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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Harvest for Hunger breaks world record for vintage threshing bee Thousands watch as 41 threshing machines work on the same field Submitted by

EHTEL QUIRING

“Chatting with Ethel”

August 24, 2013. What a day at Langenburg, Saskatchewan. And the weather didn’t throw any curve balls. A perfect day with sunshine and a light breeze. What was this day filled with activity all about? Why so much excitement in the air, and on the faces of so many pioneers and those transporting their antique threshing machines, tractors and steam engines to the field? Ask, and you shall be answered. Organizers of the Olde Tyme “Harvest for Hunger” registered with the World Record Academy to officially establish a world record for the number of antique threshing machines operating simultaneously. The world record to beat was from a group in Wisconsin that had 29 antique threshing machines operating simultaneously in 2008. At Langenburg, the 41 antique threshing machines operating simultaneously was slated for 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. As the machines were running each of the operators had their crew of 4 to 5 men on top of the stack of wheat bundles waiting for the action to start. Then with a blast from the steam engine whistle, the vintage tractors roared, and with pitch forks in hand, the crews fed the bundles into the thresher with the blower pipes spewing out the straw. What a sight to behold! It was a special weekend indeed for my husband Sam and myself to witness this historic event, and to support our son Murl and his friends. What a privilege to be a part of this Olde Tyme Harvest wth Murl’s 1929 L.A. Case

A row of 41 antique threshing machines, roughly a quarter of a mile long, are ready to estabish a world record. The Quiring threshing crew from Dalmeny (below, l-r): Leroy Schmidt, Murl Quiring, Dustin and Neil Peters. Not pictured: Larry Thiessen. tractor, the Rumley threshing machine and his high wheel wooden grain wagon. The day was complete wth entertainment involving two of Saskatchewan’s country music winners: Cody Prevost and Jess Moskaluke; food booths, trade show, children’s activities, horse and wagon rides, and bindering demonstration. Here’s a tip of the hat to the organizers and vendors who planned and worked hard for two years to make this dream come true! The proceeds of the field, charitable, and personal donations will be donated to the Canadian Foodgrains Bank. With 6,500 people in attendance, it was a very special time as friends, families and communities came together to create a once in a lifetime event showcasing the region’s rich agricultural heritage while helping those around the world who are less fortunate.

PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY ETHEL QUIRING | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Unionized workers’ wages higher on average: CLC Researchers at the Canadian Labour Congress have found that on average unionized workers in Saskatoon earn $5.23 an hour more than do non-union workers and that benefits the entire community, says CLC President Ken Georgetti. “That extra money in the pockets of unionized employees translates into an added $9.3 million every week paid into the local economy,” says Georgetti. “We know that unionized workers who earn a middle class, family-supporting wage spend their pay cheques close to home and that supports local businesses and the community.” CLC researchers surveyed wages in 30 Canadian communities and found that centres with more union members support a richer mix of businesses and services. “But it doesn’t end there,” says Georgetti. “Many of the things first won by unions are enjoyed by all workers today, including minimum wages, overtime pay, workplace safety standards, vacation pay and parental leaves.” Georgetti says that unions also advocate at local, provincial and federal government

levels for things such as public health care and an improved Canada Pension Plan. “We believe in the old saying that what we want for ourselves we seek for all.” Georgetti adds that being in a union is especially important for women and younger workers. In Saskatchewan, women who belong to unions earn an average of $7.37 an hour more than do women in nonunionized workplaces. In Canada as a whole, young workers aged 15 to 29 earn an additional $5.53 an hour if they belong to unions. “We in the labour movement take satisfaction in knowing that we have helped to build a stronger and more secure economy for everyone in Saskatoon and all of Saskatchewan,” says Georgetti. “When unions stand up for fairness, they raise the bar for everyone.” The Canadian Labour Congress, the national voice of the labour movement, represents 3.3 million Canadian workers. The CLC brings together Canada’s national and international unions along with the provincial and territorial federations of labour and 130 district labour councils.

FRIDAY 27TH & SATURDAY 28TH SEPTEMBER 2013

There when you need us

The Legends Centre, Warman BOOTHS ARE BOOKING FAST! BOOK YOUR SPACE NOW! $200 PER BOOTH Power available upon request. Pancake Breakfast Saturday Morning

NEW

EXHIBITOR’S LOUNGE FARMER’S MARKET TASTE OF WARMAN EXCITING DOOR PRIZES!

R 90 % OVE OUT! SOLD YOUR K BOO E NOW! C SPA

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE We will be limiting the number of business types allowed to participate in order to create a diverse show experience & limit competition for the participants. Booths will be on a first come first serve basis. *DETAILS SUBJECT TO CHANGE*

SPONSORED BY:

P

ASSIONS

beauty studio

306-653-2313

306-955-3131

306-975-9040

306-651-7201

350 3rd Ave S

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: SHERI - EMAIL: SHERIS@WARMAN.CA SARAH - PHONE: (306) 933-1830

We hop e to see you at the sho w!

118 - 1820 McOrmond Dr

206 Circle Dr E

118 - 3126 Clarence Ave S

13045 CHRY Clark’s Crossing 3.25” x 5.75” (2 Col x 80 lines) Colour

Clark's Crossing Gazette - September 5, 2013 issue  
Clark's Crossing Gazette - September 5, 2013 issue  

Clark's Crossing Gazette - September 5, 2013 issue

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