Legislation to Improve Saskatchewan Auto Injury Coverage

Coverage amendments introduced in the Legislative Assembly will improve Saskatchewan’s auto injury program to better meet the needs of people who are injured in vehicle collisions. Amendments to The Automobile Accident Insurance Act have different impacts for all Saskatchewan auto injury programs. In total, there are more than 20 changes, such as: · When an impaired driver causes a collision and is killed, allow an innocent party or the family impacted to sue for pain and suffering or bereavement damages (No Fault, Reduced No Fault and Tort coverage). · The list of offences that trigger the ability for an innocent party to sue for pain and suffering or bereavement damages will expand to include: criminal negligence causing death or bodily harm, criminal negligence causing bodily injury, flight from a peace officer and dangerous operation while street racing (No Fault, Reduced No Fault and Tort coverage). · Ensuring income benefits maintain pace with minimum wage (Tort and Reduced No Fault coverage). The amendments are based on recommendations from SGI resulting from consultation with and feedback from a variety of stakeholders and groups. The legislation is anticipated to be passed during the fall 2016 sitting of the Legislature, with changes taking effect January 1, 2017.

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TERRY JENSON

Premier Wall over-simplifying oil issue The more complex the issue, the more politicians are eager to simplify for their political advantage. In its most extreme, we see Donald Trump dutifully trying to capitalize on the recent shootings at an Orlando, Fla. gay bar by making it all about “radical Islam”. It’s a narrative that neatly fits his policy of banning Muslims from immigrating to the U.S. Trump’s argument conveniently leaves out the reality that the gunman was born in Queens, N.Y. And notwithstanding the shooter’s stated motivation and pledges of loyalty to ISIS) there was really likely a series of complex mental health and other factors that caused this Muslim man (who had a penchant of hanging around gay bars) to gun down 49 innocent people. However, mentioning “radical Islam” as much as he can does simplify things for Trump’s supporters, who want to believe there is a simple way to end such threats. Of course, such over-simplification by politicians isn’t always so dramatic.

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MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

But it does consistently happen. And it happens rather close to home where politicians will take a nugget of logic and pound on it until it fits their purposes. Take the 1990s NDP government that decided to close 52 rural hospitals and the Plains Health Centre in Regina in response to the massive debt and structural deficit left behind by the Progressive Conservative government of the 1980s. Logic suggested something had to be done, but what was less logical was closing the best hospital facility in Regina and spending $100-million-plus to renovate the oldest hospital facility in Regina. Even less logical was leaving vast swaths of rural Saskatchewan without emergency care. (If the NDP felt the need to close these hospitals, should they not have considered the value of

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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STARS ambulance?) But logic in politics doesn’t work that way. Instead, it is the nature of politicians to take a complex issue, strip away a lot of logic from the discussion and leave voters only with what politicians think voters want to hear. In a very real way, this is exactly what Premier Brad Wall is now doing in his bid to convince supporters that the oil industry is under siege from the left. Now, don’t get me wrong. The logic part is that there isn’t much logic in the “Leap Manifesto” now being explored by the federal NDP. In fact, it’s rather nuts, starting with its rush to end all fossil fuel usage and to abandon large-scale commercialized farming in favour of boutique small (read: organic; non-GMO farming). Wall is right that such notions can be beaten with facts. And it is a fact that converting Canada to a carbon-less economy would be ridiculously unaffordable. It is also a fact that it makes more sense for Canadians to build pipelines; especially the Canada East

pipeline; than to import oil from Saudi Arabia. But let’s face it: This Leap Manifesto notion is not going anywhere. And Wall is just over-simplifying matters to the point of absurdity by suggesting the Leap Manifesto or Hollywood crowd (including the likes of 1980s star Darryl Hannah) are a threat to the oil industry. Wall is doing his job by defending unemployed oil workers, but they are out of work because oil is less than $50 US a barrel, not because of the Leap Manifesto, Darryl Hannah or the notion that investors are bailing from oil because of massive environmental concerns. Work on convincing people in the east of the validity of building pipelines for Western oil rather than importing from disreputable regimes in the Middle East. Help put oil workers back to work by pressuring the federal government to offer financial help with abandoned wells. But don’t insult voters’ intelligence by simplifying a complex issue like oil. This problem deserves more thoughtful consideration.

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All the information that goes with a news story should also accompany photo(s) as above. Include the names of all the people in each photo and identify from left to right and from back to front. 1. Set your camera to the highest resolution possible. The more resolution, the better the final outcome of the photo in print. 2. Don’t be shy! Get close to your subject(s). Most photos taken with a built-in zoom lens extended will produce “grainy” images that do not reproduce well. 3. Attempt to get dynamic photos of something happening instead of just a quick snapshot. 4. “Presentation” photos typically don’t work well if there are too many people side-by-side in the frame. If there are many people in the photo, have them as close together as possible and, if needed, have the front row seated and the back row standing. 5. Remember taking a picture facing into the sun or bright light will produce poor quality images.


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THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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Libraries gear up for summer activities, reading program By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca There’s a little something for everybody this summer at your local library. “The summer reading club really is for everyone,” said Marla Skomar, head librarian of the Martensville branch of the Wheatland Regional Library. “Kids, families, teens and adults. It’s pretty all-encompassing.” Summer is actually one of the busiest times of the year for the Martensville library, located in the Civic Centre building at the intersection of Centennial Drive and Main Street in Martensville. “That sounds a little surprising, but we actually step up our programming hours in the summer months,” said Skomar. “A lot of people are looking for something to do with their kids, and the library is a great place to go and do stuff. The nice thing is that everything at the library is free.” The library is rolling out its TD Summer Reading Club program on Saturday, June 25. “That’s our ‘Summer: Get Your Read On’ Day,” she said. “It’s when kids can register for our summer reading club. The theme for this year is ‘Wild’, and the reading club gives kids an opportunity to track their reading minutes, participate in drop-in weekly craft activities, and register for prizes.” The “Wild Imaginations Kidz Club” features different activities every week and is open to youngsters ages 8 to 12 for an hour on Tuesday afternoons Last year, the library branch had a total of 320 kids registered in the summer reading program, and Skomar said she expects as many, or even more, youngsters this year. Skomar said the library is extending its preschool storytime sessions through the summer in response to the demand. “During the year we have storytime twice a week, but we’re’ switching to once a week during the summer,” she said. The Wheatland Library is running an “Instagram” challenge for teens, and also has a special reading program challenge for adults as well, said Skomar. The library is hosting Children’s Entertainer Sylvia Chave of Delisle on Monday, July 11 for a “Singing with Sylvia” concert.

WARMAN LIBRARY

The Warman Community Library, located in the Warman Community Middle School, is encouraging area residents to drop in over the summer. “A lot of people may think that because we’re in a school, that we shut down over the summer,” said Warman head librarian Karen Stobbe. “But we’re definitely open and we’ve got lots of programing and resources for everybody.” Access to the library is available through the main

Martensville head librarian Marla Skomar invites residents to participate in the summer reading program doors of the school building on Gowan Road, as well as through the Legends Centre. The library’s summer reading program kicks off Saturday, June 25. Stobbe said while it’s a popular program, the library does experience a drop in patronage over the summer once the students leave on summer holidays. “We are so busy with the school children every day,” said Stobbe. “We have a great partnership with the school administration and teachers. This is a big part of the school facility, and the kids use it a lot every day. So when school’s out, it gets a lot quieter..” Stobbe said during the school year, the daily patronage ranges from 250 to 400 people daily. “So when summer comes, we want to have as many programs as we can to encourage people to use the facility,” she said. Like other Wheatland branches, the Warman library has a “Wild” theme. “We will be having ‘Wild Wednesdays’ every week featuring a storytime and a craft activity,” said Stobbe. “We’re running the TD Summer Reading Club program so readers can log their books and be entered in draws for prizes.” The library’s main programs including ‘Tech Time’, Lego Club, Saturday afternoon movies, Seniors Coffee Hour and preschool

storytime go on hiatus over the summer, said Stobbe. The library’s “Photo Club”, facilitated by photographer Wayne Shiels of the Clark’s Crossing Gazette, will also wrap up for the season at the end of June.

DALMENY LIBRARY

While things tend to slow down a little in Dalmeny over the summer, the li-

brary likes to kick things up a notch, according to head librarian Crystal Benoit. “We try to keep the kids involved over the summer so they don’t regress in their literacy and reading skills,” said Benoit. “If they don’t pick up a book for two months, they can lose a lot of what they’ve learned in CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

Summer is a time to read

ASSESSMENT NOTICE FOR THE

RM OF MONTROSE 315

Notice is hereby given that the assessment roll of the RM of Montrose 315 for 2016 has been prepared and is open to inspection at the office of the Administrator of the municipality until the time for lodging appeals has expired, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday on the following days:

PUBLIC NOTICE

R.M. of Blucher No. 343

Public notice is hereby given that the R.M. of Blucher, #343 is considering a bylaw under the Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend the R.M. of Blucher, No. 343 Bylaw No. 4-2001, known as the Zoning Bylaw, as hereinafter provided: It is proposed to amend the R.M. of Blucher, #343 Zoning Bylaw No. 4-2001 as follows: 1. The Zoning District Map, which forms part of Bylaw 4-2001 shall be amended by rezoning from ICR- Intensive Country Residential District to C Commercial District, the property described as PT NE 34-36-3 W3 Extensions 7 and 8. Said property is shown within the bold line on the sketch which appears as part of this notice.

June 24 to July 25, 2016 A Bylaw pursuant to section 214 of The Municipalities Act has been passed and the assessment notices have been sent as required. Any person who wishes to appeal his /her assessment to the District Board of Revision is required to file his/her complaint(s) in the prescribed form with a $100.00 fee to: The Assessor, RM of Montrose Box 129 Delisle, Saskatchewan S0L 0P0 Dated at Donavan, Saskatchewan, June 23, 2016 Debra Claude, Assessor

Town of Dundurn Public Notice of a

DiscretioNary Use aPPlicatioN Public notice is hereby given that an application has been received to renovate a building into a take-out Pizza restaurant, which is discretionary use in the r2 - residential District. the land to which this notice relates is: Lot 9, Block 10, Plan G604 110 Government Rd. Dundurn, SK PUBLIC HEARING council will hold a public hearing on Monday, July 11, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. in the Dundurn town council chambers, 300 third ave. Dundurn, saskatchewan, to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed application. council will also consider all written and signed comments if received by 4:00 p.m. Friday, July 8, 2016. issued at Dundurn, saskatchewan this 17th day of June 2016. Eileen Prosser, Development Officer

The property may generally be described as being located in the NE 34-36-3 W3, 1.5 miles east of the intersection of Highways No. 5 and 316, on the south side of Highway No. 5 PuRPose 2. The intent of the amendment is to provide for Commercial development in the area described within this notice. exPlaNatioN 3. The specific reason for the proposed amendment is to rezone the current Intensive Country Residential area into a C - Commercial area, which may be used for commercial purposes as contained in Schedule E Commercial District of Bylaw No. 4-2001. Bylaw iNsPectioN The Bylaw and information supporting the rezoning application may be inspected by any interested person at the R.M. Office, Bradwell on any judicial day between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Copies are available to persons at a cost of $2.00. PuBlic HeaRiNg Representations respecting the bylaw will be considered by the Council at 1:30 p.m. on the 13th day of July, 2016 in the R.M. of Blucher, #343 Office at Bradwell, Sask. Council shall hear any person or group of persons, or person acting on their behalf, who wish to make a verbal or written representation. Issued at Bradwell, this 22nd day of June, 2016.

R. Doran scott, administrator


8

BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca

Saskatchewan set to begin domestic violence death review By HILARY KLASSEN hklassen@ccgazette.ca The provincial government will begin reviewing domestic violence death cases as early as next month. The announcement came from Justice Minister and Attorney General Gordon Wyant on June 16. “We are proud to be taking this major step in our work to address domestic violence in Saskatchewan,” Wyant said in a press release. “This panel will identify common themes and patterns, as well as produce recommendations that will give us the direction we need to deal with this important issue in our society.” The panel will conduct a pilot review of three to five cases this summer, with an interim report expected lat er this year. Any improvements to the review process will be made at that time.

Once the pilot is complete, the panel will begin the formal review of all domestic violence death cases that have occurred in Saskatchewan between 2005 and 2014. The panel’s final report and recommendations will be released by fall of 2017. In January, Statistics Canada reported that Saskatchewan has the highest rate of police-reported family violence of all Canadi-

an provinces. Domestic violence often goes unreported and, when it escalates, can result in loss of life. Just over a year ago, Latasha Gosling of Tisdale and her three children were killed by her boyfriend, who subsequently killed himself. Her case does not fall in the coverage period of this review. Several provinces and territories in Canada have established Domestic Violence Death Review Committees and others are in the process of doing so, according to the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative. The domestic violence death review process will expand the province’s understanding of domestic violence deaths and inform policies and practices. The panel will only review closed domestic violence death cases, it will not re-

By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca After a slight dip in call volume earlier this spring, Warman Fire Rescue (WFR) members are busy once again. “The last month has been pretty intense,” said Warman Fire Chief Russ Austin in his report to Warman City Council on Monday, June 13. “We’re back to our ‘new normal’ with about 40 calls, and we anticipate this coming month will be very similar.” Austin said during one seven-day period, WFR

members responded to 19 calls. “Some of them were fairly serious medical calls,” he said. “We had nine fire calls, including two grassfires. We also responded to a couple of motor vehicle collisions.” The fire department was set to launch its annual bike helmet safety program on Friday, June 17 with an educational blitz in the city’s elementary and middle schools, with the official kick-off on Sunday, June 19. Under the program, which has been running for many years, firefighters driving

marked fire vehicles who spot a youngster wearing a helmet while riding a bike or scooter will reward them with a coupon for a slurpee at a participating business. The child also has their name entered in a draw for helmet and bicycle prizes at the end of the summer. The helmet safety program also got a boost from the recent bike rodeo put on at the fire hall by Warman Elementary School and Warman Fire Rescue. “We had about 700 kids that took part in the course,” said Austin.

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open or re-investigate cases, question investigative techniques or comment on decisions made by judicial bodies. The structure and scope of the death review process was determined following extensive consultations with various organizations across the province, including Aboriginal groups. The death review process is the newest component of Saskatchewan’s broader response to interpersonal violence and abuse. In 2016-17, $11.4 million will be provided to community-based organizations across Saskatchewan to deliver violence support services and prevention programming including $500,000 for a new transition house in Melfort, which officially opened on Monday.

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016

in Osler

Friday, July 1st, 2016 7:00 - 10:00 AM ..............Firefighter’s Pancake Breakfast Community Hall

11:00 AM .............................Parade Following Parade ...........Free Ice Cream Osler Mennonite Church (212 2nd Ave.)

12 noon - 4:00 PM ..........Carnival Games at the Rink Hosted by Osler Mission Chapel

11:30 AM - 2:30 PM.........Food Booths selling burgers, hot dogs, watermelon and rollkuchan & desserts Community Hall

1:00 - 3:00 PM .................Open House at the Fire Hall 2:30 - 4:30 PM .................Family Bingo at Community Hall 4:00 - 8:00 PM ................Food Booth (FG Market) Selling: Perogies, Boneless Dry Ribs, Philly Cheesesteak Sandwich 8:00 - 10:00 PM ..............LIve enteRtAInMent Joy Singers 8:00-8:30 Unruh Family 8:30-9:00 Back 40 - 9:20-10:00

9:00 - 9:20 PM ................Canada Day Cake & Coffee Dusk ....................................FIReWORKS Plastic Bat & Ball Tournament will run throughout the day (to register a team please call Abe at 306-220-2232 or Ben 306-221-0716 50/50 tickets will be sold at all events (draw at 9 PM)


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THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Time to rethink health-care policy for the elderly By NEENA CHAPPELL and MARCUS HOLLANDER Expert Advisors, EvidenceNetwork. ca - Distributed by Troy Media 2016 We need to revisit conventional thinking on health-care services for seniors so the system is sustainable for all Canadians. To do that, we need to overcome a number of misperceptions. First, there is a belief that a growing seniors population will result in runaway costs that bankrupt the health-care system. But research shows that growth in the seniors population will add less than one per cent a year to health costs. In fact, the main factors driving increased healthcare costs are increased use of technology (including drugs), the rising use of health services across all ages and hikes in wages for health-care providers. A second related belief is that the percentage of provincial budgets consumed by health care is increasing as a direct result of the proportion of seniors. In fact, there is no runaway rise in health-care costs based on the percentage of gross domestic product spent on health care in Canada. There was only a minor increase, from 10 to 10.5 per cent, between 1992 and 2007. After a major increase during the last financial crisis (11.9 per cent in 2009), the percentage has declined as the economy recovers. The percentage of GDP spent on health care in Canada was 10.7 per cent in 2013 - a modest increase since 1992. A third misperception is that the health-care system for seniors needs to focus on public health and physician services. This resulted in a shift in policy priorities in the 1990s from development of an integrated national care delivery system for seniors to a focus on enhancements to public health and physician services. This in turn resulted in the integrated systems of care for older adults being broken into component parts, each competing for additional funds. One consequence has been an increased focus on home care. While this is helpful and home care is necessary, it is essential-

ly an add-on cost unless it is part of an integrated system of care where proactive tradeoffs can be made to substitute less costly home care for more expensive residential and hospital care. A fourth belief has been that the focus should be on individuals with high care needs and that relatively little attention need be given to preventive care for people who have a given health condition. However, the evidence seems to indicate that, overall, individuals with low-level care needs who are cut from care actually cost the system more - they deteriorate faster and are more likely to need more costly residential and hospital care than people who continue to receive minimal preventive care. The result is perversely - an incentive to get sicker quicker to qualify for publicly-funded care services. A focus on home care for high-needs seniors has resulted in models that integrate home care and family physician services. While such models can be part of an integrated system, they don’t replace a continuum of support that enhances quality of life and delays more expensive care. How damaging have these popular misconceptions been to our health system? Policy makers have made choices based on them, creating an apparent acceptance of the fiscal status quo without looking for cost-saving efficiencies. Clearly we need an integrated system for older adults that increases the quality and continuity of care, and can reduce costs and enhance the sustainability of the health-care system for all Canadians. A first step is for decision makers to recognize that a continuing care system for older adults is a key component of our health system equivalent to hospital care, physician care and public health. This would allow the splintered components of home care, home support, residential care facilities and geriatric units in hospitals to be brought together. Such a system would be the third largest component of our health expenditures,

after hospitals and physician care. Given that most

of the parts are already in place in most jurisdictions,

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9

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Warman creates Canada 150 mural

By HILARY KLASSEN hklassen@ccgazette.ca In anticipation of Canada’s 150th birthday next year, communities across the country are creating murals that celebrate Canada as well as reflect their local identity. The murals are made up of many individually painted 4” x 4” tiles, which become a beautiful, collective work of art when assembled. Up to 100,000 paintings will be part of the giant mural, from 100 to 150 communities stretching from Vancouver Island to Prince Edward Island. In Warman, students, community leaders and other residents took the opportunity to reserve their spot in this historical piece of mosaic artwork by painting a tile last week. The two-year project is an initiative of Mural Mosaic, a company launched in 2003 by Edmonton artists Paul Lavoie, Lewis Lavoie and Alain. “We’ve done murals at the winter and summer Olympics, Chicago Lights festival and the Calgary stampede,” said Phil Alain. Facilitators held painting workshops in Warman on Wednesday and Thursday. One of those sessions involved Mike Pavloff’s Grade 8 class at the Warman Community Middle School. Alain introduced the Canada 150 mural project to the class. “For the community of

HILARY KLASSEN | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Grade 7 students at Warman Community Middle School paint tiles for the Warman Canada 150 Mural Warman, your home city, we are doing a mural of a train car and the train car will be symbolic of what Warman is all about,” he said. “The cool thing about it is, the Warman train car will connect to the other murals across the country which are also train cars representing their communities. This could potentially be the biggest mural ever created in Canada!” Alain said the reason they’re doing a train mural is because Canada exists today because of the train. “British Columbia said they would only join confederation if they got the train.”

Phil Alain talks to students about the Canada 150 Mural

Instructor, Denise Lefebvre, gave the students a demonstration on how to paint a tile. She said Warman’s place in the mural is specific and it’s a light blue area. Students were encouraged to do a design if they’re not feeling artistic, or initials, or something related to a sport or hobby. Alain said for adults, the toughest part is convincing them to paint. But when they get over the, ‘I can’t paint’ barrier, they have an unbelievable pride, even if they have no skill. “It’s a really emotional thing. People start taking painting lessons after doing this.” Warman mayor Sheryl Spence and deputy mayors Beck and Philipchuk each painted a tile for the mosaic. Friday was the final day for facilitators to mount, clear coat and photograph the 8’ x 8’ mural. The City of Warman is planning to unveil it on Canada Day. Most communities, at various points in their history, seek artwork to express their local and cultural identity. More often than not, they bring in one artist. But that opens them up to crit-

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icism, since the art is only one person’s interpretation. “With this, it’s a community creating the mural, not any one person,” said Alain. “It’s a different vibe; community spirit goes into it. It’s really a time capsule, a visual portrayal of history.” Each community will keep its own mural as a reminder. If the complete mural was ever connected it would span four football fields (365 metres wide and 2.5 metres high). Instead, the complete mural will be visible through photographs. Alain says they’ve had a lot of great celebrities contribute. Jann Arden was one of the first special guests to paint a tile. Sarah McLachlan, Rick Mercer, NHL legends like Lanny McDonald and Glenn Hall are also painting. Others will be added, as the project is ongoing. For the actual Sesquicentennial, Canada 150 Murals will be done around Canada Day in Charlottetown, PEI, the birthplace of confederation, and in Ottawa, the nation’s capital. “People are going to be buzzing about it for over a year and a half,” said Alain.

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Martensville looks at civic election ground rules By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca Martensville City Council was scheduled to decide the ground rules for this fall’s civic election at its regular meeting on Tuesday, June 21. At the council’s Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting on Tuesday, June 14, Martensville City Clerk Carla Budnick brought forward six recommendations related to the upcoming election slated for Wednesday, October 26. The recommendations were scheduled to be voted on during the June 21 meeting. All Saskatchewan rural and urban municipalities, as well as school boards across the province, are scheduled to hold elections on that day. Martensville council was expected to adopt a recommendation to appoint Budnick as returning office for the city election. Leah Sullivan, the city’ Director of Finance, and Martha Krahn were expected to be appointed as assistant returning officers. The question of whether candidates for municipal office should be required to submit a criminal record check was also on the agenda for the June 21 meeting. If council decides a criminal record check should be required, councilors must adopt a bylaw to that effect prior to July 27. In her report to council at the June 14 meeting, Budnick recommended that council not require criminal record checks, because the check only indicates if an individual with the same name as the candidate has a criminal record. Specifics of the criminal record are not included. Budnick noted that most cities do not require candidates to submit a criminal record check. Other recommendations to be voted on at the June 21 meeting include: * holding advance polls on Saturday, October 15 and Saturday, October 22 at the Civic Centre; * having candidates’ names listed in alphabetical order on the ballot; * keeping remuneration rates for returning officers and poll clerks the same as the last election; and * establishing election day polling stations for all areas of the city at the North Ridge Centennial Community Centre.

NEW DOCTORS

Two new family physicians are slated to begin working at the Martensville Collective Health and Wellness this summer. In his report to council during the meeting on June 14, Martensville Economic Development Officer Dillon Shewchuk said the city is pleased to have Dr. Amanda Walker and Dr. Cheryl Mitchell set up their practices at the clinic founded by Dr. Allison Adamus and her husband Trevor Adamus, a physiotherapist. Shewchuk said both new physicians joined the clinic on a part-time basis and Dr. Walker is expected to begin working full time later this summer.


BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca

THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

11

Aberdeen enjoyed blue skies for the annual parade during Aberdeen Days on Saturday, June 18. Other activities included a pancake breakfast, kids’ activities, car show, slo-pitch tournament, BBQ supper, movie at dusk and fireworks.

2016

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Clark’s Crossing Gazette photos by

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Flag football kids get a kick out of tackle practice

By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca Youngsters in the Martensville Maddogs flag football program

tackled the hard-hitting variety of the game during a special practice last week. Lining up behind the pee wee and bantam Maddogs tackle football players, the kids, dressed in bright orange Maddogs t-shirts, went through a variety of stretching, running, and tackling drills at Geransky Field on Tuesday, June 14. It was all aimed at giving the youngsters a taste of what tackle football is all about, and to help them feel proud of the Maddogs minor football program in Martensville, said Clint Schachtel, coach of the Hilltops division Maddogs six-a-side spring tackle team. The team, along with the Huskies division Maddogs six-aside team coached by Bradyn Dyck, plays under the umbrella of the Saskatoon Minor Football (SMF) organization against teams from different areas of Saskatoon. The SMF 5-on-5 flag football program, open to kids in Grades 1-8; and the 6-on-6 tackle football leagues open to kids in Grades 5-8; begin their season in late April and wind up in late June with a city-wide, three-day jamboree. This year the jamboree is slated for June 24-26. The spring tackle program is a developmental league that emphasizes sportsmanship, basic skills and safe play techniques, said Schachtel in an interview just prior to the practice. “For a lot of the kids in the 6-on-6 program, this is their first experience playing tackle football,” said Schachtel, who has coached Martensville 5-on-5 flag football teams for the past several seasons. “For the age division I’m coaching, we don’t technically keep score and there is no city championship at the end of the season. The biggest thing we emphasize is having fun, learning skills, and giving your best effort. At the end of the game, if the kids put in a lot of energy and played well together as a team, then that’s the most important thing, not the score. “But it’s a game, so the kids always keep track of the score even if nobody else does,” said Schachtel. “They want to win.” He said in the spring league, the players learn all positions, and play both offense and defense. During games, each team takes possession of the ball at the 35-yard line and tries to score. After a turnover or five successive plays, the teams switch possession. “During the final two games of the jamboree weekend, we slot the kids into the positions they feel most comfortable with and finish up the season with games that are pretty competitive,” said Schachtel. He said the season has been a great learning experience for both the players and the coaching staff. “For me, it’s my first time coaching tackle,” he said. “It’s a similar game to flag but the rules are a little different and there’s a lot more emphasis on skills and safety because of all the physical contact.” He said after the summer break, a lot of the kids and coaches will be ready to hit the field in the fall when the Kinsmen Football League tackle season begins. Schachtel said having the Martensville Maddogs included in the SMF organization has been very beneficial for the program. “It’s a fantastic league,” said Schachtel. “The nice part is we always try and keep our Martensville Maddogs brand out there front and centre. We encourage the parents to show up to the games in bright orange Maddogs shirts and sweaters and cheer loud. “It lets everybody know who we are and where we’re from,” he added with a grin.

Above: Kids in the Maddogs flag football program follow the example of a Hilltops division Maddogs tackle football player during a drill. Right: An assistant coach with the Hilltops division Maddogs tackle football team, gives direction to a pack of energetic flag football players prior to a tackling drill at Geransky Field last week

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE


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THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

KNOCKING IT IN

13

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

The weather was sunny but a blustery west wind made for an interesting round as participants, including Rob Obrigewitch (above), took part in the Warman Minor Hockey Association 5th Annual Golf Tournament at the Legends on Friday, June 17.

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14

BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016

CONTAINERS for all your

OIL INFUSED PRODUCTS • 240 ml aluminum spray bottle • 50 ml glass spray bottle • 50 ml glass jar

search Young Living RetailWarman/Martensville

available for individual purchaSe

Snack on the go hydrating energy I n d e p e n d e n t D i sttake r i baucool t o r one to go!

Valkyries advance to WWCFL final

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

The Saskatoon Valkyries defeated their provincial rivals, the Regina Riot, 29-14 in the WWCFL Prairie Conference final played at SMF Field on Sunday, June 19. With the win the Valkyries advance to the WWCFL Championship Game to be played in Lethbridge on Saturday, June 25 against the Western Conference champions, the Edmonton Storm. The Valkyries previously defeated the Storm 30-17 in a pre-season game played on April 30. Above, Saskatoon QB Alex Eyolfson hands off to RB Julene Friesen.

• A satisfying medley of exotic fruits, nuts, and science • Fabulous snack or meal on the go • Helps you feel fuller, longer

• Black Pepper & Lime Essential Oils, Wolfberry Puree, White Tea Extract • 35 calories • No artificial flavours or sweeteners!

306.291.6301

109 Klassen St. West, Warman in the Gazette Building (beside the Post Office) Open Monday - Friday 10AM - 5PM • Evenings and Weekends by appointment

135 Beaudry Crescent MARTENSVILLE Starting at $190,920 Aspen Parke’s two-bedroom suites are designed for adult living with a variety of floor plans and sizes to choose from. Enjoy the lock-and-leave condo lifestyle… • Concrete floors provide superior sound and fire proofing • Comprehensive fire sprinkler system throughout • Heated, secure, groundlevel parkade • Spacious balconies to enjoy park views • Easily accessible private storage room(s) Contact sales agent Rob Friesen at Boyes Group Realty Inc. for more info. or to arrange a viewing: rbfriesen1@gmail.com

(306) 221-9350

www.spanwest.com


THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca

LANGHAM days

Streets in the ‘historic and vibrant’ town of Langham came alive during Landham Days, June 17 to 19. Following a colourful parade Saturday morning, vintage vehicles took over main street with a car show. The show was organized by Wild West Autobody, a Main Street business owned by Clarissa & Joe Penner. About 94 vehicles lined Main Street, from local communities and places further afield like Gallivan, Spiritwood, Cut Knife, Kenaston, Wilkie and Maple Creek. Other activities over the weekend Included a family dance, glow in the dark capture the flag, a pancake breakfast, colour course, water park, laser tag, food trucks, live music at the museum, sheep sheering and more.

Clark’s Crossing Gazette photos BY HILARY KLASSEN

15


IAGL B DE THE

$8.00/wk for the first 25 words 35¢/wk per word thereafter + GST

Run your word ad 3 consecutive weeks in the Clark’s Crossing Gazette with no changes

get the 4th week FREE!

THE

BDEEASLT

$12.00/wk for the first 25 words 50¢/wk per word thereafter + GST Run your word ad 3 consecutive weeks in the Clark’s Crossing Gazette and the Sask. Valley News with no changes

Blaine Lake

Valley

Beardy’s

the SaSkatcheWaN

12

Recording history every week since 1902

NeWS Rosthern

Waldheim

Hepburn

Hague

12

11

Borden

Dalmeny

Langham

1090

1110

Tenders

General Notices

Family Matters

Aberdeen

Osler

Separation and Divorce Don’t Need to be a Fight.

Duck Lake Batoche

Laird

Monday 12:00 pm

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • PAGE 16

Wingard

Krydor

16

Classifieds

get the 4th week FREE!

Combined circulation exceeds 19,000 newspapers each week!

Hafford

deadline

FOR SALE BY SEALED TENDER

Learn how Family Matters can help you and your family today.

The TOWN OF HEPBURN is now accepting tenders from interested parties for the sale of surplus Town land and vehicles. The Town reserves the right to reject any or all bids received.

1-844-863-3408 | familymatters@gov.sk.ca

Tender packages and additional information may be found online at www.Hepburn.ca

Warman

41

Martensville

14

The deadline for receipt of tenders is July 15, 2016 at 4:00 p.m.

Saskatoon

1060

Grandora

7

Vanscoy

Clavet Pike Lake

Delisle

Bradwell Whitecap Sheilds

Donavon Dundurn

Thode

Swanson

Anniversaries Please join us to celebrate the 50th Golden Anniversary in Honour of

Ardath

ON YOUR COMPUTER, SMART PHONE OR TABLET

READ US ONLINE FREE!

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

www.ccgazette.ca

1100

Legal Notices NOTIFICATION OF PROPOSED ANTENNA SYSTEM

how to PLACE your Ad

Little Loon Wireless, Operated by Access Communications Co-operative Is proposing to construct a new antenna system at: Blk/Par W, Plan 101913274 Ext 0 (within SW-11-35-04-W3) near Clavet, SK

In-person 109 Klassen Street West Cash | Cheque | Money Order Warman, SK

E-mail ads@ccgazette.ca Email your ad then call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

telephone 306-668-0575 Call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card

Fax 306-668-3997 Fax your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run) to 306-668-3997 anytime and we will process payment to your credit card

Postal Mail P.O. Box 1419 Warman, SK S0K 4S0

Cheque | Money Order

Send your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run). Do not send cash in the mail

Ad Classifications

ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 Garage Sales ....................1140 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060

MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040 REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060

Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................ 5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ........... 6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ................... 6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that place the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette and Jenson Publishing do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

Bill & Betty Miller on Saturday, June 25 @ 5:30 pm at the Reinfeld Church (east of Hague) Your presence is your present. No gifts please.

1090

Tenders Ducks Unlimited Canada Hay Tender Opportunities: 1. SW12-33-1-W3 (45 acres) RM #313; 2. NW15-34-2-W3 (55 acres) RM #343; 3. SW17-33-27-W2 (73 acres) RM #312; 4. NW4-31-28-W2 (127 acres) RM #312; 5. S1/2 34-35-27-W2 (180 acres) RM #342; 6. SW11-36-27-W2 (141 acres) RM #342; 7. NE31-30-2-W3 (118 acres) RM #282; 8. E1/2 31-37-1W3 (141 acres) RM #372; 9. W1/2 6-38-1-W3 (119 acres) RM #372. Tenders will be accepted until July 8, 2016 at 1:00 PM. Haying can begin on July 15, 2016. All tenders are for one cut only. The highest or any tender may or may not be accepted. Submit tender by phone at 306-665-7156, by fax at 306931-4108 or by email at b_bergen@ducks.ca

Deadline for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

Call 668-0575 Fax 668-3997

For details on this proposal please visit: http://www.littleloon.ca/CVW Comments or concerns can be addressed by July 2nd, 2016 to: publicinquiries@littleloon.ca or CVW Public Consultation Little Loon Wireless 826 57th St E Saskatoon, SK S7K 5Z1

1100

Legal Notices Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and this newspaper does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. Advertisers are encouraged to check their ad for errors or omissions the first week the ad is published. No credit will be given for ads with errors or omissions after the first published week.

1110

General Notices ANNUAL MEETING

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

7:00 p.m. Mid Sask Community Futures 500 Progress Avenue Outlook, Sask. For any further information, call our office at 867-9566 or 1-888-929-9990

VERNA'S COUNTRY KITCHEN Sunday Buffet 11:30 to 2:00 Open May to September North of Duck Lake (Horse Lake). Call for reservations 306-467-2099. Cash only.

1120

Coming Events WARMAN FARMERS' MARKET Thursdays 2-6 pm City Hall Parking Lot Locally grown vegetables, baking, crafts, honey and more! Like us on Facebook for more info 2016 Special Days: May 5 - Salute to Mothers June 30 - Canada Day Party July 21 - Garden Vegetable Festival Aug 11 - Kiddies Day Sept 1 - Rider Pride Sept 29 - Customer Appreciation Day

1120

Coming Events

1120

2040

You're Invited! FarmYard Market Sat, June 25, 11am-4 pm Local toe tapping band "In With The Old" 1pm - 3pm Bring lawn chairs. Lunch special: hot dog, cake and pop - $4.00. Horse rides for children, See the animals, Face painting, Beeper the Clown. Located at Highway #12 and the Osler turnoff, just 5 minutes north of Martensville

ALL-SAVE MOVING SERVICES INC. "Down Sizing Seniors" Packing, unpacking, set up auction and disposal of items. Contact John Stuart, Rosthern, 306-232-6683.

Coming Events

Hepburn Museum of Wheat open every Saturday: May 21 - September 3 10am - 3pm Please call Diana Stobbe at 306-947-4351 for off-hour tours. Sask. River Valley Museum in Hague will be open to the public for summer hours May 20 - October 10, 2016 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Open all statutory holidays from 1:00 - 5:00 p.m. For other bookings, including birthday celebrations, reunions, photos, etc. call the Museum at (306) 2252112; Frank (306) 249-0363, cell (306) 280-3348; Henry (306) 225-4511 or (306) 225-4585 PLANNING AN EVENT? Tell everyone about it in Coming Events. Ads start at $8 per week, reach over 40,000 readers. (306) 668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca. Deadlines are Mondays at noon.

Services

COLOUR COPYING

Full service colour copying while you wait or for pick-up later Save money and avoid city traffic and lineups!

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

109 Klassen St. W, Warman Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m. (Closed from 12 - 1 p.m.) Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 Email: ads@ccgazette.ca

CUSTOM ROOFING INC. Full Service Roofing. Great Rates! Residential & Commercial. 50 Years in Sask. Shingle - Torch On - CanSeal Protective Coatings seals, protects & restores Metal Roofs Repairs. Full Liability & WCB - BBB Member. FREE ESTIMATES. 306-244-4343. Plumber Josh Stuart 306-715-9149 Rosthern, SK

1140

Garage Sales Estate/Moving Sale in Saskatoon 1502 1st Avenue North Priced To Go...Cheap Quality Indoor & Outdoor Items - Must See FRIDAY ONLY, June 24, 8am-8 pm

MORE

Local News

MORE

Local Sports

MORE

Local Information

MORE REASONS

TO MAKE THE GAZETTE YOUR NEWSPAPER EVERY WEEK

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca

www.ccgazette.ca

SHINGLING We supply, install, clean up on neW homes & reroofs

free estimates call ernie at

306-220-2191 3010

For Sale PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call The Gazette at 306-668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca for details. STEEL BUILDING SALE ...”SUPER SAVINGS-ADDITIONAL 10% OFF NOW!” 20X21 $5,794; 25X25 $6,584; 30X31 $9,600; 32X35 $10,798; 42X51 $16,496. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel ,1-800668-5422, www.pioneersteel.ca.

3030

Misc. Wanted WANTED: Shed antlers, old traps, wild fur and castors. Phone 306-278-7756, Bryon or 306-278-2299, Phil.

4030

Feed And Seed Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 109 Klassen St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

4030

Feed And Seed HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

5010

Homes/Condos For Sale house for sale

5040

Land For Sale

$

279,900

215 Canora Street W. Close to daycare centre, 2 parks & school bus stop.

mls# 575665

RTM SHOW HOME: 1594 ft, 9’ ceilings, vaulted portion, front veranda area, stonework, gables and dormers, maple cabinets. awesome quality and beauty! www.swansonbuilders.ca

306-493-7027. Saskatoon, SK.

Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

7030

Business Opportunities

FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 219 1/4’s South - 100 1/4’s South East - 46 1/4’s South West - 65 1/4’s North - 10 1/4’s North East - 14 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 57 1/4’s West - 50 1/4’s farm an d p as tu re lan d av ailab le to re n t

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE

4 bdrm, 2 bath bungalow in Warman. Double detached insulated garage. Fenced and mature yard. Developed basement with concrete floor. 1978, 50x120 lot, 1014 sq. ft. Includes appliances & A/C

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone

Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

6010

Autos For Sale

Find much more on our website

www.magicpaintandbody.com

2240B - Avenue C. North Saskatoon

652-7972

or (306) 260-4691

Email: magicpaintandbody@shaw.ca

Free iPod with SGI claim - conditions apply ** FREE ** COURTESY CAR

6070

Auto Parts Wrecking over 250 units. Cars and trucks. Lots of trucks: Dodge, GMC, Ford, Imports, 1/2 ton to 3 tons. We ship anywhere. Call or text 306-821-0260. Lloydminster.

5035

Acreages for Sale CORMAN PARK ACREAGE

10 acres acres situated situated between Warman/Martensville. 10 40x60 shop shop with with MAN CAVE mezzanine, infloor 40x60 heat, SK heat,Quonset, Quonset,barn, barn,corrals, corrals,MATURE MATUREYARD. YARD. water, dugout. 1625sq.ft. bilevel fullyfully dev.dev. and SK water, dugout. 1625sq.ft. bilevel upgraded throughout., newer windows, boiler and upgraded throughout, newer windows, system, granite countertops, AMAZING boiler system, granite countertops, AMAZING SUNROOM, infloor heat in basement, c/a. SUNROOM, a MuST MuST See! $799,900mls mls a Saskatoon Tracy GuenTher Tracy 306-221-2221 / homesbytracy.net 306-221-2221

7040

Career Training BY EMPLOYER REQUEST, CanScribe is training to fill 400 Medical Transcription positions. Train with the only accredited and AHDI approved online Canadian school. 1-866-305-1165. www.canscribe.ca.

7050

Careers F/T Experienced Health and Safety Administrator / Standby Coordinator required immediately. Experience with SCSA COR Program, ISN Networld, and Comply Works along with knowledge of OH & S and Canada Safety Standards is a definite asset. Duties to include but not limited to quoting, scheduling and invoicing standby rescue services and COR, ISN and Comply Works administration. Must be fluent in English (verbal, written and reading), have strong computer skills and be customer service orientated. Please email resume with references to trans.care@sasktel.net or mail to Trans-Care Rescue Ltd., Box 559, Langham, SK, S0K 2L0. Only considered candidates will be contacted. For more information, please contact (306)283-4496.

BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca CLUES ACROSS

1. Systems, doctrines, theories 5. Belle’s friend Chip was one 11. NBA MVP 14. Preeminent 15. __ and the Beast 18. Round, flattish cap 19. Bright 21. Unpleasant person 23. Passes through a wheel’s center 24. The New York __ 28. Military alliance 29. He prosecutes the accused 30. Noble act 32. Handyman’s tool 33. Austrian river 35. An accountant certified by the state 36. Dad (slang) 39. Women 41. Type of blood 42. Ambush 44. Measuring instrument 46. Protein-rich liquids 47. Socially conservative person (Australian) 49. Girl 52. Small Spanish dishes 56. Mexican plant 58. About thigh 60. Absorptive 62. Diner 63. Ethnic group of Laos

20. Cats “say” this 22. Didymium 25. He conducts physicals 26. European Economic Community 27. Individually 29. Begetter 31. Press against lightly 34. Licensed for Wall Street 36. Posttraumatic stress disorder 37. Mountain nymph (Greek) 38. Italian city 40 South Dakota 43. Rank in the Ottoman Empire

CLUES DOWN

Get Noticed! Advertise Here!

Careers

required for preventative maintenance, repair & service of heavy equipment fleet. Journeyman with min. 5 year exp with CAT, JD and heavy trucks. Both camp and shop locations. Service truck and accommodations provided. Wage negotiable. Send resume and work references to: Bryden Construction and Transport Co. Inc., Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0; Fax: 306-769-8844 Email: brydenconstruct@ xplornet.ca www. brydenconstruction andtransport.ca

We can help you with that. A career ad in The Gazette reaches over 50,000 people each week (306) 668-0575 ads@ccgazette.ca

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

has immediate part-time openings in poultry processing. Work close to home, Tues - Thurs, in a safe respectful work environment. Competitive wages, meat discounts, training provided. To apply, call Martha or Kevin at 306-239-4763 MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-athome career today!

306.668.0575

Horoscopes

www.ccgazette.ca

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

It’s difficult to fully explain just how busy you are, Capricorn. Start trimming your to-do list so you can maintain your energy and actively involve those around you.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

It’s time to try a few new things, Aquarius. Try a hobby or activity that is out of your comfort zone. You may be surprised at how much this new hobby interests you.

PISCES February 19– March 20

There’s only so long you can put off financial concerns before they become a big problem, Pisces. Start addressing things today.

ARIES March 21– April 19

Aries, it may not be possible to get away for an extended vacation just now, but perhaps a few days away will offer the brief respite you need to get energized.

Pine View Farms, Osler,

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Hire employees

for your business.

THis includes COOKS supervisors, managers, labours, Trades & professionals. Hire employees witH Canadian experienCe ready to move to any loCation in saskatCHewan.

Call Michael at 306.651.5335

be kind to our environment Recycle this week’s newspaper

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

45. In the year of the Lord (abbr.) 48. Explorer Vasco da __ 50. Besides 51. Bart’s sister 53. They hold plants 54. Song 55. Rescue 57. Small island 58. Coniferous tree 59. Albanian currency 61. Of I

1. International radio band 2. Thrust 3. Measures insignificance 4. Appears on Roman currency 5. Does not drink 6. Midway between northeast and east 7. Actinium 8. A Chicago ballplayer 9. Compound 10. Former British pol Derek 12. Color properties 13. Chinese magnolia 16. American state 17. Conference of Allied leaders

7050

Heavy Duty Mechanic

17

Taurus, professional issues may be stressful, but try to maintain a positive attitude and the issues will soon be resolved. Rely on a trusted colleague to help.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

Face tough issues head on. No matter the obstacle, you are fully capable of overcoming it. If needed, ask for some clarification so you can better focus on the tasks at hand.

sudoku

CANCER June 22– July 22

Cancer, take some time out of your schedule for a fun day trip or another spontaneous activity that enables you to escape the daily grind and unwind for a little while.

LEO July 23– August 22

You may need to lend some special skills to a situation this week, Leo. When someone calls on you for help, accept the challenge with dignity and pride.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Virgo, make delegation a priority over the next several days. Spread the workload around to lessen some of your burden and to encourage others to contribute.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Libra, your mind is set on a new opportunity, but you do not yet have the finances to make it happen. See if you can find an investor or another way to fund the project.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

Scorpio, sometimes you have to take a challenging route even though you desire the easier path. The hard work will be worth it in the end, as you will see shortly.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Helping others is a big part of who you are, Sagittarius. Every effort you put forth will come back to you in time. Enjoy all the moments you have with others.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


18

BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca

Continued from page 7

Summer is a time to read school. The summer reading club is a great way to keep them interested in reading.” The Dalmeny library launches its summer reading program on Thursday, June 30 with a special Lego Day. There are local and region-wide prizes for those who keep a log of the books they’ve read. Benoit said the library is hosting “Singing with Sylvia” on July 20. The Delislebased children’s entertainer is doing a tour of several libraries over the summer. “She’s pretty popular, and she really gets the kids pumped up,” said Benoit. “We’re looking forward to it.” The library is hosting a “bottle cap art” day on August 2 where youngsters can make mosaics using multicoloured milk and pop bottle caps on cardboard. Benoit said the library’s regular programs, including story time, wind up at the end of June and begin again in September. She said there is an increasing number of young families new to the community who are dropping in for the programs.

OSLER LIBRARY

Tina Rempel is ready to rope in some young readers for this summer’s reading club. “We’re going with a ‘Wild West’ theme this year,” said Rempel. “We’ve got a bunch of local businesses signed up to participate, and the kids get cards with a ‘cowboy code’ that they decipher

THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Possible impaired driver picked up after hitting fence FROM THE CELL BLOCK Submitted by

SGT. ROB EYRE Warman RCMP

The following is the local media release for the Warman/Martensville Detachment of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the week of June 13 to June 20, 2016.

Traffic:

Osler Librarian Tina Rempel is promoting a “Wild West” theme for the library’s summer reading program so they can collect their reward at the businesses.” While she’s still planning her summer program, Rempel said she’s got a lot of fun western-style activities lined up for the younger set. “Everybody who registers with the summer reading program gets a sheriff’s badge,” she said. “And we’re going to be doing a big mural of the town on a paper taped to one of the walls inside the library.”

ABERDEEN LIBRARY

The Aberdeen library, located in the Aberdeen Recreation Complex, kicks off

its summer reading program on Monday, July 4. Librarian Ann Maille said the library features “games, crafts, gardening and fun” on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings throughout the summer. “We also have other events, including the “Go Science” event on July 11, and “Singing with Sylvia” on July 18. On August 11, children’s entertainers Sandy and lee are slated to perform. “We have also seen an increase in the number of kids throughout the summer,” said Maille.

June 13 at 10:50 a.m. a hit and run was reported that occurred over the weekend at the Tim Hortons in Martensville. There is damage to the rear passenger door. Matter is under investigation. On June 14 at 7:12 a.m. a gas and dash was reported at the Vanscoy Tempo. Suspect vehicle was not located. June 14 at 5:50 p.m. a car was reported doing donuts in the Arena parking lot in Martensville. Members made a patrol but the vehicle had left. June 16 at 8:40 p.m. a trailer parked on the side of the road in a residential area of Warman was hit by a vehicle whose driver was blinded by the setting sun. Driver warned. June 17 at 7:03 p.m. a vehicle was reported having driven through the fence at

the Martensville Building and Home Supply. A male was observed sitting in the van. He displayed signs of impairment.

Property:

June 13 at 1:00 p.m. a report of a theft from a bus parked at the Warman High School was received. Stereo equipment in the bus was taken. Matter is under investigation. June 13 at 1:30 p.m. a report of a break and enter was reported on 2nd Avenue South in Martensville. Someone entered the unlocked garage overnight and stole property. June 13 at 2:10 p.m. a report was received of someone entering vehicles on 1st Avenue North in Warman. June 14 at 6:00 a.m. Campland RV Resort reported being broken into and items taken. June 14 at 9:00 a.m. a vehicle was reported broken into overnight on Thiessen Street in Warman. Tool was used to pry open the door. June 14 at 11:40 p.m. a report of theft from the Martensville Corner Store was received. Matter is under investigation. June 15 at 6:50 a.m. report from Affiliated Auto Wrecking on Highway 12 reported that their main gate was knocked down. A vehicle was reported missing. June 16 at 2:00 p.m. kids reported trying to break

into the concession stand behind the Warman Diamond Arena and doing donuts in vehicles in the rodeo ring. Member attended and youths spoken to.

People:

June 14 at 11:40 p.m. two people were reported walking on Highway 16 near the Dalmeny turn-off. Both were wearing dark clothing and hard to see. Subjects were located and given a ride into Saskatoon. June 18 at 8:30 p.m. a male was located drunk and fighting with people in Warman. He was brought to Saskatoon Detachment cells and held until sober. June 19 at 1:40 a.m. members were called to the Vanscoy Hotel to assist with a patron who was extremely intoxicated, throwing drinks into people’s faces. He was removed from the bar and kept from leaving in his vehicle. If you have information regarding this or any other crime, please contact Warman/Martensville RCMP at 306-975-1670/306975-1610 or if you have information and you wish to remain anonymous in your reporting, please contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222TIPS (8477), submit a tip via their website: http://saskcrimestoppers.com/ or text in a tip: TIP206 + your tip to CRIMES (274637).

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19

Willow Cree Health Services receives accreditation By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca Willow Cree Health Services (WCHS) has earned national recognition for its high standards of planning, management and delivery of health care. The community-based health clinic, located on the Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation near Duck Lake, has been accredited by the Canadian Accreditation Council (CAC). A celebration marking the culmination of the two-year accreditation process was held on the clinic grounds on May 30. “It’s very exciting to see this day arrive,” said WCHS Director of Health Jenny Gardipy. “It’s been a long journey, but it’s been well worth it. We have a tremendous team here and they deserve a lot of credit for this accomplishment.” Gardipy said when she was hired as director for the health centre in her home community in May, 2014, one of her main goals was to achieve accreditation status. “When I worked at White Buffalo I saw how their accreditation helped that organization,” she said. “I wanted to see the same kind of standards in place here.” Gardipy and her staff worked closely with local Health Canada officials, including Genevieve Binette and Lana Davies, to get the ball rolling, and the centre’s “operations manual” outlining its policies and procedures was submitted to the CAC in November 2015. In January, 2016, WCHS was notified it was “100 per

Beardy’s and Okemasis councilor Roy Petit said the accreditation shows that good quality communitybased health care services are available, but it takes a grassroots community effort to make it happen. Lorna Okemaysim, one of the elders of the First Nation, led the ceremonial opening prayers in Cree and Eng-

lish prior to the presentation. Guest speakers received traditional blankets made by the “Starblanket Ladies”. Entertainment included traditional dances by students from Constable Robin Cameron Education Centre, Rosanna Seeseequasis and Michael Gamble, and Metis fiddle and guitar music by Dallas and Phil Boyer.

RESORT VILLAGE OF SHIELDS PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENTION TO AMEND THE ZONING BYLAW

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Canadian Accreditation Council CEO Calvin Wood (left) presents Willow Cree Health Services Director Jenny Gardipy with a plaque in recognition of its accreditation cent compliant” with its submission; a “phenomenal” mark for a First Nations clinic operating with limited resources, according to Alexander Campbell, Regional Director General for Health Canada. “First Nations health care in general is not on a par with the rest of the country,” said Campbell. “But there are many excellent facilities, and this is one. “There are currently 21 First Nations health facilities going through the accreditation process, and this centre is paving the way for others. To accomplish this in less than two years is amazing.” The WCHS focuses on spiritual, emotional, mental and physical health, and is accredited in 13 areas ranging

from mental health and addictions to children’s health and environmental health. The WCHS clinic had an on-site visit from CAC on February 9 and received a very positive report from the CAC on March 11. The official notice of accreditation was received on April 18, 2016. Accreditation represents an ongoing commitment to excellence, according to Calvin Wood, Chief Executive Officer of the CAC. “It’s more than just a plaque on the wall,” said Wood in a presentation to the gathering attended by staff, clients, board members and councilors with the Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation. “It represents a solid foundation for the organization so

that it will continue to operate effectively regardless of staff turnover. It shows that it has policies and procedures in place to ensure that client files remain confidential, intact and secure so individuals receive appropriate care when they need it.” Wood said the accreditation is good for three years, and the second time around in 2019 should be easier provided the staff and directors “internalize” the standards and processes involved. “It’s not just a matter of jumping through hoops,” said Wood. “It’s understanding the reasons why these standards are in place. “You’re adding value to the community and contributing to the overall health of the community.”

Public Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Section 44(1)(d) of The Water Security Agency Act, that the Council of the Resort Village of Shields intends to adopt a bylaw to amend Bylaw #1/2009, known as the Zoning Bylaw. InTEnT The proposed Bylaw #6/20 16 will allow for: 1.) Zoning Changes as follows: Addition of Section 2(a)(v) a shipping container may not be used as an accessory building. Addition of Section 2(hh.l) Shipping Container-”shipping container” shall mean a prefabricated metal container or box specifically constructed for the transportation and storage of goods by rail, ship or transport truck that is of any size. Amendment of Section 2(g) by inserting “but does not include a shipping container” at the end of the sentence. These changes will prohibit the use of shipping containers as buildings within Shields. ExAmInATIOn OF ByLAw The proposed Bylaw may be inspected by any persons at the Resort Village of Shields Office by calling 306-492-2259. Bylaw copies are available at no cost. PuBLIC HEARInG Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, July 18, 2016 at 7:15 p.m. in the Resort Village of Shields Hall to receive submissions regarding the proposed bylaw. Interested parties may present their views to Council at this hearing regarding this bylaw. Issued at the RM of Dundurn, Saskatchewan, this 22nd day of June, 2016. Jessie williams, Administrator


20

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THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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SUPPLIED PHOTO

Taking the bull by the horns Clavet student headed to national championship in Tennessee By HILARY KLASSEN hklassen@ccgazette.ca Stefan Tonita, a Grade 8 student from Clavet Composite School, has become the 2016 Saskatchewan Junior High Bull Riding Rodeo Champion. Stefan will be representing Saskatchewan at the National Junior High Finals Rodeo (NJHFR) in Lebanon, Tennessee from June 19 to 25. Tonita clinched his spot at the Saskatchewan High School Rodeo Provincial Finals in Swift Current in early June. Stefan’s mother Shelley said it’s a huge opportunity for him and he’s very excited. “They ride bigger animals down there, so it will be a bigger and tougher competition. But he’s been on practice bulls and done

other circuits with bigger animals, so he feels pretty confident.” Bull riders have to complete an eight second ride, Shelley said. Stefan rides with one hand, which is required at nationals but not in Saskatchewan. “It’s taken him probably a good two years to get the one-handed mastered and there’s not many kids that do onehanded.” It’s all about balance, because you can’t outpower an animal, she said. Fortunately, he’s never been seriously hurt. Featuring roughly 1000 contestants from 43 states, five Canadian provinces and Australia, the NJHFR is the world’s largest junior high rodeo. To earn the title of National Junior High Finals Rodeo Champion, contestants must finish in the top 20 - based on their combined scores in the first two rounds - to advance to Saturday evening’s final round. National champions will then be determined based

on their three-round combined scores. Stefan is riding in the Calgary stampede as well. “There’s only 25 riders and it’s pretty prestigious,” said Shelley. There’s two pools, A and B, and Stefan made the “A” pool. Participating in the Stampede is not connected to the Tennessee event but it’s another chance for him to get out there and do what he loves. Stefan’s interest in bull riding was sparked when he was quite young. He saw a family friend ride at a rodeo and decided he wanted to do it when he was older. His Dad was also a bull rider. Stefan started out by attending a rodeo school when he was nine. This is his third year in the Junior High School Rodeo Association. To follow Stefan Tonita at the NJHFR, visit NHSRA.org daily for complete results. Live broadcasts of each NJHFR performance will air online at NHSRATV.com.

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TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

A youngster gives a big hug to Kermit the Frog while storyteller Leanne Friesen looks on during a preschool storytime sesssion at the Warman Community Library on Thursday, June 9. The storytime is one of several popular weekly programs the library runs from September through to June.


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Little Learners Preschool 2016 graduates

Top row (l-r): Isaac Powell, Joshua Prestley, Griffin Valette, Zoie Valette, Carson Jones, Bree Schellenberg. Middle Row (l-r): Audrey Proulx, Aven Kroeker, Ashton Glagoloff, Vaida Shoemaker Bottom Row (l-r): Sam Kozlow, Connor Petiluk. Photo submitted

Duck Lake family gets keys to new home A Habitat for Humanity (Habitat) partner family achieved their dream of homeownership after officially receiving keys to their new home at a presentation held in Duck Lake on June 17. The province, through Saskatchewan Housing Corporation (SHC), contributed $65,000 to help build the home, located at 360 - 5th Street. The home is a threebedroom bungalow approximately 1,000 square feet or 93 square metres across the main floor, and has a partially developed basement. This is the third home in Duck Lake that was built in partnership with labour support from Correctional Service Canada (CORCAN), where inmates of the Willow Cree Healing Lodge construct the home onsite. Other homes built by CORCAN are constructed at the Riverbend Institution and transported to the community. “Our government is pleased to help another Habitat partner family reach their dream of homeownership,” Batoche MLA Delbert

Kirsch said on behalf of Social Services Minister and Minister responsible for Saskatchewan Housing Corporation Donna Harpauer. “Community partnerships such as Habitat for Humanity work to further our government’s commitment to provide safe and affordable housing to Saskatchewan residents.” “Habitat for Humanity Prince Albert and our Duck Lake chapter are elated to celebrate yet another Habitat home dedication in Duck Lake and a young family who are proud to call Saskatchewan home,” Habitat for Humanity Prince Albert Executive Director Jan Adamson said. “Habitat would like to thank the efforts of Corrections Canada and the Willow Cree Healing Lodge, where we support vocational training and a true community partnership. We also hold a great deal of gratitude to the province and Saskatchewan Housing Corporation for their generous donation to our program. This build has also been supported by Aboriginal hous-

ing grant, Habitat National Gift in Kind, Conexus Credit Union and the Town of Duck Lake.” Since 2009, the province has committed funding of $7.85 million to Habitat. The organization has received funding approval for 134 homes in 13 communities across the province. Of these, Saskatchewan Housing Corporation has invested a total of $240,000 in funding for four homes, either completed or under construction, in Duck Lake. Habitat’s innovative delivery model provides opportunities for families to stabilize their housing, and to achieve their homeownership goals. Each partner family selected by Habitat contributes 500 partnering hours in building their home, or other Habitat homes. Habitat is a nonprofit organization working toward a world where everyone has a safe and decent place to live. The organization mobilizes volunteers and partners to build homes that provide families of lowincome with access to affordable homeownership.

Relationship between sugar and obesity isn’t what you think Patrick Luciani The message over the last decade or so is that sugar is highly addictive and pushed by food producers to make us eat as much as possible. Sugar leads to obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. It dries out our skin and makes us look old. It’s poisonous, and food companies are behaving just like the tobacco industry, denying ill effects while driving us all to an early grave. It doesn’t end there. Now we have Gary Fettke, an or-

thopedic surgeon in Australia, railing against the sugar found in fruit - fructose - as the cause of all health problems. He says it all started when Adam and Eve picked the first apple. Think of the snake as Big Food. Where did all this come from? My take is that the obesity crisis has spurred pseudo-research in our desperation to figure out why we’ve put on so much weight so quickly. Anyone following the scientific literature quickly

finds themselves neck deep in conflicting studies. The problem is science can’t definitively determine any cause and effect between sugar and disease, only a correlation, leaving the door wide open for junk science to flourish while fastbuck authors peddle scare theories to pick consumers’ pockets. The media promotes these authors with endless headlines such as Sugar Overload (Maclean’s) CONTINUED ON PAGE 23

Relationship between sugar and obesity


BREAKING NEWS & DIGITAL ARCHIVES www.ccgazette.ca

THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Relationship between sugar and obesity isn’t what you think

Continued from page 22 In the ‘90s, experts told us animal and dairy fats were the culprits. Then came the anti-carbohydrate craze. Soon the blame shifted to chemicals in the environment. What you won’t hear is that the decline in smoking is one of the biggest factors driving obesity, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research. The latest fad is to avoid all sugar. One book pushing this line of thinking is Fat Chance by Dr. Robert Lustig. He claims “every single disease or condition of metabolic syndrome is driven by fructose.” He wants sugar regulated as a poison. In a recent paper in the journal Obesity, Lustig claims that cutting sugar can dramatically improve metabolic diseases such as high blood pressure and cholesterol in a matter of days. He relies on a study that followed 43 overweight children for nine days, replacing sugar with other carbohydrates. Not surprisingly, the study got plenty of uncritical play in The New York Times and The Guardian. But is it science or conjecture? The study wasn’t randomized, had no control group

and all participants self-reported what they ate. In the end, we don’t know whether it was the controlled diet or the reduced sugar that contributed to the impressive results. Still, Dr. Lustig was invited recently to give expert advice to a Senate committee reporting on obesity in Canada. Dr. John Sievenpiper of the University of Toronto, who should have been invited to brief the committee, concluded in a meta-analysis published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that “fructose had no significant effect on body weight or blood pressure as compared to other carbohydrate sources.” According to Sievenpiper and his colleagues, the problem is overconsumption and not sugar toxicity. Responding to Lustig in the journal Nature, Sievenpiper tells us fructose is still good for us. In the minds of many, the real culprit is high-fructose corn syrup, which was introduced as a sweetener in the 1970s. But the American Society for Nutrition reported that there was no strong correlation between obesity and corn syrup. They don’t even use it as a sweetener in the U.K., but Britons’ weights have still gone up.

Confusing? Now consider that a massive study at the University of Washington, reviewing 97 research papers on dietary patterns, concluded that obesity drives sugar consumption not the other way around. That brings us to the problem of how much sugar is too much. The World Health Organization tells us that added sugars - which doesn’t include sugars from fruits, vegetables and dairy - should be no more than 10 per cent of daily energy intake or about 53 grams. A can of pop has about 40 grams. The U.S. National Academy of Medi-

cine reviewed the evidence and came to the conclusion that added sugars should be no higher than 25 per cent, which is more in line with Canadian dietary guidelines. In Canada - where sugar consumption has fallen over the last 20 years mainly because we’ve been drinking less pop and more water - we consume around 11 per cent on average, and that isn’t bad at all. In fact, sugar consumption has been falling in Australia, the U.K. and the U.S., too. Yet, the overall impression is that sugar consumption is going up, given the rise in weight gain. In Aus-

tralia, when researchers at the University of Sydney found that sugar consumption was falling despite obesity rates increasing, the paradox so outraged the anti-sugar advocates that they demanded an investigation into the researchers’ data. An independent review upheld the veracity of the study. So, why all the scare stories about sugar? One explanation is the bias in research studies, discovered by American professors David Allison and Mark Cope: poorly done or smaller research projects found more negative effects of sugar

than did larger, more sophisticated research projects. And it’s the smaller more dramatic papers that get all the headlines. If you’re looking for guidance from anti-sugar experts, don’t bother. For most of us without genetic or chronic obesity problems, we know what to do if we want to control our weight and get healthy: cut back on all food (yes, including sugar). And for heaven’s sake stop reading news stories about sugar - or any pop science about health or illness, for that matter. You’ll live longer that way. HALIFAX, N.S. / Troy Media

Continued from page 19

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016

Clark's Crossing Gazette - June 23, 2016  

Clark's Crossing Gazette - June 23, 2016

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