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TERRY JENSON | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Members of the Warman Wildcats Initiation hockey teams suited up at the Legends Centre and played a few shifts during the charity hockey game Monday afternoon between the Montreal Canadiens Fan Club squad and the Warman Fire Rescue Hose Monkeys recreation team. Players for the Canadiens donned the classic Habs jerseys while the Fire Rescue players were easily identified by the red helmets on their...well, helmets. The event also featured a shoot-out and a silent auction with proceeds being used to assist in equipping the Legends Centre Medical Treatment Room.

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Worker dies in potash mine accident A 31-year-old worker from Warman was killed after he was struck by a piece of ore at 3:30 a.m. on Monday, February 17 at the PotashCorp’s Cory mine west of Saskatoon. PotashCorp spokesperson Bill Johnson described the incident a a “ground fall” occurance. “Ground fall is when part of the ground – in this case the roof – fell down and struck him,” said Johnson. “The

TERRY JENSON | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Forensic identification investigators examine the exterior of the Hague Service Centre during the morning of Friday, February 14

RCMP search for suspects after service station robbed at gunpoint By TERRY PUGH & TERRY JENSON

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Rosthern RCMP are looking for five suspects following an armed robbery at a service station in Hague during the early morning hours of Friday, February 14.

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Rosthern RCMP Sgt. Lindsay Darling said police received a 911 call at approximately 3:50 a.m. from an employee at the Hague Shell service station. The lone employee on duty at the service station at the time, a 64-yearold male, was forced to the ground behind the cash register and his hands were tied with laces. A review of the surveillance video revealed that at least five suspects were involved in the robbery. The suspects filled their vehicle with gas before entering the store. “At least one gun – a long firearm – was used in the robbery,” Darling told reporters outside the service station later that morning. “A knife was also used.”

Suspects stole cigarettes, lottery tickets and an undisclosed amount of cash from the register. They then made off in a light silver four-door Pontiac sedan. It is unknown which direction the suspects left the scene, said Darling. After viewing the surveillance video, police investigators believe there were three males and possibly two females involved in the robbery. “They were wearing balaclavas and their faces were covered,” said Darling. “Most of them were wearing hoodies. One lone suspect entered the building and pointed the firearm at the clerk and then the other suspects entered. One was waving a knife at the clerk.” The thieves were in the business for between three to five minutes and, after leaving, the employee was able to get up and call 911. There were no other customers or employees in the store at the time of the robbery. Darling said the employee was not physically injured in the incident, but was quite “shaken.” “We have contacted Victim Services to assist him in any

way they can,” said Darling. “We’ll be following up with him continuously to make sure he’s doing alright and recovers.” Darling said the service station was the target of at least one earlier robbery. He noted that it is located on a busy highway and is a 24-hour gas station and convenience store. “The owners of the business have instructed their employees to always cooperate with these people,” said Darling. “They do have a very good surveillance system, and ultimately that will help us.” RCMP Forensic Identification investigators were on the scene of the robbery during the morning and afternoon of February 14. The business was closed while investigators combed the scene. The surveillance video is of good quality and promises to aid investigators, said Darling “We’re looking at the video and it will be sent out to the media as soon as we can, and also to the surrounding RCMP detachments, as well as the Saskatoon and Prince Albert Police Services,” he said. “We’ll see if we can identify the vehicle in the surveillance video.”

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crew was right there and they administered CPR underground, and they got him to the surface as quickly as they could. He was taken by ambulance to hospital.” Unfortunately, the miner died from his injuries in hospital two hours after being hit by the piece of ore. The miner had been employed at the Cory mine for the past three years. RCMP have confirmed the man was

Miners safe following fire A fire in the Agrium potash mine near Vanscoy forced dozens of workers to take refuge in emergency shelters last weekend. The fire broke out about a kiilometer underground on Friday, February 14. According to Mike Dirham, the Agrium mine’s general manager, the fire started on an underground loader called a scoop tram. The machine has a fire suppression system, but it wasn’t able to extinguish the blaze. As a result, the miners were forced to head to specially-designed shelters to escape the smoke. “There is food and water and telephones in there where we can commumicate with the people in each shelter,” said Dirham. “They vary in size from a capacity of holding 10 people to a capacity of 60 people.” The shelters where the miners can wait for emergency crews are self-contained. The workers were clear of the area by Saturday afternoon, and there were no reported injuries. The cause of the fire is under investigation, and provincial mine inspectors are part of that process. Meanwhile underground operations at the mine were suspended until the investigation was completed.

married and has a two-yearold child, but have not yet released his name. Another miner was also taken to hospital as a result of the incident, but his injuries were not considered lifethreatening. Mining operations at the Cory mine were put on hold while an investigation was carried out. The investigation is expected to take several days.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 PG. 3

More dangerous goods are being carried on North American rail lines than ever before. But there’s also an increased emphasis on railway safety, particularly at the local municipal level, according to CN Rail

STAYING ON TRACK

By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Oil shipments, in particular, have increased exponentially over the past five years. According to the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, the number of railway oil tanker carloads in this country has increased from 500 in 2009 to 160,000 in 2013. In the United States, the number has grown from 10,800 carloads in 2009 to 400,000 carloads in 2013. “Safety is our number one priority,” said CN Rail’s Warren Chandler in an interview in early February. “We’re meeting with municipalities, local fire departments and first responders to answer their questions and concerns about what’s travelling through their communities, and to offer specialized training.” Chandler said CN Rail has adopted a “praoctive approach” to increased public concern over railway safety. Last fall, the railway company sent letters to municipalities situated along its lines offering to meet with elected officials and administrators. The City of Warman was among those municipalities to take up the railway company’s offer. In early February, Warman’s Mayor, councilors, senior adminstrators, police, and deputy fire chief met with CN Assistant Vice President David Miller and CN Dangerous Goods Officer Steven Santelli. It marked the beginning of what Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence hopes is closer communication with

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Safety a high priority for railway companies, municipalities and firefighters TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Oil tanker cars wait on a siding on the CN main line in Warman the railway company that’s been a presence in the community for more than a century. “It was a good meeting,” said Spence in an interview. “It really opened my eyes to a lot of things. At the same time, it alleviated a lot of our fears. We didn’t really know what kind of goods are travelling down our tracks, or how much. “We now have a better idea of the type and quantity of commodities. The railway will be supplying that data regularly. “But more importantly, we also learned about what safety regulations are in place to protect our citizens,” she added. “There are regulations in place that ensure the railways are run in a very efficient and responsible way.”

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Warman City Manager Stan Westby said the meeting was initiated by the Mayor after council received CN’s letter last fall. “It was a priority for us,” he said. While rail safety regulations differ between Canada and the United States, there are also many points in common, noted Westby. Both CN and CP operate continentwide, and rolling stock regularly crosses national boundaries. As a result, there are high safety standards in both the US and Canada. “One thing we learned was that all the cars are monitored, and if any car is pulled over on any particular siding for any reason, it must undergo a safety inspection within 48 hours of being pulled over,” said Westby. “In addition, the regulations re-

quire they have track safety sensors every 30 to 40 miles. CN’s standard is to have safety sensors every 15 miles. These track sensors monitor the condition of all the cars that travel over it, and register if they are overheating. An alert will stop the cars at the earliest opportunity before the next sensor, and the cars are quarantined by pulling them off on the siding.” Spence said each tanker car has a specific placard identifying the type of commodity it contains. She noted these cars are regularly inspected to verify their structural integrity. Older-style tanker cars are being retired and replaced with newer, safer models, but it will take years before manufacturers can meet the current demand.

The most reassuring aspect of the meeting was the information and training available to local firefighters and emergency responders, she said. “CN representatives are in charge of the training, and they will come to the community and do different training modules for local firefighters and emergency personnel,” she said. “There is also a specialized training ground in Colorado where they sponsor people to go and get more intensive training.” While the training programs were available to all municipalities, relatively few knew about the opportunity and even fewer availed themselves of the programs, she said. “Thankfully, that has improved,” she said. “The communication now is excellent.”

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Farms and acreages west of Osler and Warman that were hard hit by last year’s flooding are still vulnerable, but the Corman Park councilor responsible for the area says he’s hopeful it won’t be as bad this spring. Corman Park Division 6 councilor Bas FroeseKooijenga said despite an above-normal spring runoff forecast by the provincial Water Security Agency (WSA) for the Saskatoon region, a lot depends on the amount of snowfall between now and April. “We could still have a repeat of last year, but hopefully it will be to a lesser extent,” said Froese-Kooijenga in an interview on Friday, February 14. “It can’t get much worse than what we had last spring and summer.” Froese-Kooijenga said a recent meeting in Regina between elected representatives and Ken Cheveldayoff, Minister Responsible for the WSA, should have an impact on the provincial government. Froese-Kooijenga, along with Corman Park Reeve Judy Harwood and Corman Park Administrator Adam Tittemore were at the meeting on behalf of their RM. While Froese-Kooijenga was disappointed the province wasn’t prepared to commit funding for the “Osler Ditch,” a high-priority drainage project that would divert a portion of the surface runoff from Buzz Slough northwest of Osler, he said he’s still hopeful the province will partner with the federal government through CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Company says metal refinery to be built near Langham will be safe The following is a news release issued by Fortune Minerals following provincial environmental approval of the company’s proposed SMPP refinery: Fortune Minerals Limited is pleased to announce that the Honourable Ken Cheveldayoff, Minister of Environment for the Province of Saskatchewan, has accepted the Environmental Assessment Branch’s recommendation and approved the Company’s proposed Saskatchewan Metals Processing Plant (“SMPP”), subject to certain conditions. The announcement last week by the Saskatchewan Government states, “The proposal was assessed to be both environmentally and technically sound, providing both environmental safeguards and outlining company plans to ensure Saskatchewan’s air, water, and natural resources are protected throughout the duration of the project and after.” The SMPP is a hydrometallurgical refinery planned near Langham, Saskatchewan (27 kilometres northwest of Saskatoon) in the Rural Municipality of Corman Park. With a capital cost estimated to be in excess of $200 million, this plant is expected to bring 200 jobs during construction, create approximately 100 longterm direct jobs for the region, and produce new business opportunities to support the facility. The SMPP will process metal concentrates from the Company’s proposed NICO mine and mill in the Northwest Territories (“NT”). The combined facilities will be an important vertically integrated and reliable Canadian source of cobalt and bismuth metals and chemicals with a highly liquid gold co-product, and copper. “Saskatchewan has a rigorous environmental review process and we are pleased to have received approval to advance our project,” said Robin Goad, President and Chief Executive Officer of Fortune. “This is an important milestone toward bringing this state of the art metals processing facility to Saskatchewan. We intend

to work closely with the communities near our site to earn their support and demonstrate the benefits of the project.” With this approval, Fortune is now completing the process of rezoning its land with the Rural Municipality of Corman Park. The Company is also continuing its dialogue with nearby communities to explain the opportunities of the refinery and exchange information about the project with residents. The Company will host a meeting at the Affinity Community Hall in Langham on February 19th. The Company has undertaken extensive studies to develop a facility that can deliver significant economic and social benefits to the area while minimizing its environmental footprint. Dr. Richard Schryer, Director of Regulatory and Environmental Affairs for Fortune, said “The SMPP is a unique and technologically advanced hydrometallurgical facility that will contribute to Canada’s and Saskatchewan’s proven expertise in mining and processing.” Schryer, who is based in Saskatoon, also commented, “Extensive test work and piloting has been drawn on to design this facility, which incorporates the most up-to-date metallurgical and environmental technologies.” The approval for the SMPP includes conditions, several of which reflect Fortune’s prior commitments made through the environmental assessment process. They include among other conditions, establishment of an independent community based monitoring program, submission of an annual monitoring report to Saskatchewan Environment, providing effective dust control for all components of the project, and submission of a detailed quantitative and qualitative analysis of the process residue that will be stored at the site.

COMMUNITY MONITORING

With the introduction of metals refining to the Saskatoon area, Fortune has proposed the creation of an independent com-

munity monitoring program to give residents in the area confidence that the new facility is meeting or exceeding all environmental standards. The Company will commit to fund this independent body, which will have the freedom to hire its own expert consultants to review the Company’s monitoring plans prior to and during commercial operations. Appropriate consultants will report to the committee and make recommendations to the Environmental Protection Branch and Fortune. “We recognize that Fortune and metals processing are new in this region and that people who live in the area need to know that their land, air and water supply will not be adversely affected,” said Mike Romaniuk, Fortune’s Vice President, Operations and Chief Operating Officer. “Just as we’ve looked for innovative technology to treat metals at our facility, we want to bring creative approaches to our community relationships. By providing funding to set up an independent committee, we hope to establish that our company and our operations can be trusted to deliver the levels of safety and environmental responsibility that we have promised.”

ABOUT THE SMPP

The SMPP lands are adjacent to the Canadian National Railway, which will be used to deliver 180 tonnes per day of bulk concentrate from the NICO mine over its expected minimum 20year lifespan. The Company is also exploring other potential sources of concentrate that could be processed at the SMPP and is also investigating opportunities for entering the recycling business. Once operational, the SMPP would have approximate average annual production of: 40,500 ounces of gold (contained in doré); 1,600 tonnes of cobalt (contained in cobalt sulphate heptahydrate), needed to manufacture lithium ion and nickel metal hydride batteries used in

portable electronic devices and electric vehicles; Additional cobalt products can be produced to meet changes in market conditions; 1,700 tonnes of bismuth (contained in ingots, needles and an oxide compound), a non-toxic, environmentally safe replacement for lead with a broad range of industrial and commercial uses, including pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, electronics, pigments and alloys; and 250 tonnes of copper (contained in a metal precipitate by-product that will be sold to smelters).

ABOUT NICO

The NICO deposit is located approximately 160 km northwest of Yellowknife and recently received its environmental assessment approval in the NT. The deposit will be mined primarily by open pit methods

with underground ores also contributing mill feed during the first two years from the existing underground workings that were established from previous test mining programs. The ores will be processed at the rate of 4,650 tonnes per day in a concentrator at the site, using simple flotation to produce a bulk concentrate for shipment to the SMPP. More than $110 million of work has already been invested to advance the project, including completion of Front-End Engineering and Design and feasibility studies, underground test mining, and pilot plant tests to verify the process methods and products the Company plans to produce. Fortune continues to work with Deloitte Corporate Finance Inc. to complete project financing agreements for the NICO project. The Company has already announced a strategic investment by Procon Re-

sources Inc. in 2013 to provide interim financing to advance work on the project, and negotiations are ongoing to secure final project financing for the development.

FORTUNE MINERALS

Fortune is a diversified resource company with several mineral deposits and a number of exploration projects, all located in Canada. The Company is focused on the development of the Arctos Anthracite Project in British Columbia and the NICO gold-cobalt-bismuth-copper project in the NT and Saskatchewan. In addition, the Company owns the Sue-Dianne copper-silver-gold deposit and other exploration projects in the NT. Fortune is focused on outstanding performance and growth of shareholder value through assembly and development of high quality mineral resource projects.

Fortune Minerals plant poses danger Submitted by

CATHY HOLTSLANDER

Fortune Minerals wants to build a hydrometallurgical processing plant just outside of Langham, about 35 km west of Saskatoon near the North Saskatchewan River. The project cannot go ahead unless approved by the Minister according to the Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Act. The company submitted its own Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on expected environmental impacts and its plans for managing the predicted problems. The government found the company’s initial report incomplete and had to ask it for additional information. The public had a chance to review the final EIS report and submit comments during a 60day public review period that ended in early December. The company wants to pro-

cess rock shipped from its mine in the NWT to extract gold, bismuth, cobalt and copper using sulphuric acid, cyanide, other powerful chemicals and large amounts of electricity. The rock also contains significant amounts of actinolite, a type of asbestos, as well as arsenic compounds. After removing the valuable metals, the arsenic, asbestos and other material would be left permanently in waste pits at the site. In its EIS, Fortune Minerals minimized the health implications of the arsenic and did not disclose the nature of actinolite nor address its health hazards, even after it was asked to submit a more thorough examination of the project’s health impacts. All forms of asbestos, including actinolite, cause lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. There is no safe level of exposure below which asbes-

tos does not pose carcinogenic risks. Mesothelioma is a type of cancer that is extremely painful and always fatal, with death usually within 6 to 18 months of diagnosis. Once inhaled or swallowed, it is impossible to remove asbestos particles from a person’s body. The smaller the particles, the greater the health hazard. Yet Fortune Minerals did not even mention the potential health impacts of actinolite on workers, nearby farmers, local residents or future generations. The company’s plan for solid wastes is to fill 8 to 10 large pits (waste cells), two at a time, over the expected 18 to 25 year life-span of the project, then cover them with a layer of soil. At 2% of the waste stream, a total of 63,000 to 79,000 tonnes of actinolite would accumulate CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 PG. 5

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FAITH AND FAMILY Hard work and determination hallmarks of Warman senior celebrating 100 years By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

When Elizabeth Stein was diagnosed with bowel cancer twelve years ago, she just took it in stride. Rather than let it get the better of her, Stein resolved to fight back. At the age of 87, when operations are fraught with risks, she underwent surgery to remove the tumour and then set about getting back on her feet. After all, her garden - a lifelong passion of hers - was calling. She was anxious to get out of bed and back outdoors. Stein bounced back almost miraculously from the surgery. Even her doctor was astounded at her recovery - achieved without any chemotherapy or radiation. She’s been cancer-free since the surgery. “Mom just ate a lot of garlic,” said her daughter Jeanette Weatherby in an interview at the Warman Mennonite Special Care Home (WMSCH) on Wednesday, February 12. “Garlic has a lot of natural anti-oxidants, and she’s pretty tough and resiliant to begin with.” Stein will turn 100 years old on Monday, February 24, but the big celebration is set for Saturday, March 1, when her fam-

ily will gather at the care home to mark the milestone. Stein has 22 grandchildren, 41 greatgrandchildren, and 6 greatgreat-grandchildren. Stein was born and raised at Muenster. After marrying her husband, Paul, the couple lived in Flin Flon, Manitoba and Sudbury, Ontario before returning to Saskatchewan to farm at St. Gregor in 1946. Paul was a carpenter by trade, and a musician by nature - playing accordian with local bands at dances. They were married for 55 years before Paul passed away in 1989 at the age of 76. They raised nine children - four boys and five girls. And while they never had much money, there was no shortage of love. “We were a close family,” recalls Weatherby. “We still are, even though we’re kind of scattered now.” Weatherby and her husband live in Warman. One of her sisters and one of her brothers both live in Saskatoon. Elizabeth Stein lived in her own home until she was 95, but had to move to a care home in Humboldt after a fall left her with limited moblity. Two years ago, she was able to move to the WMSCH in Warman, where

she’s closer to her family. “Mom was always busy,” said Weatherby. “She loved being outdoors, especially working in her garden. That was her passion. She was out there, even at the age of 94, directing how she wanted the garden planted. “She also did a lot of the farm work. It was a small farm. We had a few cows, pigs, chickens and ducks. We had some hard times, but Mom was always there for us. I remember her in the winter chopping ice and hanging clothes out on the line at 30 below. She worked so hard all her life.” Weatherby said even during her leisure hours, her mother was always busy. “Mom loved to crochet things for her children and grandchildren,” she said. Church was a focal point for the devout Catholic family. “Absolutely, the church was, and is, very important for mom,” said Weatherby. “We always attended the little church in St. Gregor every Sunday. No matter what time we got home from a dance, we always had to get up and go to church.” Weatherby said it’s a testament to her mother’s spirit that she’s made it to the century mark. “We can’t believe mom’s going to be 100 years old,” she said. “It’s an achievement we’re all proud of.”

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Elizabeth Stein and her daughter Jeanette Weatherby of Warman are preparing for a big family gathering to celebrate Elizabeth’s 100th birthday. The resident of the Warman Mennonite Special Care Home turns 100 years old on Monday, February 24.

Building homes in Mexico a labour of love for Warman-based church group By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

start with. They do what they can to survive.” But at the same time, added Guenther, even though the people may not have much in the way of education or money, they have talent, a strong work ethic, and compassion for others. “They are a talented people,” he said. “Over the years, we’ve developed very strong, life-long friendships.” With the help of local churches, as well as volunteers from other parts of Mexico, the United States and Canada, the

A lot of people head to Mexico this time of year for sun, sand and relaxation. But for a team of volunteers with Christlike Ministries, a Warman-based Christian organization, the next month or so will be a much different experience. For 13 years, the group has been building homes for needy families in the poverty-stricken city of Juarez, a city of two million people in Mexico, just across the border from El Paso, Texas. “It’s a very depressed area, “It’s a city with absolutely no welfare one with a very transient popsystem, and a place ulation. People go there hopwhere there are no jobs,” said Frank ing to cross the border into Guenther, who along with his wife Liz and the United States for a better a team of volunteers, life, but many of these people left for Mexico on Friday, February 14. In have three strikes against an interview a week them before they’re even born prior to his deparbecause their parents have so ture, Guenther said the city of Juarez is a little to start with....” place of both despair • Fran Guenther, Christlike Ministries and hope. “It’s a very degroup builds a house every pressed area,” said Guenther. “One with a very transient pop- year for a needy family using locally-purchased materials. ulation. People go there hop “Everything is bought localing to cross the border into the ly in Juarez, except for certain United States for a better life, things like windows and doors but many of these people have that we get across the border three strikes against them bein El Paso because the quality fore they’re even born because is better,” said Guenther. “We their parents have so little to

raise money during the year to pay for the projects. We also do other things like provide food and clothing for people in poor neighbourhoods, and do prison ministry work.” Guenther said a major project was completed in October 2013 with the opening of a 1200-square foot home that also serves as a chapel and outreach centre for the local pastor and his family. Guenther said after so many years working with the people of Juarez, there is a strong bond between the Canadians, Americans and Mexicans who contribute to the projects. Building a home for a family in need, and giving them hope for the future, is a concrete way of showing God’s love, he said. “These relationships get stronger every year,” he said. “We’re very thankful that we can bless those that aren’t as fortunate as we are.” Christlike Ministries raises funds throughout the year for its work in Mexico, with its major fundraiser being the Valley Gospel Celebration, a three-day event featuring music and traditional Mennnonite food. This year the event is slated for the Brian King Centre in Warman from June 20-22. The Directors of the ministry include: Frank and Liz Guenther of Warman, Jake and Loretta Wiebe of Rosthern, Susan Hiebert of Warman and Mary and Dave Neufeld of Hague.

Frank Guenther of Christlike Ministries, based in Warman, leads a team of volunteers that are currently in Juarez, Mexico, building homes for needy families

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 PG. 6

Political issues not always what they seem to be

Education property taxes for infrastructure? By COLIN CRAIG

Canadian Taxpayers Federation

COMMENTARY

Premier Brad Wall mused recently about raising “education” property taxes and using the money to fix roads and build bridges. While it’s inappropriate to tell the public you’re taxing them to fund K-12 “education” and then turn around and use the money for something else, it’s also unnecessary. Instead of taking the easy way out and jacking taxes, Premier Brad Wall, and his government, need to do two things. First, the Wall government should keep going after inefficient spending by: pursuing a number of options; eliminating unnecessary programs, partnering with the private sector to save money, delaying unnecessary spending and scaling back pay and benefits for public sector employees. Once they implement these savings, those dollars could be used to help pay for infrastructure needs. In the past, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, a donation-based taxpayers’ watchdog organization, has praised the Wall government for taking advantage of such opportunities. For example, hospitals in Saskatchewan formed a partnership with a private company to clean linens in hospitals. The partnership is expected to save taxpayers over $93 million over the next decade. The Wall government should also take action on things like government employee pension plans. Instead of ducking the issue and letting the matter get worse and worse, the government should stop the bleeding. For example, instead of continuing to let new judges join a really expensive (for the taxpayer to fund) pension plan, new judges should be put in a less costly plan. To illustrate how this is a big problem, consider that the shortfall in the judges’ pension plan in Saskatchewan grew from $89 million in 2010 to $135 million in 2013. The same problem doesn’t exist for provincial politicians or those who work for departments and crown corporations as the provincial government (under the NDP) started putting those employees in less costly plans back in the late 1970s. Surely Premier Wall has the courage to finish the job off and move judges, hospital workers and others into less costly pension plans? The Wall government also deserves credit for downsizing the bureaucracy by over 1,900 positions over the past few years. No doubt it wasn’t easy, but consider that things seem to be operating just fine without those extra 1,900 positions. That brings us to the second thing the Wall government needs to do; demand the same type of reform by municipalities, school boards and health regions. They too should be looking under every stone for savings, scaling back benefits and cutting unnecessary positions. Gone should be the days of municipalities, health regions and school boards simply begging for more money. Everyone knows there’s fat to cut there too. One thing is clear, if Premier Wall and other organizations continue to look for savings, they can find them and there will be no need to penalize everyone with higher education property taxes.

The problem in politics is issues are never quite as they seem...or better put, never really about what politicians say they are about.

MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

Or so Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall demonstrated on a couple issues of late. The first is the on-going problem moving prairie grains, oilseeds and pulses to port by rail. Wall dashed off an angry missive earlier this month to the federal Transport Minister Lisa Raitt, demanding she intervene in a potential grain handling dispute. In fairness to the Saskatchewan Premier, one gets his frustration with grain-handling unions at the ports because it’s one we all have seen in our lives. But the very fact that CN Rail and Teamsters reached a deal the very day that Wall sent his letter suggests that some of Wall’s outraged was a little misplaced.

After all, the lack of cars designated for grain movement in this year of a record crop on the Prairies has been a frustration since the crop came off. It makes one a little suspicious that Wall just found it politically easier to rail against unpopular grain-handling unions that do something about the rail companies themselves. In fact, after his letter, Wall announced that Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart, Economy Minister Bill Boyd, Highways and Infrastructure Minister Don McMorris would meet with the rail companies in the hopes of dealing with the backlog in grain movement that the Premier now acknowledges had precious little to do with labour trouble in the railroad industry. “This grain movement backlog is a very serious situation for the entire province and it is a high priority for our government,” Wall said. “The delays in moving grain have led to lower prices for our producers at the farmgate and are harming our reputation as a reliable supplier.” This is all true, but shouldn’t

this problem have been recognized and/or addressed sooner? Or was it simply more convenient and a better story to blame the unions? There again, the stories politicians tell aren’t always the whole story, are they? Consider Wall’s bid to sell casinos in Regina and Moose Jaw to the Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA). To hear Wall tell it, the sale – estimated to be between $100 million and $200 million – would mean more jobs, better educated First Nations people and a better a return on investment among the touted benefits. And, evidently, the only thing standing in his way is NDP leader Cam Broten and the NDP’s unanimous approval. The thing is, though, Wall doesn’t need the approval of the nine-member NDP caucus to change a law in the 58-seat Legislative Assembly. Wall’s real problem is that it’s a law (and an election promise) he promised he wouldn’t change without first consulting the voters. And as for Wall’s rush to get this great business deal com-

pleted before SIGA changes its mind, is it really that great a deal for taxpayers when the casinos provide $50 million a year or so to the provincial coffers? Gee, what happened to the Sask. Party’s “No special deals” for First Nations? The suspicious among us might think that Wall is trying to deal with his own budget cash crunch problem... while also attempting to trap the NDP with its own silly legislative forbidding the sale of such Crown corporations. If so, Broten is then doing what Opposition leaders should do – holding the government to account. There again, why should Broten stand in the way of the aspirations of First Nations people, considering the NDP campaigned on resource-sharing with First Nations? Isn’t this a resource that could be shared? And why were the casinos put on the NDP government’s list of untouchable Crown corporations in the first place? Or, like so much in politics, is this just another issue that’s really being about something else?

Does children’s television programming create a lot of couch potato kids?

I

S it just me or does it seem like there is an endless amount of children’s television programming nowadays? There is no doubt that children’s programming is a lucrative market for networks, when you combine their outreach with internet websites, games and social media. But what are kids truly learning from watching them? As a parent of two young kids, it is impossible for me not to catch an episode of my kids’ favourite programs. It is funny because I always look at these shows from an adult perspective, especially when you watch too many of them. Both my kids love Toopy and Binoo, a show about an

JAMES TARRANT

Prairie Screechin’

annoying happy-go-lucky mouse that goes on imaginative adventures with his beat friend cat. Then there is that complaining Caillou. In a nut shell it is about a whiny five-yearold who gets his own way. It drives me mad. Oh, and I can’t forget Max and Ruby, a show were two bunnies live together with no parents, but the occasional aunt who drops in from time to time.

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I refuse to watch Dora the Explorer until the creator of the show purchases her a GPS. Those programs were just on the Treehouse network. I am sure that if any parent out there scrolled through the channels through their cable service they would find maybe five to 15 networks catering to kids. My point is with the abundance of options from TV, the internet and gaming systems, kids are forgetting to be kids. When I say that, I am reminded of my Dad telling me the story about how rough he had it when he was a kid. How he had to walk to school 20 miles every day with his

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books and a cord of firewood to light the pot belly stove in the classroom of his school’s one-room school house. Then if that wasn’t enough, he had endless chores to do when he got home. Am I slowly turning into my Dad? Nah, I don’t think so. When I hike my pants up to my neck and complain about the weather full time I will start worrying. I just know when I grew up I was very good at playing with my toys and playing outside with my siblings, friends; whoever really. An activity that seems lost on today’s generation. The simple act of playing with toys has many benefits.

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There is the personal interaction factor. It allows kids to connect with siblings or friends. When a kid masters a toy it can build self confidence. If parents can disguise a learning experience with an educational toy it can teach motivation. Toys allow kids to unwind when they are stressed and most importantly it allows them to be imaginative by stimulating the senses. Then there are the benefits of sports, including social interaction, discipline, goal-setting and team building. I don’t mean to preach because I don’t consider myself to be a model parent, just someone drawing on my own

experience and learning one day at a time. I just think dependence on technology sometimes robs kids of their true imaginative potential.

Correction In the February 13 issue of the Gazette, the driver of the horse-drawn sleigh in the photo from the Hepburn Winter Festival is Russ Thiessen. The Gazette apologizes for the error.

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VOL. 6 NO. 27


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

7

‘Assault’ on inebriated woman turns out to be simply a case of falling down FROM THE CELL BLOCK Submitted by

SGT. WARREN GHERASIM Warman RCMP

On February 15 at 6:25 a.m. police received a complaint of a possible assault at a residence near Delisle. The 36-year-old female called for an ambulance as she thought she had been assaulted. Further investigation revealed that she was not assaulted, but rather had fallen as a result of being intoxicated and hit her head. There were no charges on the matter.

DRIVE-THRU COLLISION

On February 10 at 1:15 p.m. police received a complaint of a two-vehicle collision in front of Tim Hortons on Centennial Drive in Martensville. A truck driven by a 43-year-old female from Martensville was leaving the parking lot and entered the street before it was safe to do so, striking a car that was southbound on Centennial Drive. There were no injuries reported. The car required towing from the scene. The female was charged with driving without due care and attention.

HIGHWAY 14 COLLISION

On February 12 at 4:00 p.m. police received a complaint of a two-vehicle collision on High-

way 14 near Grandora. Asquith Fire and First Responders assisted with the accident. A 52-year-old male received minor injuries and charges are pending.

STOP FOR SCHOOL BUSES

On February 13 at 10:30 a.m. police received a complaint from a school bus driver in Martensville that vehicles are not stopping for the bus’s red lights and stop arm. The public is reminded to stop for school buses when the stop arm is out, regardless if they are meeting or passing the school bus.

STOLEN VEHICLE ROLLED

On February 16 at 4:15 a.m. police were patrolling Highway 12 near Martensville when they located a vehicle in the centre median that had rolled. The 16-year-old male driving the vehicle was located walking down Highway 16. It was revealed that the vehicle was stolen out of Saskatoon. The youth was charged with possession of stolen property, drive without due care and attention and driving without a valid driver’s license. He was released for an upcoming court date.

PASSED OUT, HITS DITCH

On February 15, 2014 at 1:50 a.m. police received a complaint of a vehicle stuck in the ditch on Penner Road, north of Saskatoon. The 23-year-old driver of the vehicle had fallen asleep and hit the ditch. He was charged with driving without due care and attention. There were no injuries reported and the vehicle was towed from the scene.

On February 15 at 12:00 p.m. police received a complaint of an individual that hit the ditch and was passed out behind the wheel of the vehicle. An ambulance was also dispatched as it was unsure if the individual was injured. Police attended and located a 59-year-old male from Saskatoon intoxicated. He was arrested and charged with impaired driving. There were no injuries reported. The vehicle was towed from the scene.

RECKLESS DRIVER

DRUNK DRIVER NABBED

SLEEPING, HITS DITCH

On February 14 at 11:10 p.m. police received a complaint of a possible impaired driver on Highway 7 near Vanscoy. The vehicle was swerving on the road, almost hitting the ditch a couple of times. The vehicle was last seen parked at a Vanscoy business. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

On February 15, 2014 at 5:10 p.m. police received a complaint of a possible impaired driver on Highway 16 near Langham. The complainant reported that the vehicle was swerving from the centre lane to the shoulder of the road. Police located and charged a 33-year-old male with impaired driving.

THEFT FROM VEHICLE

On February 10 at 8:45 a.m. police received a complaint of theft from a vehicle in Borden. The vehicle was rummaged through and some small items were taken from the vehicle. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

MARTENSVILLE THEFT

The development was promoted as including condominiums, a golf course designed by Jack Nicklaus, an airport and a marina. An additional $2 million is believed to have been raised in other Canadian provinces. Landbankers contravened Saskatchewan securities laws by failing to register in any capacity with FCAA, by never claiming any exemptions, and by claiming that the securities they sold would be listed on an exchange and would have a certain future value. Kelly Friesen, formerly of Warman, and Sonja McAdam, formerly of Christopher Lake, sold Landbankers securities to Saskatchewan residents without being registered to trade or advise in securities in the province. Friesen and McAdam

Federal budget lacks specifics: SUMA official The 2014 federal budget is missing important details to support our cities, towns and villages in their efforts to help our province grow despite promises of action. “Saskatchewan’s villages, towns and cities have been repeatedly promised support by the federal government to meet the challenges posed by aging infrastructure,” said Mayor Debra Button, SUMA President. “But despite the immediate need for infrastructure investment in our communities, we are still left waiting for details and risk missing an important construction season.” The federal budget, released February 11, lacked details regarding the Building Canada Fund (BCF) despite the 10 year, $14 billion fund being announced in the 2013 federal budget. Instead, a handful of targeted investments were noted, such as funding for the

Windsor-Detroit border crossing, bridges in the Greater Montreal Area, and projects located in national parks. In September 2013, a $660 million investment in Toronto subways was announced. SUMA unanimously passed a resolution at its convention calling on the federal government to provide details for the BCF. The budget also lacked any funding or a plan to address affordable housing in Canada. Saskatchewan communities are experiencing a housing crisis and there is a need for federal leadership and investment. SUMA welcomed the investment in rural and Northern community access to broadband. The government announced $305 million in funding over five years to provide or improve internet access in rural and remote communities.

reached a settlement with FCAA in March of 2013 in which they agreed to: Cease acquiring, trading, or advising residents of Saskatchewan in securities matters; Resign from and be banned from acting as a director/officer of an issuer, registrant, or investment fund manager; Be banned from working in any capacity related to the trade of securities in Saskatchewan; $50,000 fine for Friesen; and $4,500 fine for McAdams. Alberta and New Brunswick securities regulators have also issued Cease Trade

On February 11 at 11:30 p.m. police were called to a complaint of a highly-intoxicated male at the Warman Hotel. He was removed from the bar and arrested for being intoxicated in public. The 52-year-old male from Saskatoon was transported to Saskatoon and taken into custody by Saskatoon Police Service for their follow up investigation on a hit and run.

TOOLS STOLEN IN DELISLE

STOLEN CAR FOUND

On February 12 at 1:15 p.m. police received a complaint of a theft of tools from a construction trailer in Delisle. The investigation into this matter is ongoing.

HOT TUB DAMAGED

On February 14 at 9:30 a.m. police received a complaint of mischief to a hot tub in Langham. The owners report that someone had turned off the breaker to the hot tub causing damage to the pipes under the hot tub. Damage estimate is unknown. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

DRUNK DRIVER CHARGED

On February 10 at 11:00 p.m. police received a complaint of

Orders against Landbankers, Friesen, and McAdams. Being an informed investor is one of the best defences against investment fraud. Before investing follow these simple steps: check registration and disciplinary history on www.securities-adminstrators.ca, check the news, search the internet and contact the Securities Division of FCAA. Anyone contacted in the future by Landbankers, its representatives, or by any other questionable person or company soliciting investments should contact FCAA’s Securities Division at 306-787-5645.

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PAST CAUGHT UP TO HIM

On February 11 at 7:50 a.m. police responded to a complaint of theft from a vehicle in Martensville. The side window of the vehicle was smashed and a couple of small items were taken from the vehicle. It was found that another vehicle was stolen from the same location. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

Former Warman resident fined in fraud scheme Kelly Friesen, formerly of Warman, has been fined $50,000 for his role in promoting a Mexican real estate development that violated Saskatchewan’s securities trading laws. Financial and Consumer Affairs Authority of Saskatchewan (FCAA) has ordered that Landbankers International MX, S.A. De C. V, cease trading in or acquiring securities and that they cease advising Saskatchewan residents on securities, trades or exchange contracts. As well, they have been fined $50,000. FCAA’s evidence shows that Landbankers raised $3 million from several Saskatchewan residents to allegedly develop approximately 6.8 kilometers of beach front property on the west coast of Mexico, near a turtle sanctuary.

a possible impaired driver at a business in Martensville. The police located a 32-year-old female and she was charged for impaired driving. She was given a 90-day driving suspension and released for court in April in Saskatoon.

206 Circle Dr E

118 - 3126 Clarence Ave S

On February 13 at 2:00 a.m. police received a complaint of a suspicious male at Ranch Ehrlo near Warman. He was seen outside the property walking around the vehicles. Police attended and located a male near a car, which was determined to be stolen. As the male was being arrested, he attempted to run from Police, but was apprehended after a short distance. A 30-year-old male from Melville was charged with resisting arrest, assaulting a Peace Officer, and theft of a motor vehicle.

STUCK IN THE PITS

On February 13 at 7:00 a.m. police received a complaint of a vehicle stuck in the snow at the gravel pits south of Radisson. Police learned the vehi-

cle was stolen and arrested one male at the location. Another male fled the scene on foot. Police Dog Services out of North Battleford were called in to assist and located the second male. A 46-year-old male from Hafford and a 37-year-old male from Saskatoon were charged with numerous offence including Possession of Stolen property and Breach of Undertaking. They were remanded and appeared in court on February 14 in Saskatoon.

COLD AND INEBRIATED

On February 16 at 1:55 a.m. police received a complaint of a possible assault in the RM of Corman Park. The police attended and found a 26-year-old male who was intoxicated and left the residence without proper winter clothing. He was arrested and charged for being intoxicated in public. He was lodged in cells until sober and warmer. There were no injuries reported.

WARMAN MINER KILLED

On February 17 at 3:00 a.m. police were called to an industrial accident at the Cory Potash Mine. A 31-year-old male from Warman was injured when a piece of ore fell on him while he was working underground. The male was taken to the hospital, given medical treatment, however succumbed to his injuries and died. Warman RCMP is assisting Occupational Health and Safety, who are investigating the accident.

PubLIc notIce Bylaw 2014-04

Public Notice is hereby given that the Council of the City of Warman intends to adopt a bylaw under The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to sell or trade a piece of Municipal Reserve for the purpose of developing residential lots. Intent The proposed Bylaw will authorize administration to subdivide and consolidate a piece of Municipal Reserve with the Legends Stage 6 subdivision Affected LAnd The affected land is legally described as a portion of MR 8 Plan 102123964 in LS 3, Section 7, Township 39, Range 4, West of the 3rd Meridian and in south east ¼ Section 7, Township 39, Range 4, West of the 3rd Meridian as shown on attached map.

ReAson The amendment is to correct a mistake in an over-dedication of Municipal Reserve. PubLIc InsPectIon Any person may inspect the Bylaw at the City of Warman office between 8:30am-4:30pm, Monday-Friday excluding statutory holidays. Copies are available at cost. PubLIc HeARIng Council will hold a public hearing on Monday March 10, 2014 at 6:30pm at the City of Warman office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed bylaw. Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing (or delivered to the undersigned at the municipal office before the hearing). Brad Toth Manager of Planning and Development

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 PG. 8

Bringing it home

Thrift stores link local, global issues, says MCC By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) is celebrating its 50th anniversary in Saskatchewan this year, and a big part of the charitable organization’s success over the decades has been due to its network of neighbourhood thrift stores. “I’m very passionate about the thrift stores,” says Erica Baerwald, MCC Thrift Shop and Human Resources Coordinator. “They’re the public face of the MCC in many communities, and they are such a vital part of the work we do, not just in Canada but around the world.” MCC Saskatchewan has a network of seven thrift stores located in Warman, Saskatoon, Herbert, Swift Current, Rosthern and Lanigan. The Warman store is celebrating its 30th anniversary this coming October. “We work with over 400 volunteers across the province who help out on a regular basis at these thrift stores,” said Baerwald in an interview on Friday, February 14. “The money they bring in to the MCC is vital to our work. This aspect has really increased in im-

portance within the last five to ten years, as the shops’ revenue-generating ability has increased.” Baerwald said the increased revenue is due in part to the robust economy in the province, but also because of good business management. “Every thrift store in Saskatchewan has paid off its mortgage,” she said. “There is no longer any debt that has to be paid on any of the buildings. That means the money can go directly to help out the programs of the MCC. It goes to help people in need both in Canada and in other countries.” The Warman Thrift Shop presented a cheque to MCC Saskatchewan for $60,000 at a special ceremony on Monday, February 10 to mark the MCC’s 50th anniversary. The Warman store came into being following the 1984 annual Congregational Meeting of the Osler Mennonite Church, according to Warman MCC Thrift Shop manager Sheila Friesen. Letters were sent to all area churches, volunteers renovated an old hall at the corner of 6th Avenue and Klassen Street in Warman and the shop was in business. In 1996, a new Thrift

Shop building a block away on Klassen Street was opened, and in 2005, that building was doubled in size. “Thirty years is a long time,” said Friesen, “and I think the shop has become an integral part of the community. We’re here to help the local community, but we also raise funds for MCC projects overseas. It’s a connection between the local and global aspects of MCC’s work.” A tradition at the store is a group of volunteer women who make blankets. “They come in on Tuesdays and Wednesdays to make the blankets,” said Friesen. “It’s a tradition that has been going on for decades and pre-dates the thrift stores..” The store relies heavily on volunteers, who give of their time and energy, said Friesen. “Last year there were over 8,000 volunteer hours put in,” she said. MCC Executive-Director Claire Ewart-Fisher said MCC has evolved over the last five decades, but the vision and mission of the organization has never wavered. “We’re still doing disaster response work and community development, but now we’re also focusing on peace-build-

Above, Alma Sawatzky of Hague volunteering at the Warman MCC Thrift Shop Right, Angela Loewen of Hepburn shopping with her six-year-old son Joseph and threeyear-old daughter Vanessa TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

ing work as well,” she said. “Besides generating funds for overseas, we have more programming locally. We do peace education classes at Bethany College in Hepburn, for example, where students do ‘urban plunge’ projects. That’s where groups of students experience life in core communities in big-

ger cities like Saskatoon. They work with people who are in need. We also do refugee assistance work, and a significant amount of work in areas of indigenous education and advocacy, as well as restorative justice.” Ewart-Fisher said the thrift stores are “part of the church

faith and tradition.” “It’s all about expressing our faith in action,” she said. “It’s an important part of who we are as Christians and Mennonites and brethren in Christ. We have a responsibility as Christians to share resources with those in need.”

Osler set to celebrate annual winter carnival The Town of Osler is pulling out all the stops with its annual Winter Carnival celebration this coming weekend, according to Osler Recreation Director Crystal Martens. “The first year the winter carnival was held was when the Olympic torch came through a few years ago,” she said. “It was a big success, and we’ve been building on it every year.” The carnival takes place on Saturday, March 1 at the Community Hall. In addition to indoor children’s and family activities, including a Family

Bingo, TaekWon Do demonstrations, dance demonstrations and Funland games and prizes, there are also outdoor activities. A popular old-fashioned horse-drawn sleigh ride will take place from 1 to 3 in the afternoon. But the biggest attraction could well be the “Digging for Silver” event at 1:00 pm. “It’s sponsored by Affinity Credit Union,” said Martens. “We get a big pile of snow and we hve coins hidden all through the pile, so the kids

can dig for the coins. There’s a time limit, so they can keep what they can dig out. It should be fun.” There’s also an outdoor shinny tournament and skating at the outdoor rink by the community hall, followed by a large bonfire in the evening. A smaller fire for roasting hot dogs and marshmallows, not to mention warming frosty hands and toes, is also a big attraction. There’s also free hot chocolate from 2 to 6 p.m. at the Osler General Store, and from 6:30 to 8 pm at the rink.

Members of the Warman Thrift Shop Board and Staff present a cheque for $60,000 to MCC Saskatchewan (left to right) Sheila Friesen (Warman Thrift Shop Manager), Claire Ewert Fisher (MCCS Executive Director), Lyle Stucky (Board Chair), Peter Fehr (Board Vice-Chair), Erica Baerwald (MCCS Thrift Shop Coordinator) (Photo submitted by MCC)

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 PG. 12

Meadow Lake, Colonsay win high school curling regionals

outlaws advance Prairie Outlaws Kelly Friesen scores on a backhand deke against Warman Wildcat goaltender Brennan Kirkness during a Fort Carlton Hockey League playoff game at the Legends Centre in Warman on Friday, February 14. The Outlaws swept the Wildcats in three straight games by scores of 8-1, 12-2 and 14-2 to advance to the second round. Meanwhile, theHague Royals lost their first two games to the Bruno TBirds by scores of 10-3 and 4-2. Results of the third game on Feb 18 were unavailable.

Submitted by

BRENDA ERICKSON

Prairie Spirit School Division

The High School Curling Regionals were held February 15 and 16 at Prairie Spirit School Division communities. The results for Region D (Central Valley) are as follows: In the Girls Regional bonspiel, hosted by Delisle Composite School, Meadow Lake was the A qualifier. Hanley was the B qualifier. “Both teams will do a fantastic job of representing us at provincials,” said organizer Barb Kielo. In the Boys Regional bonspiel, hosted by Rosthern High School, Colonsay was the winner. Spiritwood was the B event winner. In the Mixed Regional bonspiel, hosted by Waldheim School, Meadow Lake won the championship.

PROVINCIAL BONSPIELS

The Saskatchewan High School Curling Provincials for all three events are being hosted by Prairie Spirit schools on February 28 and March 1. Colonsay School will host the boys bonspiel, while Hanley School hosts the girls event and Martensville High School is the host school for the mixed bonspiel at the Martensville Sports Centre.

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Warman athlete wins silver in judo at Sask Games By CHARLENE TEBBUTT ctebbutt@yahoo.com

A young Warman athlete took home a silver medal in Judo at the Saskatchewan Winter Games in Prince Albert this week.

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Brenna Bagnell, 14, came away with silver Monday in the individual Judo competiton for her weight category. Bagnell finished the competition with three wins and one loss during the day’s matchups to make it to the finals. Bagnell said she was happy with her silver medal win and enjoyed the competition. “It was really cool because I had lots of matches this time,” she said. Bagnell, who has been doing Judo for five and a half years, said she enjoys everything about the sport. Bagnell started after her younger brother, Dan-

iel, became involved with Judo. Daniel Bagnell, 12, also competed at the Saskatchewan Winter Games in Prince Albert. He finished fifth overall in his weight class. While it may not be a popular sport for some, the siblings’ coach in the Prairie Central District said Judo is a disciplined sport that teaches young athletes life skills as well. “The number one thing is respect for your opponent,” Darryl Potts said. “You’re fighting your opponent but you don’t want to hurt them.” Ewan Beaton, provincial Judo coach for Saskatchewan agreed. Beaton, who competed in the Olympics in 1992 and 1996 and worked as an Olympic coach in 2004 and 2008, said Judo can be a way of life. “In the end, we want to build better people,” Beaton added. Beaton said about 700 young athletes currently do Judo in Saskatchewan. The sport is always looking to attract more young athletes, he said.

CHARLENE TEBBUTT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Daniel and Brenna Bagnell of Warman are competing in Judo at the Saskatchewan Winter Games this week in Prince Albert

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

13

Vipers to face Stallions in playoffs Bruins advance in provincials By JAMES TARRANT

By JAMES TARRANT

james@ccgazette.ca

james@ccgazette.ca

The Sask Valley Vipers will face the Saskatoon Stallions in opening round Saskatchewan Bantam AA Hockey League playoff action February 22. The Vipers finished off their regular season with a 3-2 loss to the Saskatoon Bandits February 16, but considering the team sits on top of the league’s North Division standings with 22 wins, five losses and four ties, Vipers Head coach Shaun Priel said he is looking forward to post-season play. “I think our kids progressed really well from the beginning of the year. Growth in your team and players is something every coach looks for and we have that,” said Priel. “At this level it is the depth that you have that makes the difference. We had everybody contributing throughout the season and that is why we had the success that we did.” Jared Hamm led team scoring for the Vipers with 28 goals and 18 assists. Chance Adrian was second in team scoring with 18 goals and 23 assists,

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Vipers Jordan Thorpe protects the puck while being pressured by Saskatoon Maniacs Tanner Robin February 15 while Jax Gipman rounded out the third spot with 17 goals and 23 assists. The Saskatoon team secured the eighth and final playoff spot in the North Division by edging the North East Wolfpack 3-2, February 15. In regular season play the Vipers defeated the Stallions 3-0. “They’ve got a few top-end players and we have to be sure

we know where they are on the ice,” said Priel. “If we play our game we stand a good chance of being successful in that series.” Priel said his team have been talking playoffs since day one. “The kids know what our goal is and if they if they all buy in they have a good chance of working through the first series and just refocus from there,” said Priel.

Chiefs take on Rebels in post-season By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The Delisle Chiefs saved the best for last, winning three of their final four regular-season games to secure a spot in the Prairie Junior B Hockey League playoffs. The Chiefs secured a 5-4 win over the Extreme Hockey Regina Capitals, February 9, defeated the Saskatoon Westleys 3-1 February 13, and sent the Prince Albert Ice Hawks packing with a 5-3 victory February 14. In those games the Chiefs also out-shot opponents by considerable margins. Against the Westleys the shots were 29-27, the Capitals 35-21 and the Ice-

hawks 63-27. Chiefs head coach Dave Norris said his team is peaking at just the right time. “Right now we are playing our best hockey and that is all you can ask for heading into the playoffs. The team is playing to their potential,” said Norris. The Chiefs ended their season with 16 wins and 19 losses in 40 games. Mark Ganter led team scoring with 21 goals and 18 assists, followed by Josh Reinbolt who had 23 goals and 14 assists. Carter Yuzdepski and Brayden Atkinson both tied for third in team scoring with 10 goals and 19 assists. The next challenge for the Chiefs will come against the

james@ccgazette.ca

The Dundurn Wheatkings made an early exit from the Wheatland Senior Hockey League playoffs with a 5-4 defeat to the Naicam Vikings, February 15. The Wheatkings were swept in three straight games in the best of five series, losing their first game in Naicam 6-3 February 7. During the following two home game stints in Dundurn the team was edged by just one goal with two 5-4 losses February 12 and February 15. The final game needed to be decided in overtime. Wheatkings head coach Richie Seward felt his team played well during both home

games but Naicam’s defensive play and secondary scoring was the difference. ”Naicam capitalized on their scoring chances and collapsed so well in their defensive zone that it was hard to get shots through to the net,” said Seward. The sweep was a huge disappointment for the Wheatkings, which saw the team finish fourth in league standings with 12 wins, six losses and three ties. ”We were more consistent this season but credit goes to the players. They worked hard all year, bought in to what we wanted to accomplish, dedicated themselves all year at practices and parked their egos for the good of the team,” said Seward. “Our captains were

fantastic leading the team and deserve a lot of the credit as well.” Seward, who has been coaching the Wheatkings for four years, said he plans to return next year and is confident most of the team will be returning as well. The interesting thing about the Wheatland Senior Hockey League compared to other senior leagues around the province is any team, no matter how well they perform, all have the opportunity to win it all. ”This league is so tight. Even Allen beating out Imperial they are one, two goal games,” said Seward. “The league is very competitive and if it was another year it could have been us moving on.”

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happy about his team’s performance in game two. “We seemed to play a little of a rec hockey game tonight, playing it safe to avoid some suspensions,” said Climenhaga. “We are a physical hard skating team that puts pucks towards the net and scores on rebounds. That wasn’t there this game but hopefully we can get back into it.” Climenhaga said he doesn’t have a preference for who he would like to play in the second round. “Lucky Lake/Dinsmore are in our league. We split regular season games with them at home winning 5-1 and they beat us in Lucky Lake 5-2,” said Climenhaga. “Wilkie have always had good teams over the years too. We’ve got to have some good preparation going into our next provincial series if we have to face them.”

It’s now ‘do or die’ time for Dalmeny Fury By HILARY KLASSEN

hilarylklassen@gmail.com

Having lost two back-to-back playoff hockey games against the Rosthern Wheat Kings last weekend, the Dalmeny Fury is Kerrobert Southern Rebels, definitely in it to win it this Friwho they with face in the best day. It’s a do-or-die situation: of five survivor series this the Wheat Kings just need one week. more win to snag the best of During the regular season five series. the Rebels defeated the Chiefs 5-2 on November 9 and 7-4 Janu- “They’re deep, they’re a strong team, they’ve got four ary 18. lines, and three lines that Norris said the regular seacan probably play with anyson losses against the Rebels one,” said Fury coach Darwere games he felt his team ren (Woody) Wutzke about the could have won. He is confiWheat Kings. “And they’ve won dent the Chiefs won’t make it it, I think two out of the last easy for the Rebels in post-seathree years also, they’ve won son play. “They have one or two decent the league.” The hunger was there at Frilines and they tend to roll a shorter bench than we do,” said day night’s game, the pace was quick with no scores on the Norris. “I think we will try to roll four lines as long as we can board for the first 19 minutes. and really try to push a 200 foot “The guys are putting in a game to wear them out.”

Dundurn edged by Naicam in series By JAMES TARRANT

The Delisle Bruins earned their way to the second round in the 2014 Saskatchewan Hockey Association Senior Men’s C provincial playoffs, February 9. The Bruins will face the winner of the Wilkie/Lucky Lake Dinsmore series. Wilkie lost out to Lucky Lake/ Dinsmore and will need three goals to advance to the second round. Each playoff is a two-game total point series. On February 9 the Bruins embarrassed the Kerrobert Tigers with a 11-0 victory and peppered the Tigers goaltender with 70 shots. It was a crazy game to play for Bruins Head Coach, Jimmy Climenhaga, who said there were so many penalties for the Tigers that the score keeper needed a second score sheet to keep track of them all.

The Bruins also lost their captain who was suspended a game for being the instigator in a fight. After the first game the Tigers would have needed to score 12 goals to win the series. They did not want to come back to Delisle. “There is a loophole in provincials where if you get beat by a significant amount it is the team’s choice to not come back,” said Climenhaga. Climenhaga said the league saw it differently, saying the Tigers would be fined about $1,000 if they did not return to Delisle to finish the series. In the second game played February 16 in Delisle, the Tigers dressed only 12 players but went on to defeat the Bruins 4-2 including a 66 shot save performance by Tigers goaltender Brad Murphy, who obviously kept the Tigers in the game. Climenhaga said he wasn’t

good effort, they’re battling hard, it’s the little mistakes that are costing us,” said Wutzke. The Friday game ended at 5-1 for the Wheat Kings. The lone Fury goal was scored by Kolten Fyfe. On Saturday, Feb. 15, the Wheat Kings took it 7-4, the Fury being aided by Justin D’Entremont and Brody Foster who each netted a single goal, and Curtis Jeffrey with a couple. “We were playing with them there for the most part, but just the full 60 wasn’t there again Saturday night and we were tied 2-2 going into the third. The Friday game we were tied at one going into the third and just weren’t able to capitalize on any of their chances,” said Wutzke. The Fury’s goalie, Aaron Stock, has been a big part of the team’s success this season.

“Our goaltending has been excellent,” said Wutzke. “Aaron Stock is doing really really well. Every game, he’s definitely giving us a chance to win.” The Fury’s standing has come up over the season. Their improvement has seen them move up to middle of the pack. As the team readies itself for the next playoff game, Wutzke reflects on how to be prepared. “You’ve just gotta come mentally prepared and ready to play. Our first and second lines have been doing really well as far as contributing on the points. Our third line is doing well trying to be as defensive as we can and play a smart game,” he said. Game three out of five in the Fury’s playoff series against the Rosthern Wheat Kings is Friday, Feb. 21 at 8:30 p.m. in Dalmeny.


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Send your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run)

Ad Classifications ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060 MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040

REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060 Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ...........6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ...................6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

11

1120

Tenders

PROPERTY FOR SALE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Proposals addressed to the Town Administrator, Town of Langham and plainly marked on the envelope “Proposals for Property for Sale” will be received until 5:00 p.m. on February 28, 2014 for the following property: Legal Address: PR1 85S04878 Zoning District: R3 Residential Site Area: Approx. 1.9 Acres Land Use: Residential (Family and Senior Housing) To receive a copy of the full Request for Proposals, please visit:

Langham Town Office (230 Main Street East) Phone (306) 283-4301 or email: admin@langham.ca.

1110

General Notices

REACH

YOUR CUSTOMERS Insert your flyer in THE GAZETTE SAVE 30% COMPARED TO THE POST OFFICE

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

(306) 688-0575

LEARN OF GOD’S plan & purpose for this earth. w w w . t h e christadelphians.org. MENNONITE HISTORICAL Society of Saskatchewan Annual Meeting at Bethany Manor, Saskatoon, February 28 at 7:30 p.m. Bob Goodnough, Church of God and Christ, Mennonite (Holdmann); music - choice. March 1 - 9:30 a.m. AGM, 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Richard Thiessen - genealogy and GAMEO. Music night at the Drop In Centre in Warman. February 28, 7pm with the Unruh Family. $5.00 per person. Refreshments after. PLANNING AN EVENT? Tell everyone about it in Coming Events. Ads start at $8 per week, reach over 40,000 readers. (306) 668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca. Deadlines are Mondays at noon. Quality Assurance Course for Health Canada’s COMMERCIAL MARIJUANA PROGRAM. February 22 & 23 Best Western Hotel, Kelowna, B.C. Tickets: www.greenlineacad emy.com or 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882.

Full service colour copying while you wait or for pick-up later

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

ANNUAL LOW GERMAN AUCTION. March 7, 2014 at Osler Community Hall. Doors & food booth open at 7:00p.m. Auction starts at 7:30. Donations gratefully accepted. Proceeds go to Valley Country School. Josh or Colleen (306) 225-2025

DALMENY LADIES BONSPIEL March 14-15-16. $160/team. For more info or to register call Bev at 306-254-2642 or Angela at 306-254-2720

STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1800-457-2206 www.crown steelbuildings.ca.

Save money and avoid city traffic and lineups!

11

Coming Events

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SHOW & SALE. February 24 to March 2 (inclusive) at Market Mall, Preston & Louise, Saskatoon, during mall hours.

RURAL WATER TREATMENT. Patented iron filters, softeners, distillers, “Kontinuous Shock” Chlorinator, IronEater. Patented whole house reverse osmosis. Payment plan. 1-800-BIGIRON (244-4766); www.BigIronDrilling.com. View our 29 patented & patent pending inventions. Since 1957.

COLOUR COPYING

The closing date for the receipt of proposals and applications is March 21, 2014.

1090

PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call The Gazette at 306-668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca for details.

109 Klassen St. W, Warman Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m. (Closed from 12 - 1 p.m.) Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 Email: ads@ccgazette.ca

3020

Pets

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

Golden Retriever pups for sale $150.00 each. Foam Lake, Call Ed 306-272-3848. Leave message if no answer.

2040

Services Offered The Disability Tax Credit Allows for: $1,500 Yearly Tax Credit $15,000 Refund (On Avg)

2060

Travel HOT TICKETS and KILLER SEATS exclusively for fans in Rural Saskatchewan

CHER June 21st in Saskatoon SHANIA TWAIN July 9th in Calgary

Covers: -Hip/Knee Replacements, - Arthritic knees, hips, hands, or shoulders, - COPD, other Disabling Conditions

BRUNO MARS August 3rd in Saskatoon

For Help Applying 1-844-453-5372

KATY PERRY August 25th in Saskatoon

FRONT ROW SEATS

MOTLEY CRUE November 18th in Edmonton November 21st in Vancouver

Like Blue? Maybe Yellow? Perhaps Pink?

For only $5 per issue, add a coloured background to your Classified Word Ad

and

Stand Out!

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

Go online to www.dashtours.com or call Dash Tours at 1-800-265-0000 One Call & You’re There

4020

Livestock Nordal Limousin & Angus Bull Sale Feb. 20 Saskatoon Livestock Sales, Saskatoon. 77 Limousin Black & Red Angus 2 yr. olds. Rob Garner (306) 946-7946, online at www.nordallimousin.com.

4030

Feed And Seed Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

ON YOUR COMPUTER, SMARTPHONE OR TABLET READ US ONLINE FREE!

3010

For Sale FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Poplar $150/cord; willow and maple $200/cord. (306) 7175298.

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

www.ccgazette.ca


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

4030

5020

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

5060

Feed And Seed Homes / Condos Recreation For Rent Property HEATED CANOLA

WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

5010

Homes / Condos For Sale ESCAPE WINTER in Sunny Mexico. First rate Real Estate buying seminars teach you how to buy real estate in Mexico. CALL FOR INFO 306537-3500 www.ExitToParadise.com. Hafford 1,140 Sq. Ft. Bungalow 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath; 2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater; water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512. HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575. HOMES, COTTAGES & More. RTMI - Ready to Move in. Call 1-888-733-1411; rtmihomes.com. Red Tag Sale on now - ask about our $100,000 giveaway.

CANADIAN MANUFACTURED backed by 10 year warranty -multi family, single section, motel style homes -Qualify for C.M.H.C. Financing CALL NOW for Special Spring Pricing Ask us about how you can receive up to to $1500 on upgrades! 1.800.249.3969 www.medallion-homes.ca Hwy 2 South Prince Albert

ONLY A FEW units left! 55plus adult community. Ground level ranchers. www.diamondplace.ca. 306241-0123, Warman, SK.

5020

Homes / Condos For Rent 303 Main Street “Townhouse" Langham 2 bedroom, 5 appliances, balcony, parking, sm. pets, $975 + electricity. Available immediately (306) 956-0044.

410/412 4TH AVENUE “Basement suite” Rosthern 2 bedrooms, 5 appliances, parking, sm. pets, $850 + electric and water heat. Across from Rosthern High School. Two available immediately. Brand new! (306) 956-0044.

LAKE FRONT LOT at Birds Point on Round Lake

5-506 Centennial Blvd “Townhouse” Warman 2 bedroom. F/S, upstairs W/D, dishwasher. Garage, rear facing & quiet, $1,397 + electricity. Available immediately (306) 956-0044.

2008 crossroads 5th wheel trailer, Model 29K.

THE RADISSON HOUSING AUTHORITY has 1 & 2 bedroom Senior suites for rent that have fridge, stove, washer, and dryer included. Rent is determined by income, and includes heat, water, sewer, and parking. Pets are not allowed. Application forms available from Radisson Housing or the Town of Radisson office. Contact Chyanne at (306) 827-2229 for more information. WARMAN: One bedroom condo. 5 appliances. F/P and A/C. Own driveway. Positively no smoking and no pets. Seniors Preferred. Phone (306) 221-2637 or (306)229-0991.

5040

Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 31 1/4’s South West - 63 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

Deadline for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

Call 668-0575 Fax 668-3997

40’ x 120’ lot, power, telephone, septic tank, well and 8’ x 12’ shed.

Package deal! Everything for $88,500.00. Phone 306-697-3449

6010

Autos For Sale

Find much more on our website

www.magicpaintandbody.com

2240B - Avenue C. North Saskatoon

652-7972

or (306) 260-4691

Email: magicpaintandbody@shaw.ca

Free iPod with SGI claim - conditions apply • • trades considered • • NOW OFFERING LUBRICO WARRANTY!

SGI ACCREDITED

FOR SALE 2004 Ford Freestar Command Start. Good tires. Runs Well. $3,000 o.b.o. (306)291-1259 Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

6070

Auto Parts

7040

Career Training Become an industry-recognized Heavy Equipment Operator in six weeks through practical experience and classroom theory. Programs run in Swift Current from May 5-June 13 and in Biggar from June 16-July 25. To find out more or to apply, visit greatplainscollege.ca or call 1 (866) 296-2472 START NOW! Complete Ministry approved Diplomas in months! Business, Health Care and more! Contact Academy of Learning College: 1-855-354-JOBS (5627) or www.academyoflear ning.com. We Change Lives!

7050

Careers Heavy Duty Mechanic/Apprentice required for preventative maintenance, repair and service of heavy equipment fleet. Experience with CAT, JD, and Hitachi. Appropriate credentials and/or certifications. Valid drivers license. Both camp and shop locations. Service truck and accommodations provided. Wage negotiable. Send work references and resume to: Bryden Construction, Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0; Fax: 306-769-8844 Email: brydenconstruct@ xplornet.ca

swna.com/ classifieds

1. Int’l. language specialist’s org. 6. Filament container 10. Amounts of time 14. Double curves 15. Clumsiness 17. Incapable of compromise 19. Mekong River people 20. Chinese broadsword 21. Rescue squad 22. Cablegram (abbr.) 23. Mold-ripened French cheese 25. Don’t know when yet 27. Rivulet 30. Wild Himalayan goat 32. Astronaut’s OJ 33. Scientific workplace 35. Xenophane’s colony 36. Exchange 38. Semitic fertility god 39. Chit 40. Sylvia Fine’s spouse Danny 41. Sole 42. Benne plant 44. Small amount 45. Sodas 46. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.) 48. UC Berkeley 49. Express pleasure 50. __ Paulo, city 53. History channel’s #5 show 59. Divertimento 60. Ridge on Doric column 61. Pastries 62. The “It” Girl 63. Hand drum of No. India

9. Birthpace (abbr.) 10. Tooth covering 11. Confederate soldiers 12. Signing 13. Point midway between S and SE 16. Ground where each golf hole begins 18. A lyric poem with complex stanza forms 22. Atomic #73 23. Thin wire nail 24. Ancient Germanic alphabet character 25. Jupiter’s 4th satellite 26. Woman’s undergarment 28. African antelope 29. Afrikaans 30. Vietnamese offensive 31. Expression of sorrow or pity 32. Scot word for toe 34. Journalist Nellie 36. Compress 37. Whiskies

1. Labor 2. North-central Indian city 3. About aviation 4. The sheltered side 5. Salem State College 6. Twofold 7. Unusually (Scot.) 8. Floral garland

Target customers who are smart and know the answers...your business could be here! Call The Gazette advertising team at (306) 668-0575

Horoscopes

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

Capricorn, you have been doing a lot of waiting around, but now your patience is bound to pay off. You just need to wait a little while longer to bear the fruits of your labors.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Aquarius, a big adventure is on the horizon. The trouble is, you do not know what to expect and what to bring along for the ride. Things will come into focus soon.

PISCES February 19– March 20

You need to take a rest, Pisces. Otherwise, you will burn out very quickly. Friends are urging you to slow down this week.

ARIES March 21– April 19

Aries, there is more to you than meets the eye. You enjoy letting others get small glimpses of your true self, but this week they will get a lot of information all at once.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

sudoku TACO TIME HIRING! F/T food counter attendant Martensville and Warman. $11-$12/hr depends on the experience - Employer willing to train. Operate the POS, take customer's order, peel, cut, prepare and heat customer's orders, restaurant clean-up (equipment, floors and trash). Some secondary education needed. Send resumes to Taco TimeMWY@gmail.com.

38. Feathery scarf 40. White clay for porcelain 43. Keeps in reserve 44. Infectious lung disease 46. Draws off 47. Chinese chess piece 48. Parrot’s nostril opening 49. Once more 50. One from Serbia 51. Fleshy, bright seed appendage 52. Plural of os 53. The horned viper 54. Japanese apricot tree 55. Taxi 56. Bustle 57. Feline 58. Malaysian Isthmus 38. Duke: “The Silver Fox” 39. Dull claptrap 40. Showed old movie 44. Express pleasure 47. Reciprocal of a sine

Down

Others may have trouble reading you this week, Gemini. That’s because you are putting forth a few different faces. It is better for all involved if you remain consistent.

Business Opportunities

Advertise in the classifieds.

Across

TAURUS April 20– May 20

7030

STAY AHEAD OF THE COMPETITION.

This Week’s C R O S S W O R D

Feeling restless, Taurus? Spend some time with a hobby that you enjoy, whether that is cooking in the kitchen or building something out in the garage.

Wrecking auto-trucks: Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. NorthEast Recyclers, 780-8750270, Lloydminster.

FOR SALE: Sask Valley News, a weekly paper operating out of Rosthern, SK for over 100 years. Contact janet@saskvalleynews.com for further information.

15

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Cancer, now is the time to introduce your family to a special friend of yours. This person will be received graciously, so there is no need to fret about the meeting.

LEO July 23– August 22

Leo, when you want to get something done, it is probably best if you do it yourself this week. This way you can bring your own unique approach to the task at hand.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Cash seems to be flowing out of your pockets this week. You may want to make some adjustments to your spending habits so you can get your finances in order.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Libra, your patience is wearing thin, but you need to keep your cool or you could end up in a sticky situation at work. Ride things out until the weekend arrives.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

It isn’t in your makeup to be meek, Scorpio. If something needs to be discussed, speak up and let others know your perspective on the situation.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Sagittarius, a lucky streak has you excited to test your good fortune. Ride this wave, but do not go through all of your money in one fell swoop. That can spell trouble.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


16

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD

306.688.0575 CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

ADVERTISE WITH US

16

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

7050

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

ICED CAPP RESTAURANTS LTD.

Careers

o/a Tim Hortons 101 Central Street East, Warman SK S0K 4S0

WW1451

Lilydale Inc - A Sofina Foods Company Is currently seeking full-time Production Workers for their chicken plant in Wynyard, Sask. Starting wage is 13.84/ hr with a comprehensive benefits package and pension program. All applicants welcome! Call Linda @ (306) 554-2555 EXT 238 for more info Send Resumes to: Linda Karakochuk Sofina Foods Inc Box 760 Wynyard, SK SOA 4T0 Fax: (306) 554-3958 Email: LKarakochuk@sofinafoods.com

Food Counter Attendant

Full Time/Part Time/Shift Work Nights/Overnights/Early Mornings/Weekends 15 positions available $10.25 - $11.00/hr. + Benefits Wage based on experience/availability Apply in-person or via email to: Iced.capp.restaurants@gmail.com WINCH TRACTOR OPERATORS. Must have experience operating a winch. To apply fax, email or drop off resume at the office. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax 780-8426581. Email: rigmove @telus.net. Mail: H&E Oilfield Services Ltd., 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W 1L7. For more employment information see our webpage: www.heoil. com.

NOTICE OF PREPARATION OF ASSESSMENT ROLL Town of Delisle

Notice is hereby given that the assessment roll for the Town of Delisle for the year 2014 has been prepared and is open to inspection in the office of the assessor from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on the following days: Monday to Friday, February 20th, 2014 to March 24th, 2014 A bylaw pursuant to Section 214 of The Municipalities Act has been passed and the assessment notices have been sent as required. Any person who wishes to appeal against his or her assessment is required to file his or her notice of appeal with: The Secretary of the Board of Revision Town of Delisle Box 40 Delisle, Sask. S0L 0P0 by the 24th day of March, 2014 Dated this 20th day of February, 2014 Mark Dubkowski, Assessor

Deadline for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

Call 668-0575 Fax 668-3997

SUMMER ROAD GRAVELING PROGRAM

The City of Warman is currently accepting applications/resumes for Part-time Contract Positions within the Parks and Recreation Department. Child Minding Staff – Qualified Child Minding Staff will be responsible to plan, supervise and carry out activities for children who will be attending the Child Minding room. Before & After School Staff – Qualified Before & After School Staff will assist the Before & After School Leader with supervision and carrying out activities for the children who will be attending the Before & After School Program Birthday Party Leaders – Qualified Birthday Party Leaders will plan & lead birthday parties as they are booked Toddler/Child/Youth Leaders – Qualified leaders will be hired to plan, organize and lead various programs as set out by the Program Coordinator These positions require evening and weekend work by a highly motivated, energetic team player with very strong public relation skills and are very organized. A criminal record check is required for all persons that are hired. Preference will be given to candidates that posses a current CPR & First Aid certificate. Applications will be accepted until suitable candidates are found. Please deliver your resume with cover letter to the Legends Centre located at 701 Centennial Blvd, email coralieb@warman.ca or mail to the address listed below. For further information on the positions please call 933-2129.

City of Warman c/o Coralie Bueckert #1 – 701 Centennial Blvd N. Warman, Saskatchewan S0K 4S2 Phone: (306)933-2129 | Fax: (306)933-2245 Email: coralieb@warman.ca The City of Warman wishes to thank all persons that apply, however, only those selected for an interview will be notified.

The Council of the RM of Corman Park has announced $10,000 for the Summer Road Graveling Program. Residents can apply between now and July 5, 2014. Accepted submissions are eligible for a grant of 50%, up to a $1,000 maximum.

For more information visit www.rmcormanpark.ca or phone (306) 978-6469

14024YY00

Careers

Part-time Contract Positions

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

7050

WARMAN WARMAN Thrift Thrift Shop Shop We are looking for good, We are looking for good, clean, quality furniture. clean, quality furniture. MCC will be able to issue a charitable MCC will be able to issue a charitable receipt if an item is valued at over $100 receipt if an item is valued at over $100 Check us out at Check us out at

www.thrift.mcc.org/donate www.thrift.mcc.org/donate

Our retail receiving hours are Our retail receiving hours are Mon-Sat 10am-4pm Thurs 10am-8pm Mon-Sat 10am-4pm Thurs 10am-8pm

.. 115 Klassen Street 115 Klassen Street (306) 933 3293 (306) 933 3293

Saskatchewan Lotteries Community Grant Program Investing in Sport, Culture, Art and Recreation

The Rural Municipality of Corman Park No. 344 Invites eligible non-profit volunteer community groups who provide sport, culture and recreation activities within the Municipality to apply for grant funding to assist with the development of such programs. Capital development projects are ineligible for funding under this program. The program must take place between the dates of April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015 in order to be eligible For more information or to receive an application please contact:

The Rural Municipality of Corman Park

14024MM00

111 Pinehouse Drive Saskatoon SK, S7K 5W1 Phone: (306)242-9303 or visit our website www.rmcormanpark.ca


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

Business & Professional

17

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

CALL (306) 668-0575 for rates & deadlines

Directory Auto PArts / rePAir

construction / contrActors

RIOAggregAtes Ltd. Box 1807       Warman S0K 4S0

USED & NEW PARTS

DRIVE SHAFT SERVICE NOW AVAILABLE

SaSkatoon truck PartS centre Ltd.

truckS BouGHt & SoLd

• Snow Removal • Gravel • Topsoil • Fill Dirt • Sand • Pea Rock • Crushed Rock

for pricing call

(306) 239-4747

Ph: (306) 668-5675 Fax: (306) 665-5711

west out of Warman on 305 until you reach 3052, then north 3.5 miles

* Custom Corral Cleaning * * Vertical Beater Spreaders * * Bobcat with Rubber Tracks * * Payloader *

North Corman Industrial Park

1-800-667-3023

www.saskatoontruckparts.ca

WARMAN’S NEW COLLISION SHOP

NEUFELD Enterprises

acrcollision@hotmail.com PHONE: 306.933.0288 CELL: 306.260.1155

For Rates Call

306-220-5013 or 306-467-5013

STAND OUT

WE ALSO OFFER: • Industrial Liquid Coatings • Sandblasting

FROM THE CROWD

ADVERTISE WITH US

BookkeePing / Accounting

306.688.0575

Peter Hermanson Residential Framer

CONTACT US

WEBSITE PHONE ADDRESS WWW.FUEL-BSI.CA 306 280 6572 208 GLENWOOD TERRACE EMAIL 306 384 3835 MARTENSVILLE INFO@FUEL-BSI.CA

306-380-9582 hermansonframing@yahoo.ca Basement Framing, Decks, Garage, Shed Packages, and Vinyl-Siding

PROFESSIONAL BOOKKEEPING SERVICES

(306) 652-5052

gnsdrywall@sasktel.net 306.221.4782

Proudly Serving Saskatoon and Area.

www.bridgecitybookkeeping.ca construction / contrActors

WARMAN, SK.

T&T

& DEMOLITION

Bobcat • Loader • Excavator • Trucking Building & Concrete Demolition Landscaping • Piles • Trenching Basements • Bush Clearing • Rock Pile Cleanup

(306) 229-4129

013-14 oking inter 2 Now bo nts for fall/w e Basem

DentAl

DECK CONSTRUCTION

I

EXCAVATING

Built to your specification * Free Estimates

IDEAL DECKS & FENCES

306-270-5903

willowsdental.ca

New and emergency patients welcome. 60-304 Stonebridge Blvd, Saskatoon

#

Monday-Thursday 7am-7pm Friday 7am-1pm Saturday 7am-1pm

Dr. Norm Vankoughnett Dr. Kristopher Milne Dr. Abdullah Patel Dr. Christine Miller

Stonebridge Location

306-244-2266

Denturist

Flooring

306.955.7090

CASH & CARRY OR INSTALLATION

The Mall At Lawson Heights

AVAILABLE

Britten Doucette D.D Doucette D.D A family based clinic with a longBoyd history in denturism. Britten Doucette D.D. Licensed Denturist

Boyd Doucette D.D. Licensed Denturist

State of the art facility

• LAMINATES • HARDWOOD • AREA RUGS • CARPET • VINYL • TILE

Britten and Boyd pride themselves on customer Located mins from Warman service, quality 10 workmanship and always finding theFree right treatment plan for&each client ensuring oral exams consultations complete patient satisfaction. Complete & partial dentures Your #1 They offer: Choice for • free consultations • complete dentures Mouth guards Ov er Denture • partial dentures • relines Anti snoring devices on Implants • night guards • teeth whitening • mouth guards • adjustments Teeth whitening • over dentures on implants Repairs done in an hour All dentures are designed and made in the clinic’s dentures ownImplant onsite labsupported providing for & theretained best quality control and customer satisfaction. Call Now to Book Your Come in and see9am-5pm them at their newly renovatedI Sat: 10am-12am Mon-Thurs: I Fri: 9am-4pm Free Consultation! clinic in the Mall at Lawson Heights, where you will be treated like family. 306.955.7090

Your #1 Choice for Over Denture on Implants

1300-3530 Millar Ave, Saskatoon (306) 653-3899

DisPosAl service

134 Primrose Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

9AM – 5PM Monday – Thursday Friday: 9AM – 4PM Saturday: 10AM – Noon

DelivereD every ThursDay To over

BEST PRICE BEST SERVICE

16,600

resiDenTial, business & farm mailboxes, reTail locaTions & elecTronic subscribers

4 and 6 yard front load bins 11.5 - 30 yard roll-off bins

Fencing • Portable Bathroom Rentals RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SERVICES Recycling & Waste Disposal

(306) 931-2604 www.allansdisposalservices.com

www.ccgazette.ca 306.688.0575

Continued from page 3

Spring flood funding the new Building Canada infrastructure program this spring. “I just hope that we’re going to keep moving forward,” said Froese-Kooijenga. “I’m optimistic it’s going to happen sooner rather than later.” The Opimihaw Creek Watershed Association (OCWA), which includes elected representatives from Corman Park, Warman, Martensville, Osler and Dalmeny, has authorized an engineering study for the Osler Ditch. The study is expected to cost about $40,000, of which the municipalities pay 25 per cent of the cost and the province 75 per cent, and is aimed at providing specific information needed to apply for federal infrastructure program funding. The projected cost of the Osler Ditch project

is roughly $13.9 million. But if the province doesn’t pony up money for the project, it’s virtually impossible for the municipalities to go it alone, he noted. Froese-Kooijenga said the RM of Corman Park invested roughly $700,000 in 2013 upgrading roads and ditches to alleviate flooding problems in vulnerable areas. Over the last few years, the investment has been close to $7 million for the RM has a whole. In addition, he said, land-

owners have taken measures to build berms and otherwise protect their own property. “It’s an infrastructure investment that benefits everyone for the long term,” he said. “In the beginning, we didn’t know what flooding issues were, but we’re learning. “It’s good to see some progress on the Opimihaw Creek projects. It’s not going to happen all at once, but these drainage issues aren’t going to go away and we have to keep working at it.”

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18

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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JUnior basketball champs

The Hepburn Hawks Jr boys basketball team won 1st place on Saturday, February 8 at the Central Valley Athletic Conference Finals. The team includes: Rear, left to right) Sandi Hamp (team manager), Daniel Shields, Ryan Andres, Jeremy Fehr, Jared Friesen, Kenzie Munkholm, Luke Martens, Josh Hiebert (coach), Jesse Bushman (coach) (Front, left to right) Tanner Goertzen, Ethan Andres, Marc Bushman, Jacob Hutchinson, Alex Larson, Ty Guenther (Photo submitted by Cathy Shields)

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in the pits. From 18 to 50 acres of waste cell surface area would be exposed to the air at a given time for the duration of the project. Fortune Minerals claims that dust particles in the waste pits would be too heavy for the wind to blow off site – even though it clearly states that its process involves grinding the rock to 15 microns or less so that the valuable metals can be leached out when mixed with the chemicals. With recent winds gusting to 115 km/ hr strong enough to knock over bins, the company’s assertion that no dust would leave the site is clearly outlandish, yet that claim was key to excluding farmers and agricultural

crops from its health impacts discussion. Fortune Minerals also failed to reveal and examine the health implications of claudetite (arsenic tri-oxide), which would form 4.5 per cent of the waste to be left at the site. Claudetite is a highly toxic and soluble form of arsenic that would would leach out of the waste pits when they begin to leak, sooner or later, and into the drinking water aquifer below. Claudetite is a known carcinogen and also causes miscarriage and birth defects. Fortune Minerals’ failure to disclose and properly investigate the health implications of actinolite and claudetite should

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be red flags to the Minister of Environment. If the company has been less than transparent in its EIS report, should we trust it to build and run a plant that uses deadly chemicals? And even with the best engineers, the dangerous wastes Fortune Minerals plans to leave behind will outlast any human construction. It is the provincial government’s responsiblity to protect Saskatchewan residents from serious health and environmental problems by preventing irresponsible development from taking place. We do not want poisoned waters and carcinogenic soils to be the legacy we leave to future generations.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014

19

Clavet skaters participating in Saskatchewan winter games this week Submitted by

LAURA McLEOD

Clavet Skating Club Coach SK Winter Games Coach

The Clavet Skating Club is proud of all of its members in all of its programs for their many accomplishments this

season. Special congratulations go out to Mikaela McFall (Ladies U12 Free Skate), Alison Fedoriuk (Ladies U16 Free Skate), and Katelynn Montgomery (Ladies U15 Free Skate), who have been selected to represent Team Prairie Central at the 2014 Saskatchewan Winter Games in

Prince Albert, February 16-22.  These skaters competed in the District Run-Offs in Warman in December in order to earn their spots on the team; since then, they have been training exceptionally hard to be ready for the Games. Despite early morning practices, countless program

run-thrus, and uncomfortable boots, these three girls have remained positive and eager in their training, demonstrating a true love for the sport. This dedication has allowed them to continually improve and perfect both their technical elements and artistry. Because of

this, we know that Mikaela, Alison, and Katelynn will be excellent ambassadors for the Clavet Skating Club, and the sport of Figure Skating, at the Winter Games. We are very proud of you and wish you the very best of luck! Post Note: Laura McLeod is

a member of the Clavet Skating Club Coaching Team. The skating club is extremely proud of the entire coaching team, and we congratulate Laura on being selected as a member of the coaching team for the Saskatchewan Winter Games.

Clavet girls make the cut for winter games hockey team Submitted by

TRACEY SENGER

Clavet School has 5 girls participating in the Saskatchewan Winter Games girls Hockey team. Congratulations goes out to Kalista Senger, Rayna Jacob-

son, Mackenna Parker, Willow Slobodzian and Emily Perehudoff for their great accomplishment. The Zone 5 team constists of 12 forwards, 6 defence and 2 goalies born in 1999 & 2000 with Jason Wickstrom and Lisa

Brady of Regina coaching. The girls start their games on Wednesday February 19th at 5:00pm against Zone 6 (Saskatoon), Thursday February 20 at 11:30am vs. Zone 8 (Lakeland), Friday February 21

at 5:00pm vs. Zone 1(Southeast). Playoffs will take place Saturday morning. Wishing you the best of luck during this awe-inspiring opportunity!  Go Team Prairie Central Go!!

Beaulieu named Clavet volunteer of the year By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Every village, hamlet, city and town in Saskatchewan requires numerous volunteers to keep community organizations running strong. That’s why the Village of Clavet has been honouring volunteers for over 20 years. Clavet Mayor Blair Bentley, said the town has always been a tight knit community where everyone chips in. The Village’s annual volunteer banquet honours volunteer firefighters, first responders, EMO officials; the Community Hall Board, Parks and Recreation volunteers and councillors. Bentley said the town usually receives a couple of nominations a year for either a citizen of the year or volunteer of the year award. This year it was Tanya Beaulieu. “If no one volunteers kids don’t have activities like hockey, soccer, or baseball,” said Beaulieu. Beaulieu’s long list of volunteer work in Clavet is impressive. In the past eight years she has lived in Clavet, she has volunteered with Clavet Minor 14024DX00

Soccer, Minor Flag Football, the Clavet School Community Council and the Clavet United Church Fund-raising Commit-

tee. Beaulieu has also helped out with Clavet Minor Hockey, The Clavet Skating Club. Beaulieu said she was very

appreciative of the award. “It feels nice to be recognized, but I was totally shocked by it as well. I don’t volunteer to win awards. I do it for my kids and to help out in my community,” she said.

Radisson swept by Maymont The Radisson Wheat Kings senior men’s hockey season is over, thanks to their arch-rivals, the Maymont Settlers. The Wheat Kings were swept in three straight games by the Settlers in the first round of the Sask Prairie Hockey League playoffs. The Wheat Kings lost 12-4 on February 8, 5-3 on February 9, and 5-4 on February 12. Maymont now takes on the Shellbrook Silvertips in the second round of the SPHL playoffs. Game 1 is in Maymont on Friday, February 21 at 8:30 p.m.

Clavet Mayor Blair Bentley awarded Tanya Beaulieu with a Volunteer of the Year Award, during a Volunteer Appreciation Banquet February 8

Clavet School students competing in the Saskatchewan Winter Games in Prince Albert include: (left to right) Tori Shmon – figure skating: dance Alison Fedoriuk – figure skating: freeskate, Kalista Senger – womens’ hockey team, Mackenna Parker – female hockey team. Emily Perehudoff – women’s hockey team, Willow Slobodzian – women’s hockey team, Rayna Jacobson – women’s hockey team, Katelynn Montgomery – figure skating: freeskate, Mikaela McFall – figure skating: freeskate, Brodie Girod – men’s hockey team

Skaters from the Clavet Skating Club are participating in the Saskatchewan Winter Games in Prince Albert February 16-22. They include: (left to right) Mikaela McFall, Alison Fedoriuk, Katelynn Montgomery and Laura McLeod, Winter Games Skating Team Coach

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Clark's Crossing Gazette - February 20, 2014 issue