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Three people injured in Highway 11 crash south of Warman By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Three people, including a 50-year-old man and two 17-year-old girls, were rushed to hospital with undetermined injuries after a multiple-vehicle collision on Highway 11 south of Warman on Friday, January 24.

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The collision occurred around 12 noon in the southbound lanes of Highway 11 north of the Pioneer elevator and about a mile south of Township Road 384 (the south access to Warman). The cause of the crash is still under inves-

tigation by Warman RCMP. Warman RCMP Sgt. Warren Gherasim said the collision occurred while a vehicle was being towed from the centre median. “At approximately 12:00 p.m. Warman RCMP were at the scene of a single vehicle collision where a vehicle was being towed from the centre ditch on Highway 11, south of Warman,” said Gherasim. “Traffic was being diverted into one lane while police were on scene and being assisted by a tow truck. While traffic was proceeding southbound past the scene of the first collision a Silver Cobalt rearended a burgundy Oldsmobile Alero.” Gherasim said the adult male operating the Alero, and two teen-aged females in the Cobalt were all injured and transport-

ed by ambulance to hospital. The extent of their injuries is still undetermined. There were no other persons or vehicles involved. Russ Austin said the crash was the fourth in 24 hours that the Warman Fire Department had responded to. The first of the string of incidents, a collision at Highway 11 and Wanuskewin Road early Thursday morning between a pickup truck and a car sent a man and woman to hospital with undetermined injuries. “Last night (Thursday) at approximately 9:00 p.m. a single vehicle rollover occurred where the lone male occupant, according to witnesses, was ejected from the vehicle but was not on scene apon our arrival, apparently taken by a motorist from the scene,” said Aus-

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tin. “We were called at 11 a.m. this morning to a single vehicle rollover one mile south of the Warman south access, but again on arrival the driver was not on scene, but had been dealt with by the RCMP.” That rollover scene was the site of the subsequent vehicle collision which sent the three people to hospital. The rash of collisions should serve as a warning to drivers to exercise caution on the highways, said Austin. “I would like to remind drivers when the weather is fluctuating drastically between warm and cold, pavement frost is a dangerous issue,” said Austin. “Please slow down, take your time, be extra vigilant, and allow for safe braking distances between vehicles as part of your road condition awareness.”

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Woman injured in collision at Highway 11 and Wanuskewin Road A woman was taken to hospital with minor injuries following a two-vehicle collision at the intersection of Highway 11 and Wanuskewin Road on Thursday, January 23.

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The collision occurred about 7:30 in the morning, during the rush-hour commute. Warman RCMP Sgt. Mark Ochitwa said a north-bound half-ton truck attempted to

cross the south-west bound lanes of the divided highway when it was clipped by a fourdoor car. The male driver of the car did not suffer serious injuries. The female driver of the truck suffered minor injuries and was transported to hospital by MD Ambulance.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 PG. 3

Heart to heart

Langham helps youngster in urgent need of transplant By SELA BALZER

Langham Correspondent

“Thank you for coming to my fundraiser”. The voice was that of Jaden Halliday coming from the cell phone. Jaden’s dad, Nathan Halliday, held the phone up to the microphone so the 220 assembled guests at the fundraiser could hear. Jaden’s frail condition prevented him from attending the pulled pork supper and live auction fundraiser held in his honour in Langham, on Friday, January 24. Jaden Halliday, the 8-yearold son of Nathan Halliday and Sheryl Burke, is on the waiting list for a heart transplant. He has been diagnosed with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy. It is basically unexplained dilation of the left ventricle of his heart that causes decreased heart function. It also causes dilation of his right ventricle and the heart valves. “Langham did us proud,” were the words of Evelyn Kasahoff in reference to the Pulled Pork Supper and Live Auction. Evelyn and her friend Carol Epp were instrumental in bringing the community together while individual families donated every item of the supper and all of the auction items. Jocelyn Armstrong prepared the pork at her restaurant ‘Honey Bees’, the Langham Bible Church provided the facility, Joel Armstrong served as emcee and Keith Mierau lent his auctioning skills to net the fundraiser a profit of $16,985. The money will go to help Jaden and his family deal with extraordinary expenses related to his condition.

HEART INFLAMMATION

What exactly is Dilated Cardiomyopathy? It is a viral infection that causes inflammation of the heart. The heart muscle becomes weak and is unable to pump blood efficiently. This forces the heart to work harder and the heart chamber to enlarge and is often detected when there are signs of congestive heart failure. Jaden is currently being ad-

Zoar Church volunteer’s Linda Gossen and Marianne Dyck preparing the salads for the Pulled Pork Supper ministered several types of medications through IV and a Pic line inserted in his arm. The meds are to treat his heart failure symptoms and to stop his heart form deteriorating; close monitoring is important since heart function can deteriorate rapidly. Children with dilated cardiomyopathy are more prone to congestive heart failure and therefore have a higher rate of heart transplantation. It is estimated that six in a million children suffer from the disease. Little Jaden is one of them.

heart failure, his heart function was between 12-15%,” she continued. “He was admitted to ICU and started on anti-failure management medications and spent eight days in hospital. He was discharged home on a very strict med regimen and looked to be improving. “Things stayed the same for a while. At the end of October his heart function had decreased to 15% again and we were referred

STARTED LAST SUMMER

Jaden’s ‘nightmare’ story began innocently as a suspected cold in the summer of 2013. His mother Sheryl Burke pens: “Jaden got sick at the beginning of August with what we thought was a cold, when it didn’t go away I took him to the doctor. She thought he might have a chest infection so she sent him for a chest X-ray. I never heard from her and over the weekend it seemed Jaden was getting worse. So I took him back to his doctor on Monday and she told me his heart and pulmonary artery was enlarged and referred us to a pediatric cardiologist the next day. “Originally the suspected diagnosis was ‘Viral Myocarditis’. A common cold virus had attacked his heart and left him in

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Keith Mierau and Joel Armstrong holding the Shovel of loonies

Jaden Halliday of Langham is awaiting a heart transplant to the Stollery Children’s hospital in Edmonton for transplant assessment. “After five gruelling days of tests, needles and consults Jaden was officially listed for transplant on November 6. We were discharged from hospital in Edmonton and carried on with our weekly appointments with the cardiologists here in Saskatoon. “Then in early December Jaden was readmitted to ICU and started on an IV medication that helps his heart pump more efficiently, the last ditch effort before surgical intervention. After a couple of weeks he was sent home on the medication. We are the first family in the province to go home on this medication. He had to be readmitted two days later because he would not stop vomiting. “The doctors could not get Jaden stabilized and flew him by air ambulance to the Stollery again. The cardiologists there had him slated in for a mechanical pump to be surgically implanted to bridge him till he gets a heart. “For whatever reason he stabilized the day after we got there and managed to avoid surgery. Jaden was transferred home again and has been home for 2 weeks and is doing fairly well.

“The threat of surgery and readmission to hospital still looms over us because his condition is so fragile. But we are just taking it day by day. Our focus now is keeping him as healthy as possible and weight gain so when the time comes he is ready for the transplant. He is currently at stage 3.5 out of 4 on the transplant list. At these stages and lower donor hearts come from Western Canada and the northwestern states. Now we wait!’ Jaden’s grandmother, Nora Halliday, says the trauma of all of this has been hard on Jaden’s 6-year-old brother Hunter as well. The brothers have always been close and loved noth-

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ing better than wrestling on the floor together or with their dad. All such activities are totally out of the question now for Jaden, which leaves Hunter standing on the side lines. Jaden has a tutor that comes to the house so as to keep him up to date with his schooling. If this story has touched your heart you are invited to make a donation to the Jaden Halliday fund at any of the Affinity Credit Union branches in Saskatchewan. All donations will go to the Halliday family to cover expenses for Jaden’s upcoming heart transplant in Edmonton. Any unused proceeds will be donated to the construction of the Saskatchewan Children’s Hospital.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Municipalities sign on to regional plan By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on regional planning has been signed by the RM of Corman Park, the Cities of Warman and Martensville, and the Town of Osler. The MOU was signed on Wednesday, January 22 in Warman by Corman Park Reeve Judy Harwood, Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence, Martensville Mayor Kent Muench and Osler Mayor Ben Buhler. Corman Park Administrator Adam Tittemore, Warman City Manager Stanley Westby, Martensville City Manager Scott Blevins and Osler Chief Administrative Officer Sandra MacArthur also put their signatures on the document. The MOU has been in the works for several months, and while all parties agreed on the need for regional cooperation, the specific wording of the document was not finalized until earlier this month. All four councils voted to endorse the MOU’s final version. The MOU notes that all four muicipalities have a mutual interest in promoting growth and development, and each pledges to “develop a collaborative and consistent approach” toward managing land use. The MOU commits the municipalities to continue regular monthly meetings of a “Regional Planning Committee” made up of the Mayor or Reeve, two elected Councilors, and administrative staff from each of the participating municipalities. The Reeve, Mayor and Councilors have voting rights, while administrative staff serves in an advisory capacity only. The Regional Planning Committee’s mandate was recent-

ly strengthened after it was expanded to include the elected represntatives. For the past year, the committee was made up of administrative staff who laid the groundwork for the current MOU. Warman Manager of Planning and Development Brad Toth said the MOU demonstrates that all four municipalities are “moving forward with a very broad approach to regional planning.” “We know there will be hurdles,” said Toth in an interview on January 23. “But the agreement provides the basic framework for successful regional development.” Corman Park Director of Planning Rebecca Row said the MOU is a starting point for discussions. “This is basically a framework document that will focus the talks,” she said in an interview on Monday, January 27. “The objective is to ensure that everyone’s interests are taken into account. It’s important to be on the same page with regional talks, and this paper provides the foundation. It can be adjusted as needed, but it outlines the basic principles that everyone can agree on.”

REGIONAL STANDARDS

The MOU states the municipalities will work collaboratively on a future land use plan to give developers, investors and local governments certainty when making investment decisions. The municipalities also agree to work with regional service providers to identify infrastructure capacities and protect corridors for roads, schools, utilities, potable waterlines, and wastewater systems. The MOU commits the four

municipalities to also work within the larger “Planning for Growth” (P4G) committee which includes the City of Saskatoon. A meeting of the P4G committee is slated for February 6. The MOU’s final wording states that the municipalities will “create policies which seek to protect future urban growth areas while allowing for compatible rural development that addresses regional development and servicing standards.” The definition of “regional standards” still needs to be finetuned. The wording reflects a consensus among the municipalities to ensure that compatible standards are in place for land that may be designated for residential, industrial or commercial use. Equivalent standards benefit urban centres that annex land because the cost of servicing is already covered. In return, the RM would receive increased compensation for annexation of that serviced land. “We wanted to put in wording that everyone is comfortable with,” said Toth. “The objective is to allow development along lines that everyone agrees on. The compensation levels would be adjusted to recognize the RM put extra work into that land, and it would reduce our costs in the event a property is annexed because we wouldn’t have to do the improvements necessary to bring it up to an urban standard. I think it would make the land more attractive, and it gives the RM a better return on their investment.” Toth said the urban municipalities want to see the RM grow because increased development benefits the entire region.

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5

RM builds stronger bond with hamlets By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The RM of Corman Park is hoping to built a stronger relationship with its 11 hamlets scattered throughout the rural municipality’s seven divisions. During the RM’s council meeting, Monday, January 20, Administrator Adam Tittemore provided a report that described the structure of a Hamlet and an Organized Hamlet, and information about the procedures for establishing, incorporating, altering or restructuring an organized hamlet or resort village. The structure of an organized hanlet’s operations was also outlined. The report stated that hamlets form part of, and are governed by, a rural municipality; they contain at least five occupied dwellings and 10 subdivided lots with an average area of less than 1 acre; they have no formal boundaries other than the subdivided lot or property lines and are not recognized as municipal entities. An organized hamlet are designated by Minister’s Order and have a legal boundary; organized residents can elect a three person hamlet board to represent the community to the RM council; all grant mon-

RM plans to replace old equipment

cent of the RM budget goes towards infrastructure and public works type activities,” said Tittemore. “Everyone wants to make sure they have nice road surfaces to drive on as well as have access to water and waste water facilities.” Corman Park Reeve Judy Harwood said when she was campaigning for her current position a little over a year ago she saw the need for better communication between the hamlets and the RM of Corman Park. “What I found when talking to the various hamlets was that they need to get together as a group because they had similar issues,” said Harwood. Tittemore said the RM is actively building reserves so there is money in the bank to complete some major capital projects. He also said that hamlet infrastructure is also being evaluated so a timeline can be devised as to when major repairs should be done. Harwood said the RM will meet with each of its 11 Hamlet boards once a year, which is something that has never been done before.

ey received from the Organized Hamlet Grant is to be allocated to the community; the RM and Hamlet must negotiate an agreement where 40 per cent to 75 per cent of all taxes collected from the community are allotted to the organized hamlet accounts. Currently the RM allots 40 percent of the organized hamlet accounts. In a document prepared for the Clark’s Crossing Gazette by Tittemore, he stated that the RM’s 11 organized hamlets have a total population of 1,558, and a total net assessment value of $131,864,600; consisting of 18.65 per cent and 14.34 per cent of the municipality. Tittemore said the RM’s goal is to get more involved with each hamlet board and to have them interact with Corman Park council and administration so there is a greater understanding of the issues and to make sure every resident receives the highest level of service. Most of the big issues include infrastructure, which are pretty standard for most hamlets, said Tittemore. “I would say close to 80 per

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The RM of Corman Park will be looking to find some money to upgrade road equipment in this year’s budget. The budget is currently being worked on but the release date will probably be contingent on the release of the provincial budget, says Corman Park Administrator Adam Tittemore. “We won’t be able to set the mill rate until the provincial budget comes down,” said Tittemore. “They set the school tax rates and some of the government funding, so the RM would be able to set what our expenditures are going to be.” The RM’s public works department is looking to replace two graders, a mower, a tractor and a couple fleet trucks,

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 PG. 6

End of the board hasn’t ended agriculture woes

Drive defensively

After the long and bitter fight over ending the Canadian Wheat Board’s monopoly as a single-desk seller, a gleeful Saskatchewan Party MLA was waxing on this spring about how a big impediment to modern-day farming had been eliminated.

COMMENTARY

Last week, the Warman Fire Department and Warman RCMP detachment responded to four separate collisions on Highway 11 in the space of 24 hours. One of those collisions occurred while the wreckage from a previous one was being cleaned up. The week before, there were two major collisions on that highway - both of them at busy intersections. These were very serious collisions. So serious, in fact, that it’s a wonder no one was killed. The sad fact is that major collisions are so common that rarely a week goes by without at least one. But it’s not just Highway 11 between Warman and Saskatoon that’s dangerous. It’s the same story on Highway 12 North between Saskatoon and Martensville, Highway 7 West between Saskatoon and Delisle, Highway 11 South between Saskatoon and Dundurn, Highway 16 East between Saskatoon and Clavet, and Highway 16 West between Saskatoon and Radisson. In 2013, according to the Warman RCMP detachment, there were 683 traffic accidents in their jurisdiction. This compares to 533 in 2012. That’s a troubling trend. Weather conditions, particularly in the winter, are sometimes a contributing factor. Another one of the big factors contributing to the high incidence of collisions is the sheer number of vehicles on the road. With the tremendous growth in Saskatoon and surrounding region, the volume of cars, pickup trucks, SUVs and semis on the road is rising rapidly. Oviously, the roads have to be engineered so they can safely handle this increasing volume. So far, the strategic improvements at key intersections, like those at the main entrance to Warman, have helped, but realistically, they are stop-gap measures and have not been able to keep up. Which brings up, once-again, the longstanding cry for overpasses on Highway 11 at the Wanuskewin Road intersection and also atWarman’s main entrance, and on Highway 12 at Martensville’s main entrance. Anyone who has ever tried to make a left turn or cross these busy divided highway at any of these intersections during peak traffic times knows how nerve-wracking it can be. The provincial government needs to commit some serious funds to these overpasses in the upcoming budget so that the planning and construction work can get started as soon as possible. But in the meantime, drivers need to realize that ultimately, preventing collisions is everybody’s business. Pay attention to road conditions. If it’s icy, slow down. Don’t speed. And yes, 130 kilometers an hour is speeding. Especially if the road is icy and there’s snow blowing across the highway. Don’t text while driving. This is common sense, but it’s surprising how often people ignore the law. Don’t drink and drive. Again, it’s common sense, but lots of people do it anyway. The reality is that motorists need to drive defensively.

MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

It was a time for optimism. We were in the process of growing a record crop in Saskatchewan and prices were still rather high. But when asked why we should necessarily assume agriculture in rural Saskatchewan would now be a panacea given all the other problems out there – including the ageold frustration with the railways – the farmer/politician wryly smiled: “I guess we won’t hear (CWB opponents) admit that things are worse,” he said. To a point, the politician has been right. We have heard proportionally little about the current agriculture frus-

trations in the post-monopoly-world. Included in those frustrations are falling prices from grain companies... although that issue surely has something to do with the heavy crop and glut on the market. But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t frustrations out there. In fact, they are now starting to be voiced. One such voice is Manitoba’s largest farm group, the Keystone Agriculture Producers. Its president, Doug Chorney, penned a rather interesting article about how the excitement of last fall’s record yields has been replaced by an old and worsening problem of the railways failing to move grain in a timely way. “What’s new now is that last fall’s optimism has turned into concern because these crops are still on the farm,” Chorney wrote. “Abysmal service once again by Canada’s two major railways has limited crop movement so drastically that grain companies, which buy and market the crops, are buying very limited amounts ��� or are not buying at all.” Chorney’s article noted that

inland terminals and elevators are full as they wait for railcars that don’t come, largely because the 33 per cent increase in yield was met with a mere two per cent increase in car allotment as of November, according to the Western Grain Elevator Association. Moreover, only 27 per cent of the cars are arriving at the terminals and elevators on time and the railways are “leaving the cars at the elevators to be loaded for longer-than-average time periods – sometimes as much as 11 days,” Chorney noted. He added that port terminals were without rail service for 28 days during a three-anda-half month period last fall. When there is no grain to ship or shipments are late, grain companies are fined, and Canada loses both contracts and its reputation as a reliable shipper, he said. Admittedly, Chorney rightly blames the railways for this problem and asked for shortterm intervention by Transport Minister Lisa Raitt. But he also noted the longerterm need for a “governmentdirected reassessment of how railways do business.”

After all, prairie crop production is getting larger, Chorney said. He also noted that CN and CP moved 8.7 million tonnes of crop in mid-November 1993, but were only capable of moving 7.5 million tonnes in the same week this past November. Chorney does not mention the end of CWB board monopoly. He also correctly notes that what’s going on with the railways is a problem long in the making. That said, one of the old CWB’s roles was as a farmers’ advocate for getting the cars in a timely fashion. There is obviously one less advocate for this critical element of today’s agriculture business. And, in this brave new world of marketing freedom, farmers are finding themselves in heavy competition with other industries like oil and potash that use the railways to move their product. The end of CWB’s monopoly may have solved marketing problems for some farmers. But that certainly doesn’t mean it’s solved all the problems in agriculture. In fact, some of those problems may be getting worse.

Golden Retriever puppies are cute and cuddly, but they have a dark side With a five-year-old son and a four-year-old daughter it only seemed natural for me to add a dog to our family unit. I grew up with dogs and I felt giving my kids a loyal animal friend would teach them responsibility. Plus they could take it for walks and play with it outside. Then we got a 10-week-old Golden Retriever we named Winston. What an eye-opener. If you are thinking about getting a large dog, let me give one word of advice: Research!!! It doesn’t take long to find out anything about a dog nowadays. Plenty of websites and informative iPhone apps will give you all the information you need. In the case of Golden Re-

JAMES TARRANT

Jock from the Rock

trievers, or any kind of retriever, rent the movie, ‘Marley and Me’. We already have a Bichon Frise, but 14-year-old dogs don’t like kids mauling them. They only move when they have to eat or poop. Their philosophy is, ‘if I don’t have to do it, I won’t.’ For a dog that age, being lazy takes precedence over everything.

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I prefer big dogs like German Shepherds and St.Benards. They are less likely to wear cutesy coats, doggie booties or have pink bows in their fur. Oh I am sure there are dog owners who say that is not true, but it was going to be my dog. (Sorry, our dog dear, just in case my significant other reads this column). See, I’m normal. At least I like to think I am. I feel that a dog is just a dog. It’s not human and shouldn’t be thought of as one. It should also not be forced to dress up like a preschool toddler against its will. That line of thinking has no place with my girlfriend. Her

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heart melts when we visit Petland and she sees the doggie accessories. I in turn pretend I am listening and dash off to visit the reptile section, when she is not looking. When we finally made the decision to not get a tiny, annoying, yappy dog that I would be tempted to punt like a football when I got up to get a late night snack. Instead, we opted for a Golden Retriever. At first I thought it was a great idea. Winston is great with our kids and loves to be walked. But there is one thing I didn’t know. They have a dark side. Oh yes. They love to chew on anything they can find. It doesn’t matter what it is: kids toys, shoes, curtains,

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beds, recliners, toilet seat covers, mouldings, anything. Also, strewing garbage all over the kitchen is their favourite sport They love it. They also love not coming inside when it is -30 after they wake you up to take them out to urinate at 5 am. It is great fun, especially when you chase them to come inside and fall in a pile of snow in your housecoat barely missing where they done their business. Yay, Winston. The best part is this: Golden Retrievers apparently think that if you are the same size as them then you are fair game to tackle. My kids are his size. I don’t know how many times my daughter has been ‘Dino-

tackled’ because he was overexcited. And our poor Bichon has learned to lock herself in the dog kennel when Winston is near. True story. Would I get rid of him? To be honest, I thought about it. But the love and loyalty of a Golden Retriever is like no other. My girlfriend Carla thinks Winston has potential to be a good dog. I agree. At 20 weeks old maybe it’s kind of a dog’s Terrible Two’s stage. Wait, now I am thinking about the dog as a human. Damn. I now realize that besides my own kids, Winston is the first one to jump on the bed in the morning to give me a kiss. Well more like lick. My big bald head has never been cleaner.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

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iscovery is a fundamental part of education at the University of S a s k a t ch e wa n , and students play an integral part by applying fresh perspectives to existing knowledge. Students are encouraged to embrace discovery early. One opportunity allows undergraduate students to spend their summers conducting research in disciplines ranging from physics and psychology to biology and mathematics and statistics. Students work in research labs under the supervision of U of S faculty and their findings are presented at a juried poster competition. Some of the student research now has a more permanent home, thanks to a new online U of S journal launched in 2013. The USURJ (U of S Undergraduate

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Active research part of undergrad education at the U of S Research Journal) was created and is run by undergrads in association with the University Learning Centre (ULC). The biannual f a c u l t y r e v i e w e d journal issued its first call for submissions in the fall of 2013 and is planning its first issue in February 2014. “We’re hoping it will make undergraduate research more visible on campus,” said medical student Scott Adams, who shares editor-in-chief duties with graduate student Danielle Bruni-Bossio. “Our aim is to encourage students to take advantage of (research)

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opportunities, and to create a supportive environment for undergraduate research.” Adams explained that USURJ’s genesis came in January 2012 when the undergraduate community first formally proposed the concept of a dedicated research journal. Funding from the U of S Office of the Vice

President Research and the ULC supported the hiring of Bruni-Bossio on a graduate student fellowship and the building of a journal website at www.usask.

ca/urj. The USURJ is throwing its net wide to cover any research area. “ We are aiming for a balance among all disciplines,” Adams said. “Submissions might include research from a summer project, undergraduate honours theses or something written for a class. It’s meant to include original research not published elsewhere.” The journal is also meant to give

undergraduate students a taste of what research offers, enticing them to pursue graduate studies and associated career options. While at first students will likely submit work they have already done, it is hoped they will start to write with publication in mind as the journal gains prominence. “The undergraduate researchers are our future graduate students, researchers and innovators in their own right,” said Adams. “If we can encourage them now to engage in research, it’ll support us in our goal of bringing them into graduate studies and immersing them in the research culture of the university.”

Choosing a residence at the University of Saskatchewan

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or many new U of S students going to university doesn’t only mean starting a new program of study, it also means finding a new place to live. More than 1,300 students live in the two largest residence complexes at the U of S, Voyageur Place and College Quarter, and each building offers its own distinct atmosphere and student experience. One aspect students may wish to consider when choosing a residence is convenience, especially if this is the first time they will live away from home. Voyageur Place is a popular choice for first-year students because it is linked to most classroom and student service buildings by a tunnel system. This means that while other students arrive in class wearing snow boots and parkas, they can get to class in 10 minutes or less wearing pyjamas and flip-flops, if they choose. In addition, because meals are prepared for Voyageur Place residents, they don’t need to worry about buying groceries or doing the dishes, something Luran

Lu, an international student from Shanghai, China, enjoys. “It’s really helpful,” he says. “You save lots of time that way, and you get to do more studying and

living and eating areas, as well as several large, bright lounges which are popular hangouts for students. College Quarter residence assistants (RAs)

hang out with friends more.” Residents of the College Quarter residence complex may have to brave the short walk in the cold to get to their classes, but these buildings are also a popular choice with students. Larissa Kurz, a student from Central Butte, Saskatchewan, chose to live in College Quarter because, she says, “it feels more like an apartment building than a university residence.” College Quarter is the newest residence for undergraduate students, offering fully furnished fourbedroom, two-bathroom suites with open concept

work hard to provide opportunities for students to get together to study or socialize. “They’ve always got some kind of event organized,” says Kurz. No matter which residence students choose, each offers a comfortable, secure and convenient environment for students to live in. Both personal and academic support services are available to all residents, allowing them to devote more attention to their studies and to having fun. “The best part about residence is the people,” Kurz emphasizes. “You meet so many new friends.”


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

New Master’s of Nursing – Nurse Practitioner Degree to Launch in September

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pplications are now being accepted for the new master’s of nursing (nurse practitioner) degree, offered jointly by SIAST and the University of Regina beginning September 2014. This master’s level Collaborative Nurse Practitioner Program is designed for registered nurses (RN) who are looking for new challenges. It meets Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association approval standards, and it will provide the extensive knowledge and skills needed to manage the care of patients and their families in a primary care setting. The program will be offered online and consists of 11 courses, along with a one-week residency lab requirement and 702 hours of clinical practice education with qualified

nurse practitioner, pharmacist and physician preceptors. Students, based in Saskatchewan, may complete the program on a full-time or parttime basis, in two or four years respectively. Graduates of the program are eligible to write the national nurse practitioner exam and seek registration as a registered nurse, nurse practitioner (NP). Advanced Education Minister Rob Norris welcomed this new program to help meet the health needs in the province. “I would like to commend the University of Regina and SIAST on this new degree program, which draws on their extensive experience in nursing education, health research and collaboration,” said Norris. “Increased training opportunities such as this will help secure Saskatchewan’s

nursing workforce and contribute to highquality healthcare in the future.” A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse with graduate level educational preparation and possesses advanced clinical knowledge. The NP can autonomously assess, order and interpret diagnostic tests, diagnose, prescribe medication and perform specific primary care procedures within a legislated scope of practice (CNA 2009). Deans of Nursing, Dr. david Gregory of the University of Regina and Dr. Netha Dyck of SIAST welcome this opportunity to partner in this second nursing program being offered by the two postsecondary institutions. The Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Science in Nursing (SCBScN) program is currently in its third year.

“Accessibility via distance education will enable students to meet family and personal commitments while maintaining a full-time study schedule,” said Dyck. “It is designed for RNs who have demonstrated academic and clinical excellence, and who are comfortable serving in leadership roles and as patient advocates in a complex, rapidly changing health care system.” “The new program will provide extensive clinical opportunities under the supervision of preceptors and faculty,” added Gregory. “It brings together worldclass faculty, practising nursing practitioners and instructional designers to create a contemporary learning

experience.” C o m m u n i t y development, health promotion and collaboration with nterprofessional health care providers are essential components of the program. Graduates will help meet the growing demand for primary and preventative care in conventional settings and in an office, clinic

Co-operative Education (Co-op) program earned $9.7 million in wages

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articipants in the University of Regina’s Cooperative Education (Co-op) program earned $9.7 million in wages this year. But it’s not just the promise of a paycheck that draws students to the program. “Being able to practice and experience what you’re taught in class and getting paid is the perfect balance,” says Esther Edoho, a University of Regina student in the Faculty of Business Administration. “Another perk is that you get to work with professionals in your field of study – they have offered me advice on how to progress with my future career and what I will need to know to stand-out when it comes time for interviews,” she adds. Sydney Gossard is in her final year of studies with the Faculty of

Arts (English) and Centre for Continuing Education (public relations certificate) at the University of Regina. She agrees that the Co-op program provides relevant experience. “My academic experience hasn’t been trumped by my Co-op experience, but rather, enhanced; the skills and values I could have only gained from the classroom are put to use in my work placements, and then further adapted into specific tasks and projects,” says Gossard. Since its inception in 1969, the University’s Co-op program has had a record of 835 careerrelated placements in 2013 – a 45 per cent growth in the last seven years. With more than 50 programs to choose from, students from the faculties of Arts, Business Administration,

Engineering and Applied Science and Science are benefitting from an average of 12-16 months of supervised work experience by the time of graduation. “I have been able to use skills specifically related to my degree– my writing skills, my communication skills, my creativity,” says Gossard, who is certain this experience will aid her in the future. In addition to the Co-op program both students have taken advantage of the other services offered at the University of Regina’s Career Centre, which offers workshops on resumé writing and interviewing, long-term career goal setting, and career and volunteer fairs. For both students, the University’s Career Centre has bridged the gap from classroom to career.

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and ambulatory care centres. Graduates may also follow patients and families in a variety of settings, such as school, home, workplace and hospital, dependent upon their health care needs. Fo r further information or detail on admission requirements, visit w w w. sasknursingdegree.ca.


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

SIAST Delivers Programming to Meet Industry Needs

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s a polytechnic, SIAST aligns programs and research activities with industry needs. That means the depth of programming – whether it’s apprenticeship training, certificates, diplomas or degrees – prepares graduates to contribute from Day 1 on the job. SIAST’s applied research partnerships with employers, focused on seeking solutions to real-world challenges, draws on faculty expertise and helps students hone their critical-thinking skills. SIAST president and CEO, Dr. Larry Rosia notes that curriculum is developed with employer input to ensure students acquire a relevant education to equip them with marketable skills.

“By working closely with employers, we design programs to fit their needs and to help them capture new opportunities in Saskatchewan’s evolving economy,” says Dr. Rosia. In recent years, that approach has led to the development of such programs as the Mining Engineering Technology diploma and the Business Insurance diploma. SIAST has been involved with degree programming for more than a decade, but always through partnerships with other institutions. The Bachelor of Psychiatric Nursing program, launched in September, is the first degree offered solely by SIAST. “Graduates of the program will help

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this province address meeting the needs of an increasingly complex health system,” says Dr. Netha Dyck, SIAST’s dean of Nursing. SIAST will consider more degrees in the future, focusing on areas of industry where an increased level of applied learning is needed in industry. Dr. Rosia identifies construction management as a possibility. “A program in this field would respond to the leadership gap that’s emerging as seasoned supervisors enter retirement,” Dr. Rosia says. That same keen focus on opportunity and need drives applied research. Recent and upcoming applied research projects, for instance, include a software

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solution for managing building energy efficiency, a gas station remediation project with Federated Co-op and the University of S a s k a t ch e wa n , and contamination prevention in the brewery process. “Everything we do is driven by meeting the needs of two key stakeholder groups: students and

employers,” Dr. Rosia says. “It’s a proven formula for advancing economic development, thereby supporting the Saskatchewan Plan for Growth.” SIAST currently serves more than 26,000 distinct students through campuses in Moose Jaw, Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon, and through its extensive

network of delivering distance education opportunities. In 2013, SIAST was formally accepted as a member of Polytechnics Canada, which includes some of the country’s largest technical institutes. Legislation has been introduced to recognize SIAST as Saskatchewan’s polytechnic.

(CST) program after he heard its graduates were job-ready. “This was definitely because of the hands-on approach that SIAST takes,” says Roan. Following graduation from S I A S T, he decided to complement his diploma with a computer science degree from university. With transfer agreements between SIAST and u n i v e r s i t i e s, that meant he needed only two years of further courses to complete his degree. Dr. Rosia says pairing a SIAST diploma with a university degree provides a grad with the benefits of technical education and the advanced theory required for career advancement in the most economical amount of time possible. “We want it to be easy for students to move between institutions without repeating course material they have already covered,” he says. Roan notes the benefits, saying a diploma and a degree

contribute favourably to one’s resume. Students also have the option of applying for credit for prior learning; that is, for knowledge gained in a non-academic setting. They can seek academic credit for the knowledge they obtained through life and work experiences, reducing the time investment required to achieve a credential. SIAST delivers a full suite of programming, i n c l u d i n g apprenticeship training, certificates, diplomas and degrees. Curriculum is developed with employer input to ensure students acquire a relevant education that equips them with marketable skills. Currently SIAST offers 150 programs to choose from. The institution gets top marks from both employers and grads: 98% of employers surveyed say they’d hire a SIAST grad again, and 97% of grads rates programs as good to excellent.

SIAST Transfer Credits

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rograms offered by Saskatchewan’s polytechnic, SIAST, focus on real-world learning opportunities for jobs, building on an individual’s prior learning achievements. SIAST president and CEO Dr. Larry Rosia says that’s a successful combination, describing the SIAST “advantage” as a significant one to meet this province’s educational and workforce needs. “We know individuals are looking for hands-on learning, small class sizes and job ready skills,” says Dr. Rosia. “SIAST delivers a full range of programming. Whether it’s apprenticeship training, certificates, diplomas and degrees, curriculum is developed with employer input to ensure students acquire a relevant education that equips them with marketable skills.”

“We know individuals are looking for hands-on learning...” A number of agreements are in place that enables grads to seek transfer credit between post-secondary institutions. Roan Cooney experienced that flexibility firsthand. As a high school graduate from Saskatoon, he entered SIAST’s Computer Systems Technology


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

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Warman student receives scholarship

Martensville hosting PWOS

Talia Dale, of Warman, Saskatchewan, a first year Bachelor of Science student, was awarded a total of $3,500 for Honours, Non-Alberta Residency, and Basketball, funded by The Augustana Community Endowment Fund Award, An Augustana Non-Alberta Incentive Entrance Award, and A Brett Binder Athletic Scholarship. Three hundred twenty-five UAlberta Augustana Campus students have been awarded scholarships and awards for the

The Prairie Women on Snowmobiles (PWOS) 2014 mission is getting closer, The PWOS trek leaves Prince Albert on Friday, January 31 and travels through Shellbrook, Blaine Lake, Waldheim before ending the day in Martensville. A fundraising steak night supper is scheduled for that evening at the Adobe Inn. The following day, the riders head off to Asquith, Biggar, Rosetown and Kindersley. The eight-day trek ends on February 7 in Nipawin. The riders, who are raising money for breast cancer research, will travel about 1800 kilometers over the course of the mission. Over the years, the group has raised more than $1.8 million toward the cause. Each mission consists of a group of ten volunteer snowmobilers who travel across the province, passing through many towns and cities. Breast cancer is the most commonly-diagnosed cancer in Canadian women and the second most common cause of cancer death in women.

2013-2014 academic year. Receiving such awards is: Over $574,000 was provided by the University of Alberta and Augustana Campus in recognition of excellence in Academics, Fine Arts, Athletics, and Leadership. Support comes from generous donors, investment earnings on endowments, and from Faculty funded awards. Augustana College prides itself on offering The Best of Both Worlds. You can earn a degree from the Universi-

ty of Alberta - one of the Top 5 Universities in Canada - in a welcoming, close-knit campus community of professors and fellow students from across Alberta and around the world. The college offers four year Bachelor Degree Programs in Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences, Fine Arts, Management and combined Science/ Education, the 100-year-old Augustana Campus in Camrose, Alberta, is committed to providing over 1,000 students with a high quality, undergraduate education every year.

Talia Dale of Warman

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Canadian Tire slated to build retail outlet in Martensville By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Canadian Tire Corporation is committed to building a major retail outlet in Martensville.

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The corporation confirmed on Wednesday, January 22 that it has purchased five acres of land in the Black Iron Crossing commercial development area west of Centennial Drive in Martensville. The announcement was made in a news release issued jointly by the City of Martensville and North Prairie Developments Ltd, the developer of the Black Iron Crossing property. “It’s a deal that’s been years in the making, and it’s nice that

it’s finally come to fruition,” said Martensville Economic Development Officer Dillon Shewchuk in an interview January 22. “We met with Canadian Tire a few years ago in an effort to familiarize them with Martensville in particular and the region in general. Since then, they’ve been evaluating the location and taking into account the amazing growth that’s been happening here. “I think that played a major role in their decision,” he said. Shewchuk said while there are no firm details available yet on the size of the store or the timing of the construction, he said it’s highly likely that construction would start in 2014. “I would be surprised if they did not move fairly quickly on this,” Shewchuk said. “There are a lot of other commercial buildings going up in that area right now. There’s a lot of momentum.”

Eugene Hritzuk with ICR Commercial Real Estate, the agency facilitating the development, confirmed the deal has been in the works for some time. “There are a lot of issues when a big retailer comes into a centre,” said Hritzuk. “This has taken at least a year to work out all the details.” Hritzuk said having Canadian Tire in Martensville provides massive credibility to the location, and will encourage others to move in. Clinton Elenko, vice-president for real estate with Canadian Tire Corporation, said in the news release that the company is excited about Martensville and the surrounding region. “It is a tremendous growth story and we look forward to being part of its future,” said Elenko. Shewchuk said having a major retail chain like Canadian

Tire commit to opening an outlet in Martensville is likely to send a positive message to other national chains. “It will help the region as a whole,” said Shewchuk. “It’s really positive for residents, because it gives them the option of shopping closer to home. Part of the appeal is that it’s a destination store. It’s also likely to attract other businesses and bring in more traffic for everybody.” Martensville Mayor Kent Muench said he’s excited to see this major Canadian chain move to Martensville. “Not only will our residents have access to Canadian Tire’s retail services, but the project should result in numerous new jobs for local Martensville residents,” said Muench. “That’s good news not only for people who live here now, but for those considering a move to Martensville.”

A recently-completed survey showed that Martensville residents are looking for additional retail services, particularly larger, national chains like Canadian Tire. “As more and more retail services are offered here, we’re seeing higher residential growth, and as our population grows, more commercial growth follows,” said Muench. “So overall, we’re in a really great situation here.” The Canadian Tire property is located north of the new Saskatoon Co-op gas bar currently under construction. “It will be right around where the intersection of Centennial Drive and 3rd Street North is,” said Shewchuk. The Black Iron Crossing development currently has several businesses - some of which are in operation and others in the process of building. These include Tim Hortons, Saskatoon

Co-op, Pharmasave and a future wellness centre. Further to the north is a 15-acre RV Mall being developed by TRX RV, as well as a 20-acre development known as Northlands Business Park. North Prairie also has a sixacre commercial land development, Sunset Ridge, on Martensville’s southern edge along Centennial Drive. The development currently includes a Taco Time, Dairy Queen, and a Canalta Hotel which is under construction. John Williams of North Prairie Developments said interest from companies looking for commercial land in Martensville has been steady. “We’ve had a lot of success in Martensville, and with talks ongoing with other national chains and major retailers, we hope to continue making more announcements like this soon,” said Williams.

Martensville Protective Services gala honours those who serve others By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

WATER AND POWER SITUATION

Warman firefiighters responded to an alarm at a condominium complex on Centennial Boulevard in Warman about 3:00 p.m. on Monday, January 27 and again on Tuesday afternoon, January 28 at about 4:30 p.m. While there was no sign of smoke or fire, the building’s alarm detected water coming from the sprinkler system. SaskPower had to be called on Tuesday to shut off the power becuase the water was flowing onto an electrical component in the building. The result power outage affected a portion of Warman.

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Honouring those who “serve and protect” is the theme for the eighth annual Martensville Emergency and Protective Services Dine and Dance, slated for Saturday, February 8 at the North Ridge Centennial Community Centre in Martensville. Wayne Ditto, a member of the Martensville Fire Department said the purpose and scope of the gala occasion has evolved since its modest beginnings eight years ago. Ditto is a members of the organizing committee, which also includes: Judy Morris with the Martensville office of the Warman/Martensville RCMP detachment, MFD Firefighter Chad Eckes, MFD Captain Gary David and MFD Firefighter Bill Symons. “The Martensville Fire Department and the Martensville RCMP detachment originally started it as a fundraising dinner,” said Ditto in an interview on Friday, January 24. “We needed the funds to put toward equipment for the fire department. Now that Martensville has become a city, we don’t rely on fundraising so much any-

more for our capital equipment and uniforms and things like that. Those items are part of the municipal budget now. But we do still have a fundraising component where we put funds toward educational programs like fire safety, bicycle helmet safety and baby car-seat clinics.” The focus, said Ditto, is now primarily on paying tribute to those people who serve their fellow citizens. “We include the firefighters, police, RCMP, military, First Responders, the Provincial Ministry of Corrections and Public Safety employees, EMS, Emergency Measures Organization,” said Ditto. “Anyone with any connection to the military or to Protective Services is honoured. It’s a formal occasion. Everyone wears their dress uniforms. The key theme is to pay respect to those people, including those who have fallen in the line of duty or who have passed on.” A centerpiece of the evening is the “Honour Ceremony” - a tribute to the fallen officers, followed by a minute of silence. The evening is also the occasion for the Martensville Fire Department to hand out its

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Long Service Awards to members. “We like to recognize our own members and give them credit for the years of service they devote to the volunteer fire department,” said Ditto. “Some members are also retiring, and we use this occasion to bring attention to their achievements.” Three of the Martensville Fire Department members will be receiving Governor-General’s Awards for their 20 years of service to the department. That same evening, the City of Martensville presents its Citizen of the Year award and Volunteer of the Year award. “A lot of people in the community come to the event, and this is designed to show people we’re there for them,” said Ditto. “Through good and bad, if you call, we’ll be there for you in your time of need. In times of fear, panic, chaos and terror, these are the people who choose to run in and help, while others are running out.” Tickets for the event can be purchased by calling Wayne Ditto at 406-668-8036 (after 5 pm) or at 306-380-6554; or Judy Morris at 306-975-1610. The deadline for purchasing tickets is Tuesday, February 4.


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 PG. 12

‘It’s like watching a train wreck’ Cyber-stalking, cyber-bullying, inappropriate phone apps: Youth, parents need to know the dangers By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Brian Trainor saw a lot during his 27-year career with the Saskatoon City Police Service. The retired detective-sergeant investigated everything from parking tickets to murder. Over the years, he noticed a common thread running through every type of serious crime. “Every major call dealt with some form of aggression or abuse,” said Trainor. “That’s essentially what bullying is. It’s aggression, harassment and abuse. And here’s the kicker. It’s a criminal offense.” Trainor, who now runs his own private consulting company, is in high demand as a speaker at schools across the province, averaging between 30 to 40 presentations a month in communities large and small. He’s an internationally-recognized expert on cyber-bullying who combines a positive, humanitarian approach with a stern warning on consequences. And he’s a hit with students of all ages, who listen with rapt attention because he speaks their language and understands what makes them tick. He’s also more knowledgeable than most of his audience when it comes to the latest technology and trends. Trainor says as children and youth become increasingly hooked on smartphones and have unrestricted access to the internet, the incidence of cyberbullying will only get worse. The problem, he notes, is that they don’t understand the implications of their actions, and they don’t realize there are serious consequences if and when they cross the line between what’s socially-acceptable, and what’s illegal. What they don’t know can, indeed, hurt them, he insists. “I love talking to kids, especially those in Grade 12,” he said in an interview following a presentation to Warman High School students in early Janu-

Kik: Our beliefs We believe we’re at the beginning of the smartphone era – one of the most transformative changes of our generation, comparative to the rise of the first personal computer or the creation of the Internet. For the first time in history, we have a device that isn’t just a tool. Your smartphone is actually part of you: always on, always connected, and always with you. We see it as an implant. It just hasn’t been implanted yet. We believe this will let us interact with the real world tomorrow, as easily as we interact with the virtual world today - and completely redefine how people connect with each other and their environment. Kik is at the helm of this once-in-a-lifetime paradigm shift. A smartphone messenger is just where we chose to start. (www.kik.com/about) ary. “This is information they need, because this stuff can impact their future.”

CONNECTED, ADDICTED

Trainor said kids are connected with each other through technology to the point where the first thing they do when they get up in the morning and the last thing they do at night is check their phones. And they aren’t just on Facebook and Twitter anymore either, he said. “They’re on Kik, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr, pinterest, What’sApp and even real nasty sites like Ask.FM,” said Trainor. “Some of these are very hateful sites with no redeeming value whatsoever. And lots of parents have never even heard of them.” Trainor said kids feel they have to be on those sites in order to be part of their peer group. “If they’re not part of the discussion, they feel like they’re out of the loop,” he said. “When things get nasty, they tend to downplay it. They don’t call it ‘bullying’, they call it ‘drama’. And it can get progressively worse. It’s like watching a train wreck.” Parents won’t be able to keep up with their kids in a no-holds -barred internet environment, anyway, said Trainor. “The minute you go to Kik,

your kids are gone,” he said. “That’s just the way it is. Don’t blame the technology. The technology isn’t the problem. It’s just technology. It’s how we use technology that’s the problem. We need to teach these people from an early age - and I’m talking Grade 2 and 3 - how to use this technology properly.” He said it’s up to parents to set the rules early and enforce them. “You’re not your kids’ buddy, you’re the parent,” he said.

THINK BEFORE YOU SEND

Trainor said people tend to think that because they’re ‘online’, then they’re invisible and anonymous. But nothing could be further from the truth, he added. Texting or blogging a nasty anti-gay or racist comment, or posting a photo, leaves a permanent trail that police investigators can use to track you down in a matter of minutes through phone company and interent provider records. “Think before you click ‘Send’,” Trainor told the students in the audience. “You have no idea of the impact it could have on you and your family.” Lawsuits are becoming increasingly common in cyberbullying cases, and there have been instances where a stu-

dent’s family was forced to declare bankruptcy and sell their home to pay for the settlement, said Trainor. Last August, the province of Nova Scotia adopted a law known as the ‘Cyber Safety Act’ which defines cyber-bullying as a crime, and streamlines the court system to facilitate lawsuits in those cases. “People aren’t going to the police anymore,” he said. “They’re going straight to lawyers.” Recently in New York state, two 13-year-old boys were convicted of child pornography and sent to jail for five years each after electronically distributing a nude photo of an underaged girl. He said Facebook profile pages are the first place police officers go to when they’re looking for criminals. The same goes for bad guys looking to steal an innocent victim’s identity. “Everybody has a profile page,” said Trainor. “Look at your Facebook profile. Don’t put your address or phone number or your birthday or your siblings’ names or any of that information on it. Any fraudster who wants to go online and pretend to be you can do it easily.” Trainor said not every instance of online conflict is cyber-bullying. Bullying, he said, involves unwanted attention. There are

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Sgt. Brian Trainor is a retired Saskatoon Police officer who is in populare demand as a speaker on cyber-bullying different types of bullying, including physical, verbal and psychological. But at their root, they are all weapons of intimidation. Cyber-bullying is an extension of that abuse, but is conducted under the false cloak of anonymity. He said young people need to ask themselves one basic, simple question before they hit ‘send.’ “Ask yourself: Am I breaking a rule or breaking a law? How does this action reflect on me?’,” said Trainor. “If you wouldn’t do it to someone’s face, don’t do it online.”

MESSAGE MADE IMPACT

Trainor’s message made an impact on his audience, judging by the number of students who stuck around to talk to him after the presentation. Melissa MacPherson, a Grade 11 student at Warman High School, said she was surprised at how widespread the problem is across the country. “I’m always checking my phone,” MacPherson said. “It’s a pretty important part of my life. But I didn’t realize how some of the comments kids make can be hurtful. “That was an eye-opener for me.” MacPherson said she had some of the apps on her phone, but had never heard of some of the nasty ones. “I don’t want

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Russell Dyck, Vice-Principal of Warman High School, said the students themselves asked for a speaker on cyber-bullying. “At the beginning of the year, we surveyed our students, asking them what type of topics they wanted covered that aren’t typically covered in a traditional classroom,” said Dyck in an interview after Trainor’s presentation. “This was by far the most popular topic the kids wanted to hear about.” Dyck said the key to getting through the teenagers is to be honest, and he noted that Trainor’s approach does exactly that. “Much of what Brian told the kids is the same thing we as teachers have been saying,” said Dyck. “If you’re being bullied online, don’t respond to the bully. Tell an adult immediately. If it is a direct immediate threat, tell us, or the police directly. That’s powerful for kids to undnerstand - that their online actions have an impact on others.” Dyck said in instances where bullying is detected, the school does its best to resolve the situation through mediation. “It’s a lot more work on everyone’s part, but in the end, it’s more impactful and the solution is longer-lasting,” he said.

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13

February 2014 Volume 1

City Website: www.warman.ca

Issue 6

Dear Residents: The purpose of our newsletter is to provide all residents in Warman, & area with information as to what is happening in business, sport and our community. We believe it is important that as a learning and highly-involved community we share this information with everyone. Please feel free to call Sherri (306-933-2133) or Heather (306-933-1929) if you have suggestions or information for our newsletter.

Message from Mayor Sheryl Spence and Council Hello from your Mayor and Council, January is almost behind us and with it we have had some very strange weather from bitter cold, to spring thaw temperatures, to incredible winds that caused all sorts of problems for Warman. Once again power interruptions that caused havoc for residents and businesses alike. Warman Administration and Council met with representatives from SaskPower in late 2013 to discuss our concerns with the outages, and disruptions to power in Warman through 2013. We were advised, at that time, that some of the disruptions had been caused by accidents, either contractors hitting lines, or accidents taking out facilities. We were advised that SaskPower is taking steps to make our power supply more reliable with a couple of large projects.

the second source. Furthermore all switching will be automated so if power is disrupted the system can switch without having to have personnel on the scene manually doing it, this saves time and is instantaneous. We have been told to expect an April 2014 completion date. With these changes Warman should see positive changes to our Power supply and service should be greatly improved. Other Issues to Note: We recently had some concerns brought to our attention in regard to Water bill increases in the last billing statement. We thought clarification is needed here so our residents fully understand. Water Rate History; In 2012 the City increased the water rate from $11.00 to $12.00 per thousand gallons. In 2013 we increased the rate from $12.00 to $13.00 per thousand gallons.

Saskatoon Reinforcement Project: This project is being undertaken to address the electrical capacity and reliability issues in and around Saskatoon. A new substation is being constructed just south of Martensville and a new switching station at Aberdeen, with a transmission line connecting the two stations. The Main purpose is to reinforce SaskPower’s transmission system in order to accommodate forecasted residential and commercial electrical load, growth in the City of Saskatoon and surrounding area, improve reliability, and reduce technical losses.

SaskWater has announced a 7% water increase effective April 1st which will likely mean another $1.00 increase per thousand gallons being passed along to consumers. Recycling Rate History;

The benefit to Warman in layman’s terms is we will have two power sources once this is complete instead of the one we currently have. Meaning if one is disrupted power can still be fed through

These increases in Water utilities only are applied to our residents if the municipality experiences a rate increase from the supplier. In both these situations that has been the case.

City Council Meeting February 10 and 24 located at 107 Central St. in the council chambers at City Hall starting at 6:30pm. Doors are located on Fifth Ave. S.

IMPORTANT NOTICE Please remove your Loraas Disposal cart from the street after being emptied. Carts left on the street are interfering with snow removal. Your co-operation is greatly appreciated.

Recycling fee for blue carts has increased ten cents (2.0%) from $5.00 to $5.10 per month effective January 1, 2014. Recycling fee for multi-units has increased five cents from $2.50 to $2.55 per month effective January 1, 2014. Recycling fees are added to the quarterly utility billings and reflect increases in Loraas’ fees.

Representatives from Council, Administration, Fire Department, RCMP, and neighbouring communities will be meeting with CN officials to discuss conveyance of dangerous goods along our rail lines. After all the recent attention this topic has brought throughout the country we as community leaders want to be fully aware of what is traveling through our community and further to that being prepared for any incidents that could occur. The spring Business Breakfast will be hosted by Great Plains College and the City of Warman. Come join us and get an update from some community partners February 19th, 8:00 a.m. upstairs in the Conference room at Warman High School. We continue to work with our neighbouring communities to discuss regional partnerships and look for opportunities that build stronger communities, therefor a stronger province. As always do not hesitate to call your Mayor or Council if you have questions, suggestions or just want to chat. We always welcome conversation with the residents of this great city.

A Town with a past A City with a Future! “If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant.”- Anne Bradstreet

**WASTE & RECYCLING PICKUP CORRECTION*** ATTENTION RESIDENT PLEASE BE ADVISED: The following dates shown on your Waste & Recycling Pickup Magnets are INCORRECT. They should be as follows: MARCH 3 & 7 MARCH 10 & 14 MARCH 17 & 21 MARCH 24 & 28 MARCH 31

RED WASTE BLUE RECYCLING RED WASTE BLUE RECYCLING RED WASTE

June 9 & 13 June 16 & 20 June 23 & 27 Jun 30

RED WASTE BLUE RECYCLING RED WASTE BLUE RECYCLING

We apologize for the error. Please continue to rotate your bins every week as shown above. City of Warman


14

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

COMMUNITY EVENTS Warman Mennonite Special Care Home Monthly Bus Trip

Warman Cheer Classic

Tuesday, February 4

February 28 and March 1

A monthly bus trip to Lawson Heights. The bus leaves the care home at 9:30am and picks up passengers from their homes after that. The return time

The Legends Centre Come check out some great cheerleading action. 50 teams will be

will be around 2:00pm. Cost is $10.00/trip and is open to anyone who is interested - not just seniors. Contact Zelma Peters or Sheryl Fehr

participating in this years event. Come check out the action at our new event and support Warman High School Athletes.

Warman Minor Soccer Registration Night

Warman Community Association Ladies Diamond Dinner

Feb 6 and 11

Saturday March 1

306-933-2011

The Legends Centre - 7:00pm - 9:00pm This registration night will be for Warman Minor Soccer’s outdoor program

Brian King Centre Tickets are Now on Sale. Tickets cost $50.

that will run in May and June.

Scrapbooking Fundraiser

To purchase tickets contact Sharon: 306-934-5914 Bev: 306-221-7279 Grace: 306-384-1092

February 7 and 8

E: wca-wca@outlook.com

www.wcacommunity.com

Brian King Centre A fun filled weekend of scrapbooking. Gift bags, raffle and door prizes,

Warman Community Hockey Tournament

mini manicures/pedicures and massages available. Fore more information on how to register and prices contact Joylene at 306-291-8600 or email

The Legends Centre Come out and join us for our 2nd annual Adult hockey tournament. Three

prairieribbons@gmail.com.

WUC 2nd Annual Valentine’s Day Dance Thursday February 13 ***PLEASE NOTE THE LOCATION HAS CHANGED TO THE WARMAN HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM*** A fun family dance for everyone to enjoy. For more information check out our website or Facebook.

March 21 and 22

Game Minimum, Beer Gardens on Site, No skill level required. Register as individual players. Register by email to Heather - heatherc@warman.ca. Registration forms will be available online at www.warman.ca under Recreation and Community Services Dept - Special Events.

Scared Scriptless Players Production “You Can’t Take It With You

Friday February 14 Watch for further information on our Valentine’s Day special events happening at The Legends Centre on Facebook and www.warman.ca.

March 21 - 23 Brian King Centre Tickets are now on sale. To purchase tickets to this year’s production please contact Joanne @ 306-651-2277. Friday and Saturday Wine and Cheese $20.00. Sunday Dessert Matinee - $15.00. For more information visit our Facebook page or City of Warman website - www.warman.ca.

Winterfest

Go Girl

Monday February 17 The Legends Centre A fun filled day to celebrate Family Day in Saskatchewan!! Come down to The Legends Centre and we will keep you active and entertained. This is an event you won’t want to miss! Complete details will be available on our website www.warman.ca or Facebook.

Friday, March 28 The Legends Centre - 8:30am - 4:00pm This event is hosted by the Intercommunity Development Group. A GIRLS ONLY event for girls in Grades 5-8. Features drama, cheerleading, baton, belly dancing, orienteering, lunch and snacks provided! All of this for only $5.00 To register email Coralie - coralieb@warman.ca or cal 306-933-2210

Valentine’s Day @ The Legends Centre

February Break Activities February 18-21 @ The Legends Centre Join us for another fun filled week of activities at The Legends Centre. Some days may require pre-registration. Visit www.warman.ca for further information.

Spring Business Breakfast - hosted by Great Plains College Wednesday, February 19 @ 8:00am Prairie Spirit Conference Centre Connect with local businesses and hear what’s happening in 2014. Speakers: Stanley Westby – newly appointed City Manager, City of Warman Rob Neufeld – Region Manager, Great Plains College RSVP by February 12 to development@greatplainscollege.ca.

Warman Club Volleyball Home Tournament Saturday, February 22 The Legends Centre starting at 9:00am Come out and cheer on the Warman Club Volleyball team at their Girls U18 and U15 home tournament. For more information contact Kevin Davis @ kevindavis@sasktel.net.

Crystalbrook Community Group Sponsored Free Public Skate Day Sunday February 23 Diamond Arena 4pm - 6pm

Prairie Ribbons Rhythmic Gymnastics Northern Gala and Northern Catz March 29 and 30 Please watch www.prairieribbons.blogspot.ca “event” for further details.

Crystalbrook Community Groups presents The Night the Ladies Left “Wrecking Ball” March 29 Brian King Centre A fun filled evening of dancing for LADIES ONLY! Midnight lunch will be provided. More details will be available soon via FACEBOOK or our website www.crystalbrookcg.org.

Warman Osler Skating Club Carnival March 30 The Legends Centre @ 2:00pm Come and join us for this year’s carnival production - Songs of the Decades. Please join us in celebrating our 2013/2014 season’s skating accomplishments.

DROP IN SPOrTS for ages 7yrs to 12yrs starts JANUARY 31st from 7:30pm - 9:30pm $2.00/child


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

15

Warman High School February 2014 Newsletter Dear Parents, Students and Community Members: The purpose of our newsletter is to provide all residents in Warman, Osler & area with information as to what is happening not only in education, but in business, sport and community. We believe it is important that as a learning and highly-involved community we share this information with everyone, not just the parents of students. Please feel free to call us at the school (933-2377) if you have suggestions or information for our newsletter. W.H.S Website www.spiritsd.ca/warmanhigh — W.H.S daily announcements, photos and more! WHS Running Track – Interested in walking or running? Please purchase a “Track Pass” from Warman High School. Cost is $30.00. This pass is good for the entire school year. The available times are 6:00 – 9:00 am. & 5:00 – 9:00 pm., Monday – Friday. Please remember that no outdoor footwear or strollers will be permitted. Track re-opens Tuesday, September 10, 2013. Bus Lane Parking—We would appreciate it if parents would NOT park in the bus lane when picking up a or dropping off your child/children from school. We encourage you to use the south entrance of the school. If you need to pick up your child, please wait until 3:15 to use the bus lane as we have 11 buses that need to be able to access the bus lane. Also, when you are entering the bus lane, please remember that the traffic is ONE WAY and that you MUST enter from Klassen Street. Entering from the Central Street cases traffic jams. ATTENTION: BUS STUDENTS Hot 98.3 FM, CHWW FM, 92.9 The Bull FM, C95 and AM stations CKOM 650 and 600 CJWW radio stations will be notified if the buses are not running because of weather conditions. You can also check the Warman High School website for updates. Winter Apparel A reminder to students and parents to dress appropriately for the weather. Students are coming to school dressed inadequately for weather conditions. REPORT CARDS Report Cards will be sent home with students on Friday, February 7th, 2014. If you have any questions regarding your child’s progress, please contact the teacher and a parent/student/teacher conference can be arranged. Library Do you have 2013 magazine back issues that appeal to teenagers in a school setting? Stop by the WHS Library with your donations. Do a good thing for education and the environment. W.H.S. School Community Council — Our next meeting is being held on Wednesday, February 12th at 6:30 p.m. in Rm. 210 at WHS. Everybody is welcome to attend! Please visit www.spiritsd.ca/whs/ for more information on school happenings and the SCC. Please become an involved parent in your child’s education. WHS Grad Information

Grad 2014 - Wednesday, June 25, 2014! More specific details will follow. Lifetouch – GRAD PHOTOS – the proofs were dropped off by Lifetouch on Friday, January 10th so check with your grad to view the proofs. A representative from Lifetouch will be at Warman High School with information and samples of photo/package options on February 4th from 3pm – 6pm. ALL Grads/parents must sign a consent form allowing their grad photo, name, etc. be published in the newspaper, yearbook, etc. Please see Warman High School Website Grad Page for form. Grad Parents: if any of you are interested in organizing a BBQ the day prior to Grad for Grads only, please let Mrs. Morrow know. Also, if you want to plan/organize a Chemical Free Grad activity after the Grad Banquet, let Mrs. Morrow know. **Please check the Grad Page on the Warman High School website for updates. Cheerleading The Warman High School Cheerleading team has been practising since October. We are looking forward to an exciting 2013-14 season and plan to attend the following: COMPETITIONS Regina Ice Breaker (Regina) Warman Cheer Classic ACA West Edmonton Competition (Edmonton) Provincials (North Battleford)

February 8 Feb 28 & Mar 1 March 7-9 March 22

2014 WARMAN CHEER CLASSIC - Fri. Feb. 28th and Sat. Mar 1 at Legends Centre We are excited to host our 8th Annual Cheer Competition. We have over 1000 athletes performing at our two day competition in our new facility, the Warman Legends Centre. Come out and enjoy Saskatchewan's largest cheerleading competition. Admission Friday: $10.00 Adult /$5.00 for children 10 and under. Saturday: $15.00 Adult /$5.00 children 10 and under. 2 Day Pass: $20.00 Sr. Girls Basketball The Warman Sr. Girls Basketball team are having a very successful season. We are a very young team with eight new players and only four returning. We have participated in the John Paul II Tournament, finishing first, Carlton Tournament, Prince Albert, finishing first, Melfort Tournament, St Mary's Sweet Sixteen Tournament, Peacock Moose Jaw Tournament, all finishing second. The team is undefeated in the CSHS Basketball League with playoffs on February 11th and 13th in Warman. Upcoming tournaments are the Warman Tournament on Feb 1st and North Battleford Comp. Tournament on February 7 and 8th. Good luck to the team in their upcoming Conference playoffs on Feb. 28th and March 1st in North Battleford. I want to thank the players and their parents for their support and commitment to the team throughout the season. Senior Boys Basketball The Senior Boys basketball team has had a busy season so far. They are still taking part in the Central Saskatchewan High School Basketball League with Warman, Valley Christian Academy, Ecole Canadienne Francaise, Saskatoon Christian School, Clavet, Martensville, and Rosthern Junior College. League Playoffs begin on February 11. The boys will be in Clavet this weekend for a tournament with their first game at 7:00pm.


16

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Junior ‘A’ Girls Wolverines Basketball Update January was a busy month for the Junior Girls A team. The team finished the regular season with a record of 5 Wins and 0 Losses. In our home Blast-Off Tourney, the girls captured 3rd place with a win over E.S. Laird Sabres from Lloydminster. The team travelled to the Hot Hoops tourney in Lloyd on January 24th and 25th. The Girls defeated the Meadow Lake Stingers and Bishop Lloyd Lancers to advance to the “A” Final. The girls lost 44-40 to Vermillion in the final game. The girls played great the whole weekend. The Girls will be playing in the Championship tourney to be held at Warman High School on February 8th. The Junior “A” Girls are hoping to claim their 4 th title in a row. Should be an exciting weekend. Good Luck Wolverines.

Work Experience Thank you to the many employers who provided workplace experience for WHS students in Semester 1. Semester 2 students will be going to work beginning in March. Please contact Susan Bayne at 933-2377 if you are interested in having a Work Experience Student. Career Education News All WHS Grade 10 students had individual meetings in Semester 1 to discuss the use of PowerSchool, Math pathways, Science pathways and credit requirements. All Grade 11 students will do an on-line career assessment and have an individual meeting in Semester 2. Parents are welcome to call or make an appointment as well. Prairie Spirit’s Career Site, www.futurechoice.ca is a great place for students and parents to access information regarding post-secondary options. The Course Selection Booklet under the Registration Tab on Warman High School’s homepage has information about courses offered and graduation requirements. Career Information and Events can now be found on Facebook at Career Guidance Warman High. Students and parents will find posts highlighting upcoming events and post-secondary information. All Grade 12s should make sure to check it out.

Post Secondary Education 1. University of Saskatchewan  The deadline for admission to the College of Kinesiology and the College of Engineering is February 15, 2014. The deadline for Competitive Entrance Awards is February 15, 2014. Students must have applied for admission, paid the application fee, and have  submitted the Competitive Entrance Awards application by February 15, 2013. Any supporting documents must then be submitted to the U of S by March 1, 2014 Please ensure that once you have applied, you tell the Career Counsellor in your school so that your marks may be sent to the U of S in support of your application for Competitive Entrance Awards. 2. University of Regina  Applications for Nursing will be open until February 15, 2014.  The Faculty of Education has changed their application deadline to March 1, 2014. They have created a webpage called "How to Apply to Teacher Education" providing students with deadlines, important information, the application form and a worksheet with the questions to be answered. 3. SIAST • High-demand programs are open for application until 4:30 p.m., February 15, 2014 . All supporting documentation is required by 4:30 p.m. February 28th. Combined Laboratory and X-Ray Technology Dental Hygiene Medical Laboratory Assistant Medical Laboratory Technology Medical Radiologic Technology Power Engineering Technology Practical Nursing

WHS Athletics Warman High School athletics is now on twitter! You can find the scores for all athletic teams on twitter @warmanwolverine

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Teacher Appreciation Week

Family Day (no school)

Grad Picture Order Event

Winter Break (no school)

SCC Meeting

Report Cards

Valentine’s Day

Hawaiian/Beach Day Cheer Classic PEP Rally


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 PG. 17

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Delisle Bruins dominate heading into provincial senior C hockey playoffs Three straight wins provide momentum for team By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Delisle Bruins forward Dan Hounjet stickhandles past an Outlook Icehawks defender during a game on Friday, January 24. Hounjet led the way for Delisle with three goals.

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Provincial hockey playoffs get new sponsor The Saskatchewan Hockey Association (SHA) announced a new partnership with SGI Canada and the Insurance Brokers’ Association of Saskatchewan (IBAS). Beginning in the 2013-14 hockey season, SGI Canada and IBAS will be recognized as the major sponsor of the SHA Provincial Playoffs. The SGI Canada IBAS Provincial Playoffs will run from January 20-March 31, 2014 in communities province-wide. “In Saskatchewan, it’s safe to say that most of us share a love for the game of hockey,” said Andrew Cartmell, President and CEO of SGI Canada. “SGI Canada is committed to giving back to the communities where our customers live and is proud to support a sport that brings people together, whether they’re watching or playing the game.”

The Delisle Bruins recorded three straight wins last weekend to earn a second-place berth in the Sask Valley Hockey League (SVHL) standings. The Bruins decimated the Outlook Icehawks 11-1 on Friday, January 24, beat the Loreburn 19ers by an identical 11-1 score on Saturday, January 25, and doubled up on the Rosetown Redwings 4-2 on Sunday, January 26. The Bruins are now at 17 wins and three losses, and are currently enjoying a five-game winning streak. Bruins head coach Jimmy Climenhaga said the team is injury free and playing consistent hockey. “We have been lucky,” said Climenhaga. “We get good turnouts for practices. We are mak-

ing sure that we keep the third guy high, eliminate the odd man rushes, get the puck in deep, work the puck down low and get lots of shots on net. That is typically what we have been working on in practices and in games it has been working out well.” In the game against the Icehawks, the Bruins’ Dan Hounjet led the scoring with three goals and one assist; followed by Blake Rolston with four assists; Justin Kerr had one goal and two assists and Chad Laing tallied two goals and one assist. In the Loreburn game, Kerr led the way with four goals for Delisle. Taylor Barber added three assists while Chad Starling and Dacota Wruck each scored a goal and an assist. In the Rosetown game, Kevin Mrygold led scoring with one goal and an assist, followed by Brennan Boyle, Dan Hounjet and Chad Laing who each scored

Dundurn Wheatkings try to right the ship as regular season draws to close By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The Dundurn Wheatkings dropped a hard-fought 6-3 decision to the Allan Flames in Wheatland Senior Hockey League action January, 25. Wheatkings head coach Richie Seaward said the Flames opening goal put his team back on their heels. “We had some chances to score in the first. In the second they [Flames] ran into some penalty trouble and we just didn’t take advantage to score,” said Seward. “We hit some posts, had some bad bounces and their goalie made some pretty tough saves.” Seward added that his team’s uneven play defensively also got them into a bit of hole when the Flames were able to score two power play goals in the second period and never looked back. The Flames, who currently sit on top of the WSHL standings with 14 wins, five losses and one tie won all three games against the Wheatkings, which

Seward believes stem from a number of factors. “They are a beatable team, they work hard and have a lot of skilled players, but they are a big team. You have to use your speed against them because size wise a lot of teams in the league wouldn’t match up against them. They have some big guys up front but especially in the back end,” he said. The Wheatkings have three games left in their regular season. On Saturday January 29 they take on the Holdfast Trackstoppers, then next weekend the Wheatkings will play a home and home series against the Kinistino Tigers February 1 in Dundurn and February 2 on the road. This year the Wheatkings will not be participating in the provincals, which Seward says was a decision made by coaches, management and players to focus on league playoffs instead. Last season the Wheatkings finished sixth overall in the WSHL standings. Seward is confident his team could fin-

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single markers. The Bruins will finish off their season on the road against the Eston Ramblers January 31 and the Dinsmore/Lucky Lake Dynamoes February 7. They will then prepare for the Senior “C” provincial playoffs, with their first game coming against Kerrobert, February 8. Last season the Bruins lost to Hudson Bay in the semi-final. Climenhaga said it is hard to predict how a team will do in the provincials because anything is possible. “It is a decent draw. They [Kerrobert] play in a good league and you never know what you are going to get from league to league,” said Climenhaga. “We’ve got to be playing our best heading into those games. A two-game series is a little scary, so we can’t take a night off.”

Richard Reimer (306) 227 4009 REALTOR

THE

ished in he to go top four and earn home ice advantage when the league playoffs begin in he the second week of February. “I really like our chances. Our goaltending is stronger this year, we have six of the strongest defenseman in the league and we have a very good bunch of veteran up guys up front that can score goals. The best part about our team is our work ethic. We never give up,” said Seaward. Right now the Wheatkings are tied for third place with the Tigers in the WSHL standings. It is too early to tell who they might face in post season play, said Seward. “I know Holdfast is out for sure and judging from some of the results Lake Lenore is out as well. Depending on where we finish. We could still finish first or finish fourth. We could play Naicam, Imperial, Young, St.Brieux or Kinistino. It is so hard. There are so many scenarios that could happen,” said Seward.

RESULTS T EAM


18

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

How ExErCisE BEnEFits olDEr sEniors

Fitness Tips

According to new research from the University of Navarra in Spain exercise for older seniors have a very positive impact. Scientists recruited 24 adults aged 91 – 96 and then divided them into a non-exercised control group and a “multi-component” exercise group. The main focus was to learn how exercise would impact “muscle power output, muscle mass, and muscle tissue attenuation; the risk of falls; and functional outcomes in frail older adults. At the beginning of the study subjects completed several tests to measure strength, power, balance and gait. Sit-to-stand ability and injury rates were also observed, as were lower-extremity muscle mass and muscle fat infiltration.

The exercise group met twice a week for 12 weeks. Training sessions consisted of “muscle power training” —participants performed 8 – 10 repetitions at a 40 – 60% of 1-repetition maximum—along with balance and gait or walking retraining. At the end of the study, the exercise group participants had improved on all counts. The intervention group showed significantly improved (time-up-and-go) with single and dual talks, rise from a chair and balance performance, and a reduced incidence of fall. In addition the intervention group showed enhanced muscle power and strength. More-over, there were significant increases in total and high-density muscle cross-sectional area. The authors and scientists concluded that strength, power, balance and gait training should be recommended to older seniors as a mean of improving health and reducing injury risk. The study was publish in 2013 Next time in my Fit Tips column: Eating for Weight Loss

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fort carlton hockey league scoreboard Tuesday, January 21 Warman 3 at Hague 6

Friday, January 24

Shellbrook 7 at Dalmeny 4 Bruno 6 at Hague 4

Saturday, January 25

Tisdale 3 at Shellbrook 4

Warman 4 at Prairie 12

Sunday, January 26 Hague 4 at Prairie 8

UPCOMING GAMES Tuesday, January 28 Tisdale at Shellbrook

Friday, January 31

Dalmeny at Warman Hague at Rosthern

Saturday, February

Warman at Shellbrook Dalmeny at Prairie Tisdale at Hague

fort carlton hockey league standings RANK TEAM

1 Prairie Outlaws 2 Shellbrook Elks 3 Rosthern Wheat Kings 4 Bruno T- Birds 5 Dalmeny Fury 6 Hague Royals 7 Tisdale Ramblers 8 Warman Wildcats

GP 20 20 20 20 20 19 18 19

W 18 14 14 13 7 6 5 1

L

1 5 6 6 12 13 11 17

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

OTL 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 1

PTS 37 29 28 27 15 12 12 3

XLVIII

outlaws eliminate braves

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

The Prairie Outlaws eliminated the LeRoy Braves in two straight games by identical scores of 6-3 in the bestof-three provincial Senior C hockey playoffs last weekend. (Left) Prairie Outlaws’ forward tanner Schultz gets in behind LeRoy defenseman Luke Fritzshaw as he screens LeRoy goaltender Nathan Unrau. The Prairie Outlaws, based in Waldheim, will now take on the Rosthern Wheat Kings in the second round of the provincial playoffs. Upcoming series involving Fort Carlton Hockey League teams are as follows: Hague vs Lanigan: Game 1 - Saturday February 8th @ 8:30 PM in Hague; Game 2 - Saturday February 15th @ 8:00 PM in Lanigan Game 3 - Sunday February 16th @ 3:30 PM in Hague Bruno vs Strasbourg: Game 1 - Sunday February 2nd @ 4:00 PM in Bruno; Game 2 - Friday February 7th @ 8:00 PM in Strasbourg Game 3 - Monday February 17th @ 8:00 PM in Bruno Shellbrook vs Lloydminister: Game 1 - Saturday February 8th @7:30 PM in Shellbrook Game 2 - Sunday February 9th @ 6:00 PM in Lloydminister; Game 3 - Tuesday February 11@ 8:30 PM in Shellbrook

Now, that’s a long game... Midget A girls game sets endurance record By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A provincial Female Midget A hockey playoff game between Rosetown and Elrose on Friday, January 24 could qualify as one of the longest sudden-death overtime games in hockey history. Elrose beat Rosetown 1-0 at the 139 minute mark of the 8th overtime period during the second game of the two-game, totalpoint series. The first game in Elrose ended in a 0-0 tie. The second game

in Rosetown also ended in a 0-0 tie after regulation time. It wasn’t until the eighth overtime period that Elrose finally scored to win the series 1-0. A Sask Valley Hockey League (SVHL) game between the host Rosetown Redwings and visiting Eston Ramblers that night had to be cancelled because the Female Midget A provincial game overtime period took so long. “Apparently both senior teams were dressed and ready to hit the ice when game time rolled around, but the girls

game was still going strong, so they had to wait,” said SVHL league statistican Bill Rewuski of Warman. “Eventually, the senior league’s ice time ran out and the players never did get to play, so the game had to be cancelled.” The existing NHL record for the longest overtime game ever played was set on March 24, 1936, when the visiting Detroit Red Wings’ Mud Breneteau scored against the Montreal Canadiens to win the game 1-0 after 116 minutes and 30 seconds.

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deadline

Mondays 12:00 Noon

$8.00/wk for the first 25 words 35¢/wk per word thereafter + GST THE

IAGL B DE

Classifieds CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 • PAGE 19

1090

1090

Tenders

Tenders

PROPERTY FOR SALE

Run your word ad FrEE! 3 consecutive weeks with no changes, get the 4th week

LAND FOR SALE BY TENDER 308 RM OF BIG QUILL NO. 308 W2, SE 26 - 31 - 18 -- W2, includes 143 cultivated cultivated acres acres

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

how to PLACE your Ad In-person 109 Klassen St. West Warman Cash | Cheque | Money Order

E-mail ads@ccgazette.ca Email your ad then call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

telephone 306-668-0575 Call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

Fax 306-668-3997 Fax your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run) to 306-668-3997 anytime and we will process payment to your credit card

Postal Mail P.O. Box 1419 Warman, SK S0K 4S0 Cash | Cheque | Money Order

Send your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run)

Ad Classifications ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060 MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040

REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060 Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ...........6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ...................6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

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Proposals addressed to the Town Administrator, Town of Langham and plainly marked on the envelope “Proposals for Property for Sale” will be received until 5:00 p.m. on February 28, 2014 for the following property: Legal Address: PR1 85S04878 Zoning District: R3 Residential Site Area: Approx. 1.9 Acres Land Use: Residential (Family and Senior Housing) To receive a copy of the full Request for Proposals, please visit:

Langham Town Office (230 Main Street East) Phone (306) 283-4301 or email: admin@langham.ca.

W2, SW 26 - 31 - 18 -- W2, cultivated acres acres includes 146 cultivated 31 - 18 - W2, SE 33 cultivated acres acres includes 155 cultivated includes aa steel steel Quonset Quonset SW 34 - 31 - 18 W2 includes Westeel Rosco Rosco Bins Bins with with Wood wood floor, 77 Westeel on hopper; hopper; 2 Westeel Rosco Bins on painted/weldedSteel steel Hopper hopper Bins, bins, 11painted/welded electrical service service Small Rigid Frame Shop, electrical cultivated acres acres and 130 cultivated 34 -- 31 31 -- 18 18 -- W2, W2, W 1/2 of NW (LSD 12 & 13) 34 cultivated acres acres Including 70 cultivated

RM OF PRAIRIE ROSE NO. NO. 309 309 W2 SE 26 - 32 - 19 -- W2 Hayland

CALL FOR PROPOSALS Camp Kitchen

Call for Proposals for the lease of the Camp Kitchen building located at Kinsmen Park for the 2014 season will be accepted to the undersigned until 4:30 p.m., February 24, 2014. Interested parties are asked to submit their proposal indicating the stated lease purpose of the building including the lease amount. The operating season is May to September, 2014. City of Martensville Box 970 Martensville, SK S0K 2T0

SALE BY TENDER 1. The Town of Hague offers for sale the following building to be moved: Hague Town Shop Civic Address: 406 Main Street, Hague Size: 30 x 44’ with a 32 x 32’ addition

2. All tenders must be submitted in a sealed envelope marked “Building Tender” addressed to the: Town of Hague Address: Box 180 Hague, SK S0K 1X0 3. Tender must be postmarked by 4:30 p.m. on: February 28th, 2014. 4. A certified check to the municipality for 5% of the amount of the tender must accompany the tender. Tenders submitted without certified funds will not be considered. 5. The building for tender will be sold “As Is”, with the exception of the removal of: Overhead Unit Header and Shelving Unit 6. Potential bidders may call the Town Office, 306-225-2155, to make arrangements for an inspection of the building. 7. Highest, or any tender, not necessarily accepted 8. Successful bidder will have 30 days to provide the balance of cash to complete the purchase. The deposit will be forfeited if the successful bidder does not finalize the agreement for sale withing the required time. 9. All permits (moving) are the responsibility of the purchaser and are in addition to the bid price. Tentative move for the building can be scheduled for after June 1, 2014; deadline to be moved off site is June 30, 2014. Dated the 30th day of January, 2014. Deanna Braun Administrator of Hague

INCLUDED MINERAL RIGHTS NOT INCLUDED Interested parties should submit tenders Interested parties should submit tenders ON ON BEFORE FEBRUARY 2014 OROR BEFORE FEBRUARY 28,28, 2014 ADDRESSED TO: ADRESSED TO: Law Firm Firm LLP LLP Kohaly, Elash & Ludwig Law 1312 - 4th St. Estevan, SK SK S4A S4A 0X2 0X2 3631 (306) 634 - 3631 For more information contact contact 998 -- 7857 7857 Brenda Retier at (708) 998 Or Neil Wallace at 011 - 31 - 229 229 -- 506 506 -- 939 939 All tenders should be in writing writing and and should should deposit of of 10% 10% of of the the be accompanied by a deposit tendered amount payable to Kohaly, Kohaly, Elash Elash Ludwig Law Law Firm Firm LLP. LLP in trust. && Ludwig Highest or any tender tender not not accepted necessarily accepted

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Legal Notices NOTICE TO CREDITORS:

Estate of David B. Fehr In the estate of David B. Fehr, late of Delisle, in the Province of Saskatchewan, deceased. All claims against the above estate, duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before March 12, 2014.

HARVEY FEHR, PETER REIMER and, MENNONITE TRUST LTD.

Executors in the Estate of David B. Fehr P.O. Box 40 Waldheim, SK S0K 4R0 Tel: (306) 945-2080

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Coming Events BIG RIVER FISH DERBY on Cowan Lake Saturday, March 22, 2014 For Info visit: www.bigriver.ca or email: krienkemaisie@sasktel.net To register call: 306-4797004. LEARN OF GOD’S plan & purpose for this earth. w w w . t h e christadelphians.org. PLANNING AN EVENT? Tell everyone about it in Coming Events. Ads start at $8 per week, reach over 40,000 readers. (306) 668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca. Deadlines are Mondays at noon.

Services Offered

COLOUR COPYING

Full service colour copying while you wait or for pick-up later Save money and avoid city traffic and lineups!

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

109 Klassen St. W, Warman Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m. (Closed from 12 - 1 p.m.) Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 Email: ads@ccgazette.ca

EXPERIENCED MUSIC INSTRUCTOR for piano & theory. Now accepting students. valsmusicstudio @gmail.com. (306) 2294774. Please contact me directly for more information.

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For Sale Restless Leg Syndrome & Leg Cramps? Fast Relief In One Hour. Sleep At Night. Proven For Over 32 Years. www.allcalm.com Mon-Fri 8-4 EST 1-800-765-8660.

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Coming Events

Radisson Antiques & General Store 321 Main St. • 306-827-3003

SALE - JAN. 29 TO FEB. 1

ALL MUKLUKS AND MOCCASINS 10% OFF

STOREWIDE 10 TO 50% OFF (except tobacco) STORE HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 10AM-8PM • Sat. 10AM-6PM

3010

For Sale 2014 STEPHENS 38 CUBIC METRE TANKS. Single compartment, double conical aluminum alloy construction. Auto slack adjusters. Call today 1-888-345-3036 or www.dunlopwesternstar.co m. PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call The Gazette at 306-668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca for details. RURAL WATER TREATMENT. Patented iron filters, softeners, distillers, “Kontinuous Shock” Chlorinator, IronEater. Patented whole house reverse osmosis. Payment plan. 1-800-BIGIRON (244-4766); www.BigIronDrilling.com. View our 29 patented & patent pending inventions. Since 1957. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1800-457-2206 www.crown steelbuildings.ca. STEEL BUILDINGS: ”THE BIG YEAR END CLEAR OUT!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

4030

Feed And Seed HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

5010

Homes / Condos For Sale FOR SALE. Seniors bungalow condo at Bethal Terrace. $359,000. Will negotiate. 306-934-6009 or 306-230-7092. Hafford 1,140 Sq. Ft. Bungalow 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath; 2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater; water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512. HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575.


20

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

5010

5080

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

7040

7050

Homes / Condos Land For Rent Career Training Careers Land for Rent by Tender - LEARN FROM HOME. EARN For Sale RM of Grant (Alvena, SK) FROM HOME. Huge is a de-

HOMES, COTTAGES & More. RTMI - Ready to Move in. Call 1-888-733-1411; rtmihomes.com. Red Tag Sale on now - ask about our $100,000 giveaway.

*SE 35 40 28 W2 *NE N 1/2 27 40, SE - SE 1/4 34, SE NE 1/4 34. Cash rent July. Tender on BOTH parcels. (quote per acre rental). Submit bids by February 15/14 to: Land Tender 1633 Avenue C North Saskatoon, SK S7L 1L4. Questions? mt page@outlook.com.

5020

Homes / Condos For Rent

6010

Autos For Sale

2 BEDROOM SUITE in 4 Plex. 5 appliances, A/C. $825.00 per month includes water. Adults only. N/S, N/P. (306)975-1942 in Warman.

FOR SALE 2004 Ford Freestar Command Start. Good tires. Runs Well. $3,000 o.b.o. (306)291-1259

WARMAN: One bedroom condo. 5 appliances. F/P and A/C. Own driveway. Positively no smoking and no pets. Seniors Preferred. Phone (306) 221-2637 or (306)229-0991.

Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

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Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 31 1/4’s South West - 63 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s

6070

Auto Parts Wrecking auto-trucks: Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. NorthEast Recyclers, 780-8750270, Lloydminster.

FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

7030

Business Opportunities ALL ABOUT LEARNING has developed a rural tutoring system. To learn more about this fantastic business opportunity call toll free 1-844823-6817. FOR SALE: Sask Valley News, a weekly paper operating out of Rosthern, SK for over 100 years. Contact janet@saskvalleynews.com for further information.

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Land For Sale

NEW LISTING

2 Quarters of Prime Farmland West of Hepburn. Average assessment: 107,850 and $795,000 MLS

For more info contact: 306 232 5525

mand for Medical Transcriptionists. Start your online learning today with CanScribe Career College. www.canscribe.com 1.800.466.1535 info@canscribe.com.

Practicum Training Institute HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING. Programs resume March 2014. For Details visit www.practicumtraininginstitute.ca or call (306) 955-0079 today to secure a seat! There is a CRITICAL need for Medical Transcriptionists across Canada. Work from Home. CanScribe graduates welcome and encouraged to apply. Apply through MTR at www.hds-mt.com/jobs.

7050

Careers Attention Semi Operators! Are you looking to downsize? Haul RVs from USA to western Canada! 5-6 day round trip. Looking for 1 ton O/O. 1-800-867-6233; www.roadexservices.com. GPRC, Fairview Campus, Alberta needs Power Engineering Instructors. No teaching experience, no problem. Please contact Brian Carreau at 780-835-6631 and/or visit our website at www.gprc.ab.ca. Long haul SEMI DRIVERS AND OWNER OPS REQUIRED to haul RVs and general freight. O/O paid 85% of invoiced amount with open invoice policy. Signing Bonus currently being offered to O/O. Drivers paid 40¢/running mile + pick/drop/border. Benefits, co fuel cards and subsidized insurance. Must have ability to cross border. Call 800867-6233; www.roadexservices.com. WINCH TRACTOR OPERATORS. Must have experience operating a winch. To apply fax, email or drop off resume at the office. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax 780-8426581. Email: rigmove @telus.net. Mail: H&E Oilfield Services Ltd., 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W 1L7. For more employment information see our webpage: www.heoil.com.

Pine View Farms Osler

has immediate part-time openings in poultry processing. Work close to home, Tues- Thurs, in a safe respectful work environment, competitive wages, training provided.

To apply, call Martha at

(306) 239-4763 Heavy Duty Mechanic/Apprentice required for preventative maintenance, repair and service of heavy equipment fleet. Experience with CAT, JD, and Hitachi. Appropriate credentials and/or certifications. Valid drivers license. Both camp and shop locations. Service truck and accommodations provided. Wage negotiable. Send work references and resume to: Bryden Construction, Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0; Fax: 306-769-8844 Email: brydenconstruct@ xplornet.ca

CLARK S CROSSING

www.ccgazette.ca

8. Flat or fitted bedding 9. Canted 10. Dissertation 11. Bulgarian monetary unit 12. Wonderment 13. Used to be United ___ 19. Hawaiian garland 21. Nearly horizontal mine shaft 24. Search party group 25. One who makes it into law 26. Exclamation of pain 27. Grannys 28. Out of it (slang) 32. Loudness units 33. Soup serving dipper 35. Rough, grating 36. A public promotion

Call The Gazette advertising team at (306) 668-0575

Horoscopes

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

Come on, Capricorn. You know you have the goods to get the job done, so why are you stalling? Cast aside your reservations and get a move on.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Really, Aquarius. You’ve tried to help countless times before, and nothing has come of it. Why try again? Mixed messages at work make for an interesting week.

ARIES March 21– April 19

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Truly, Taurus, you cannot always take things at face value. If you suspect there is more to a situation than what someone is telling you, there probably is.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

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37. Pleasure seekers 41. Article 42. Winnows 46. From a distance 48. Rural delivery 49. Previously 53. Nostrils 54. Icahn’s airline 55. Poker stakes 57. Game sides 58. Sharp, glacial ridge 60. Tennis’ Kournikova 61. Spoken telegraphic dash 62. Anti pollution agency 63. ___ de sac: one end access 64. Marsh elder genus 65. Original part maker (abbr.)

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Jeepers, Aries. Who knew you were so popular? You host an event, and suddenly you’re in demand. Invitations fly. Accept those committed to a cause.

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Gazette

Across 1. Chronicles (abbr.) 4. Wallops 9. He supported the world 14. Own (Scottish) 15. Ungentle 16. Sinews 17. Computer processing 18. A Monkey’s song 20. Narrate or tell 22. Lampreys 23. Dialogue for the audience 24. Many signatured requests 29. Cost, insurance and freight 30. Not under 31. Exchange 32. S. Am. river - Rio de la ___ 34. Isaac’s mother (Bib.) 38. Sodium 39. Possesses 40. Falls 42. Animal pouch 43. Overdose 44. Samoyeds 45. Genus bellis 47. Mediation council 50. Beachware manufacturer 51. Not on 52. Inactive 56. 1963 Nobel chemist 59. Bambi 60. More ethereal 61. Adornments 66. No (Scottish) 67. 805 km Venezuelan river 68. Occasion 69. Time at 0 meridian (abbr.) 70. Nathan and George Ellery 71. S.I.T.C. character Jones 72. South southeast Down 1. Protocist genus 2. Hell 3. Copies 4. 1932 & 1980 Olympic mtn. 5. Part of harness 6. Macaws 7. Mutual savings bank

PISCES February 19– March 20

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This Week’s C R O S S W O R D

Rumors are squashed at work, allowing for many sighs of relief. Gratitude is hard to come by at home until a guest arrives. Enjoy the shift in attitude, Pisces.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Hopes fall as further news circles. Relax, Gemini. All is not lost. There is someone in the wings with a plan that will work out. Finances improve with additional revenue.

sudoku

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Push, Cancer, push. Do whatever you must to rally the troops and bring a project to conclusion. Prayers are answered at home. Celebrate with a party.

LEO July 23– August 22

Lucky Leo. You manage to pull off the impossible at work, and all the right people are watching. A promotion of some sort could be in order.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Some trips are best unplanned, Virgo. Toss some stuff into a bag and see where the road takes you. You won’t believe what you encounter.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Lazy Libra. You have lofty goals but little motivation this week. Don’t worry about it. Everyone needs a break now and then. You will soon be back to form.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

You’re rarely challenged, but when you are, you know just what to say and do. That talent will not go unnoticed, Scorpio. Travel plans shift. Go with it.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Oh, Sagittarius. Your complaints are well founded, but this is not the time to voice them. Wait until a more opportune time arises. A friend makes a request.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

A career ad in The Gazette reaches over 40,000 people each week (306) 668-0575 ads@ccgazette.ca

Gazette

LABOURER The Town of Langham is seeking a Public Works Labourer. All labourers are responsible to the Town Foreman under supervision of the Town Administrator. With application please submit salary expectation. Benefits include a standard SUMA benefits package. For more information regarding job description and qualification requirements please contact the Town Office. Applicants must submit resumes no later than February 14, 2014 to: Town of Langham 230 Main Street East Box 289 Langham SK S0K 2L0 Phone: 283-4842 Fax: 283-4772 e-mail: admin@langham.ca

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Our company is growing and we want you to be part of it! Basic qualifications: • own a reliable vehicle and smartphone • ability to communicate positively and professionally • organized and able to multi-task while meeting deadlines • detail-oriented with a creative mindset Previous experience an asset and preference given to those who: • have previous media sales experience • an understanding of sales processes and strategies • have the ability to work towards and take pride in exceeding sales targets We offer many benefits including: • base salary plus commissions • travel footprint of less than 60km in radius with flexible schedules • weekends off • 4 weeks of paid vacation • cost-shared staff directed health/dental benefit plans • ongoing training and industry education opportunities This newly-created position within our company will be filled immediately.

Please send resume along with cover letter and references in confidence to: tjenson@ccgazette.ca

or drop-off in-person at 109 Klassen Street West, Warman

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Red tape awareness week proclaimed Efforts to modernize and improve Saskatchewan’s business landscape will be celebrated, as the Government of Saskatchewan and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) proclaim January 27-31, 2014 Red Tape Awareness Week in Saskatchewan. “2013 was a year full of progress as our ministries, Crown corporations and agencies worked hard to cut red tape and reduce duplication,” Economy Minister Bill Boyd said. “Throughout the past year, over 100 regulations, policies and procedures have been updated to make our regulatory system more relevant, efficient and effective.” Of the many updates to regulation, highlights include changes to Saskatchewan’s liquor rules and regulations, The Saskatchewan Employment Act, the reduction of paperwork and shortening of repair time at SGI, and the implementation of flat rates for a number of customer requested services by SaskPower. Saskatchewan also became the second jurisdiction in Canada to legislate regulatory accountability through The Regulatory Modernization and Accountability Act, which came into effect in the fall of 2013. The legislation mandates annual reporting from ministries and agencies across government regarding regulatory modernization activities. “CFIB is pleased Saskatchewan is once again the first province to proclaim Red Tape Awareness Week in the country,” CFIB’s Vice-President, Prairie & Agri-business, Marilyn BraunPollon said. “Often red tape initiatives are here today and gone tomorrow, so we commend the provincial government for legislating red tape measurement/reporting and making regulatory reform permanent. We look forward to continuing our work together to further reduce red tape for Saskatchewan entrepreneurs – allowing them more time to grow and expand their business.” This marks the fifth consecutive year that the Ministry of the Economy has joined forces with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) to proclaim Red Tape Awareness Week in Saskatchewan, and acknowledge its continued efforts to bring red tape issues to the attention of government.

Provincial oil production sets new all-time record Saskatchewan’s oil patch set new records in 2013, in some categories surpassing benchmarks established just the year before. The province’s oil production for the calendar year just ended is 177.9 million barrels (487,400 barrels per day), up from the previous record of 172.9 million barrels (472,500 barrels per day) set in 2012. Drilling activity was robust, with a total of 2,433 horizontal oil wells drilled in 2013, a new record that surpasses the 2,036 horizontal oil wells drilled in 2012. “These records reflect the hard work of the men and women employed in Saskatchewan’s oil industry” Energy and Resources Minister Tim McMillan said. “The importance of the oil industry cannot be understated, as a top employer and exporter it contributes positively to communities throughout our province.” A total of 3,371 oil wells were drilled in 2013, the third best year ever for oil well drilling. This figure ranks behind only 2011 (3,528 oil wells) and 1997 (3,608 oil wells). The Lloydminster and Kindersley/Kerrobert areas accounted for almost two-thirds of all drilling in 2013. Saskatchewan is ranked as the number one jurisdiction in Canada for oil and gas investment policies, according to The Fraser Institute’s annual Global Petroleum Survey.

Public health advisory on measles expanded There are confirmed cases of measles in Saskatchewan. Health officials are advising the public of the potential for risk of exposure. Further investigation has caused the Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region and the Ministry of Health to expand the list of public locations where people may have been exposed to the measles virus. People who visited the following establishments during the dates and times listed should be aware of the symptoms of measles: **New Locations** Superstore (Rochdale location - January 17 between 1100-1330h) Walmart (Rochdale location - January 17 between 1115-1345h) Uplands Pizza (475 Broad St. N. - January 171145-1500h) Co-operators Centre in Evraz Place (1700 Elphinstone St. - January 18 between 1330-1745h) Soma Salon and Spa (2336 9th Avenue N - January 20 between 1515-1830h) In the process of contact tracing possible measles exposure, public health officials have also been directly in contact with individuals they believe may have come in contact with measles (eg. daycare workers and families). **Previous Locations** Security Building Supplies (January 13-17 inclusive) Chapters book store and attached Starbucks Coffee (South Albert location - January 13 between 1000-1330h) Sobeys (South Albert location - January 13 between 1000-1330h) Lawson Aquatic Centre (Pool facility and common areas: January 14 between 1230-1730h) Safeway (13th Avenue location - January 14 between 1530-1830h) Menchie’s Frozen Yogurt (Quance St. location January 14 between 2000-2300h) Argyle Park Community Centre (January 14 between 1830-2100h and January 15 between 1830-2100h) Uplands Community Centre (January 14 between 1830-2100h) Background on Measles Measles is a highly infectious and potentially serious disease that is easily transmitted through the air. Symptoms include high fever, cough and runny nose, followed by a rash. The rash often starts on the face before spreading to the rest of the body. *Note - the earliest a person will experience symptoms is ONE WEEK following exposure. If you were born before 1970, you are assumed to be immune from contracting this disease. IF YOU DEVELOP THE ABOVE SYMPTOMS: Please CALL your Primary Health Care provider’s office, explain you were a contact of a suspect measles case, detail your symptoms, and see what accommodations can be put in place PRIOR to your visit to minimize contact with other patients. Call HealthLine at 811 for general information.

Surgical wait times reduced Surgical teams across the province continue to work toward the goal of improving surgical care and reducing patient wait times to less than three months from the time surgery is planned. Statistics to the end of November show that about 79 per cent of patients are receiving a procedure within three months thanks to the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative, which is nearing the end of its four-year transformation effort in March 2014. There are 4,796 patients waiting more than three months for surgery – 10,555 fewer than when the Surgical Initiative began in March 2010. “Thanks to a monumental effort by surgical teams, patient advisors and health region administrators, we have made incredible progress toward sooner, safer and smarter surgical care,” Health Minister Dustin Duncan said. The province’s largest and busiest health regions – Saskatoon and Regina Qu’Appelle – have both faced challenges meeting surgical demand. The Saskatoon Health Region has implemented a mitigation plan to overcome increased demand for about 700 more surgeries this year; however, even with the increased effort, it will take until late 2014 to meet the target of providing all surgeries within three months. Overall, Saskatoon has been achieving the planned increased volume of surgical cases this year, but demand rose more than expected in 2013. The region’s mitigation plan to deal with the increased demand includes expanding operating room hours so an additional 465 surgeries can be performed this fiscal year and exploring ways to even out the wait lists of surgeons. The region will also work with other health regions to offer patients surgeries closer to home and will increase the number of day surgeries handled by the third-party surgical centre on contract with the Saskatoon Health Region.


22

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Disabled workers to benefit from federal wage subsidy The Neil Squire Society has been awarded a national contract for $8.8 million dollars from the Government of Canada’s Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities. The contract introduces a new wage subsidy employment program for people with disabilities called Working Together. The Working Together Program provides employers with a wage subsidy for a minimum of six months and consistent support from the Neil Squire Society. When needed, the necessary worksite adaptations will be provided to help accommodate any needs of the new employee. There is often an assumption that someone who has a disability is unable to participate in the workforce. By introducing this new program, and providing employers with a wage subsidy, employers will experience the benefits of hiring people with disabilities. This program will help eliminate stereotypes and myths that are placed upon people with disabilities and their ability to be employed. “Our government’s top priorities are creating jobs and economic growth. To support Canada’s long-term prosperity, we must ensure that everyone who wants to work has the opportunity. This initiative helps Canadians with disabilities gain work experience, particularly

with small and medium-sized businesses that would benefit from their skills and talents,” Candice Bergen, Minister of State (Social Development). “We are excited to have this opportunity provided by the Government of Canada. This funding will help Canadians with disabilities demonstrate their abilities and value, thereby achieving long-term attachment to the workforce,” Dr. Gary Birch, Executive Director of the Neil Squire Society. For more information on the wage subsidy program called Working Together, please visit the Neil Squire Society website, www.neilsquire.ca. The Neil Squire Society is the only not-for-profit organization in Canada that for the past 29 years has used technology, knowledge and passion to empower Canadians with physical disabilities. The Society has developed innovative programs and services and some of the world’s leading edge assistive technology for people with physical disabilities. More than 29,000 people with disabilities in Canada have benefited from the work of the Society. With about fifty staff, Neil Squire Society has offices and provides services to Canadians in Vancouver, Regina, Ottawa, and Fredericton, as well as to many small communities across Canada via distance education.

Continued from page 5

RM of Corman Park council explained Corman park Public Works Director Joe Stewart. Tittemore said the equipment replacements are part of a capital plan the RM is putting together. “We are looking at making sure that our maintenance costs are in line with what it should be for a piece of equipment,” said Tittemore. “Joe has put together a plan that looks at our whole fleet of equipment; all our trucks, graders, tractors, everything. We’re looking at the hours that are on them and coming up with a plan of how we can buy new equipment and get max value out of those with the trade-ins.” Stewart explained that a piece of equipment with 7500 hours on it equals out to be about five years. Tittemore said that the RM plans on buying new pieces of equipment and using them for a set period of time based on the hours put on each one in a year. ”We are looking at a three, five or ten year turnaround time where we would get our maximum value for that piece of equipment,” he said. “With maintenance costs that spike with aging equipment we want to look at what our maximum value is to get something different.” Stewart said graders typically cost about $300,000. He said the trade-in is essentially part of the purchase. “I don’t want to trade a grader that is worth $20,000 for example,” said Stewart. “I want to trade a grader when it is worth $100,000.” The RM has about 1,100 kilometers of road to cover on a yearly basis, said Joe. “The RM has typically put more hours on their graders than a private contractor because we run them every day. So that is something we look at in terms of negotiating prices,” said Stewart. “When we go to a dealer we say this is our estimated hours per year. Then we negotiate what’s the best time to get rid of a piece of equipment.” Tittemore said the RM has additional goals with devising a capital plan. One is to save money by cutting down on equipment operating expenses and

save the burden on the taxpayer by not having to raise taxes to help purchase new equipment. Tittemore explained that there are capital sales or pieces of land that the RM has opened up for sale. He said with expected sales to occur in the near future the RM could have some funding to put into a capital reserve. Corman Park Division 5 Councilor Ken Beauchemin, public works committee chairman, said a capital plan just makes sense for the RM. “What is really important is that we now have a plan. The RM has never had a plan in the past. It is a huge improvement and shows we are going in the right direction,” said Beauchemin.

Livestock price insurance program introduced The Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation (SCIC) will deliver the recently announced Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) for Saskatchewan producers. Beginning this spring, WLPIP will be available to Saskatchewan producers through their local Crop Insurance office. Producers will be able to

purchase price insurance options for their calves, fed cattle, feeder cattle and hogs. WLPIP is a risk management tool that allows producers to purchase market price protection on cattle and hogs. The program insures producers against an unexpected drop in price over a defined period of time. Producers pay a premium to receive forward price

coverage and if the market price falls below the coverage price, the producer will receive a payment. WLPIP is based on the existing Alberta livestock price insurance program. Saskatchewan producers will now be on a level playing field with producers in Alberta and western Canada with the introduction of this program.

SCIC staff are available to sit down, one-on-one with producers, to provide more information on how livestock price insurance works, how to sign up for the program and how to purchase insurance policies. Producers can get more information by visiting their local Crop Insurance office or going online.

Charlie Major to headline country music awards show many hits titled, “The Best 20 Of The Last 20”. Major will host and headline the SCMA Awards Show on Sunday, Apr. 13 and will also perform that afternoon at the Songwriter’s Circle, joining Saskatchewan’s top country artists who will take to the stage throughout the weekend. Early bird weekend passes are available until Jan. 20. Weekend passes and tickets for individual events are available at Davis Rexall Drugs (Nipawin), Backstage Music (Melfort), or online at www. picatic.com/SkCountryMusicAwards. In addition to the Awards Show and Songwriter’s Circle, events include: Kick Off Party, New Artist Showcase, Youth Showcase, Cabaret, Country Gospel Show & Brunch, Roots Café, President’s Banquet & Industry Awards, Awards After Party and music seminars.

The Saskatchewan Country Music Association (SCMA) and North East Country Music Association (NECMA) are thrilled to announce that three-time Juno award winner and seven-time CCMA award winner Charlie Major will be the headliner and guest host of the 2014 SCMA Awards Weekend and Country Music Festival Apr. 11-13 in Nipawin. Truly a Canadian legend and one of the accomplished ‘nice guys’ in the game, in addition to his numerous Juno and CCMA wins, Charlie Major was the first Canadian artist to score six BDS #1 hits from his debut album after which an abundance of chart topping singles continued to follow. Major is a musical powerhouse and consummate entertainer, having sold close to half a million records in Canada alone. His latest album release is a compilation of his

Warman Elementary School

Kindergarten 2014-2015

Planning has begun for our fall classes. Parents / Guardians of children born in 2009 are asked to contact the Warman Elementary School office at

306.933.2066 or email wes@spiritsd.ca to pre-register.

All events are open to the public and will take place at Nipawin’s Evergreen Convention Centre. The Saskatchewan Country Music Association is a nonprofit organization, dedicated to the promotion, development and enhancement of all aspects of Saskatchewan coun-

try music at the local, national and international level. The SCMA endeavors to create venues for the promotion of Saskatchewan country artists through hosting its own events, such as the annual SCMA Awards, and involvement in events hosted by other organizations.

NOTICE OF PREPERATION OF

NOTICE OF PREPERATION OF

RESORT VILLAGE OF THODE

RESORT VILLAGE OF SHIELDS

ASSESSMENT ROLL ASSESSMENT ROLL Notice is hereby given that the assessment roll for the Resort Village of Thode for the year of 2014 has been prepared and is open for inspection in the office of the assessor from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. by appointment - call 492-2259 weekdays, from January 31/14 to March 3/14.

Notice is hereby given that the assessment roll for the Resort Village of Shields for the year of 2014 has been prepared and is open for inspection in the office of the assessor from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. by appointment - call 492-2259 weekdays, from January 31/14 to March 3/14.

A bylaw pursuant to Section 214 of the Municipalities Act has been passed and the assessment notices have been sent as required.

A bylaw pursuant to Section 214 of the Municipalities Act has been passed and the assessment notices have been sent as required.

Any person who wishes to appeal against his or her assessment is required to file his or her notice of appeal with the Assessor, Resort Village of Thode, Box 81, Dundurn, Sask. S0K 1K0 by the 3rd day of March, 2014. An appeal fee of $50 is required to be remitted with the appeal. Successful appeals will have fee refunded.

Any person who wishes to appeal against his or her assessment is required to file his or her notice of appeal with the Assessor, Resort Village of Shields, Box 81, Dundurn, Sask. S0K 1K0 by the 3rd day of March, 2014. An appeal fee of $25 is required to be remitted with the appeal. Successful appeals will have fee refunded.

Dated this 31st day of January, 2014.

Dated this 31st day of January, 2014.

Jessie Williams, Assessor

Jessie Williams, Assessor

Registration packages will be mailed in the spring to those who have contacted Warman Elementary School office. Once you’ve received your information package, it will be necessary to fully complete the forms and return them as soon as possible for your child to be enrolled at Warman Elementary School.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park No. 344 intends to adopt a bylaw under The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend Bylaw No. 23/10, known as the Corman Park-Saskatoon Planning District Zoning Bylaw. 14015KK00

INTENT a) The proposed Bylaw No. 02/14 will provide for textual amendments to add the Commercial Storage Centre use as a permitted use in the D-Business (DB) and a discretionary use in the D-Light Industrial 1 (DM1) Districts. Commercial Storage Centre uses rent or lease secure space where clients can store and retrieve their goods. AFFECTED LANDS The affected lands are: a) All lands zoned D-Business (DB) and D-Light Industrial 1 (DM1) District forming part of this notice (Bylaw 02/14). PUBLIC INSPECTION Any person may inspect the proposed Bylaw at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office at 111 Pinehouse Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, up to 5:00 p.m. until Friday, February 14, 2014. PUBLIC HEARING Council will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed Bylaws. All written comments received by 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 11, 2014, will be forwarded to Council. Issued January 20, 2014 at the City of Saskatoon, in the Province of Saskatchewan. Adam Tittemore, Administrator


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

23

BORDEN & DISTRICT News By LORRAINE OLINYK lolinyk@ccgazette.ca

Three boys from Borden School – Dallas Burnett, Andrew Derksen and Eric Westad, along with Tyler Kamm from Colonsay and their coach Dwayne Yachiw of Saskatoon, curl in a Saskatoon Under 19 League on Sundays and a Men’s League on Tuesday. This past week-end they curled in Rosetown in 11 – 16 years Rivers West Qualifier to determine who would advance to the Winter Games in Prince Albert February 19 – 22. Winning three out of four games in a double knockout-format, the team now advance to the Games. The teams for Rivers West go to a Pep Rally in North Battleford on February 8 when they get their uniforms and info package and they travel by bus to the Winter Games which start February 16. A surprise 25th wedding anniversary luncheon was held in the Borden Senior’s Room on Saturday, January 18 for Steve and Marlene Derbawka. All of their children were there – Patrick and his fiancé, Jasmine Calibaba and their children Scarlette and Derek, Stephanie, David and Samuel along with extended family of Steve and Marlene, and good friends and neighbors also shared the day. The Derbawka siblings’ band, Redberry Grass, provided the entertainment with Scarlette accompanying them on tambourine and family providing additional vocals.

ROBBIE BURNS NIGHT

The Borden Lions Caledonian Society held a Robbie Burns Night on January 25 in the Borden Senior’s Room, with the Lions members and their spouses along with District Governor Tom Armstrong and his wife from the Saskatoon Millenium Club and special

guests. The room was decorated with Scottish flags, picture of Robbie Burn, plaid on the tables and ribbon around the chocolate mint glasses, a video was running of Scotland before and now and many of the Lions wore a red wig with plaid cap. President John Buswell gave the Selkirk Grace, the Haggis was brought in while everyone sang Auld Lang Syne then the address to the Haggis was given by Bob Wardhaugh. Bob paid tribute to Robbie Burns who died at the age of 37 years, then Archie’s Angels sang Star of Robbie Burns. A tribute was given to the work of the CNIB which the Lions donate to and Donald Dyck gave the toast to the Queen. District Governor Tom Armstrong spoke on the work the Lions do locally and around the world with Red Cross, Stars, Dogguides of Canada, Quest, Lion’s Eyebank, Can. Diabetes Assoc., and in 3rd world countries. Lions members need to go out and ask people to join as membership is declining and every Lion’s Club does a lot in their own communities first and then elsewhere. D.G. Armstrong then presented Chevrons to three Borden members – Judy Dyck and Peggy Wainwright – 10 years and Melvin Wasylyshin – 30 years and he presented his banner to Lion John and the Borden Club. Steve Derbawka then gave the toast to the Lassies who joined the club in 2000 and all the work they do, and his wife Marlene replied. With the help of Sean O’Conner on accordion or Celtic Bodhran drum, Bob Wardhaugh and his accordion led Archies Angels in singing close to twenty Scottish songs.

SNOWMOBILE RALLY

Orolow Church are holding their Snowmobile Rally on Sat-

urday, February 22 starting at 11 a.m. from Orolow Hall which is 16 miles north of Borden, 7 miles east then ½ mile north again. There is always lots of food and prizes along with a great rally at this one. For more info phone Peter @306-997-5703 The Borden School and the Borden Lions Club are hosting a Soup and Sandwich day in the Borden Community Centre on Wednesday, February 12 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. and everyone is welcome to attend. The Borden Friendship Club held their monthly cash bingo on January 23 with close to 25 playing. Winners were Jean Graham, Bev Assman, Elsie Woytiuk, Sandra Dickson, Pat Trischuk(2x), Stella Hawryluk, Eileen Petrun, Camille Golding and Mary Ostachoff. The next Bingo is February 20. The Borden Friendship Club held their first meeting of the new year on January 8, with secretary Lorraine Olinyk presiding. The club set their Telemiracle Valentine’s Tea for Friday, February 14 at 2 p.m., with a 50/50 draw and door prizes. Since they no longer need the wagon that the tables were stored on, the wagon will be up for silent auction at the Tea. A Kaiser tournament was held January 14 and the winners were John Petrun and Ed Neufeld. The next event is Bingo on January 23 and the potluck supper with December and January birthdays being celebrated on January 29. Kay Brunsch, formerly of Radisson, died November 29 at the age of 79, in Fort Nelson, B.C., where her daughter Lynn Fertuk resides. A memorial service will be held in Radisson on June 21.

! y b a b r u o T hat’s Be part of the

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24

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Business & Professional

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Youngsters are being encouraged to take an interest in protecting water resources for the future. The North Saskatchewan River Basin Council (NSRBC) recently unveiled its Watershed Poster Contest, open to students in Grades 5 through 7. Last year’s poster contest “Water and Wildlife” was very successful,” said Susanne Abe, Communications Coordinator for the NSRBC. “We received well over 50 entries from students Grades 4 through 6 and got invited to hold two in-school presentations about the watershed and how surface water behaves.” This year the watershed

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group announced that ten watershed organizations across the province are able to offer students from Grades 5 to 7 a chance to participate in a poster contest. This year’s theme is “Groundwater – Below the Surface”. The artwork must be 8 ½ x 11 in size, 100% hand drawn and display content in conjunction with the theme. The top three local entries will win prizes provided by the NSRBC. The first place winner’s poster within the watershed will then be judged at the provincial level against the top posters from the other nine watersheds for the chance to win the pro-

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vincial grand prize: an Outdoor Sports Package valued at $1,000. “We invite schools and individuals, Grades 5 through 7 to participate in this contest”, said Abe. The deadline for entries is March 3, 2014. The winning posters will be posted on the organizations website www.nsrbc.ca which also holds more information on the contest details. “So, get your pencils, crayons and water colors ready and send your posters to: NSRBC, Box 458, Hafford, SK, S0J 1A0. And don’t forget to put your name and address on the back of your poster,” concluded Abe.


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The Saskatchewan Hockey Hall of Fame announced this year’s list of Hall of Fame inductees. The 2014 inductees are: Players: Brian Propp, Brad McCrimmon, Johnny Gottselig, Jim Neilson Builders: Terry Simpson, Wayne Kartusch, Emile Francis Official: Wes Smith Grassroots: Bruce Clements Teams: 1982 Prince Albert Raiders, 1972 Rosetown Redwings According to Jack Brodsky, chair of the nominations committee for the Hall, “There are so many people from our province who have made outstanding contributions to this great game that choosing the inductee class each year is always difficult. With such a rich hockey history in Saskatchewan, we know we once again have a superb class to announce.” The 2014 induction dinner will be held Friday July 18, 2014 at the Art Hauser Centre in Prince Albert. Dennis Beyak, Voice of the Winnipeg Jets, will MC the event. To purchase tickets please contact the Prince Albert Raiders office (306-7645348) or any host committee member. The Saskatchewan Hockey Hall of Fame is location in Swift Current.


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Business CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 PG. 27

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Rehabilitation clinic at Warman’s Legends Centre expanding chiropractic services to clients By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Growing up just north of Prince Albert, Dr. Riley Broker helped take calls and schedule appointments every Saturday in his dad’s chiropractic clinic. It only seemed natural that he would follow in his father’s footsteps. Broker said his memories watching his dad help so many people was the reason why he chose to become a chiropractor. ”One of the biggest things I remember is seeing people walk into my dad’s office with so much pain and tears in their eyes, then see them get adjusted, with their ability to function improved. It was remarkable,” he said.

Broker attained a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of Saskatchewan and then pursued his chiropractic certification from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto. He recently graduated from that college in June, 2013. He started working for Pro Sport Rehab and Fitness in Warman and Saskatoon shortly after graduation. Since that time Broker said he has treated clients aged two to 92 years old. Among his clients are several Saskatoon Blades hockey players. He still has slots open for appointments in Warman. The clinic is located in the Legends Centre. ”I would like to see more people than I do right now,” he said.

“My goal is to increase my patient load and have people in Warman know I am here in the community that I am competent and good adjuster.” Broker said in the chiropractic profession there are many treatment philosophies. An example includes requiring a patient to first receive an X-ray before treatment. Broker explains that his approach is more hands on. “My objective findings are based on palpations, pushing, fixations, muscle tightness and then also on orthopaedic tests,” said Broker. “I try to find what the problem is, such as if a certain spot is causing the pain or if the pain is coming from somewhere else. If that doesn’t work then the underlying pathology

is that you would send for an Xray.” A lot has changed in the chiropractic profession since he grew up watching his dad, said Broker. He said the big thing is that clients at one time could get their adjustment covered by provincial healthcare, and most clinics have now gone to a paperless receipt system. Broker said the joy of people coming to see you knowing that you are doing such a good service to make them feel better is the reason why he enjoys his job. “There is a unique bond between patient and chiropractor that is really unique to the chiropractor profession,” he said.

Manitoulin Transport unveils terminal in Corman Park By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Mantoulin Transport unveiled a new terminal in the Rural Municipality (RM) of Corman Park, during a press conference at its new location on 2 Prospect Road, January 22. For the past two years the company operated at a location in Saskatoon just north of 51st Street on 2950 Miners Avenue East. The new location, which sits on 8.4 acres and includes 16 dock level-doors will enable more shipping capacity and provide Saskatchewan businesses with improved connections across Canada and the rest of the world, said Don Goodwill, president of Manitoulin Transport.

Goodwill said the new facility is equipped to handle shipping requirements for the region’s oil and gas, forestry, mining and agriculture industries. Goodwill said expansion was needed because the company outgrew its facility at its Miners Avenue location. He expects the new facility will help Manitoulin double its volume in the next couple of years. Corman Park Reeve, Judy Harwood, said there is always a clustering effect when a large company sets up or expands its services in a rural municipality. “When you have a company of this caliber coming into Corman Park it is only going to bode well for other companies wanting to set up here. I am ex-

cited about the future,” she said. MLA for Saskatoon Eastview, Corey Tochor, said new companies setting up in Saskatchewan and expanding their services is a sign of a growing province. “We know we are seeing more companies setting up for the first time in Saskatchewan in the transportation and manufacturing sectors,” said Tochor. “It is a good sign of a diverse economy. We need more companies that can handle transportation of goods.” The history of Manitoulin goes back 50 years to a northern, Ontario town of Gore Bay, said Goodwill. Since that time Manitoulin has grown to become one of Canada’s leading transporta-

tion and logistics solutions providers. Its global services include expedited less-than-truckload/ truckload, customs brokerage, international freight forwarding, global time critical solutions, warehousing, crating, packaging, household moving, oilfield services logistics and supply chain management. In North America through Manitoulin’s band of companies, services include expedited less-than-truckload and truckload, trans-border, intermodal, private fleet, guarenteed service, temperature-controlled, dangerious goods and supply chain management.

Retail sales stay bouyant in Saskatchewan Saskatchewan shoppers and retailers were busy in November 2013 as retail sales climbed both annually and on a month-overmonth basis. Statistics Canada reported today that retail sales were up 1.0 per cent in November 2013 over October, the third month-overmonth increase of the last four months. Saskatchewan had the second highest percentage increase among the provinces. Nationally, sales were up 0.6 per cent over the same period. At the same time, another report on Employment Insurance (EI) released today highlighted that for the month of Novem-

(Left to right) Corman Park Reeve Judy Harwood, Manitoulin president Don Goodwill and MLA for Saskatoon Eastview Corey Tochor cut the ribbon on Manitoulin Transport’s new facility on 2 Prospect Road, January 22.

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JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Dr. Riley Broker works on a client at his clinic in the Legends Centre in Warman

ber 2013, Saskatchewan had the largest decrease in the nation of regular EI beneficiaries (13.9 per cent) compared to November 2012 (and the second largest decrease compared to October 2013). “Today’s reports point to the overall strength of Saskatchewan’s economy,” Economy Minister Bill Boyd said. “Rising retail sales show there’s an increase in consumer confidence, while at the same time, fewer Saskatchewan people are collecting employment insurance because of our strong labour market.” In Saskatchewan, 1.2 per cent

of the working-age population (15+) received EI benefits in November 2013 compared to 1.8 per cent nationally. Saskatchewan had the second lowest number of EI beneficiaries as a percentage of the working-age population, behind Alberta at 0.9 per cent. “Saskatchewan’s robust economy is benefitting both businesses and consumers,” Boyd said. “Job opportunities have never been greater and we are fortunate to have the means to spend more of our earnings which in turn contributes to a stronger, growing economy.”

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26

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Bethany College HONOURS OUTSTANDING ATHLETES Submitted by

ALVIN THIELMANN

Athletics Director Bethany College - Hepburn Photos by Matt Smith

ATHLETES OF SEMESTER

We have had an exciting fall semester with many team and individual highlights.

KATELYN THIELMANN

Several athletes stood out in the competition but on the women’s side we acknowledge Katelyn Thielmann of Hepburn as our Female Athlete of the Semester. Thielmann is in her second season with the Eagles and has a strong work ethic. Her hard work on the back end of the soccer pitch has helped propel the team to a record never achieved in the history of Eagles Soccer. The team is at a .500 record and keeps on improving. Thielmann’s play has steadily improved as her confidence grows. She usually wins any 50/50 ball and has speed to burn when she needs it. And, armed with greater confidence, she is creating more scoring chances for the team. She is a noticeable leader on the team.

DEREK RIEDIGER

The Male Athlete of the Semester, Derek Riediger, is a first year student from Chilliwack, BC playing Hockey and Basketball at Bethany College. His energy level on the court is refreshing and he is often creating opportunities on both ends the court. Both on and off the ice Riediger has emerged as a leader and earned the respect of the coaching staff as the go-to guy. He has been known to challenge his teammates to a higher level and his smooth skating and strong shot make him an outstanding player. Bethany College Eagles congratulate these top athletes and look forward to watching them as they continue their college

Katelyn Thielmann

Josie Willms

Royal University Hospital operating despite difficulties created by ruptured water pipes Many members of the Saskatoon Health Region team worked through Monday and overnight to ensure the effects of a burst water pipe and subsequent flooding were minimized. As of this Tuesday morning, January 28: The pediatric outpatient unit remains closed, but designated parts of the dept. will reopen later today. Patients will be seen in alternate locations as required, but all registration will continue at pediatric outpatients.

All coronary care unit beds are now open. Surgeries continue as scheduled. Only six procedures were affected on Monday, January 27. Client Representatives are available to help patients navigate around affected areas and to respond to any concerns they may have. The Health Region operations will continue as normal, according to a news release issued by SHR on Tuesday morning.

However, areas that are still affected by water damage, such as pediatric outpatients and The Medicine Shoppe pharmacy, will continue to be a focus of remediation work. Saskatoon Health Region thanks our clients and patients for their understanding during this trying situation. We also acknowledge the many employees and physicians who worked above and beyond their usual duties to minimize the impact of this situation on patient care and safety, staff safety, and Region operations.

306.688.0575 www.ccgazette.ca

“City living wrapped in the charm of a small town lifestyle” Derek Riediger

Odai Naphouthai

athletic careers this coming semester.

SK who is on the Eagles men’s soccer team and has earned recognition as the December Male Athlete of the Month. His growing soccer skills and quick feet have given him confidence in his abilities. It is a pleasure to watch Naphouthai show great skill, especially for someone so new to the game.

JOSIE WILLMS

In other sports news at Bethany, Eagles women’s soccer team had a great run in December losing only once in four games of play. This vastly improved team has many players who have stepped up their game. Josie Willms is a versatile player who can play any position on the team. Willms is a local from Hepburn and is in her second season with the Eagles. She is a threat with her skill and speed anytime she is on the floor. Her play in December earned her Female Athlete of the Month.

ODAI NAPHOUTHAI

Odai Naphouthai is a second year athlete from Saskatoon,

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

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With this coupon and a purchase of at least $50.00 (excluding applicable taxes, prescriptions, tobacco and gift card purchases) we will deduct $6.00 from your total. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. One coupon per family purchase. Coupon cannot be combined with any other coupon offer. No rainchecks, no substitution. Valid only at participating SuperValu stores in Martensville and Warman.

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CLEAROUT PRICE

(Stock #N1435)

LEATHER, LOADED

Was $38,700

AUTO TRAILER TOW SPECIAL

6.7 CUMMINS TURBO DIESEL

SPECIAL EDITION, LEATHER, LOADED

$49 Weekly+++

(Stock #P6646)

NO CHARGE DIESEL

2013 CHRYSLER 200 S

2013 DODGE DART

BIG DEAL EVENT 2013 RAM 3500 HD CREW CAB DUALLY 4X4

WE WON’T BE UNDERSOLD!!!

UP TO 59 MPG

City Auto

CLEAROUT PRICE (Stock #P6517) Was $29,790

$20,690* $119 Bi-Weekly**

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD 4X4

Was $65,605 $53,777 Less $1500 Loyalty Bonus++ (Stock #N9023)

2014 JEEP COMPASS SPORT NORTH EDITION 4X4

$299 Bi-Weekly**

CLEAROUT PRICE

$18,690* $107 Bi-Weekly**

$52,277*

2014 RAM 1500 SPORT QUAD CAB 4X4

CLEAROUT PRICE (Stock #P1414) Was $21,790

CLEAROUT PRICE

Was $50,935

(Stock #P7326)

$38,998* $223 Bi-Weekly**

2014 JEEP PATRIOT NORTH EDITION 4X4

STANDARD HEMI ENGINE

LEATHER, LIMITED, V6, 285 H.P.

CLEAROUT PRICE (Stock P5012)

$27,998* $160 Bi-Weekly**

(Stock #P7010)

CLEAROUT PRICE

CLEAROUT PRICE

$28,890* $157 Bi-Weekly**

HEATED SEATS, REMOTE START

Was $51,705

(Stock #P6075)

$48,698* $284 Bi-Weekly**

HEATED SEATS, REMOTE START

CLEAROUT PRICE Was $31,755

(Stock #P3017)

$27,997* $166 Bi-Weekly**

CLEAROUT PRICE Was $30,355

(Stock #P2015)

$26,798* $159 Bi-Weekly**


Clark's Crossing Gazette - January 30, 2014 issue