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An innovative art project in Langham connects youth and seniors

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Parents and kids spent some time warming up at the firepit in Kinsmen Park near the North Ridge Centennial Community Centre in Martensville on Saturday, February 1 during the city’s annual Winter FunFest celebration. Hundreds of residents braved the elements to skate and play shinny on the openair ponds, go for a horse-drawn wagon ride, try some coffee-can curling, as well as participate in indoor children’s activities. More photos on page 10.

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Participants in the 2014 PWOS trek arrive in Martensville at sunset on Friday, January 31

Tough sledding: Prairie Women on Snowmobiles brave harsh conditions By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The ten women who signed up for this year’s edition of the Prairie Women on Snowmobiles (PWOS) cross-province trek likely knew what they were getting into. But that didn’t make things any easier. The veteran sledders pulled into Martensville on Friday, January 31 at the end of a gru-

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elling first day in a week-long journey that will take them across the province. Along the way, they dealt head-on with bone-chilling temperatures and bone-shaking ice drifts. “It’s been a rough day on the trails, that’s for sure,” said

PWOS president Carol Lueken in an interview in front of the Martensville Tim Hortons as the sun was setting on the western horizon. “We had hardpacked ice for most of the day, ad those drifts aren’t very forgiving. They‘re awfully hard once you hit them.” But it was a great introduction to long-distance snowmobiling, added Lueken, and the trekkers proved themselves up

to the challenge. “They were tough conditions, but the ladies persevered and made it through, and we had a great day,” she said. “Now we’re looking forward to warming up and having a hot meal.” A fundraising supper at the Adobe Inn, a long-time sponsor of the annual event, brought out a good crowd, and the sledders hit the trail the following morning, heading west toward

Kindersley. The trek is slated to end on Friday, February 7 in Nipawin. Over the past 13 years, PWOS has raised over $2 million for cancer research. In 2013, the mission raised $209,885. The fundraising total for this year’s ride won’t be known for several weeks, but Lueken said each of the ten riders had to raise a

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Local knowledge, on-the job experience major assets for newest Corman Park Police officer By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

having worked shoulder-toshoulder with veteran police officers. “Police College was definitely challenging,” said Schreiner in an interview. “But looking back, I would say I definitely enjoyed the experience. It’s something I’ve always wanted to do, and I’ve been looking forward to this for a long time.” Just getting into the college was a feat in itself. Potential students need to undergo a polygraph test, a criminal record check, educational examination, a formal interview by senior officers, medical exam and pass the Police Officers’ Physical Ability Test (POPAT). The college was established in 1974 and provides training to new recruits from municipal police services as well as courses to personnel of accred-

A policeman who knows the local area has a leg up on the bad guys. And 28-year-old Dana Schreiner, a graduate of Warman High School, definitely knows the back roads of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park. Schreiner, the newest constable with the seven-member Corman Park Police Service, graduated from Saskatchewan Police College in Regina on Friday, December 13. Three days later, on Monday, December 16, he was on the job, patrolling the biggest RM - both in terms of geographic area and also population - in the province. Raised on a farm in the RM of Corman Park between Warman and Martensville, Schreiner is a great fit with the munic“Dana is a huge asset. ipal police service, according to Sgt. He grew up in this area. He John Garnet, the acting police chief. knows all the party spots. “Dana is a huge He knows the traffic asset,” said Garnet. “He grew up in this patterns. He knows the area. He knows all the party spots. He history of the area. He’s knows the traffic familiar with this region and patterns. He knows the history of the the local issues. area. He’s familThat’s worth a lot...” iar with this region and the local issues. • Sgt. John Garnet That’s worth a lot.” Acting Chief, Corman Park Police Service In addition, Schreiner gained plenty of valuable onthe-job experience by working ited police services within Sasseveral hundred hours alongkatchewan. The three major side regular officers of the pocomponents of the course inlice force. Schreiner spent four clude physical fitness; academyears as a volunteer auxiliary ic classes in Criminal Law, officer with the Corman Park Criminal Justice and Human Police before enrolling in the Behaviour; and practical skills 18-week Recruit Training Prolike investigative techniques, gram course at the Saskatchreport writing, problem solving ewan Police College course at and crisis intervention. the University of Regina. Schreiner said the level of in It was a gruelling course, struction at the college was exboth physically and mentalcellent, largely because the ly, but Schreiner was more pre- courses are taught by police ofpared than most raw recruits, ficers who take time from their

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Dana Schreiner graduated from the Saskatchewan Police College at the University of Regina in December and is the newest constable with the Corman Park Police Service regular jobs to teach the courses. “These are people with 25 to 30 years of experience who really know their stuff. They make sacrifices to teach at this college because it means so much to them,” said Schreiner. Schreiner’s training at the college was sponsored by the Corman Park Police. It’s an “investment” that will pay dividends in the years to come, said Garnet. “When the opportunity came up to send Dana to Police College, I had no reservations at all,” said Garnet. “Dana had been working with us as a volunteer for four years, and dur-

ing that time he was always going the extra mile to learn as much as he could. He showed us he’s got what it takes to be a top-notch officer.” Garnet said it takes about five years after graduation from police college for an officer to become fully trained and able to deal with whatever he or she comes up against in the course of their duties. So having an experienced officer join the ranks right out of college is a bonus, he added. Schreiner said he chose the Corman Park Police force because he wants to continue working in his home area. “I like the fact I’m working

in the community I grew up in,” he said. “I live in Warman. I like the fact that I’m at work right away. I’m not a big fan of being moved across the country and being posted in different communities. It’s nice to stay in one place and make a long-term home.” Schreiner said he also likes the appeal of municipal policing. “I grew up on a farm. I like working with farmers, and it’s also a real mixed area with urban municipalities that are growing rapidly,” he said. “I also like the fact that we work in cooperation with so many other police agencies. We cooperate with the Saskatoon Po-

lice Service, the Warman and Saskatoon RCMP detachments, the Dalmeny Police Service, the RM of Vanscoy Police Service, the CN Police, the provincial Conservation officers, and Transport Compliance officers. There’s a wide diversity. Criminals don’t stop at the border of the cities, and the police agencies have to work together.” Schreiner is getting a taste of cooperation while working within the Saskatoon Police Service during the month of February. Garnet said the experience will help the young recruit learn many aspects of police work in a larger force.

Legal service accessibility improved for low-income people The province is providing financial support that will assist low-income individuals in accessing justice services in Saskatoon. As part of a funding agreement between the Government of Saskatchewan and the Community Legal Assistance Services for Saskatoon Inner City Inc. (CLASSIC), the Ministry

of Justice will provide a total of $300,000 between 2013-2016. Justice Minister and Attorney General Gordon Wyant presented CLASSIC with a cheque for $90,000 today in Saskatoon. “The purpose of this funding agreement is two-fold,” Wyant said. “It will support legal assistance for those who need it most and give Sas-

katchewan’s next generation of lawyers the opportunity to learn hands-on about the legal community’s responsibilities to equal access to justice.” The agreement provides funding for CLASSIC’s Legal Advice Clinic, which provides direct legal assistance to low-income individuals in inner city Saskatoon. It will also

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Preventing falls helps seniors stay independent: health worker By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Accidental falls account for 57 per cent of injury-related hospital admissions, according to Daphne Kemp with the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR). Kemp told a standing room only crowd at the Seniors’ Coffee Hour on Tuesday, January 28 that preventing falls is key to maintaining seniors’ independence. The event, held in the parents room at the Warman Community Middle School is a monthly program for seniors organized by the Warman Community Library. “One in three Canadians 65 years and older will have a fall this year,” said Kemp. “That number increases to one in two Canadians over the age of 80.” Kemp says the health region defines a fall as an unexpected event where a person lands on the floor, ground or lower level. She explained that the region also considers a fall to be a

slip and fall without injury and a fall when someone is braced by someone while falling and helped to the ground. There are over 400 risk factors for falling, said Kemp. Some of the most common areas where falls occur in the home include bathtubs, stairs, kitchens and bedroom. Some of Kemp’s recommendations to fall-proof a home include placing a non-slip mat or a grab bar in a bathtub. In the kitchen keeping floors clean and dry and placing items on lower shelves in the cupboard so using a step stool is not necessary. In the bedroom, Kemp suggested using a night light or glow tape leading from the bedroom to the bathroom for late night visits. On stairwells Kemp advised seniors to make sure stairwells were free of clutter, that rugs on the stairs are tacked down and there are sturdy hand rails on both sides. There are also preventative

tools seniors may not realize are important including staying active by exercising for 30 minutes a day, wearing appropriate footwear and keeping a balanced diet to prevent lightheadedness and dehydration. For people who have osteoporosis, Osteoporosis Canada recommends that 800 to 2000 international units for Vitamin D daily,” said Kemp. The Osteoporosis Canada website suggests Vitamin D improves the function of muscles which improves balance and lessons the likelihood of falling. If a person continues to fall despite preventative measures taken, a tool that is becoming more and more common in long term care homes to prevent hip fractures caused by halls are hip protectors, said Kemp. The protector is a girdle with two pads sewn in to the sides, which can come in different styles and is 85 per cent effective. “Hip fractures can have the

most devastating impacts,” said Kemp. Martensville couple Clement and Audrey Vertenchini have experienced falls, which was the reason why they took in the presentation. Clement said he once fell off a ladder while installing Christmas lights. His wife Audrey cut herself badly during a fall, an incident which resulted in her needing physiotherapy. Vertenchini, said the presentation was very informative. “It opened our eyes to the potential dangers that do exist in our home,” said Vertenchini. Preventing falls for seniors is something Kemp is passionate about. She has been fall prevention coordinator for two years and spent 18 months travelling to communities within Saskatoon’s health region. Kemp’s grandmother passed away due to complications stemming from successive falls. “If changes that caused the fall are not made, the chances of falling again are very high.”

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

The Saskatoon Health Region’s Daphne Kemp provided useful information about preventing falls during a Seniors’ Coffee Hour presentation at Warman Community Middle School on January 28

North Corman Park Search and Rescue holds basic training day Five new members of North Corman Park Search and Rescue (NCPSAR) learned the basic techniques for search and rescue operations during a training session on Saturday January 25 at the Dalmeny Fire Hall. Trainers at the session included Duwayne Woodland, Rick Elder, Gord Jackson and Tom Moody. “Basic Search and Rescue (SAR) training covers mainly personal preparedness for search activities,” explained Tom Moody. “Preparedness includes things like maintaining personal fitness, the proper type of clothing and personal protective equipment needed

Members of the North Corman Park Search and Rescue team hold a basic training session at the Dalmeny Fire Hall on Saturday, January 25 (Photo submitted by Tom Moody)

for different weather and terrain conditions, recommended gear for each member to carry, how searchers are called out and organized, and also basic map and compass navigation.” The NCPSAR is a volunteer SAR group under the SARSAV umbrella in Saskatchewan. It consists of 42 members from Dalmeny, Martensville, Warman, Hepburn, Osler and Langham who are trained in ground search and rescue. This training varies by member,” said Moody, “All members are trained in Basic Search, plus many are trained

as Search Team Leaders and Search Managers. Many members also have other training such as Medical, Rope rescue, Navigation, All Terrain Vehicle, Water Rescue, Ice Rescue, and Evidence Search.” SAR members are required to purchase and maintain their own search and rescue gear, including their pack, clothing, footwear, compass, and GPS. Moody said the NCPSAR is called out on occasions when a person is missing, or if a search is required for evidence. “NCPSAR is dispatched at the request of the RCMP to as-

sist in searches anywhere in Saskatchewan,” he said. “The NCPSAR conducts training exercises several times per year for members to practice their skills.” The next scheduled training exercise for NCPSAR members is March 29, when they will focus on Map and Compass. Moody said volunteers are always needed. “The NCPSAR is always looking for new members,” he said. “Anyone interested can contact Duwayne Woodland by email wood211@hotmail. ca.

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5

Canada’s veterans, who have sacrificed so much, deserve our respect Every time my father would talk about my grandfather there was always a sense a pride in his eyes. My grandfather was comparable to a Forrest Gump character. He fought in the First and Second World Wars, was a boxer, survived two Tsunamis, shipwrecks and witnessed one of the largest man made accidents in Canada during the war effort, the Halifax Explosion. I can remember my Dad telling me when medical personnel carried my grandfather away from the Halifax Waterfront for treatment he thought he was in heaven because the medical personnel resembled angels because of their white coats. After the shell shock, he soon

JAMES TARRANT

Prairie Screechin’

realized he was alive and I bet felt lucky he was one of the fortunate few that lived to tell his family about it. I never met my grandfather, he died well before I was born, which sort of made my grandfather a legend in my eyes. When I think about him I wish he would have lived a little longer so I would have the opportunity to interview him and talk about his military life.

One thing I have always wondered was if my grandfather suffered any post traumatic stress because of his military service and if he was truly compensated for it. When I was working for a newspaper in Happy ValleyGoose Bay Labrador, I was fortunate to meet Captain Wilfred T. Haynes, a former Royal Navy captain. In 1940 he joined the Royal Navy as an Ordinary Seaman, but was wounded while on duty in the Mediterranean. Haynes carried shrapnel in his left leg until he was 85 years old, which eventually led to the amputation of his leg. I can remember Haynes telling me how his son Bruce was installing a rail and hoist in a

bathroom in his home to make it easier for his father to take a bath. It was hard to listen to how he was treated by Veteran Affairs in Ottawa, who constantly sent Haynes letters explaining why they were not going to compensate him for the loss of his leg. Haynes died later that year. I am not sure if he ever did receive compensation, but eight years later you can still read about veteran families in the media, who are forced to cover the cost of health related injuries because of the war effort. The latest dishonour from Veterans Affairs Canada came earlier this month when it ordered Cpl. Leona MacEachern’s

husband to pay back an overpayment of $581.67 because according to the Canadian Forces Members and Veterans Re-Establishment and Compensation Act earnings loss benefits are payable up to the day of MacEachern’s death. MacEachern, who was a 20year veteran of the Canadian Arms Forces and suffered from PTSD, died December 25, 2013 when she deliberately drove into an oncoming transport truck just outside Calgary. The Federal Government right now is being asked a lot of questions by opposition leaders and veterans about whether Stephen Harper will retroactively compensate ex-soldiers whose pensions and benefits

were unfairly clawed back. In May 2012 former defence minister Peter MacKay and federal lawyers negotiated an $877 million retroactive settlement dating back to 1976. This continuing saga makes me wonder if fighting or dying for your county is an honourable thing anymore? If dealing with the symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder wasn’t enough, money will not cure it, but surely compensation based on time served should assist in providing a better quality of life for our veterans. We can’t afford more suicides because of PTSD or disabled veterans feeling their country has forgotten about them.

SUMA delegates call for infrstructure funding Delegates at the Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association (SUMA) convention passed a resolution on Tuesday, February 4 that the Government of Canada immediately release the program design and details of the renewed Building Canada Fund. “It is vital that urban municipalities have access to federal funding to address the escalating infrastructure deficit in our communities,” said SUMA President Debra Button. “We have been waiting long enough

to access the funding promised by the federal government. We can’t afford to miss another construction season.” In March 2013, the federal government announced in its budget that a renewed Building Canada Fund would be developed, providing $14.4 billion for infrastructure projects over 10 years. The final details of the program design have not been released. Urban governments have been told that the earliest they can expect to see federal funding is April 2014.

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More than 800 groups and organizations across the province will benefit from approximately $1.4 million in charitable gaming grants distributed by the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA). “These grants will provide a financial boost to a number of important projects and programs in communities across the province,” Minister responsible for SLGA Donna Harpauer said. “Our government is pleased to provide financial support to the groups and organizations who work hard to enhance their communities by volunteering their time for others.” Among the grants provided by SLGA this quarter: Yorkton and surrounding area re-

Counter service for both Vital Statistics and the province’s ceived $104,480; Moose Jaw health services card is available and surrounding area: $97,483; February 3 at their new permaLloydminster and surround- nent location in downtown Reing area: $63,442; Humboldt and gina. surrounding area: $49,034 and The issue and renewal of proSwift Current and surrounding vincial health cards joins Vital Statistics as a public service for area: $46,703. Groups that raise funds residents of Saskatchewan folthrough licensed charitable lowing the transfer from the gaming (bingo, raffles, breako- Ministry of Health to eHealth pen ticket sales, Texas Hold ‘em Saskatchewan. poker and Monte Carlo events) “eHealth is pleased to offer receive a quarterly grant equal counter service for residents to 25 per cent of net proceeds of Saskatchewan looking to reraised through these activities. new, replace or apply for their Groups that conduct licensed health services card,” eHealth charitable gaming activities Saskatchewan CEO Susan Anand events do not have to apply tosh said. “Offering the profor the charitable gaming grant. vincial health card is a great fit Charitable gaming reports sub- with eHealth because we have mitted by groups and organiza- already been providing countions are used by SLGA to cal- ter service and management of Vital Statistics. Residents can culate grants. now visit the same location for all of these services.” All services are available online, by phone, and now, in person at one central location. For added convenience, customers are reminded that they can go over $90 million in Workers’ online anytime to renew, replace, request or change their Compensation Board claims.

Construction companies fined for unsafe conditions A numbered company, 1234049 Alberta Ltd. of Moose Jaw pleaded guilty to two counts under occupational health and safety legislation and was fined $1,040 in Regina Provincial Court on January 15, 2014. The charges stemmed from an inspection on November 14, 2012 where an Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Officer observed workers at a worksite in Regina working without fall protection equipment. Three other charges were stayed. In a separate case, Wright Construction Western Inc. of Saskatoon pleaded guilty to one count under occupational health and safety legislation and was fined $840 in Saskatoon Provincial Court on January 9, 2014. The charge relates to an inspection on October 27, 2011 at a commercial building worksite in Saskatoon. One worker was observed on a roof not wearing fall protection equipment, while three other workers were wearing appropriate equipment but did not have their lanyards attached. In the last five years, the construction industry has paid

health services card information. This move is a natural progression of housing similar services. Vital Statistics transferred to eHealth in mid-2013, moving from its former Park Street location to physically join eHealth and health card services on February 3. The transfer of the health services card to eHealth occurred in early January of this year. Visit www.ehealthsask.ca to order birth, death or marriage certificates, or to apply for and replace a health services card, and to report any changes to the family status or address associated with a health card. Counter service is available at 2130 11th Avenue, Regina, between the Bay and the Regina Transit office. eHealth Saskatchewan is a Treasury Board Crown Corporation responsible for the implementation of the provincial electronic health record. eHealth co-ordinates, implements and maintains key electronic health information systems in many public health care organizations.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 PG. 6

Income splitting: who benefits? By DAVID MACDONALD

Senior Economist Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

COMMENTARY

Eighty-six percent of Canadian families would gain no benefit from the proposed federal Conservative government’s income splitting plan. This information was released recently in a new study released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). The study examines the cost and the distributional impact of three income splitting scenarios: pension income splitting; income splitting for families with children under 18, as the Conservatives have pledged; and income splitting for all families. The study finds that the impact of income splitting in all scenarios is very unequal and the lost revenue for Canadian governments would be substantial. Income splitting creates a tax loophole big enough to drive a Rolls Royce through. It’s pitched as a program for the middle class but in reality it’s an expensive tax gift for the rich. The upper third of Canada’s richest families would receive $3 of every $4 spent on income splitting. The study finds seven out of ten senior families get no benefit at all from pension income splitting and the richest 10% of senior families receive more than the bottom 70% combined. The cost of pension income splitting for senior couples in 2015 is estimated at $1.7 billion ($1.2 billion federally and $500 million provincially). In contrast, it would cost $1.5 billion a year to lift all Canadian seniors out of poverty. The study examines the Conservative plan to extend income splitting to families with children under 18 and finds: 86% of all families would gain no benefit whatsoever from this tax loophole. There are real consequences of creating a $5 billion a year loophole that gives tax breaks to Canada’s richest families who don’t need them. If Canadian governments are concerned about supporting families with children, they could provide a universal child care program similar to the Quebec $7-a-day model for roughly the same cost as income splitting. Income splitting is a policy choice that would purposely exacerbate already high income inequality in Canada. This is inequality by design, not by accident.

More needs to be done for First Nations

As this province leaps ahead to new levels of economic prosperity in the 21st century, you’d like to think that we’ve left our old problems behind. Sadly, though, there are days when it only seems our old problems are getting worse. One such problem is our relationship with First Nations people - specifically, the problems of their children growing up in a safer and secure environment. Perhaps things have improved, marginally. But a few reminders of late suggest we still have a long ways to go. About 13 years ago, I wrote a chapter in a book entitled “Writing off the Rural West” in which I explored the often difficult relationships between Saskatchewan’s First Nation communities and the rural farms and towns and small cities that surround them. One example that I raised was that of one community in which it was a reasonably common practice to buy up then-cheap lots around your house in town just so that they wouldn’t be bought by Saskatchewan Housing and become homes to a First

MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

Nations family migrating from the nearby reserve. This was often done for reasons that extend well beyond race. Such renters are not always good caretakers. A rundown property next to yours would devalue your own property - a tough pill to swallow in the days when housing in Saskatchewan was of considerably less value than it is now. Our economy has changed significantly in the past decade and a half. Our property is worth more. But for many First Nations people, the boom has passed them by and they are struggling as much as ever. Consider the recent news that close to 500 children - most of whom would be First Nations children - have died in the care of the Saskatchewan welfare system in the past two decades. Not all these deaths were nec-

essarily nefarious. Many had to do with pre-existing conditions. However, that these “pre-existing conditions” often have to do with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) passed on from addicted parents suggests a cruel reality. The next generation of First Nations children are being failed. It is the same thing that happened to the previous generation and the generation before that - many of whom were from the residential school era and some of whom suffered unspeakable abuses. It’s not that we’ve turned a blind eye to the problem. We are sympathetic to the sad state of affairs. We blame the problem on the social services system that’s both overly bureaucratic and overburdened with what often seems to be growing caseloads. We blame the lack of qualified foster homes - especially within the First Nations community where everyone would prefer First Nations children be raise. We blame the poor work of First Nations child care services and we blame chiefs and band coun-

cils who often don’t do a good job of distributing what resources are available. And we rightly blame the parents. Some are mere children, themselves. Some have their own addiction issues. All too many suffer from inadequate parenting skills that have been lost in the sad history of residential schools and alcohol and drug addiction problems. We blame the entire system and rightly point out a good job is the first step to solving anyone’s social problems. But that so little has improved suggests that maybe we all should shoulder some of the blame. Sure, we are all sympathetic to these babies and young First Nations children starting their lives with huge disadvantages that make a productive adulthood virtually impossible. But we get too caught up in issues that don’t much matter, like a 13-year-old First Nations kid wearing a cheeky sweatshirt that is mostly about showing pride in her heritage. Maybe we have made strides. But we all have to do better or the problem will only get worse.

New academic assessment system poses more questions than answers Is it change for the sake of change or do the experts know something we ordinary parents and citizens don’t? That was the burning question as education students, school division trustees and staff, teachers, parents and some community members heard from five “experts” at a public forum and panel discussion on the new assessment and reporting system implemented throughout Prairie Spirit School Division. For those that may not have heard about this forum, you are not alone. Despite having a child in school and being the owner and publisher of the newspaper of record for a large portion of the school division, I never found out about it until three hours beforehand. Sure, there were postings on Facebook, posters in the schools and on one school website. But I guess I don’t hang with the right friends on Facebook. Maybe I need to walk

TERRY JENSON

One Cup Column

my son into the school each morning so I can check the bulletin board for announcements. If all else fails, I should put a sticky note on my computer screen to check all the school websites each day twice a day for this type of vital information. It was a forum open to everyone in the division, yet the only website that had any information about it was the Warman Community Middle School. And, if you don’t have a child attending WCMS, chances are good it’s not exactly a must-see website. For those who weren’t aware of this forum, it was a missed opportunity to learn more about the new grading sys-

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tem that ditches the tried and true letter grades or percentage grades in favour of ostentatious terms such as “Beginning”, “Approaching”, “Meeting” and “Extending”. Before moving on, I’ll have to give the school division an “Approaching” grade (in older days, this would be a “C” at best) for their promotional faux pas. A barely one-third full auditorium that holds 400 people does not exactly constitute a stellar crowd, especially in a division with no fewer than 44 schools and over 9,400 students. The decision to move to a new assessment method for our students is all but a done deal in the division. Gone are the days of excited youngsters coming home from school with beaming smiles on their faces because they worked hard and earned an A+ or a 94 per cent average on their report card. Now, under this new system, hundreds and thousands

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of kids will come home and all mutter the same term in a monotone, Ferris Bueller’ish voice: “Meeting”. That’s great! You’re meeting what? Meeting on the playground? Meeting a friend? Meeting for a game of “stand around” because you’re not allowed to use a soccer ball at recess? Bueller? Bueller? All sarcasm aside, this new grading system will produce two types of young adults. First is the naturally gifted and motivated student who suddenly learns through osmosis that they can be lazy and need only do the bare minimum. The term “Extending” doesn’t exactly bring out the hunger to achieve, whereas a chance to go from a B+ to an A- is a target to strive for. The second type will be the ones that are unmotivated and lured by the system into a false sense of accomplishment. They tried really hard, were given an Approaching mark and sent

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on their way. Sorry to break the news but trying really hard doesn’t cut it in the real world. My own experience with resumes from the “younger generation” is proof positive. Can’t spell my company’s name right in the cover letter? Couldn’t meet that deadline because you didn’t think the assignment was really all that important? Thanks for trying...but no job for you. I wouldn’t want my doctor to tell me following surgery they tried to take out my gall bladder but couldn’t find it so they took out my spleen. There is a big difference between trying and doing. In some ways if I’m 80-years-old, I’m kind of hoping I get another 80-year-old with the scalpel. Sure, I may have some extra stitches, but at least I can be assured he or she will be on time and very likely get the right organ. Even the youngest of students need goals. Ever watch a youngster play a video game?

I have plenty of experience in this area. When my sevenyear-old son makes it to his game’s next level after trying so hard, he is walking on air and is proud of himself. Moreso, he is motivated to get past the next challenge. He knows all about goals and how to achieve them. A report card that says he is “Meeting” or even “Extending” is hardly a ringing endorsement of his hard work and dedication in the classroom. The blame cannot be put squarely on the teachers, however. They have been put into a difficult position of squaring a building with round corners. It’s rather ironic that the group of academics who came up with – and are promoting this new grading system – once received letter and percentage grades in elementary school. If it was good enough for those same academics then, why isn’t the same system good enough for our kids now?

HAVE AN OPINION? EXPRESS IT HERE.

The Clark’s Crossing Gazette welcomes Letters to the Editor regarding topics of interest to our readers. The Gazette reserves the right to edit letters for brevity and clarity. Letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, signature and daytime telephone number for verification purposes (name and daytime telephone number in the case of emailed letters). Letters must be tastefully written and meet the Gazette’s legal standards in order to qualify for publishing. Letters must be signed and include contact information for authenticity purposes. The Gazette does not necessarily support or oppose the opinions, expressed or implied, in this newspaper. The Clark’s Crossing Gazette is independently owned and operated. Any reproduction for non-personal purposes, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. The Gazette is distributed free of charge to residents in the area. Subscriptions outside the market area within Canada are available at a rate of $109.00+GST/yr.

VOL. 6 NO. 25


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

7

to bridge a gap Art project in Langham aims to encourage youth involvement By JESSICA SEIDEL

jessye.rae96@gmail.com

An innovative art project aimed at encouraging youth to become more involved in their community is getting off the ground in Langham.

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Once it takes flight, the project will also help bridge the generation gap by tapping into the creativity of seniors. It all adds up to creating a more lively, dynamic community, according to Kris Moffatt, a Langham visual artist and curatorof the Moffatt Galleria. Moffatt, in partnership with the art program at Walter W. Brown high school, was recently awarded a $9,800 Creative Partnership Program “Explore and Develop” grant from the provincial government. This means that the students of Langham School and members of the community are going to be given the opportunity to express their artistic styles all over town. Basically they’re getting the chance to improve, and exercise their artistic skills, and bring a new art as-

pect to the town of Langham. The five main partners of this project are Moffatt (artist partner), art teacher Brian Knowles and Principal Michael Neufeld of Walter W. Brown School, the Town of Langham itself, Langham & District Heritage & Village Museum, and the Langham Senior Citizens Home. Each of the partners has a specific job to carry out. Moffatt is in charge of researching the needs of the community, partners and students and drafting project ideas to create a final plan for the project. The school will manage grant reporting, fund administration, artist contract and payment and help ensure the project remains on track and applies to the students’ needs. The town will be consulted about projects and will contribute input and spaces for the art of the students and community. They will also provide project documentation through interviews and input. The Museum and Senior Citizens Home will both be consulted on project development and possibly provide space for the actual creating phases of the project. Phase one of the project is mostly up to the school and Moffatt. Together they will fig-

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Jessica Seidel, a Grade 12 student at Walter W. Brown High School (far right), Art Teacher Brian Knowles and Langham visual artist Kris Moffatt inside the Moffatt Galleria studio in Langham ure out the needs of both the students and community, and work out the interest in projects and participation. Then Moffatt will start to develop projects that will fit those needs and present them to Knowles, after which they will be sent to the funders for approval.

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

“I wrote a thesis question when I applied for the creative partnership grant,” explained Moffatt in a recent interview. “And that question was: ‘will

involvement with art in the community increase student engagement, and their sense of belonging in the community?’ “Basically the goal of this project is to promote kids to become involved with art and their communities,” Moffatt added. “The people of this town, the kids mostly, who don’t own houses, and who haven’t been in Langham for 40 years, tend to feel that maybe they don’t belong in this town so much, they feel they have nothing to contribute. This project is to help

them make this town theirs and also express themselves. “I used to be a student, and I know what it was like and how bad I wanted that chance,” Moffatt said. Once the first phase of the project has been approved and planned out, the partners can start working on the second phase of getting people involved. If the first phase is approved the project will be in line for funding. If granted, the project will be sure to benefit all par-

ticipants. “I just think it’s a great way to make, or to give real world application to what we do in art at Walter W. Brown and increase the profile of art in Langham,” said art teacher Brian Knowles. The provincial Creative Partnerships programs are supported through the collaboration of the Saskatchewan Arts Board, SaskCulture, and financial support from Saskatchewan Lotteries Trust Fund for Sport, Culture and Recreation.

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NEW MARTENSVILLE CITY HALL OPENS FOR BUSINESS City of Martensville staff members Janet Shewchuk (left) and Heather Braun are set to greet members of the public at the reception counter of the new Martensville City Hall. The new building opened for business on Monday, February 3. On Thursday, January 30 and Friday, January 31, city staff (inset above) were busy packing up their files and furniture for the big move. The $2.5 million, 10,000 square-foot facility brings together all the civic departments under one roof. Until now, city staff operated out of three separate buildings. The new city hall, which is still undergoing last-minute finishing touches, also includes the new Martensville City Council Chambers. The city’s computer system and telephones are operational in the new building. A total of 17 city staff, including all Department heads, will be operating out of offices in the new City Hall, which is expected to meet the needs of the rapidly-growing city for the next ten years. The building was designed by Maurice Soulodre Architects. This spring, landscaping work on the site, located adjacent to the existing Martensville Civic Centre, will be commenced. The total cost of the building and landscaping is expected to be about $3 million. The Martensville Library, located in the Civic Centre, is set to undergo a major renovation and expansion as it takes over some of the vacated space. The Martensville RCMP office, it should be noted, is still operating out of the old City Hall building. TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Saskatoon Health Region offers last chance to get flu vaccine If you’ve missed out on getting the flu vaccine so far, the Saskatoon Health Region wants everyone aged six months and up to know there’s still time to get immunized. “Getting your influenza immunization is the best way to protect yourself and your family,” says Manager of Disease Control Karen Grauer. “It’s not too late to take advantage of the free vaccine.” Flu clinics were held in Saskatoon and Watrous on Fri-

day, January 31. Upcoming drop-in flu clinics include: Saskatoon: Wednesday, Feb. 5, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Public Health North East office, 108407 Ludlow St. Saskatoon: Saturday, Feb. 8, 9 a.m. to noon, Public Health South East office, 3006 Taylor St. Some physician offices are offering flu vaccine to individuals medically at risk, along with their families, if they are unable to attend a clinic.

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From February 3 to 7, indidialysis or who recently had vidual appointments are also transplant surgery) should call available, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily, for people “Getting your influenza aged six months immunization is the best way to and older. Appointments protect yourself and your family. can be booked through a local It’s not too late...” public health • Karen Grauer, SHR Manager of Disease Control office. Severely immunocompromized people (those re306-655-4612 to book an indiceiving cancer treatment, on vidual immunization appoint-

ment. Influenza vaccine is offered to children and family members through routine childhood immunization visits. Postpartum mothers are offered vaccine before discharge from the hospital. Most people between two years and 59 years of age will receive FluMist, a vaccine sprayed into the nostrils. Those not eligible for FluMist receive injectable vaccine, including children six to 23 months

of age, pregnant women, those over 60 years old, immunocompromised people, and healthcare workers in direct contact with the immunocompromised in care facilities. Since the flu immunization program began on October 21, 79,415 people, including healthcare workers, have been immunized. Visit www.4flu.ca for complete influenza information including information about upcoming clinics.

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Volunteer group looks to establish licensed childcare facility in Warman By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A non-profit group is looking to build and operate a provincially-licensed childcare facility in Warman that could accommodate up to 42 youngsters, including toddlers and infants. Brenda Black, President of the Warman Childcare Centre (WCC), says the group has been working for the better part of a year to make their dream a reality. “We started with a committee of volunteers in the spring of 2013,” said Black in an interview on Thursday, January 30. “We incorporated as a nonprofit corporation and have put together a business plan. This type of facility is needed. The number of young families in Warman, Martensville, Osler and the surrounding region, is growing and we need more childcare spaces.” Black cited statistics that

show there are 770 children under 5 years of age in Warman, yet there are only 20 provincially-licensed childcare spots available in the city. Black said the provincial government allocates annual funding for 500 childcare spaces to licensed childcare centres across the province. The funding is tied to the allocation of licensed spaces, and both allocations are made in March. Black is hopeful the group will be allocated some licensed spaces based on their application. Black noted that not all childcare centres are licensed, and stressed that there are many high-quality unlicensed, privately-owned and operated childcare centres in Warman and other communities. But there are just not enough childcare spaces available, even when unlicensed facilities are included in the mix, she added. The shortage is even more acute when the

needs of parents with infants are considered. “An infant needs a lot more constant attention,” she said. “An infant is a child 18-months-old and under. But one of the problems is that most maternity leaves are only for 12 months.” Licensed childcare centres are regulated by the provincial Ministry of Education Early Learning and Child Care Branch, and must meet specific standards for the number of caregivers per child, floor space, nutrition and other requirements. Caregivers at licensed facilities must also be certified in Early Childhood Education. Auditors regularly inspect licensed childcare centres to ensure compliance with the required standards. Licensed childcare centres are also eligible for government funding based on their childcare space allocations and childcare subsidies are also available to some parents through a licensed facility.

A full explanation of the provincial Child Care program’s regulations and standards is available online at www.education.gov.sk.ca/ELCC . Black said the WCC is currently fundraising to build and operate a 4,000-square foot licensed childcare centre in the City of Warman. The location for the new centre has not yet been determined, but Black said it would have 42 spaces for children, including six spots for infants. She said the centre would be open about 12 hours a day, five to six days a week, and require between seven to ten staff members, including a full-time director of care. The estimated start-up cost of the project, she said, would be in the neighbourhood of $750,000. The operating budget would be separate, she noted, and would be based on revenue generated from fees and gov-

ernment funding. Black said the group is optimistic the provincial government will allocate childcare spaces to the WCC. “As soon as we get allocated spaces, we will be shopping for a location and nailing down our building layout,” said Black. “We cannot start building till we get government funding. The spaces have to be allocated to us through government, and then we receive funding and a startup grant. After that we will go to the bank to secure financing, and begin construction of the building.” Black said there will likely still be a need for more childcare spaces in Warman, Martensville and Osler, even after the WCC facility is eventually built. “We believe even with our centre open, there will still be a need for another centre,” she

said.

FUNDRAISING DINNER

The WCC is kicking off its fundraising campaign on Thursday, March 27 with a steak dinner at the Brian King Centre in Warman. The event features rising country music star Codie Prevost. “Codie will be unveiling his brand new album at that event,” said Black. “Codie’s a great musician and a wonderful entertainer.” The dinner also features award-winning food. “Darren Craddock, the Executive Chef at the Riverside Golf and Country Club, is the husband of one of our board members,” said Black. “Darren is the 2012 Saskatoon Gold Plate Winner.” Tickets for the fundraiser are $30 for adults and $10 per child and are available by calling 306-955-4316 or 306-262-1729.

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Racing with the Stars Warman students compete in annual Knights of Columbus Indoor Games By WAYNE SHIELS

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The 49th Annual Knights of Columbus Saskatchewan Indoor Games was held at the Saskatoon Field House on January 31 and February 1. One of the goals of this event is to provide Saskatchewan youth with positive role models by having elementary school students compete in the same meet that has events featuring international track stars. The place was vibrating as hundreds of elementary students competed in the school 4x100 relays. on Friday evening. Students from Warman Community Middle School were well represented with a combined 12 teams in the Under-11 and Under-13 groups. Of those 12 teams, eight advanced to the semi-finals on Saturday morning, and six then advanced to the Saturday afternoon’s final where the girls Under-11 team placed 5th, the Under-11 boys finished 2nd and 5th. The Under-13 girls finished 3rd and 5th. The Under-13 boys finished 4th. Many of those students had their introduction to relays by running in the hallways of Warman Elementary School. With the opening of the Warman Community Middle School this school year the students have access to the large gyms at the Warman Legends Centre for their morning practices. Coach Shane Bachmeier, a Grade 5 teacher at the Middle School talked about how the use of these facilities have really helped the teams. He said, “with the high number of students involved, the gyms allow students to get a large number of baton exchanges when practicing.” Bachmeier, along with teachers, Bonnie Williams, Michelle Russell, and Amanda Baudais have between 60-80 students for the morning practices. Students develop a sense of teamwork through competing in indoor events such as the Knights of Columbus Indoor Games. It is Canada’s only world-class Olympic Calibre Indoor Games. and the school relays are a special part of the event.

Hundreds of people braved cold winds and frigid temperatures to take part in the annual Martensville Winter FunFest on Saturday, February 1. The event, which took place at the North Ridge Centennial Community Centre and Kinsmen Park, featured indoor children’s activities and outdoor events. The most popular outdoor site was the firepit, where people cooked hot dogs. Horse-drawn wagon rides were popular with the kids, as were the performances of Beeper the Clown. (Gazette photos by Terry Pugh, Bonnie Gorelitza and Angela Reddekopp)

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Warman Community Middle School’s Emma Horbay competing in 4x100 relays

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

11

Martensville skaters win medals at Clavet interclub regional competition By JENNIFER SKAKUN

President, Skate Martensville

Skate Martensville had 13 STARSkaters attend the Annual Regional Interclub Competition held in Clavet on Saturday February 1. Martensville contenders had a strong showing and brought home 21 Gold medals, 14 Silver medals and 7 Bronze medals. Entries for our skaters included Elements Events, Jump Events, Spin Events, Freeskate, Interpretive and Team Events. This year Skate Canada opted to combine three Regions for this competition, with skaters from Qu’Appelle Region 4 and Quill Plains Region 7 joining skaters from our Blackstrap Region 8. There were skaters in attendance from Clavet, Dalmeny, Drake, Dysart, Fort Qu’Appelle, Humboldt, Leroy, Martensville, Osler, Outlook, Raymore, St. Brieux, Warman, Weyburn and Wynyard.

ers had fun and skated well. All in attendance received a medal, a certificate of achievement, progress report cards for their events, and a swag bag. Thanks to the Program Assistants from our Club who attended to sup-

For several of our skaters this was their first competition experience and others are still quite new to competing so Skate Martensville is very proud of the accomplishments achieved this weekend. Awesome skating everyone and we look forward to your continued success at the Jean Norman Competition hosted in Moose Jaw February 28th – March 2. Our hats off to the Clavet Skating Club and their many volunteers for hosting such a great event. Skate Martensville also had six CanSkaters attend the Annual Regional Interclub Funfest held in Clavet on Sunday February 2. In attendance were Kiersten Skelton, Tenley Jaeb, Emma Daku, Emma McIntyre, McKenzie Kobelsky and John Hamm. Entries for our skaters included Elements Events, Spin, Spiral, Jump Events, and Team Events. Our CanSkat-

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 PG. 12

Delisle Chiefs lose heartbreaker to Saskatoon Royals

ringing it off the iron Warman Midget AA Wildcats’ forward Michael DuRussel watches a shot from the point beat the Prince Albert Raiders goalie, only to have the puck ring off the crossbar during Centre Four Hockey League action in Warman on Friday, January 31. The Wildcats lost the game 7-2, and were edged 3-2 by PA on Sunday, Feb 2. The Wildcats’ next home game is Sunday, Feb 16 at12:45 p.m. at the Diamond Arena in Warman

By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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Vipers earn split in weekend games By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

It was a rough and tumble style of hockey when the Sask Valley Vipers took on the Saskatoon Outlaws at Kinsmen Arena on Saturday, February 1. Vipers defencemen Austin Shumanski made his presence known, manhandling the Outlaws in the back end, but a wrap around goal by the Outlaws’ Brendan Carey opened the scoring in the first period. Saskatoon’s 1-0 lead was short lived when Benson Thorpe and Jax Gipman crashed the Outlaws’ net to tie the game 1-1 early in the second period. The game turned into a bit of a back-and-forth basketball match with both teams trading goals in the second and third periods. The Outlaws’ Noah Bazowsky gave his team a 2-1 at the close of the second period, while early in the third period

It was a goal that Delisle Chiefs goaltender Keith Boon wished he could have back. Booon surrendered the tiebreaking goal in the dying seconds of regulation time to allow the Saskatoon Royals to skate away with a 2-1 victory on Friday, January 31. It was a slow start for the Chiefs, who were outshot 9-3 by the Royals in the opening period, despite Ryan Fredrickson’s goal which put the Chiefs up 1-0. The Chiefs opened up their game in the second period, getting countless shots on goal only to be foiled time and time again by Saskatoon goalie Jay Hudon The Royals fought back in the second period when Marty Ruether scored an unassisted marker to knot it up in the second period 1-1. The Chiefs continued to pour on the shots in the third period, despite playing short-handed as a result of racking up 44 minutes in penalties. They peppered Hudon with 34 shots.

the Vipers’ Tylin Cameron kept his team’s hopes alive with a 2-2 stalemate. After scoring a goal to put his team in the lead in the opening period, Carey decided it was only fitting to close out the game with a game-winning goal to edge the Vipers 3-2 for the win. The Vipers travelled to Humbolt to get their scoring touch back, scoring two goals a period to double up on the Broncos 6-3. Chance Adrian led team scoring with two goals and one assist, followed by Austin Wheeler who added three assists and Jared Hamm who had a goal and an assist. The Vipers have two games remaining in their record breaking regular season next weekend, when they take on the Saskatoon Manics Friday, February 14 and the Saskatoon Bandits February 15. Both games will be played at the Kinsmen Arena in Saskatoon.

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Delisle Chiefs’ Brayden Atkinson uses his big frame to protect the puck from Royals’ defenceman Ken Tomchuk

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The Royals, meanwhile, spent 34 minutes in the sin bin during the penalty-filled contest. It looked like the game was heading to overtime, when Tyler Hahn broke the back of the Chiefs with less than 40 seconds on the clock to seal the victory for the Purple and Black. The Chiefs redeemed themselves on the road in Carrot River the following day with a 4-1 victory over the Tri-Town Thunder. Michael Hugen open up the scoring for the Chiefs in the first period on a set up by Jackson Hill and Kynan Tarnowski. The Thunder managed to make it a game when Luc Casavant knotted up the game 1-1 with just over a minute to go in the second period. The Chiefs dominated the third period with goals from Tyson Leard, Mark Ganter and Kynan Tarnowski. The Chiefs will head out on the road Wednesday, February 5 to take on the Quakers, then return home Friday, February 7 to face the Saskatoon Westleys at home Friday 7. Game time is 8 p.m.

THE

RESULTS T EAM


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

13

Clavet storms back to win Cougar Classic By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The Clavet Cougars senior men’s basketball team won their Cougar Classic tournament with a 83-69 victory over Indian Head on Saturday, February 1. The 18-draw tournament featured high school teams from Birch Hills, Olser, Stobart, Kinistino, Warman and Indian Head. Cougars head coach Paul McTavish said the final game was much closer than what the score indicated.

“We were down ten at the first and we managed to tie it up at the half. They were up by about six or eight after the third quarter, then we ended up winning it in the end. They won the first and third quarter and we won the second and fourth quarters.” The Cougars’ gold medal win gives the team a 21-3 record and possibly a third place finish, depending on when the Saskatchewan High School Athletic Association releases its 3A basketball school rankings in March. The Cougars defeated Stobart

85-44 in their opening game, and then continued their dominance over Kinistino 72-51 to earn a spot in the final against Indian Head. It was an important game to win says McTavish. “Winning that game yesterday against Indian Head was crucial because it puts us ahead of them in the 3A rankings.” In 19 years the Cougars have represented Clavet 19 times at provincials and won 11 titles, said McTavish. If the Cougars win regionals this year it will mark the fourth time McTavish’s team has made

WArman sr. girls invitational basketball tournament

it to provincials in the six years he has coached them. In 2011 the Cougars won the Hoopla Tournament and last year made it to the final only to lose to Regina Christian Academy. “This is probably the most complete team that we have had. Last year we had a team that worked really well together,” said McTavish. “This year our Grade 12s built on what those grads from last year started. We got some grade 11 kids that are really athletic and helped us pushed us forward. The win against Indian Head also had a personal connection. The head coach Tim Cline is McTavish’s first cousin. “It is interesting because we have only played Indian Head twice. It was important for us to win for rankings but also for family bragging rights,” laughs McTavish.

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Clavet Cougars guard Daniel Kolesnikow (left) powers through Indian Head’s defence for a lay-up during the Cougar Classic Senior Boy’s Basketball Tournament

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WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Janaya Brown of the Warman Wolverines (left) gets into close quarters with St. Mary’s Quinn Buettner during the Warman High School Sr. Girls Invitational Basketball Tournament on Jan. 31 and Feb 1. Teams from Humboldt, Prince Albert, Meadow Lake, Estevan, Saskatoon, and Moose Jaw competed for the championship. The host Wolverines advanced to the championship final with dominant wins over the Humboldt Mohawks and St. Mary’s. In the finals Warman was up against a powerful team from Moose Jaw, the Peacock Collegiate Toilers. The Wolverines matched Moose Jaw shot for shot at the start of the game and the first quarter ended with Moose Jaw holding a slim 16-14 lead. Peacock then began to dominate rebounds and increased their lead to 39-27 at half time and eventually won 77-44. It was the second year in a row that the team from Moose Jaw has won the Invitational Tournament.

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Classifieds CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 • PAGE 14

1010

1090

Obituaries

1090

Tenders

Tenders

LAND FOR SALE BY TENDER

Run your word ad FrEE! 3 consecutive weeks with no changes, get the 4th week

RM OF BIG QUILL NO. 308

how to PLACE your Ad

for Excavating Services

In-person 109 Klassen St. West Warman Cash | Cheque | Money Order

E-mail ads@ccgazette.ca Email your ad then call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

telephone 306-668-0575 Call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

Fax 306-668-3997 Fax your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run) to 306-668-3997 anytime and we will process payment to your credit card

Postal Mail P.O. Box 1419 Warman, SK S0K 4S0 Cash | Cheque | Money Order

Send your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run)

Ad Classifications ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060 MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040

REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060 Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ...........6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ...................6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

SE 26 - 31 - 18 - W2, includes 143 cultivated acres

TENDER

Murray, Leane Michelle (Elson) 1973 ~ 2014 With great shock and sadness we announce the sudden passing of Leane Michelle (Elson) Murray in Mexico on January 12, 2014. Leane was born in Calgary, graduated from Eckville High school and later as a single parent, obtained her registered nursing degree from RDC. Leane is survived by her two sweet children Andrew and Erin Williams of Red Deer, AB and her loving husband of 18 years Glenn Murray of Warman, SK; her parents Dwayne and Shelley Elson as well as her sister Dayna (Greg) Pimm; brothers Michael (Tammy) Elson and David Elson; her grandparents Margaret and Hugh Linden; her aunts and uncles: Liz and Ernie Pucci, Kent (Ellen) Linden, Gene and Loree Sears as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. She is also survived by Sandra (Clare) Turner, Cliff (Marilyn) Sawa and Michelle (Dale) Lauf Mike (Gwen) Sawa, and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins She was predeceased by her grandparent’s Verner and Jennie Elson. Leane will always be remembered for her sweet generous spirit, her heartwarming laugh, her love for family and all animals (except strangely for monkeys). A memorial service for Leane will be held at the Eckville Community center on Saturday February 1, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to a scholarship at Red Deer College School Of Nursing that will be set up in memory of Leane. Sylvan Lake and Rocky Funeral Homes and Crematorium, your Golden Rule Funeral Homes, entrusted with the arrangements. 403-887-2151.

1090

Tenders

PROPERTY FOR SALE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Proposals addressed to the Town Administrator, Town of Langham and plainly marked on the envelope “Proposals for Property for Sale” will be received until 5:00 p.m. on February 28, 2014 for the following property: Legal Address: PR1 85S04878 Zoning District: R3 Residential Site Area: Approx. 1.9 Acres Land Use: Residential (Family and Senior Housing) To receive a copy of the full Request for Proposals, please visit:

Langham Town Office (230 Main Street East) Phone (306) 283-4301 or email: admin@langham.ca.

SW 26 - 31 - 18 - W2, includes 146 cultivated acres

The City of Martensville is accepting tenders to provide grave digging services at the Martensville Cemetery for 2014. The tendered bid must be effective for the entire year, with no difference in summer and winter rates. Tenders may be dropped off at City Hall – 37 Centennial Drive South, Martensville between the hours of 8:30 am-5:00 pm, or mailed to: City of Martensville, Box 970 – Martensville, Sk S0K 2T0 The best or any tender may not necessarily be accepted. Applicants must be fully insured and have a business license issued by the City of Martensville. Deadline for submission is Thursday, February 27, 2014 at 4:30 pm.

SE 31 - 18 - W2, includes 155 cultivated acres SW 34 - 31 - 18 W2 includes a steel Quonset 7 Westeel Rosco Bins with wood floor, 2 Westeel Rosco Bins on hopper; 1 painted/welded steel hopper bins, Small Rigid Frame Shop, electrical service and 130 cultivated acres W 1/2 of NW (LSD 12 & 13) 34 - 31 - 18 - W2, Including 70 cultivated acres

RM OF PRAIRIE ROSE NO. 309 SE 26 - 32 - 19 - W2 Hayland

MINERAL RIGHTS NOT INCLUDED Interested parties should submit tenders ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 28, 2014 ADDRESSED TO: Kohaly, Elash & Ludwig Law Firm LLP 1312 - 4th St. Estevan, SK S4A 0X2 (306) 634 - 3631 For more information contact Brenda Retier at (708) 998 - 7857 Or Neil Wallace at 011 - 31 - 229 - 506 - 939

CALL FOR PROPOSALS Camp Kitchen

All tenders should be in writing and should be accompanied by a deposit of 10% of the tendered amount payable to Kohaly, Elash & Ludwig Law Firm LLP in trust.

Call for Proposals for the lease of the Camp Kitchen building located at Kinsmen Park for the 2014 season will be accepted to the undersigned until 4:30 p.m., February 24, 2014. Interested parties are asked to submit their proposal indicating the stated lease purpose of the building including the lease amount. The operating season is May to September, 2014.

Highest or any tender not necessarily accepted

City of Martensville Box 970 Martensville, SK S0K 2T0

1100

Legal Notices NOTICE TO CREDITORS:

Estate of David B. Fehr In the estate of David B. Fehr, late of Delisle, in the Province of Saskatchewan, deceased. All claims against the above estate, duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before March 12, 2014.

HARVEY FEHR, PETER REIMER and, MENNONITE TRUST LTD.

Executors in the Estate of David B. Fehr P.O. Box 40 Waldheim, SK S0K 4R0 Tel: (306) 945-2080

1110

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1100

Legal Notices TAX ENFORCEMENT LIST

TOWN OF DUNDURN - PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN

NOTICE is hereby given under The Tax Enforcement Act that unless the arrears and costs appearing opposite the land and title number described in the following list are fully paid before the 6th day of April, 2014, an interest based on a tax lien will be registered against the land. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY ASSESSMENT LOT 505001400 06 505001400 07 505002950 13 505002950 14 505003250 21 505005150 13 505005150 19 505005250 14 505005250 20 505005400 1 505005450 505005450 2 505006100 3 505006100 14 505007150 18 505007150 1 505007400 2 505008350 6 505008800 1 505008800 1 505008800 2 505009400 505009750 10 505009400 16 505010100 2 505012600 5 505012600 6 505012600 7 505013150 16 505013150 18 505013150 5 505016000 16 505018300 7 505018900 1 505019500 1 505020000 6 505020600 6 505022350 18 505033000 B 505034700 10 505060000 0

PLAN NO. BLK 47454 2 47454 2 47454 3 47454 3 47454 3 47454 5 101579979 5 47454 5 101579991 5 47454 B B2915 6 B2915 6 B2915 6 B2915 6 101580050 6 C10105 A C10105 A C10105 A C4769 2 C4769 3 C4769 3 C4769 B C4769 4 C4769 4 C4769 5 C4769 8 C4769 8 C4769 8 C4769 8 101580937 8 C4769 9 G901 12 79S10318 16 79S10318 17 79S10318 18 79S10318 18 79S10318 19 97S47707 21 10 101951401 10 101951401 102110577 C

Dated the 27th day of January, 2014 Eileen Prosser, Administrator

EXT 0 0 0 0 0 0 55 56 57 1 0 0 0 0 54 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 41 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0

TITLE NO. 115438114 115438125 133187104 142444425 1154388877 1331877104 115438888 115438899 115438901 121110130 131782811 131782833 131782844 115439070 115439069 142048920 142048942 115440353 143452942 130616119 130616120 132157032 140151338 136378547 129648853 134407841 134407920 134407953 142825675 142825709 13943462 142827970 140611597 126082661 138242426 142948479 128959183 137211858 114483977 137323920 143605492

TOTAL ARREARS 1263.58

TOTAL ADVERT. ARREARS COSTS & COSTS 8.25 1271.83

1772.24

8.25

1780.49

3543.73 2499.12

8.25 8.25

3551.98 2507.37

2583.86

8.25

2592.11

2114.66 7531.75

8.25 8.25

2122.91 7540.00

4193.95

8.25

4202.20

1902.70

8.25

1910.95

5809.48 2586.02 3384.77

8.25 8.25 8.25

5817.73 2594.27 3393.02

2600.84 714.66 3340.04 5266.11

8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25

2069.09 722.91 3348.29 5274.36

2133.92

8.25

2142.17

1699.37 5594.69 3169.02 2531.57 3674.23 2941.36 2756.21 5216.20 2321.86 561.62 729.09

8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25 8.25

1707.62 5602.94 3177.27 2539.82 3682.48 2949.61 2764.46 5134.45 2330.11 569.87 737.34


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

1110

General Notices HOST FAMILIES NEEDED. Northern Youth Abroad is looking for families to host 2 youth from Nunavut/NWT. Volunteering in your community. July/August. www.nya.ca. 1-866-2122307.

1120

Coming Events Country Gospel Breakfast Buffet & Concert Featuring

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Smiley’s Buffet 702 Circle Drive East Adults - $15.00 Children under 12 - $6.00 **Price includes breakfast buffet and concert** For more information, contact Bob Klein 306-242-7431 Ken Olson 306-229-8600 ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SHOW & SALE. February 24 to March 2 (inclusive) at Market Mall, Preston & Louise, Saskatoon, during mall hours. Quality Assurance Course for Health Canada’s COMMERCIAL MARIJUANA PROGRAM. February 22 & 23 Best Western Hotel, Kelowna, B.C. Tickets: www.greenlineacad emy.com or 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882. LEARN OF GOD’S plan & purpose for this earth. w w w . t h e christadelphians.org.

1120

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1120

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

3010

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Personals Country Introductions Introducing you to honest, down to earth singles like yourself. Wanted ladies, offering Free Membership! Good, honest bachelors available. Call Cheryl at 1-877-247-4399.

2040

Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Get a record suspension pardon for career, travel and peace of mind. BBB Rating A+. RCMP connected. Nation-Wide; www.nationalpardon.org or toll free 1-866-242-2411.

DeaDline

for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

3010

For Sale FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Poplar $150/cord; willow and maple $200/cord. (306) 7175298. PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call The Gazette at 306-668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca for details. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1800-457-2206 www.crown steelbuildings.ca.

RURAL WATER TREATMENT. Patented iron filters, softeners, distillers, “Kontinuous Shock” Chlorinator, IronEater. Patented whole house reverse osmosis. Payment plan. 1-800-BIGIRON (244-4766); www.BigIronDrilling.com. View our 29 patented & patent pending inventions. Since 1957.

4030

Feed And Seed

HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

5010

Homes / Condos For Sale Hafford 1,140 Sq. Ft. Bungalow 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath; 2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater; water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512. ONLY A FEW units left! 55plus adult community. Ground level ranchers . www.diamondplace.ca. 306241-0123, Warman, SK. HOMES, COTTAGES & More. RTMI - Ready to Move in. Call 1-888-733-1411; rtmihomes.com. Red Tag Sale on now - ask about our $100,000 giveaway.

5020

Homes / Condos For Rent 2 BEDROOM SUITE in 4 Plex. 5 appliances, A/C. $825.00 per month includes water. Adults only. N/S, N/P. (306)975-1942 in Warman. WARMAN: One bedroom condo. 5 appliances. F/P and A/C. Own driveway. Positively no smoking and no pets. Seniors Preferred. Phone (306) 221-2637 or (306)229-0991. HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575.

5030

Apartments For Rent

One Bedroom Senior Unit Applications are being taken for a one bedroom senior unit. - Rent is based on income. - Rent includes water & sewer, heat, building & yard maintenance, fridge, stove, washer & dryer Borden has many small town amenities. Some examples are: - A Special Care Home - A Health Center with a Registered Dietician, Licensed Nurse Practitioner & Doctors coming in every Tuesday - A pharmacy, Volunteer Fire Department & First Responders - Co-Op Grocery & Farm Service, Service clubs, Churches & much more. For more information please contact: Ivan Youchezin Housing Manager 306-997-4997 Borden Housing Authority P.O. Box 238 Borden, Sask. S0K 0N0

15

This Week’s C R O S S W O R D Across

1. Take by theft 7. Cash machine 10. Removed from attendance 12. Old World buffalo 13. Spread by dividing 14. Herd of unsheared sheep 15. Main arterial vessel 16. Carbamide 17. In the style of 18. Leafstalk angle 19. Physiques 21. Command right 22. Gratuitous 27. Printed display 28. Dexter inspector 33. “Hammer Time’s” initials 34. Making one ashamed 36. Hill (Celtic) 37. Expletive 38. Surface 39. Atomic weight 40. Swiss river 41. Publicists 44. Hollow cylinders 45. Most hirsute 48. Wading bird 49. Not in residence 50. According to 51. Property injury

5. “Run to Him” singer Bobby 6. Doctor of Education 7. Celestial intermediary 8. Roman garment 9. More (Spanish) 10. Ear shell 11. Diversify 12. A lofty nest 14. Dinner jackets 17. ___ Dhabi, U.A.E. capital 18. Small terrestrial lizard 20. Unhappy 23. Takes off 24. Mollusk shell lining 25. Socialist Debs’ initials 26. Arrived extinct 29. Atomic #37

30. 17th Greek letter 31. Blue eyed cat 32. Alliance between nations 35. Headquarters 36. Container weight adjustments 38. Chadic language Bura-_____ 40. Tributary of the Seine 41. Length x width 42. A small dent 43. Distribute 44. A gratuity 45. Possessed 46. Overgarment 47. A doctrine

Down

1. Russian Emperor (var. sp.) 2. Take hold of 3. South American Indian 4. Commune in northern France

Target customers who are smart and know the answers...your business could be here! Call The Gazette advertising team at (306) 668-0575

Horoscopes

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

You have so much to do now that your mind may be in a complete jumble. Others will come at you with questions, but take a deep breath and answer them one at a time.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Change is not the best idea right now. It is much better to stick with the status quo for a little while longer. Then you will have enough stability to make a change.

PISCES February 19– March 20

Pisces, you have many new ideas about how to get rich quick, but you will probably want to find more sensible ways to earn a living.

ARIES March 21– April 19

Aries, you are inspired to take on the world, but you may want to focus on smaller goals this week. Finishing a long-lingering work project is a viable option

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Something doesn’t seem to be falling into place. Take stock of things at home and at work to crack this nut. A little more investigation many be necessary.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

You may be offered a opportunity this week that is too good to pass up. Despite this great offer, do your best to stay focused on work for the next several days.

sudoku

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Exercise caution and do not jump to any conclusions at work. While you may know what your boss expects from you, it is better to wait to hear what he or she has to say.

LEO July 23– August 22

Leo, you can envision exciting adventures ahead, and those times will be here before you know it. Channel your enthusiasm and get a head start on your adventure.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Virgo, you have a desire to be different from everyone else this week. It’s good to be original, but don’t stray too far off the beaten path or you may find yourself lost.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Libra, a friend may shock you by doing something really outrageous. You do not know what to make of this change in personality, but do your best to take it in stride.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

Work figures to put a lot on your plate in the coming week. You can handle everything that comes your way, so long as you keep your cool and continue to work hard.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

You may be tempted to sneak off and play hooky from work, Sagittarius. Just make sure you handle all of your obligations first. Now is not the best time to kick up your heels.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


16

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014

5040

Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 31 1/4’s South West - 63 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

6010

Autos For Sale

Find much more on our website

www.magicpaintandbody.com

2240B - Avenue C. North Saskatoon

652-7972

or (306) 260-4691

Email: magicpaintandbody@shaw.ca

Free iPod with SGI claim - conditions apply • • trades considered • • NOW OFFERING LUBRICO WARRANTY!

SGI ACCREDITED

FOR SALE 2004 Ford Freestar Command Start. Good tires. Runs Well. $3,000 o.b.o. (306)291-1259 Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

6070

Auto Parts Wrecking auto-trucks: Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. NorthEast Recyclers, 780-8750270, Lloydminster.

7030

Business Opportunities FOR SALE: Sask Valley News, a weekly paper operating out of Rosthern, SK for over 100 years. Contact janet@saskvalleynews.com for further information. VOTED BEST side business in Canada. Guaranteed to receive your full investment back. Minimal time required. Pay after machines are installed. Exclusive rights available; www.locationfirstvending.com. 1-855-9333555.

7040

Career Training START NOW! Complete Ministry approved Diplomas in months! Business, Health Care and more! Contact Academy of Learning College: 1-855-354-JOBS (5627) or www.academyoflear ning.com. We Change Lives!

7050

Careers Pine View Farms Osler

has immediate part-time openings in poultry processing. Work close to home, Tues- Thurs, in a safe respectful work environment, competitive wages, training provided.

Careers LABOURER The Town of Langham is seeking a Public Works Labourer. All labourers are responsible to the Town Foreman under supervision of the Town Administrator.

EMO Coordinator

With application please submit salary expectation. Benefits include a standard SUMA benefits package.

The City of Martensville is seeking a coordinator for our Emergency Measures Organization. The EMO coordinator will be responsible for updating the EMO plan for the City of Martensville and continually improving it to meet the changing needs of our City. This is a part-time position in which the successful candidate will receive an annual per diem for their time, reporting directly to City Manager/Fire Chief.

For more information regarding job description and qualification requirements please contact the Town Office. Applicants must submit resumes no later than February 14, 2014 to:

For more information please visit www.martensville.ca under employment

Cando is looking for experienced Mark IV Tamper, EJ6 Tamper, or equivalent tamper operators to join its team. The positions will troubleshoot and repair computerized, hydraulic/electrical components; train others on the operation & maintenance of the tampers; perform track inspections; coordinate daily activities ensuring track permits are issued, followed and cancelled as required. Five years experience operating a tamper, ability to hold CROR, TIG, and eRailsafe certifications and have experience working in Class 1 or similar railway environment. Clear drug and alcohol test. Ability to travel in Canada Full time; wage range $30 to $35 per hour; overtime. Schedule is 10 days on, 4 days off; accommodations & living allowance provided when on the road.

Email: employment@candoltd.com Fax: (204) 725-4100 c a n d o l t d . c o m 4th Floor, 740 Rosser Avenue, Brandon, MB 204-725-2627

Advertise in the classifieds. swna.com/ classifieds

To apply, call Martha at

MORE

Local Information

MORE REASONS

TO MAKE THE GAZETTE YOUR NEWSPAPER EVERY WEEK

Delivered every Thursday to over

16,600

residential, business & farm mailboxes, retail locations & electronic subscribers CLARK S CROSSING

Phone: 283-4842 Fax: 283-4772 e-mail: admin@langham.ca

STAY AHEAD OF THE COMPETITION.

MORE

Local Sports

Gazette

Town of Langham 230 Main Street East Box 289 Langham SK S0K 2L0

Railway Tamper Operator

MORE

Local News

Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca www.ccgazette.ca

ICED CAPP RESTAURANTS LTD.

o/a Tim Hortons 101 Central Street East, Warman SK S0K 4S0

Food Counter Attendant

Full Time/Part Time/Shift Work Nights/Overnights/Early Mornings/Weekends 15 positions available $10.25 - $11.00/hr. + Benefits Wage based on experience/availability Apply in-person or via email to: Iced.capp.restaurants@gmail.com

(306) 239-4763 Heavy Duty Mechanic/Apprentice required for preventative maintenance, repair and service of heavy equipment fleet. Experience with CAT, JD, and Hitachi. Appropriate credentials and/or certifications. Valid drivers license. Both camp and shop locations. Service truck and accommodations provided. Wage negotiable. Send work references and resume to: Bryden Construction, Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0; Fax: 306-769-8844 Email: brydenconstruct@ xplornet.ca

8010

Auction Sales

Account Manager Are you currently working in media sales (print or electronic) and looking for an opportunity to join a growing company that is closer to home? Do you possess a track record of excellence and the willingness to reach a higher level? Want to work (and have some fun, too) with an award-winning team in a fast-paced, family-owned business atmosphere where each person matters?

LIVE UNRESERVED

HARDWOOD FLOORING AUCTION SAT. FEB 15 - 10:30 AM

VIEWING: FRI. FEB 14 - 8 AM - 4:30 PM At Both Our Locations!

REGINA - EMERALD PARK SASKATOON - 3350 IDYLWYLD DR. N

Over 20,000 sq/ft Per Location of Exotic Hardwood and Laminate All New, Wide Plank, Prime Quality, Retail Grade Product Visit Our Website for Terms, Conditions & details

www.McDougallAuction.com

1-800-263-4193

Regina* Saskatoon* Moosomin P.O. Box 3081 Regina, SK S4P 3G7 Dealer Licence # 319916

Our company is growing and we want you to be part of it!

Gazette

Basic qualifications: • own a reliable vehicle and smartphone • ability to communicate positively and professionally • organized and able to multi-task while meeting deadlines • detail-oriented with a creative mindset Previous experience an asset and preference given to those who: • have previous media sales experience • an understanding of sales processes and strategies • have the ability to work towards and take pride in exceeding sales targets We offer many benefits including: • base salary plus commissions • travel footprint of less than 60km in radius with flexible schedules • weekends off • 4 weeks of paid vacation • cost-shared staff directed health/dental benefit plans • ongoing training and industry education opportunities

CLARK S CROSSING

This newly-created position within our company will be filled immediately.

Please send resume along with cover letter and references in confidence to: tjenson@ccgazette.ca

or drop-off in-person at 109 Klassen Street West, Warman No telephone calls, please. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. We thank all applicants in advance for their interest in this position.

WW1451

Lilydale Inc - A Sofina Foods Company Is currently seeking full-time Production Workers for their chicken plant in Wynyard, Sask. Starting wage is 13.84/ hr with a comprehensive benefits package and pension program. All applicants welcome! Call Linda @ (306) 554-2555 EXT 238 for more info Send Resumes to: Linda Karakochuk Sofina Foods Inc Box 760 Wynyard, SK SOA 4T0 Fax: (306) 554-3958 Email: LKarakochuk@sofinafoods.com


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Business & Professional

17

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

CALL (306) 668-0575 for rates & deadlines

Directory Auto PArts / rePAir

construction / contrActors

RIOAggregAtes Ltd. Box 1807       Warman S0K 4S0

USED & NEW PARTS

DRIVE SHAFT SERVICE NOW AVAILABLE

SaSkatoon truck PartS centre Ltd.

truckS BouGHt & SoLd

• Snow Removal • Gravel • Topsoil • Fill Dirt • Sand • Pea Rock • Crushed Rock

for pricing call

(306) 239-4747

Ph: (306) 668-5675 Fax: (306) 665-5711

west out of Warman on 305 until you reach 3052, then north 3.5 miles

* Custom Corral Cleaning * * Vertical Beater Spreaders * * Bobcat with Rubber Tracks * * Payloader *

North Corman Industrial Park

1-800-667-3023

www.saskatoontruckparts.ca

WARMAN’S NEW COLLISION SHOP

NEUFELD Enterprises

acrcollision@hotmail.com PHONE: 306.933.0288 CELL: 306.260.1155

For Rates Call

306-220-5013 or 306-467-5013

WE ALSO OFFER: • Industrial Liquid Coatings • Sandblasting

Peter Hermanson Residential Framer

BookkeePing / Accounting

306-380-9582 hermansonframing@yahoo.ca Basement Framing, Decks, Garage, Shed Packages, and Vinyl-Siding

Denturist

Flooring

306.955.7090

CASH & CARRY OR INSTALLATION

The Mall At Lawson Heights

Britten Doucette D.D Doucette D.D A family based clinic with a longBoyd history in denturism. Britten Doucette D.D. Licensed Denturist

State of the art facility

• LAMINATES • HARDWOOD • AREA RUGS • CARPET • VINYL • TILE

Britten and Boyd pride themselves on customer Located mins from Warman service, quality 10 workmanship and always finding theFree right treatment plan for&each client ensuring oral exams consultations complete patient satisfaction. Complete & partial dentures Your #1 They offer: Choice for • free consultations • complete dentures Mouth guards Ov er Denture • partial dentures • relines Anti snoring devices on Implants • night guards • teeth whitening • mouth guards • adjustments Teeth whitening • over dentures on implants Repairs done in an hour All dentures are designed and made in the clinic’s dentures ownImplant onsite labsupported providing for & theretained best quality control and customer satisfaction. Call Now to Book Your Come in and see9am-5pm them at their newly renovatedI Sat: 10am-12am Mon-Thurs: I Fri: 9am-4pm Free Consultation! clinic in the Mall at Lawson Heights, where you will be treated like family. 306.955.7090

Your #1 Choice for Over Denture on Implants

1300-3530 Millar Ave, Saskatoon (306) 653-3899

DisPosAl service

134 Primrose Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

9AM – 5PM Monday – Thursday Friday: 9AM – 4PM Saturday: 10AM – Noon

BEST PRICE BEST SERVICE

4 and 6 yard front load bins 11.5 - 30 yard roll-off bins

Fencing • Portable Bathroom Rentals RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SERVICES

ADVERTISE WITH US

Recycling & Waste Disposal

(306) 931-2604 www.allansdisposalservices.com

WEBSITE PHONE ADDRESS WWW.FUEL-BSI.CA 306 280 6572 208 GLENWOOD TERRACE EMAIL 306 384 3835 MARTENSVILLE INFO@FUEL-BSI.CA

gnsdrywall@sasktel.net 306.221.4782 WARMAN, SK.

PROFESSIONAL BOOKKEEPING SERVICES

T&T

EXCAVATING & DEMOLITION

Bobcat • Loader • Excavator • Trucking Building & Concrete Demolition Landscaping • Piles • Trenching Basements • Bush Clearing • Rock Pile Cleanup

(306) 652-5052 Proudly Serving Saskatoon and Area.

(306) 229-4129 DentAl

www.bridgecitybookkeeping.ca construction / contrActors 013-14 oking inter 2 Now bo nts for fall/w e Basem

DECK CONSTRUCTION

I Built to your specification * Free Estimates

IDEAL DECKS & FENCES

306-270-5903

willowsdental.ca

New and emergency patients welcome. 60-304 Stonebridge Blvd, Saskatoon

#

Monday-Thursday 7am-7pm Friday 7am-1pm Saturday 7am-1pm

Dr. Norm Vankoughnett Dr. Kristopher Milne Dr. Abdullah Patel Dr. Christine Miller

Stonebridge Location

306-244-2266

ON YOUR COMPUTER, SMART PHONE OR TABLET

READ US ONLINE FREE!

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

www.ccgazette.ca

306.668.0575

Rowan crowned Masters Athlete of year Ted Rowan of Martensville was awarded the 2013 Masters Athlete of the Year award for Athletics in the Saskatchewan Sport Awards. The 80year old Rowan was nominated by Saskatchewan Athletics. He was given the award Ted Rowan by Saskatchewan Sport Inc. Rowan is a perennial winner in the Masters Athletics class. In 2013, he set a new Canadian Masters record in the men’s 8084 age class pentathlon, 200 meter event, and long jump. Rowan also set new Saskatchewan Athletics records for the pentathlon, 200 meter, 1500 meter, long jump, discus and javelin at the Canadian Masters

Championships. He set new Saskatchewan Athletics Masters records for the 100 meter and high jump at the Huntsman World Senior Games. Rowan also won gold medals in long jump and triple jump at the Saskatchewan Senior and Masters Championships/Canada Summer Games Trials. To top it off, he placed first in the 50 meter and 100 meter events at the Saskatchewan Open Championships and Trials.

OTHER WINNERS

Rylan Wiens, 11, of Saskatoon, won the Youth Male Athlete ofthe year. He earned numerous awards in diving. Fifteen-year-old Kylie Zirk of Saskatoon won the Youth Female Athlete of the Year award for her achievements in Canoe and Kayak. The Male Athlete of the Year

14022DX00

CONTACT US

AVAILABLE

Boyd Doucette D.D. Licensed Denturist

was Lyndon Rush of Humboldt in Bobsleigh. Another Humboldt athlete, Briane Thiesen-Eaton, won the Female Athlete of the Year for her performances in AthleticsHeptathlon. The Team of the Year Award went to the Regina Thunder junior football club. Darren Whitehead of Prince Albert and Ellen Griffin of Saskatoon received the Volunteer Awards. Shane Bradley of Saskatoon won the Coach of the Year award for his coaching in amateur wrestling. Roger Anholt of Moose Jaw won the Male Coach Dedication award and Brenda Lyons of Estevan was awarded the Female Coach Dedication award. The Male Official award went to Brent Chadwick of Assiniboia and the Female Official award was given to Kristen Brough of Regina.


18

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Real estate

WateR & sePtic

CALL (306) 668-0575 for rates & deadlines

Directory Hall Rentals

Mla / MP

Brian King Centre

GORDON WYANT MLA Saskatoon Northwest

CITY of Warman only 15 min. from Saskatoon

main Hall seating 600 Banquets up to 400 Kitchen & all amenities Ice machine & walk-in cooler no catering or corkage fees

Brad Hyde 270-6495

75 B Lenore Drive Saskatoon, SK. S7K 7Y1 Ph: 934-2847 Fax: 934-2867

meeting rooms non-prime day rates available Booking 7 days / week Stage

Email: g.wyant.mla@sasktel.net

www.gordonwyant.ca

• Weddings • Banquets • Conferences • Anniversaries • Dances • Conventions

Available For All Events

• Air conditioned • Meeting room • Banquet seating 400 • Seating up to 600 • 7 Days a week oo n

BOOK NOW

FuneRal seRvice

Kelly Block, MP

Saskatoon - Rosetown - Biggar

Working hard for YOU! 1-888-590-6555 Kelly.Block@parl.gc.ca www.kellyblockmp.ca

ORtHdOntics

FLOOD ASSISTANCE Delisle, SK (306) 222-9737 Email: larrylink@yourlink.ca www.linksbackhoe.com

WindOW cleaning

www.bobletkeman.com

Independently Owned & Operated

(306) 221-2911

Residential ~ Commercial ~ Institutional WEEKLY | BI-WEEKLY | MONTHLY terms available

306-257-3660 skip-43cusson@hotmail.com

The Langham Bantam Vikings won the A side of the Warman Tier 3 Bantam tournament held on January 25 and 26. Langham played Warman in the final and won 7-0. The Langham team includes (back row, l-r): John Buller (coach), Jon Yellowlees (coach), Reid Madsen, William Maerz, Dexter Deagau, Cyrus Penner, Shawn Madsen (coach). Middle row: Mic Rode-Moyer, Scott Yellowlees, Jordan Vaandrager, Taylor Buller, Riley Tallis. Front: Bailey North, goalie. (Photo submitted by Shawn Madsen)

Family Owned & Operated ~ Crematory On-Site ~ Immediate Cremation ~ Memorial Services ~ Traditional Services ~ Memorial Tea ~ Celebration of Life ~ Private Family Services

GRAVEL ~ EXCAVATING ~ DRIVEWAY REPAIR

gold medalists

Community Hall

306-253-4321 townhallaberdeen.ca

WATER & SEPTIC SYS TIFIED TEM R E INSTALLERS C

Bob Letkeman

North Country

ABERDEEN & DISTRICT

t 1 5m i n E a st of S a sk a

hhyde@sasktel.net

& LSKIDSTEER inks‘ BACKHOE SERVICES

FREE ESTIMATES ~ 10% DISCOUNT FOR SENIORS

933-2210

• Catering • Bar amenities • Walk in cooler • Hardwood dance floor • Stage

bhyde@sasktel.net

Helen Hyde 229-8787

www.hallmarkrealty.ca

Business & Professional

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

Kevin Martens

Funeral Director & Owner

591 Centennial Dr. N Martensville

(306) 242-7888 www.saskfunerals.ca

Dr. Kirby Cadman D.M.D., M.Sc. Orthodontic Services Prof. Corp. No Referral Required NOW SEEING PATIENTS IN WARMAN

HealtH & Wellness

NEED AN ULTRASOUND?

306.933.4500 SAME TO NEXT DAY APPOINTMENTS!

inteRnet seRvice

Suite 200, 3502 Taylor St E., Sask. (306) 955-3677 F: (306) 955-4788 drcadman@sasktel.net

P:

Now accepting new patients No referral required 384-9200 #203 - 502 Cope Way

Saskatoon

Real estate RICK REDDEKOPP Buying or Selling? Call me first.

High Speed Internet 1-866-328-6144

www.littleloon.ca

Mla / MP

NANCY HEPPNER MLA - Martensville

CONSTITUENCY OFFICE 99 4th Street • Hague

306.371.6450

rick.reddekopp@gmail.com

Saskatoon

DelivereD every ThursDay To over

16,600

resiDenTial, business & farm mailboxes, reTail locaTions & elecTronic subscribers

Tel (306) 975-0284 or (306) 225-2280 Fax (306) 225-2149 Box 830, Hague S0K 1X0

Email: heppner.mla@sasktel.net

www.nancyheppner.com

www.ccgazette.ca 306.688.0575

14022DA00


GET BREAKING NEWS AND PAGE REPLICAS ONLINE FREE www.ccgazette.ca

REACH

YOUR CUSTOMERS

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

Insert your flyer in THE GAZETTE

Business

(306) 688-0575

WARMAN’S NEW

COLLISION SHOP

acrcollision@hotmail.com PHONE: 306.933.0288 CELL: 306.260.1155

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 PG. 19

WE ALSO OFFER: • Industrial Liquid Coatings • Sandblasting

HAMMERING IT HOME

Martensville’s Lake Vista development is gearing up for a major building boom once the spring thaw arrives By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Martensville’s booming population is expected to grow even more rapidly this spring when the city’s newest neighbourhood opens up. Lake Vista, a planned neighbourhood by North Ridge Developments located on 120 acres in the city’s northeast corner, will add 1,100 residential units to the city, boosting Martensville’s population by about 3,000 people. Currently, the population is estimated to be about 8,000. Lake Vista will also house a major new commercial area and several multi-family condominiums, including at least two that will be tailored for seniors. With land preparation and servicing work for Lake Vista Phase 1 virtually complete, builders are anxiously waiting for the green light to start building homes. “We have all the underground servicing for Phase 1 complete,” said Darryl Altman, North Ridge project manager for land. “All the deep undergrounds including storm sewer, sanitary sewer and water lines are in place. We also have our shallow utilities like SaskPower, SaskEnergy, Sasktel and cable in place. “Ninety-nine per cent of the concrete curbs and gutters are all done for Phase 1, and the roadbeds are all ready for paving in the spring. Work on Phase 2 is still going strong, and we expect to have the servicing ready soon so builders can get going. “It’s going to be a pretty busy place,” he added. “There will be a lot of hammering here in a few weeks.” In an interview on Wednesday, January 29 at the Lake Vista site while heavy machinery was busy moving frozen soil, Altman pointed out the construction work on the development’s centrepiece pond for Phase 1. The massive excavation is designed to act as a reservoir for stormwater runoff and will be tied in to an underground pipeline that connects to the city’s main stormwater collection

system. A second, somewhat smaller pond in Phase 2 of the development is also under construction, and will tie into the Phase 1 pond. Both are intended to provide a recreational and visual focus to the development. “This part of the development is all going to be landscaped this year,” said Altman. “There will be some beautiful lots backing the pond, which will feature three fountains.” He said the excavation work is being done during the colder months while the soil is frozen. “In the spring, this will be full of water,” he said. “So it’s important to get this completed at this time of year.” A pumping system will be constructed on the west end of the pond to regulate the flow of excess water into the city’s main stormwater drainage system. “It will automatically pump out the excess water when it reaches a certain level,” explained Altman. “It’s designed so that it doesn’t cause issues downstream.” North Ridge has several major residential developments currently on the go, including projects in Dalmeny, Clavet and Humboldt, but Altman confirmed that Lake Vista is the largest. “It’s the biggest single development that North Ridge has ever undertaken,” he said. The Lake Vista development, bordered on the west by 10th Avenue North and on the south by Main Street, is slated to be built in six phases. Each of the phases will contain a variety of housing types, ranging from single-family units to multifamily residences. Plans for the development include a system of linear parks and pathways that encourage pedestrian traffic and link residential areas with a designated commercial district in the southwest portion of the neighbourhood. Final plans for the development were discussed at a recent Committee of the Whole meeting of Martensville City Council. At that meeting, the developer and councilors discussed park landscaping, street and sidewalk maintenance arrangements, and other details.

(Above) Crew Chief Joel Klashinsky and rodman Lee Paulow of Webb Surveys take readings at a location in Phase 1 of the Lake Vista development. (Lower) Construction work continues on the reservoir pond in Lake Vista Phase 1.

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20

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Credit Card fraud artist wanted by police vehicle in Warman. The owners were home when they heard the car alarm go off. The drivers door of the vehicle was left open. Witnesses report seeing a group of people running from the scene. Police did extensive patrols and no individuals matching the suspects description were located. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

FROM THE CELL BLOCK Submitted by

SGT. WARREN GHERASIM

TOOLS STOLEN

Warman RCMP

On January 29 at 10:45 a.m. police received a complaint of a break-and-enter to a garage in Delisle. The owner believed that the break-in occurred in the past month. Various tools were taken from the garage. The investigation into the matter is ongoing.

FRAUD ARTIST SOUGHT

On January 14 police received a complaint of a fraud involving a credit card at a business in Martensville. A photo of the individual was obtained through the security camera at the business. A photo of the male is attached. Anyone who is able to identify the male is requested to contact the Martensville RCMP at 306-975-1610 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

COP SHOP STAYING PUT

The Martensville RCMP office is still located at the rear of the old City Hall office next to the Martnesville Fire Hall. They have NOT moved to the new City Hall. The phone number for the Martensville RCMP office remains the same: 306975-1610

A REASON NOT TO SMOKE

On January 27 at 8:50 p.m. police received a complaint of a possible impaired driver north on Highway 12 near Martensville. The vehicle was reported to be swerving between the lanes and driving on the shoulder of the road. Police located the vehicle and found the 25year-old female driver of the vehicle from Martensville to be sober. She had dropped her cigarettes in the vehicle and was attempting to retrieve them while driving. No charges were laid on this matter.

SPEEDING ON ICE

On January 28 at 7:15 p.m. police received a complaint of an accident on Centennial Boulevard in Warman. A vehicle lost control on ice and hit a pole. The air bags on his vehicle were deployed. The 46-year-old male driver of the vehicle was charged with driving at a speed that is greater than reasonable and safe. There were no injuries reported.

STRUCK A DEER

On January 30 at 7:20 p.m. police received a complaint of a single vehicle accident on Highway 16 near Borden. The 66-year-old female driver of the vehicle received minor injuries when her vehicle struck a deer and went through the front windshield. The vehicle was towed from the scene. EMS attended and transported the female to hospital with minor injuries. No charges were laid in this matter.

REAR ENDED AT WARMAN

On January 31 at 5:45 p.m. police received a complaint of a two-vehicle collision at the south access to Warman on Highway 11. A 58-year-old female driver of one of the vehicle reported that she was rearended by another vehicle at this location. She advised that the other driver appeared to possibly be intoxicated. Police attended and found that the driver of the other vehicle was impaired. A 44-year-old female from Warman was charged with Impaired Driving and was released for court in Saskatoon. There were minor injuries reported in the accident. Both vehicles were towed from the scene.

LUTHERAN RD. ROLLOVER

On January 31 at 8:05 p.m. police received a complaint of a single vehicle rollover on Lutheran Road near Highway 16. Police attended and found a female to be intoxicated. She was charged and released for an up-

SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE The fraud artist who used a credit card to scam a Martensville business is seen in this sureillance video from the store. The public’s help is requested in locating this individual. Call the RCMP at 306-975-1610 or Crimestoppers at 1-800222-8477

On January 30 at 3:00 a.m. police received a complaint of a suspicious vehicle in a yard in the Asquith area. The female reported that there was a vehicle and a couple of people trespassing on her property. Police patrolled the area but were unable to locate any suspects. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

BROKE DOWN, BROKEN IN coming court date. There were no injuries reported. The vehicle was towed from the scene.

HAGUE DRIVER CHARGED

On February 1 at 2:30 a.m. police conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle in Martensville. The driver of the vehicle was impaired. Police charged a 20-year-old male from Hague. He was released for an upcoming court date.

IMPAIRED DRIVER

On February 1 at 11:30 p.m. police were conducting a traffic stop in Warman. They located a 29-year-old male from Regina operating a vehicle while he was impaired. He was charged with Impaired Driving and released for court in Saskatoon on March 26, 2014.

FOUR-VEHICLE CRASH

On February 2 at 12:00 p.m. police received a complaint of a four-vehicle collision in Warman. Investigation revealed that a 16-year-old male driver of a vehicle exited an alley too fast and struck a truck. The truck then struck a parked car, causing minor damage to it. The 16-year-old’s car also struck a parked car, causing minor damage to it as well. There were no injuries reported. Charges are pending on this matter.

HIGHWAY 7 COLLISION

On February 2 at 8:00 p.m. police received a complaint of a two-vehicle collison on Highway 7 at the intersection of Highway 762. A vehicle was attempting to cross the highway when it was stuck by another vehicle that was travelling east bound. The occupants of both vehicle received minor injuries in the accident. EMS attended and transported the individuals to hospital for treatment. Both vehicles required towing from the scene. Investigation into this matter is ongoing and charges are pending.

THEFT FROM VEHICLE

On January 27 at 2:00 p.m. police received a complaint of a theft from a vehicle in Warman. The vehicle was unlocked & thieves stole a couple of small items from the interior of the vehicle. The interior was rummaged through, but nothing was damaged. The vehicle had been used by the owner, therefore was unsuitable to fingerprint. No charges were laid on this matter.

THIEVES SCARED OFF

On January 27 at 9:30 p.m. police received a complaint of an attempted break-and-enter to a

On January 30 at 2:30 p.m. police received a complaint of damage to a vehicle near the Borden bridge. The 22-yearold female owner of the vehicle from Saskatoon, reported that her vehicle broke down on the side of the highway the night before. When she returned the next day to get the vehicle, her windshield was damaged. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

BACK WINDOW SMASHED

On January 31 at 8:00 a.m. police were called to a report of damage done to a vehicle in Martensville. The 23-yearold owner of the vehicle from Saskatoon reports that while she was parked outside of the residence, the back window of her SUV was smashed out. Nothing was taken from the vehicle. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

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VANSCOY GAS AND DASH

On February 1 at 2:30 p.m. police received a complaint of a gas and dash at the Tempo in Vanscoy. Police responded and charged a 32-year-old male from Kindersley with theft under $5000. He was released for an upcoming court date.

ASKING FOR TROUBLE

On February 1 at 6:30 p.m. police were dealing with a male on a disturbance call in Martensville when another male attempted to get involved. He began to bang on the windows of the police car. When he refused to follow the instructions of the police officer he was arrested for being intoxicated in public, arrested and lodged in police cells. The 21-year-old male from Saskatoon was issued an ticket and was released from custody once he was sober.

TRESPASSING VEHICLES

On February 1 at 7:15 p.m. police received a complaint of two suspicious vehicles that had entered a farm yard in the RM of Montrose. The owner of the property was home at the time and attempted to obtain plate numbers of the vehicles but was unsuccessful. Patrols of the area were made by police, but were unsuccessful in locating the suspect vehicle. Nothing was taken from the residence and no charges were laid.

WARMAN ARREST

On February 2 at 1:20 a.m. police received a complaint of an intoxicated male at the Warman Hotel. Police attended and located a 27-year-old male to be highly intoxicated. He became belligerent with police and was arrested for being intoxicated in public.

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Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

Clark's Crossing Gazette - February 6, 2014 issue  

Clark's Crossing Gazette - February 6, 2014 issue