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Captive audience WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Warman Assistant Librarian Twyla McNeil reads to pre-schoolers on Saturday, November 30 as the library marked its 30th anniversary with a ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially open its new location in the Warman Community Middle School, which is connected to the Legends Centre. See page 8 for full story.

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Holiday publishing dates PUBLISHING DATES & DEADLINES Thurs. December 19 issue

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TERRY JENSON | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

With Christmas just around the corner, Santa Claus made a special trip to Warman on Saturday morning, November 30 for breakfast at the Wagon Wheel Family Restaurant. Children of all ages were given a few minutes to recite their wish lists before having their pictures taken with jolly old St. Nick. “I’m a very busy man at this time of year,” Santa said as he

prepared to dig into his plate of stacked pancakes and sausages. “The elves are working harder than ever getting all the presents ready for me to deliver on Christmas Eve. While they do that I’m going over my list to see who’s been naughty and who’s been nice. I really can’t wait to make that trip on December 24!”

No issues December 26 or January 2

Warman Catholic School Board poll set for Dec. 19 By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Catholic ratepayers in Warman will have an opportunity to vote later this month on whether to establish a separate school board in Warman. A poll is slated for Thursday, December 19 at the Brian King Centre in Warman. And if a majority of Catholic voters decide to form a board, it would only be a matter of weeks before trustees are elected and a process of amalgamation with the Greater Saskatoon Catholic School Board could begin, similar to what occurred in Martens-

ville last year. Josie Hodgkinson, secretary of the Warman Catholic ratepayers group which launched the campaign to form a Catholic school board in the city, is happy with the progress that’s being made. “Things are moving along,” said Hodgkinson at a meeting of Catholic ratepayers in Warman on Wednesday, November 27. “We got approval from the Minster of Education on October 24 to begin the process of setting up a Catholic Board of Education. We have a poll set for December 19, and we’ve nominated a returning officer. We’re just waiting for confirmation from the Minis-

ter with regard to our nomination.” Hodgkinson said there are costs associated with the poll, to the tune of about $7,000. But, she added, those costs are being paid for by a private individual who wishes to remain anonymous. “Our prayers were answered on that one,” said Hodgkinson. Ken Loehendorf, ExecutiveDirector of the Saskatchewan Catholic School Boards Association, encouraged all Catholic ratepayers in Warman to vote at the poll on December 19. He noted that voters selfdeclare their faith, and a simple majority of 50 per cent plus one is sufficient to approve the

establishment of a Catholic School Board. “The more people we get to the poll the better,” said Loehendorf. “It shows the government how much popular support there is for its establishment. Martensville had 160 voters at their poll, so the more support we can show, the better.” Loehendorf noted that Warman has already been earmarked for a Catholic School by the provincial government, and he said it’s important for Catholic ratepayers in the community to be involved in the decision-making process of what the school will look like.

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Residential, business lots selling quick in Delisle By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Delisle is growing faster than anticipated, but that’s a good problem to have, according to Delisle Town Administrator Mark Dubkowski. Last May, the town opened up 20 new residential lots. Eight of those lots sold in less that six months. Five years ago, the town opened up a 34-lot residential subdivision, of which only seven lots remain. Dubkowski said the town currently has 19 lots in its inventory. If another five lots are sold by next spring, the town is going to have to plan where it will expand. The most likely expansion would be a 192 acre parcel of land on the east side of the community. That land is earmarked for another subdivision in the future, but town officials hadn’t anticipated it would be needed this quickly. “The big question for us is deciding to proceed farther north or proceed eastward. Just from a servicing standpoint it would be much easier for us to go northward,” said Dubkowski. “For us to continue eastward we will require another lift station, which is probably a seven million dollar price tag on that. It is for water and sewage because it is starting to slope down hill.” Dubkowski explained that the recently built rectangular lots are single family dwellings, which can include 18 to 20 metres of frontage, typically 38.1 to 125 feet deep and have a minimum of 1200 square feet above ground. The minimum price is

$60,000 plus GST for lots along Bentley Avenue, with top end lots in Bentley Place, which is a cul-de-sac, selling for $99,000. Dubkowski said six of the nine top-end lots have been sold. These lots include a view of the town’s gold course and view of the valley. If order to add some variety to the town’s expansion plans, it also recently opened up business lots on a 15-acre parcel of land just south of Elevator Road, the CN tracks and Highway 7. “The lots along Elevator Road we were developing as part of a first phase,” he said. “The type of business we are trying to encourage is fabrication because we can’t accommodate businesses that require heavy sewer use.” The town already has two business lots sold. A storage facility bought one of the lots, while the other will be occupied by Cobra Industries, said Dubkowski. Dubkowski said the town took it on itself many years ago to be its own developer. “If we had not taken the initiative a lot of this growth would not have happened,” he said. “That decision was made by the council itself and previous councils. We’ve been doing this for five to years, when things were not so much of an economic boom.” The consensus from Delisle residents for the town’s expansion plans has been positive, said Dubkowski. “Resibecoming a more viable community. We are not just a farming or mining community. We offer a variety of services.”

Two-horse open sleigh

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Neil Bartsch drives his team of horses as he takes passengers for a ride around R.J. Gidluck Park during Santa’s Workshop festivities at the Legends Centre in Warman on Saturday. Families were also treated to pictures with Santa, crafts, a movie plus free public skating.

Langham man guilty of trafficking crack cocaine A Langham man was sentenced Monday in Saskatoon provincial court to three years in prison after pleading guilty to trafficking crack cocaine.

Touni Vardeh-Esakian, 38, was investigated on three separate occasions by the Saskatoon integrated drug unit when they received a tip and started watching Vardeh-

MARTENSVILLE CRASH INJURES ONE

One person was taken to hospital with undetermined injuries by MD Ambulance following a two-vehicle collision on Centennial Drive North in Martensville on Thursday, November 28. The collision occured at about 5:45 p.m. and involved two north-bound vehicles. Martensville

Esakian in June 2012. The investigation found that Vardeh-Esakian made three hand-to-hand drug transactions from his vehicle.

The arrest occurred after the third transaction when police seized $10,000 to $12,000 worth of crack from Vardeh-Esakian’s vehicle and his Langham home.

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

First Responders and Warman RCMP responded to the scene quickly and stabilized the injured person until paramedics arrived. The Martensville Fire Department had a busy day, responding to a small house fire in earlier in the morning. The fire was extinguished quickly and no one was injured.

520 Central St W


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013

Program offers support and education for children with Down Syndrome

MONDAY & TUESDAY

By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

A new program is hoping to provide additional education and support services for children with Down Syndrome and their families in Saskatoon and surrounding communities. The AIM program, which stands for “Ability in Me” is a Saskatchewan-based initiative, which will work together with parents, caregivers, health and education professionals. Its goal is to provide services such as speech language therapy, occupational therapy, and support for developing reading skills, through group and individual sessions. Currently parents who have children with Down Syndrome can get speech language and occupational services through Saskatoon’s Early Childhood Intervention Program, the Alvin Buckwold Centre in Saskatoon and in pre-school programs offered in Public and Catholic Schools. The only difference is the AIM program will offer more one on one instruction. Christy Waldner, spokesperson for AIM, said “the program will be there to support educators and parents.” Waldner, who has a 15 year old daughter with Down Syndrome said the idea for AIM closely models a Calgary-based program called PREP. According to an AIM brochure, PREP was founded by Barbra Tien, a speech language pathologist . In the 25 years the program has been in service it has offered innovative programs that promote successful inclusion at home, school and community for individuals with Down syndrome and their families. Over the years PREP has helped 1000 families and has recently allowed down syndrome adults to attend college and university. Barb McHarg, who is an inclusion strategist and outreach coordinator with PREP, said she is thrilled, excited and proud that parents in Saskatoon are interested in starting their own program modeled after PREP. “It is great to see another group of parents working extremely hard doing the leg work to create a program for their children’s needs,” said McHarg. “We are more than willing to share our expertise and anything we can do to support families and ultimately children who have Down syndrome.” McHarg, who also is a parent that has a child with Down Syndrome, said the PREP program sets the bar high for children with Down syndrome, meaning parents should never look at the diagnosis as a setback. “We expect our students to be learners, to have appropriate behavior and reach their full potential, whatever that looks like,” said McHarg. “We want them to be exposed to different things, to be involved in their community and their schools.” Since the program’s inception, there have been many parent groups and organizations throughout Canada and in the United States that have asked for advice on how to start their own program McHarg said the most important service the PREP program provides is peace of mind for families. “Although we are all about inclusion it is a warm caring environment of families that are involved with kids with Down syndrome,” said McHarg. It is a place to air your troubles, celebrate your successes. It is a safe place for parents to come, push their kids and expect the most from them.” Waldner is one of the many parents in Saskatoon that has

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Lauron Doerkson, Alexander Ives, Owen Kellow and Isabelle Cross will benefit from the AIM program made trips to Calgary over the years for her child to take advantage of the PREP program. “I really believe we wouldn’t be where we are with Sydney (daughter) today if we hadn’t gone there. Obviously it helped her but I also believe that it was instrumental in helping us as a family advocate and navigate through the school system.” Waldner said any time she had a question, it was always easy to contact someone by phone or email. Some of the potential services listed on AIM’s brochure includes weekly small group sessions for ages 0-18 years, which will focus on skill-building, speech and being successful in inclusive settings. The program will also include one on one speech language therapy, a reading program, which will include one on one instruction, outreach programming and ongoing support to parents, schools, education and health professionals, community organizations through things including workshops, training, education and

resources. AIM was incorporated in January 2013. Its board members include Tammy Ives, president, Christy Waldner, vice president/communications, Sherri Denluck, treasurer and Earl Scott, secretary, and other supporting board members Ted Merriman, Doug Finnie and Ben Roberts hope to have the program in place by September of 2014. Right now the board is collecting names and applying for funding to see how many families are interested in supporting the program, said Waldner. She said in the original business Waldner said the program could support 106 families. “That number makes up 1/3 of the population of kids with down syndrome. People were a bit surprised by that statistic. When we compare to Preps numbers Calgary has the same population as our entire province. According to prep that is a realistic number. To learn more about the program contact christy.waldner@ aimprogram.ca or its website at aimprogram.ca

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

5

Plenty of opinions surround debate over public-private partnerships Right or wrong, governments across the country are adopting P3s for array of projects By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

When it comes to public-private partnerships there always seems to be a lot of questions. The most common one is the cost effectiveness of P3 funded infrastructure projects. Depending on the design and the infrastructure that is to be built, a P3 funding model involves the pubic and private sector fitting the bill for the project with the private sector handing the maintenance costs, which can last between 30 to 40 years. Simon Enoch, Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, said there are a litany of complaints that can be raised about the P3 funded infrastructure. “Certainly the record has shown that over a 30 year contract because of private financing costs and the right of profit that has to be factored in P3s are more expensive,” said Enoch. “The cost savings that the government talks about are in the area of risk transfer. They like to champion that as a potential cost savings.” Enoch added that savings are only realized if the risk actually occurs. “If the risk doesn’t materialize then the private consortium is still getting paid. The sort of insurance premium. Unless everything goes wrong those cost savings aren’t actually realized.” Right now there are about 206 P3 projects across the country in a variety of sectors, said Mark Romoff, CEO of the Canadian Council for Public Partnerships. He said what differentiates

public private partnerships from the traditional approach is the partnership between a government entity and a public private consortium whereby the private sector is responsible for construction and will arrange a portion of the financing from outside finance groups. The consortium is also responsible for maintenance of the project which could be between 30 to 40 years. “Historically with infrastructure development the procedure involved a simple design build concept which depend largely on government funding,” he said. “The idea behind the public private approach is that it brings a more integrated approach to the various elements of the project in long term cycle management.” Romoff said this approach demonstrates better value for money, which is how the cost savings is evaluated for each project. In a 2010 Conference Board of Canada study titled Dispelling the Myths: A Pan-Canadian Assessment of Public-Private Partnerships for Infrastructure Investments, it provides a list of the various infrastructure projects that have saved millions using the P3 funding model. An example is the Anthony Henday Drive Southeast Leg Ring Road in Edmonton. Using conventional methods it would have cost the public sector alone $497 million whereas with the P3 funding model it cost $493 million, a difference of $4 million. Another example is Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer centre, which would have cost the public sector $463 million, but were able to get it done for $39 million less by using the P3 approach. With P3 funded projects accounting for only five per cent of infrastructure projects in Canada according to Romoff.

There are also P3 projects that did not work. In Nova Scotia a Special Report for the Public Accounts Committee Evergreen and Wackenhut Leases by the provinces Auditor General found that the P3 funding model cost significantly more. Wackenhut and Evergreen were the procurement agencies building the individual projects. The Evergreen School Project (Moncton North School) would have cost $594,576 using a traditional method. The P3 cost amounted to $774,576. In the development of a Miramichi Youth Facility using

a P3 model the study concluded that in the first year operation the youth facility would have cost $31,537 more than the cost estimated by Wackenhut. Enoch said there needs to be an independent assessment of the P3 school project announced in October. “Mr. McMorris said there is going to be one (independent assessment agency) and that will be the professional accounting firm that would be brought in. I don’t consider accounting forms to be independent mainly because all of them are sponsors of the Canadian Council for Private-

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Public Partnerships. Their explicit mandate is to advocate for the P3 model and see it expand across Canada.” Sarah Clark, president and CEO of Partnerships of B.C. said they would not go ahead with a P3 project unless it proves to be a good case for saving money. Clark said in most cases B.C. Partnerships doesn’t go ahead with a P3 unless it is 50 million and over. As one of the first provinces to adopt the P3 funding model, Clark said the province have now completed over 40 (complete or in procurement) proj-

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ects with $7 billion of private capital at risk. Clark explained that P3s have been implemented to build hospitals, transportation and transit. Now the province is implementing P3s in areas such as housing, wastewater, energy, corrections while still applying the model to health care and transportation. Saskbuilds, the Government of Saskatchewan’s P3 agency, is currently working on a long-term care facility for Swift Current, a hospital for North Battleford and a highway bypass in Regina.


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 PG. 6

Health rules make tough rural life tougher Relying on press located for her health care died in June after a life-long Dealing with a child’s longbill for that final stay in Swift needs, the Bowyers were hit battle with epilepsy. term illness would be trying Current’s hospital. with more substantial per Diagnosed with her seri The Bowyers are looking for releases a poor strategy enough for any parent. ous illnesses while just a baby, sonal travel lodging and food help through the province’s

COMMENTARY

In a world where consumers are bombarded by thousands of messages each day, some advertising is a necessity. One example of this, for instance, is the latest campaign by SaskPower. In this multi-faceted approach that includes print, electronic and social media, the Crown utility responsible for keeping our lights on are informing its customers that it is investing in new equipment and technologies to accomplish its mandate. Now, some will say that as the only provider of power in the province, advertising its plans to improve the supply of electricity into the future is not needed. But, consider for a moment that whenever the power flickers or goes out, what’s the first reaction? Exactly. Even though SaskPower is a monopoly when it comes to electrical supply, it is in the company’s best interests to tell customers what is being done to stabilize and expand the grid’s capacity. Opposition MLAs, including NDP critic for SaskPower, Cathy Sproule, are on record saying the Crown corporation should be utilizing news releases instead of paid advertising to spread the word. In a thinly-veiled Letter to the Editor sent to community newspapers around the province, Sproule says the $700,000 ad campaign is not needed in the face of SaskPower’s application for a 15.5 per cent rate increase over the next three years. She further adds that the provincial government “took” $120 million from the Crown in 2012 for general operating expenditures. It’s been beat to death before but while in government the NDP frequently “took” money from the Crowns for general operating purposes. It’s nothing new and Saskatchewanians have almost come to expect such a transfer of dividends. But, the real issue here is the control and placement of the message. While good for its immediacy, radio and television are famous for providing only short bursts of information – usually a clip lasting 15 seconds or less per story – so only a fraction of the information is usually reported. Radio and television are also extremely fragmented mediums with literally thousands of terrestrial, satellite and Internet options available. In print, especially community newspapers like this one, local news is king (and always will be) so finding out who won your council byelection or where the new school will be built will always take precedence over “less local” happenings. A great example of local being put first: SaskPower’s proposals for upgrades to the transmission lines and switching stations in the North Saskatoon region, and the reaction to those plans by local residents and municipalities, received significant coverage in this newspaper. In Saskatchewan, roughly eight out of 10 residents read their local community newspaper. No other medium in the province comes close to the penetration and reception newspapers like this one have among readers wanting to be in the know. The multitudes of generic press releases from various sources – including those from SaskPower – are lower priority than local news, so the message may or may not be published. By paying for the space, advertisers – like SaskPower in this case – are able to secure a guaranteed placement in front of its audience with a message that is 100 per cent in their control. And when it comes to ensuring all of SaskPower’s customers are in the know, strategically advertising their plans is the only realistic option. It is the lone method that guarantees the message will get through accurately to its intended destination: the customers.

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But imagine dealing with this while also contending with the political bureaucracy and its rules and regulations that don’t always accommodate your health care reality. Now, imagine trying to contend with all this in rural Saskatchewan, where a daily three-hour round trip to see your child in care is about the shortest journey you will have had to make this year. Now, imagine having to fight with government after your child passes on over ambulance bills or hospital stays it classifies as long-term care. This has been the tough reality for Richard and Brenda Bowyer of Maple Creek – a farm family confronted with some of the worst that life can throw at you. The Bowyer’s middle child of five, 28-year-old Roxanne,

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Roxanne was around “10 or 11 when she started to lose her functions,” Brenda Bowyer said. As any parents would under such circumstances, the Bowyers’ dedicated their life to the proper care of their child. A new home was built on their beef and grain operation to accommodate Roxanne’s access needs. With whatever help they could get through the government the health system and care available in Maple Creek, the Bowyers did whatever they could to care for Roxanne for as long as they could. However, during the first half of this year – the final six months of Roxanne’s life – things became exceedingly difficult. In January, Roxanne’s worsening condition required longer term stays in Saskatoon, Swift Current and even Medicine Hat when there was no admitting physician available in Swift Current. Each time Roxanne was re-

costs. Even Roxanne’s stay in Swift Current meant substantial gas bills as they dared icy roads from Maple Creek for the daily three-hour commute to be with their daughter. Roxanne Bowyer’s final months included a tracheotomy tube to help her breathe. After stays in the Swift Current hospital, she would be admitted to the Palliser care home in Swift Current where her needs could be attended to by licensed practical nurses. But in order to simply move her from the hospital to the nursing home in that city, the Bowyers incurred a $254 ambulance bill. An ambulance was required, Brenda Bowyer explained, because they could not have driven their special needs child themselves because of the tracheotomy tube and fear of more seizures. And even though she had to be in hospital because of the tracheotomy tube, Brenda said the Cypress Health Region had classified her as a long-term care patient. That resulted in another $588.50

supplemental health coverage, but at this point they have been unsuccessful. It is frustration added to their grief. This is a tough story of parents asked to endure more than their share. But it’s also a story of bureaucratic inflexibility and little recognition that people in rural Saskatchewan might have a tougher situation than others. Brenda said its not as if they don’t appreciate their care or the help from government and their community of Maple Creek that is building a new hospital. However, a family that has already endured what they have gone through should get any small breaks our health system can offer. After all, the Sask. Party government established an entire a sub-department of rural health with a minister in charge to presumably deal with such issues. Yet it still seems that government or its health region do not get what rural families like the Bowyers have to go through.

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HAVE AN OPINION? EXPRESS IT HERE.

The Clark’s Crossing Gazette welcomes Letters to the Editor regarding topics of interest to our readers. The Gazette reserves the right to edit letters for brevity and clarity. Letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, signature and daytime telephone number for verification purposes (name and daytime telephone number in the case of emailed letters). Letters must be tastefully written and meet the Gazette’s legal standards in order to qualify for publishing. Letters must be signed and include contact information for authenticity purposes. The Gazette does not necessarily support or oppose the opinions, expressed or implied, in this newspaper. The Clark’s Crossing Gazette is independently owned and operated. Any reproduction for non-personal purposes, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. The Gazette is distributed free of charge to residents in the area. Subscriptions outside the market area within Canada are available at a rate of $109.00+GST/yr.

VOL. 6 NO. 18


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

7

Multi-vehicle collision on Highway 16 results in numerous injuries a can at the rear of the residence. There were no injuries and damage to the residence was minor. Martensville Fire Department assisted.

FROM THE CELL BLOCK Submitted by

SGT. WARREN GHERASIM

STOLEN WORK TRUCK

Warman RCMP

On November 30 at 10:15 a.m. Police responded to a multi-vehicle collision on Highway 16 just west of Maymont. Over 20 vehicles and six semis were involved in the collision. There was very poor visibility at the time of the accident due to very heavy fog. There were no life-threatening injuries reported, although numerous people were transported to both North Battleford and Saskatoon hospitals. One person was taken by STARS with non-life-threatening injures. Maymont Fire Department, North Battleford Fire Department, WPD Ambulance, MD Ambulance all attended to assist the injured. Tow trucks from both Saskatoon and North Battleford removed the damaged vehicles. The highway was blocked off for approximately 6 hours while the investigation was being done, reopening at 4:30 p.m.

COLLISION NEAR OSLER

On November 25 at 4:30 p.m. Police were called to a 2 vehicle accident near Osler. The 49-year-old male from Warman reports that a tractor slid through an intersection and hit his vehicle. He received minor injuries and the vehicle was towed from the scene with assistance from Astro Towing.

FAILURE TO YIELD

On November 26 at 7:00 p.m. Police attended to a complaint of a collision near Delisle. The 48-year-old male from Caronport advised that he struck another vehicle as it was pulling out of a farm yard. There were no injuries and the driver was charged with failing to yield to the right of way.

TRAILER AXLE FIRE

On November 28 at 8:20 a.m. Police were called to a fire in the axle of a bus trailer on Highway 16 near Langham. The fire department attended and extinguished the fire before Police arrived. There were no injuries and no charges on the matter.

MARTENSVILLE COLLISION

On November 28 at 5:40 pm. Police responded to a two-vehicle accident on Centennial Drive south in Martensville. A 34-year-old female from Saskatoon received minor injuries in the accident. Both vehicles received minor damage but were not driveable from the scene. Astro Towing assisted with removal of the vehicles.

On November 30 at 9:00 a.m. Police received a complaint of a stolen work truck from Martensville. The vehicle was equipped with GPS and was therefore located a short time. There was no damage to the truck. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

Gord Martens, CFP

WARMAN VANDALISM

of an individual walking near a residence in Borden with a bat. Police located a 15-year-old male who was intoxicated. He

was arrested and charged. He was arrested and held for court in Saskatoon on December 2, 2013

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WARMAN TOOL THEFT

On November 25 at 9:30 a.m. Police received a complaint of theft of tools from a residence that was being built in Warman. Thieves stole approximately $3,000 worth of tools. The investigation is ongoing.

THEFT OF TIRES

On November 25 at 9:40 a.m Police received a report of a theft of tires from the garage of a residence while it was being built in Martensville. Investiga-

Beware of imposters

PUBLIC NOTICE Bylaw 2013-30

Public Notice is hereby given that the Council of the City of Warman intends to adopt a bylaw to provide for the closure of a municipal laneway. Intent The proposed bylaw will close the existing municipal laneway just east of City Hall.

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Affected Land The affected land is shown on the attached map, and highlighted in yellow.

Klassen Street

FORM D {Clause 50(5)(d) of the Act} {Subsection 3(4) of the Regulations}

5th Ave nue

NOTICE OF POLL

Petition to establish the Warman (Roman Catholic) Separate School Division Take notice that a poll with respect to the above noted petition will be held on the 19th day of December, 2013, from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at the following location: Brian King Centre 202 - 8th Avenue North Warman, SK S0K 4S0 I will attend to receive representations and appoint electors to represent supporters and opponents of the petition on the 19th day of December, 2013, from 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. at the following location: Brian King Centre 202 - 8th Avenue North Warman, SK S0K 4S0 Dated this 28th day of November, 2013. Guy Denton Returning Officer

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Reason The Bylaw is meant to eliminate the increasing amount of thru traffic that uses this laneway.

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Public Inspection Any person may inspect the Bylaw at the City of Warman office between 8:30am-4:30pm, Monday-Friday excluding statutory holidays. Copies are available at cost. Public Hearing Council will hold a public hearing on December 16, 2013 at 6:30pm at the City of Warman office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed bylaw. Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing (or delivered to the undersigned at City Hall before the hearing). Sarah King Subdivision and Policy Planner


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Dignitaries on hand for the official opening included (l-r) Martensville MLA Nancy Heppner, Warman City Councilor Zane Dmytryshyn, Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence, Library Board Chair Rick Hales and Warman City Councilor Richard Beck WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Warman library celebrates milestone anniversary, officially opens new facility By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The Warman library celebrated a “historic day” on Saturday, November 30. The library marked its 30th anniversary with a ribboncutting ceremony to officially open its new location on the second floor of the Warman Community Middle School, which is connected to the Legends Centre. Mayor Sheryl Spence said the new facility was the result of a partnership between the City of Warman, the Prairie Spirit School Division (PSSD) and the Wheatland Regional Library system. “The decision to make this move happened after a lot of discussion around the table,” said Spence. “As a city council, we realized that although our library was in a good central location and was wellused, it would eventually need renovations and expansion, and we really didn’t have a lot of room to grow. So it made tremendous sense to work with the school division to become part of this beautiful new school. This is a wonderful facility, and it will benefit everyone in the community and the school.”

The Warman library officially opened last month, and it’s been a busy few weeks for the library staff.. It’s also a big change from where it started three decades ago, according to Warman City Councilor Zane Dmytryshyn. He explained that in 1982, the community was served by a bookmobile, which came around once a month for a few hours. “I mentioned this to a few people and I was told that before that, the book bus was brought in by horses,” said Dmytryshyn. “The community really needed a permanent library. So when the present Warman Elementary School was built, there was some space freed up in the basement of the old white school, which has since been demolished. But, we had the cooperation of the school board and we moved into the old school for three years. It was so successful that we had the biggest circulation of all 36 branches of the regional library system.” The library then moved into a location on Klassen Street that at one time had been the doctor’s office. Volunteers renovated the space to accommo-

date the library, he said. The partnership between the library and the school actually has very deep roots, according to Rick Hales, Chair of the Warman Library Board and a veteran of three decades on the branch library board. “When I started my position here with the board, I was employed by the old Rosthern School Division,” Hales noted. “It became apparent to me early on that the book bus wasn’t enough for this community. Many adults were coming to me after hours to borrow books from the school library, so I felt we needed something better. “There was a natural partnership and growth between the school library and the community library. They grew together.” The current move to the new middle years school marks the seventh relocation or renovation for the library over the past three decades, said Hales. “And every one of those moves has been an improvement,” he said. “I’ve enjoyed every move because I’ve been able to walk away and say, this is a change for the better.” Hales was presented with

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an award to commemorate his three decades of work as a volunteer with the library at the official opening. Martensville MLA Nancy Heppner said libraries are an important part of every community, and Warman is fortunate to have such a great new facility. “My Dad was an English teacher, so he taught me early on how to read, and I spent many hours as a child in our local regional library,” said Heppner. “In fact, I’m pretty sure I still have my original library card.” Heppner added the cooperation between the community, the library and the school division in Warman serves as a model for other communities across the province. “It’s heartwarming to see the cooperation between all the groups, because at the end of the day, we all benefit from these partnerships, especially the kids.” City Councilor Richard Beck, who is on the local library board as well as the Wheatland Regional Library board, said much is owed to the volunteers and staff who have contributed to the library over the years.

Martensville pitches partnership to deliver practical, timely health care By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Martensville can play a role as a primary health care centre for the Saskatoon region, says Martensville Mayor Kent Muench. In a presentation to the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR) board meeting at Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon last week, Muench said there are many opportunities to expand health services and facilities in outlying communities, and Martensville in particular. “Right now Martensville and the region are underserved in some areas,” said Muench in an interview following the presentation. “But, fortunately, a lot of things are aligning right now and we have an opportunity to solve those concerns. Our city council is motivated to improve health services and make things happen.” Muench said partnerships are key to making the health care system more sustainable and efficient. He added that there are facilities available in Martensville that can be used for various health care services. “At the end of the day, we’re not asking for anything new,” said Muench. “The services are already in place and the health care providers are already in place, but most of them are located in Saskatoon. If some of those services were moved to Martensville it could provide efficiencies in terms of servicing residents of Martensville and the region. It makes sense to have the services where the people are.” Muench said lab work, speech pathologists, nurse practitioners and home

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care services are all needed throughout the region. But if people have to spend several hours driving to the service providers, that doesn’t advance the goal of providing timely care, he noted. “We’re interested in helping build a health team that can service the region in a sustainable way,” said Muench. “We’re looking to build health care services in the community that are more efficient and provide timely service.” He said Martensville initiated a health care survey earlier this year, and of the 500 respondents, 50 per cent indicated they travelled to Saskatoon to access a family doctor. “Over half those people said they would immediately switch family doctors if there was another family physician practising in Martensville,” he said. Currently the Martensville Medical Clinic has one family physician, Dr. Karamdad, who provides excellent service, but has a client load that is at capacity. Muench said the City of Martensville is looking to partner with the school division, private health care professionals, and others to build a regional centre of care. “We’re interested in partnering with the school division to have pediatric specialists, for example, or to utilize our new Athletic Pavilion, with its running track, to assist clients with cardiac care,” he said. “We’re going to have two new schools in our city, so why not plan to incorporate some health care services into those facilities as part of a partnership. “That’s the exciting part,” Muench concluded. “There is a lot of opportunity in our growing city to come up with solutions for the long term.”

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

9

Martensville Athletic Pavilion construction pressing ahead By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The Martensville Athletic Pavilion (MAP) is about a month behind schedule, but the structure should be totally enclosed by the end of this week, says Martensville City Manager Scott Blevins. In an interview on Wednesday, November 27, Blevins said the onset of colder weather has slowed the pace of construction for the fabric-covered structure. But, he added, it’s steadily progressing on a day-by-day basis and once the walls are up, construction work can continue through the winter on the $12.5 million, 50,000 square-foot building. “The outside temperature is a key factor right now,” said

Blevins. “It’s a critical time. They are trying to hit the nicer days when daytime highs are above minus-15 degrees Celsius. Those are the days when the material can be put in place. Anything colder than that has a detrimental effect.” The specially-formulated fabric for both the outer and inner skins is designed to be applied to the structure within certain temperature parameters. Insulation is installed between the inner and outer skins of the building. Once the building is completely enclosed, the interior can be heated, additional concrete can be poured and the interior structures put up. The cross-laminate timbers for the dressing rooms are expected to be delivered by De-

ities. The building will eventually be attached to the Martensville High School, after a $26.3 million expansion and renovation to that building which is expected to be completed in 2016.

CITY HALL PROGRESS

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

The exterior of the Martensville Athletic Pavilion should be completed this week cember 9, stated Blevins. He said the bulk of the exterior work is done, and just the “finishing touches” are left. “We’re definitely over the hump,” he said. The good news is that the building is coming in under budget.

“We’re about a million dollars under the quoted estimate at this point,” Blevins explained. “The building was expected to cost $12.5 million. There’s still a long way to go until it’s finished. We’re expecting it to be open in late June or early July, so we’ll see

what happens over the next few months. But, if we stay under budget, the money we save can be put towards the lanscaping and other costs.” The MAP will house several full-size basketball courts, an Olympic-size running track, dressing rooms and other facil-

The new Martensville City Hall, meanwhile, is expected to be ready for occupancy by midJanuary, said Blevins. Work on the interior of the new building is continuing and office furnishings are being installed. The $2.2 million building was originally scheduled to open in early September, but delays related to ground conditions on the site, combined with other delays related to drywalling, put the project back a few months.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 PG. 10

Life’s brighter under the sun

Dalmeny Christmas Carnival draws crowd By HILARY KLASSEN

hilarylklassen@gmail.com

HILARY KLASSEN | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Chances are good Mrs. Claus eats her necklace after distributing all the treats to the kids at the Dalmeny Christmas Carnival last weekend

Sleigh rides, free public skating, the arrival of the Clauses, and a ton of gathered kids can only mean one thing – it’s the Dalmeny Children’s Christmas Carnival. Did I mention the home-baked Christmas baking? The J J Loewen Centre was a-buzz with activity on Sunday, December 1, igniting the spirit of the season. It was obvious that event organizer George Zwack was having fun, doing his share of buzzing around to ensure success. He pointed out the ‘Retro’ Riders’ Anderson Jersey proudly provided by Sask Power, and up for silent auction. And he noted the assistance of the Martial Arts Club, who ran the canteen so kids could get more fuel to play games and earn prizes, and grown-ups could forget about the diet for a minute. Fantastic Face Painting was there to add colour to the event and transform some faces. Kids moved through various activities, like trying to

toss a toilet paper roll through an upright toilet seat, spinning a wheel for a prize, being duped by a magician, or dropping a golf ball down a spiked wall, like you might see on The Price is Right. A puppet show by Wide Open Children’s Theatre had all the kids immobile and attentive for a while. Santa and Mrs. Claus arrived late as usual, but they always get away with it. Under the costumes were Shelly Graham and Cory Kallis who immediately commenced some chit chat and photo ops with children. Mrs. Claus handed out goodie bags to each child. Kids had a chance to practice their curling skills with Rocks and Rings, a program that uses floor curling to snag young curlers into the sport. Balloon Funn with Warren was popular, and cookie decorating was ongoing. Presented by the Dalmeny Merchants Association, the Dalmeny Children’s Christmas Carnival was the place to be on Sunday. The community spirit was obvious and the fun was free.

Warman flu clinic wraps up successful campaign By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A total of 500 people turned out for the influenza vaccination clinic at the Brian King Centre in Warman on Friday, November 29. That high participation rate reflected the overall success of the campaign by the Saskatoon Health Region (SHR), according to Karen Grauer, SHR’s Manager of Disease Control, Population and Public Health. In an interview as the campaign entered its final stages last week, Grauer said about 53,000 people took advantage of the flu clinics in Saskatoon and surrounding municipalities. “It was a very successful campaign,” said Grauer. “The numbers were up over previous years. I think more people are becoming accustomed

to knowing that influenza is an annual threat, and that they need to protect themselves and their loved ones by getting immunized.” Despite the high numbers at the Warman clinic, Grauer noted that wait times did not exceed 10 to 15 minutes. “There was a short wait in the first hour, and after that people could walk in and be immunized right away,” said Grauer, adding 90 per cent of the clients rated the experience very positively. “We are pleased with this turnout, given this was the last mass clinic in the area, and there were opportunities to go elsewhere prior to this date,” she said. Grauer said so far, Saskatchewan has seen two confirmed cases of influenza, but she expects the number of cases to increase.

“That’s about what we usually see at this time of year,” said Grauer. “The peak starts to come in mid-December and into January, then it starts to wane.” The influenza vaccine is designed to target the three most prevelant strains of flu, said Grauer. “The World Health Organization tracks influenza outbreaks in Asia and Australia and gives us an indication of what to expect by the time flu season hits us in late fall and early winter. We have the advantage in this part of the world of knowing what to expect.” Influenza is a respiratory infection, said Grauer, noting many people confuse it with stomach flu, which is not related. Influenza symptoms include the sudden onset of fever and chills, a cough,

muscle aches, headache, fatigue and a runny or stuffy nose. Infected people can spread the virus on to others before they show any symptoms. She said in addition to getting a flu shot, people can protect themselves by washing their hands thoroughly and by coughing or sneezing into their sleeve. “It’s spread by coughing and sneezing, or by touching contaminated items like doorknobs,” she said. “Children and older adults are more vulnerable, as are people with lower immune systems.” The flu shot becomes effective roughly two to three weeks after immunization. Grauer said influenza vaccines will be offered until the end of March, 2014 by appointment through the local public health office.

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11

Environmental summit gives RJC students hands-on opportunity to learn By JAMES TARRANT

Public Notice of A Discretionary Use Application

james@ccgazette.ca

Rosthern Junior College (RJC) hosted the first-ever Youth Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Summit (YESS) November 28. The day included a series of workshops focused on recycling, reusing and reducing the global footprint. In previous years RJC held an annual celebration called Deeper Life Days where the school would explore biblical and social justice themes such as food security and feeding the hungry, said Ryan Wood, vice principal of RJC. The difference this year is that the school picked a standalone theme of environmental sustainability and invited local schools in the area to help share ideas. Wood says it was a common sense approach to deal with a serious global issue. “We were looking at this and saying ‘okay, we are a private school so already we are distant from people’. If we come together we are actually embodying what we are teaching, which is that we can’t do it alone,” says Wood. Wood says students wanted the summit to be hands-on. “The students have been quite vocal, saying ‘do not just bring in speakers to talk at us. Organize a day where we are more interactive.’ Students have an expansive world view and as teachers we only shoot ourselves in the foot if we don’t listen to what students are asking for,” said Wood. Carol Reimer-Wiebe, manager of 10,000 Villages in Saskatoon, was among the resource people at the event. 10,000 Villages operates under the auspices of the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC), and is a Canada-wide fair trade, non-profit organization whose mission is to buy products that are fair priced from producers in developing countries and sell them in North America. Reimer-Wiebe explained why it is important that people are paid a fair living wage for the items they make. She also talked about recycling. “I brought a number of items from my store that are made out of recycled products such as newspapers and orange peel,” said ReimerWiebe. “Then we made the paper beads in different ways to show students how much

Public notice is hereby given that application has been received for 3 separate secondary suites, located within 3 single detached dwelling, which is a discretionary use in the R2 - Residential District. AFFECTED LANDS The land to which this notice relates is: Lots 29, 30, 31; Block 13; Plan No. 102138847 701 Maple Place, 703 Maple, 705 Maple Place, Warman, SK The Council will consider this application at 6:30 p.m. on December 16, 2013 in Council of Chambers at the Warman City Hall, located at 107 Central Avenue West. Council will hear any person or group wishing to comment on the proposed application. Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing or delivered to the undersigned at the City Hall before the hearing. JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Issued at Warman, Saskatchewan, December 3, 2013

Rosthern resident Jesse Ens, left taught students about natural building techniques during the YESS Summit at Rosthern Junior College on Thursday, November 28 work is involved in making them.” Rosthern resident Jesse Ens taught students about natural building techniques. Ens brought in miniature timber frames and used a mortar to cut up little pieces of doweling to simulate a cord wood wall system. Then he put on a roof and added some plants. Ens said natural building is a concept that is catching on across Canada. “I did a course in natural building at the College of the Rockies,” said Ens. “We have created a system of mass production and now we are finding out that probably wasn’t the best thing. It is fast and makes people a lot of money but it is not the healthiest or the prettiest way to go.” A special feature of the summit was an aboriginal drum performance by students from Vincent Massey

School in Saskatoon. RJC Principal Ian Wilson said knowledge keepers (aboriginal elders) pass on techniques of drumming. “The knowledge keepers and the boys teach techniques and songs but there are also the cultural teachings that go along with it, and that is where the environmental peace comes in,” said Wilson. “They talk about the relationship to the land our first peoples had and continue to have and the ties that the drum brings to the people to reconnect them to the environment and to the land.” Wood said the idea behind the summit is to look at issues from both a local and global perspective. “The idea is not just awareness for awareness sake,” said Wood. “But seeing it though a world that is interconnected and seeing what part we have to play in it.”

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 PG. 12

Martensville curlers win Dominion silver Submitted by

LYNN REMESHYLO

President, Martensville Curling Club

Both the men’s and women’s curling teams from Martensville came home with silver medals from the Dominion Club Curling Championship in Thunder Bay. The ladies lost the final to Manitoba while the men were defeated by Alberta. Both had come in first in their pools and both defeated the Yukon Territory teams in the semi finals. We are very proud of them. Carol Ferris of Martensville, who participated in the event as a coach, said it was a “great experience” for both players and fans. “Thunder Bay treated us all like rock stars,” said Ferris. “Both teams curled so well the entire week. They represented the club in a way that showed the friendship, sportsmanship and respect that our club works toward from season to season. They made me proud to be part of the experience and our club.” Here are some quotes from

the “Dominion Curls” website about the event: “It was disappointing loss for Burnett and her Martensville rink of Melissa Surkan, Samantha Yachiw and Joanne Wood. “Saskatchewan found themselves down 3-0 after three ends to Manitoba but battled back to tie the game after five ends. “The tears from the Saskatchewan third Melissa Surkan said it all, but Burnett put the loss in a positive perspective. ‘There are 12 other teams that would have liked to be in the final and we were one of them, so we have to very proud of that,’ said Burnett, reflecting on their week at the national championships. “Martens and his Martensville Curling Club rink of Leo Perrin, Kevin Fehr and Chad Krikau proved a worthy opponent for Alberta as the two teams had finished first in their respective pools with 5-1 records and both came through the semi-finals with convincing wins.”

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JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Mike King of the Dundurn Wheatkings opens up the scoring against the visiting Young Comets on November 30

Wheatkings edge Comets in shootout By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Dundurn Wheatkings goaltender Johnathan Hamlin raised his arms in celebration after stacking his pads to make a shoot-out save that sealed a win against the Young Comets, November 30. The save gave the Wheatkings a 6-5 win and moved Dundurn into a tie with Imperial for first overall in the Wheatland Hockey League. Wheatkings coach Richie Seaward said the Comets are a tough team to play against when they force you to play their game. “What they do is they slow the game down, get in your face and try to suck you into penalties,” said Seaward. “Unfortunately tonight during the second period we got sucked in to their game and that is what they wanted.” Mike King opened the scoring for the Wheatkings about eight minutes into the opening frame when he buried a beautiful goal on a crafty set up by

teammates James Ginther and Chris Wagar. The Comets evened the score when Braydon Heroux pounded a shot at Hamlin, who made the save. The puck, however, trickled in to make it 1-1. The Wheatkings current leading scorer and captain, Dustin Sikler, got his team back into the lead, corralling a low shot after a nice behind the net pass from Darcy Schroeder to beat Comets goaltender Brett Papic. The Wheatkings increased their lead by two goals in the second period on the power play as Schroeder was able to jam the puck home during a scramble at the side of the net to make it 4-2. The Comets narrowed the Wheatkings lead down to one as Heroux displayed his heroics – again beating Hamlin with a slapper from the slot to make the score 4-3. Sikler stretched Dundurn’s lead to two once again, redirecting a shot past Papic. Shane Mason and Schroeder

picked up helpers on the play. The Comets took advantage of some undisciplined play by the Wheatkings, allowing Young to tie the game on goals by Jessie Dengler and Brad Marcoux. In the third period, the Chad Freeden gave the Wheatkings the lead once again on a set up in the slot by Wagar and Conrad Neufeld. The Comets forced overtime seven minutes later as Marcoux wristed a shot over the left shoulder of Hamlin. No

Vipers still rolling The Sask Valley Vipers tied the Humboldt Broncos 2-2 in Martensville, November 30 and defeated the Ssskatoon Generals 5-2 at the Warman Legends Centre, December. The impressive winning streak is at 17 games and counting with only two games to play before Christmas. The Vipers take on the Saskatoon Outlaws on Saturday, December 21 and will host the South Division leading Praire Storm December 22 at home.

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team scored in the overtime period, which led to a shootout to decid the winner. After two rounds, the Wheatkings came out on top. Dundurn’s record is now five wins, one loss and two ties with just five games to go before the Christmas break. The team will be on the road to take on the Holdfast Trackstoppers on Friday, December 6. The next home game will come against the Craik Warriors on Saturday, December 7. Game time is 7:30 p.m.

THE

RESULTS T EAM


Classifieds

deadline

Mondays 12:00 Noon

$8.00/wk for the first 25 words 35¢/wk per word thereafter + GST THE

IAGL B DE

Run your word ad FrEE! 3 consecutive weeks with no changes, get the 4th week

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E-mail ads@ccgazette.ca Email your ad then call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

telephone 306-668-0575 Call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

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In Memoriam

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306-668-3997 Fax your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run) to 306-668-3997 anytime and we will process payment to your credit card

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Ad Classifications REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060 Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ...........6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ...................6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

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Tenders

3010

Coming Events

For Sale

Tradeshow/Craft Sale Sat. Dec. 7th In Loving Memory of Victoria Grace & Elizabeth Andrea

Wollf

Those we love remain with us For love itself lives on, Cherished memories never fade because One loved is gone. Those we love can never be more than a thought apart, For as long as there is a memory they live on in our heart.

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Thank You Notes The Walker and Matschke families thank the Borden and Radisson communities and Martens Warman Funeral Home for the caring and support following the death of our mother, Helen Walker. A special Thank You to the Borden Lions Club for the wonderful family supper.

DeaDline

for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

The City of Warman is accepting tenders to provide grave digging services at the Warman Cemetery and the Warman Memorial Gardens from January 1st 2014 to December 31st, 2014. The tendered bid must be effective for the entire year, with no difference in summer and winter rates. Additional information and specifications can be obtained from City Hall located at 107 Central Street West during regular business hours – 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Please drop off tenders at the above address or forward by mail to: City of Warman Box 340 Warman SK S0K 4S0 Attn: Kietha Swenson The best or any tender may not necessarily be accepted. Applicants must be fully insured and have a business license issued by the City of Warman Deadline for submissions is 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, December 11th, 2013.

The Warman Community Association would like to thank everyone who came out and supported the Craft and Bake Sale this year, making it a huge success.

A special thank you goes out to all the businesses who decorated a tree for our Festival of Mini Trees: • Reid and Sons • Subway and Sweet Memories • Sandy Lockhart Photography • Canine Corner • Bodacious Bustlines • Great Plains College Resturant ••Earthly • Wagon Wheel Restaurant EarthlyDelights Delights • Warman Veterinarian Clinic • Kessler Agencies Corner Service Relish Photography • Warman Corner• Service • Relish Photography • Passions Beauty Studio

Congratulations to all the winners of the year Christmas trees. See you again next year!

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10 am - 3 pm Free Admission!

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ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060 MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 • PAGE 13

701 Centennial Blvd. Warman

Support your local Home-based businesses and artisans this Christmas! 1120

2040 1120

Coming Events Coming ServicesEvents Borden Farmers’ MarkOffered Christmas markets

Dec 12 and 19 Legends Centre 2-6pm December 12 Enter our ‘Stocking’ Draw Proceeds to Warman Food Bank Musical entertainment by Terry Pugh! Coffee & goodies courtesy of the vendors Our Regular vendors will be joined by 3 Farmers Camelina Oil & Soap Cutts December 19 Lots of last minute Christmas baking & gifts ideas will be available!

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STAY AHEAD 1120 Coming OF THE COMPETITION. Events Advertise in the classifieds. swna.com/ classifieds

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Public noticE - Call for Proposals for the operation of the Concession at the Martensville Athletic Pavilion will be accepted until 4:00 pm, Friday December 13, 2013. The City is seeking and will select a Concession Operator that will provide innovative, affordable, safe and reliable food services at the Martensville Athletic Pavilion. The Martensville Athletic Pavilion is attached to the High School

Recreation & community Services Department P.o. box 970, 66 Main Street Martensville, SK. SoK 2to

Parties wishing to obtain instruction to bidders, please call (306) 931-3385.

The First Saskatchewan Lutheran Church Choir will be presenting two Christmas cantata performances on Sunday, December 15 at 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. at the church, located on Lutheran Road, SW of Langham, corner of Range Road 3082/Township 382. Everyone is welcome! Posters displayed within the surrounding communities include a map. For more info. please contact Tina at 306283-4479 or Rickea at 306283-4812.

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Services Offered GIVE A GIFT OF HOUSE CLEANING. SENIORS DISCOUNT. CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION (306)9342167. EXPERIENCED MUSIC INSTRUCTOR for piano & theory. Now acceptin g students. valsmusicstudio @gmail.com. (306) 2294774. Please contact me directly for more information.

Moose Jaw, SK Give the Gift of WARMTH with Temple Gardens Gift Cards this Holiday Season! To Purchase: Onlinetemplegardens.sk.ca Toll Free 1-800-718-7727 Visit our Kiosk at the Northgate Mall in Regina from (Nov 26 - Dec 24) Or directly at the Hotel

BOSCH Mixers $229 & up, VITAMIX Blenders $499 & up, BAMIX Hand Blenders Kitchenaid Commercial Mixers, Spiral slicers, LEFSE Supplies. Call Hometech Regina toll free 1-888-6926724. FOR SALE: Closed in China cabinet, 66" high by 36" wide by 12" in depth. Like new condition, paid $800 asking $350. Call (306) 2392145. ICE FISHING HUTS on sale now! Hold-on large huts are ready for pick up. We sell out every year. Made in Canada. Phone (306) 2534343. LARGE FERTILIZER TANKS on year end sale! 5,000 gal only $2,800. Made in Saskatchewan. Phone (306) 2534343. METAL ROOFING, SIDING, AND TRIMS. 36” TuffRib/Low-Rib Colored 83¢/sq.ft. Galvalume 72¢/sq.ft. Largest Color Selection. Custom Trims Manufactured In-house 40 Year Warranty. Call MEL-VIEW METAL 1-306-752-4219. STEEL BUILDING ”THE BIG YEAR END CLEAR OUT!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel, 1-800668-5422. www.pioneer steel.ca. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1800-457-2206 www.crown steelbuildings.ca. WATKINS PRODUCTS Household, health and wellness products. Famous for cinnamon pepper, vanilla, medicated ointment, cleaners. Call Independent Associate: Joan (306) 931-3716, Warman. RURAL WATER TREATMENT. Patented iron filters, softeners, distillers, “Kontinuous Shock” Chlorinator, IronEater. Patented whole house reverse osmosis. Payment plan. 1-800-BIGIRON (244-4766); www.BigIronDrilling.com. View our 29 patented & patent pending inventions. Since 1957.

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3010

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4030

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Feed And Seed Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED

HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 22 1/4’s South West - 58 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

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We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

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Business Opportunities HOME BASED Embroidery Business for less than $10,000. Get started in the promotional products industry. Work from home on your schedule. Call Nicolle at 1-866-890-9488.

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Careers LOOKING FOR experienced welders to work in a Christian environment in the Hepburn area immediately. Tickets not required. Good benefits. Travel allowance. Wages based on experience. Call Dave from Hamm's Welding (306)270-7970 4wdwelder@sasktel.net

7050

Careers

Administrative Associate/ Bookkeeper for operation in the $5 million range located in Prince Albert Area. Candidate should have Accounting major with extensive Office Administration experience. General responsibilities and qualifications available on request. Position offers progressive career, comprehensive training, flexibility and comprehensive benefits package. Criminal Record Check required. Interested qualified candidates send resume to: office @groenenaccounting.com or fax to 306-747-3592. Salary based on experience and education Closing Date: December 20, 2013.

7050

Careers WW1342

RENT BACK AVAILABLE

www.westerncommodities.ca

Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

5010

Homes / Condos For Sale

A CAREER OPPORTUNITY AWAITS! Member Service Representative $1200/week Guaranteed

6010

Hafford 1140 Sq Ft Bungalow 3 bedroom; 1 1/2 bath; 2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater ;water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512 HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575. ONLY A FEW units left! 55plus adult community. Ground level ranchers. www.diamondplace.ca. 306241-0123, Warman, SK.

Autos For Sale

Farm Business Consultants Inc., Canada’s Small Business and Rural Tax Specialist requires motivated individuals to collect financial information from our clients.

2008 Honda Odyssey EXL, 8 pass. minivan, loaded, leather seats, sunroof, heated seats, remote side doors, 72,000 miles. One owner. $18,000 OBO. Call (306) 2252135.

You will be: • A good communicator • Proficient with numbers • Able to travel within Rural Saskatchewan • Own reliable transportation

Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

6070

5020

Homes / Condos Auto Parts Wrecking auto-trucks: Parts For Rent to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of

Three bedroom house for rent immediately in Osler. Close to Highway 12 and Martensville. Tenant pays for utilities. $1250/month 1604-217-3197

6. Opportunities, so to speak 7. Blah 8. Abominable Snowman 9. Presents, as a threat 10. Two-wheeled covered carriage 11. Absorbed, as a cost 12. “Comprende?” 13. “To ___ is human ...” 21. Acrobat’s garb 22. Dressed to the ___ 25. Dye with wax 26. Similar 27. Turn red or yellow, say 29. Bit of color 30. Halftime lead, e.g. 32. Assassinated 33. Ham radio response 34. Burning 35. Dwell

Land For Sale

Call The Gazette advertising team at (306) 668-0575

Horoscopes

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

Expect to be busy for the rest of the month, Capricorn. With potential birthday celebrations and holiday tasks to complete, spare moments are few and far between.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Aquarius, learning a new skill this week will only add to your already vast repertoire of abilities. This is one more reason to have a positive attitude.

PISCES February 19– March 20

Please submit your cover letter and resume to: Saskatoon and Area: smarkewich@fbc.ca Regina and Area: regrec@fbc.ca

Aries, delay your plans for the time being. A number of unexpected tasks that will require your undivided attention in the coming day, so clear your schedule.

Certified Learn to VANSCOY COMMUNITY RECREATION BOARD Skate Instructor is now accepting proposals for the Vanscoy Arena 2013 – 2014 season for

to facilitate our local learn to skate Arena Ice Maintenance & Caretaker program that will run from early January through to the end of February.

The successful proponent will be responsible for maintaining the ice surface, general cleaning and upkeep of the arena facility and minor building and tractor maintenance. The successful proponent will also be responsible for collecting ice rental fees. Should the proponent be willing to manage ice bookings over and above current minor hockey and recreational bookings, the Board will share a portion (to be negotiated) of the hourly ice rental rate with the successful proponents for these rental times. Proposals will bebe received no later than Thursday Expressions will received no later than December 12 , 2013 Proposals can be faxed to 978-0237 Thursday, December 12th, 2013 Mailed to Vanscoy Community Recreation Board – PO Box 246 – Vanscoy, SK Emailed to vanscoyrecreation@gmail.com Proposals can be: or dropped off at the Village Office at 109 Main Street, Vanscoy th

The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals for any reason. `````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

Faxed: (306) 978-0237 Mailed: Vanscoy Community Recreation Board PO Box 246 - Vanscoy, Sk. S0L 3J0 Emailed: vanscoyrecreation@gmail.com Dropped of at: The Village of Vanscoy Office at 109 Main Street, Vanscoy

The Vanscoy Community Recreation Board is currently seeking expressions of interest for a certified Learn to Skate instructor to facilitate our local learn to skate program that will run from early January through to the end of February. Expressions will be received no later than Thursday December 12th, 2013. Expressions can be faxed to 978-0237, mailed to Vanscoy Community Recreation Board – PO Box 246 – Vanscoy, SK, emailed to vanscoyrecreation@gmail.com or dropped off at the Village Office at 109 Main Street, Vanscoy

To view pictures, visit our Kijiji ad (ad ID# 548722565)

We can help you with that. A career ad in The Gazette reaches over 40,000 people each week

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

(306) 668-0575 ads@ccgazette.ca

36. Habitual drug user 39. Handrail support 40. Time of financial need (2 wds) 45. Neigh softly 47. Blows away 49. Flip, in a way 50. Monroe’s successor 51. Prepare for winter takeoff 52. Small spreading juniper bush 54. ___ cheese 55. “Good going!” 56. 1990 World Series champs 57. ___ de deux 58. “I” problem 59. Blackguard

Target customers who are smart and know the answers...your business could be here!

Emphasize feeling good about yourself this week, Pisces. Doing so will enable you to help others in the near future.

currently seeking expressions of interest for a

The following land will be offered for sale by tender under the direction of the selling officer Curtis J. Onishenko, Barrister & Solicitor, McKercher Law Office. Bids close December 20th at noon. South East 31-39-5 West of the the third & North East 31-39-5 West of the third. For a full list of details contact: valmart2@shaw.ca

Across 1. Door feature 5. Christian Science founder 9. New moon, e.g. 14. Control freak 15. Achy 16. Horse opera 17. Aroma 18. Checked item 19. Contemptuous look 20. Energy converters (2 wds) 23. Bridge play (pl.) 24. Map line 28. “Give it ___!” (2 wds) 29. Big ___ Conference 31. French Sudan, today 32. Lawn mower’s path 35. Sits tight 37. End 38. Hit by thunderstorm’s electrical discharge (2 wds) 41. “Is that ___?” 42. Bulrush, e.g. 43. Like some buckets 44. Clickable image 46. ___ bit 47. “Wheel of Fortune” buy (2 wds) 48. Not at all 50. Makes right 53. January 1 to December 31 (2 wds) 57. Strikes with beak 60. Cameron ___, actress 61. Plunge headfirst 62. Fits 63. #1 spot 64. Battery contents 65. Regretful 66. Bungle, with “up” 67. Cravings Down 1. Comprehend 2. Low point 3. Kind of layer 4. Robin’s tidying spot 5. Former Portugese monetary unit

ARIES March 21– April 19

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Assume the role of the strong and silent type this week, Taurus. You do not have to share your opinions with everyone, as an air of mystery may boost your popularity.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

5040

LAND FOR SALE BY TENDER

This Week’s C R O S S W O R D

We offer: • Guaranteed weekly minimum pay of $1200 • Ongoing training and development

Please visit our website: www.fbc.ca

Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. NorthEast Recyclers, 780-8750270, Lloydminster.

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • DAY, MONTH, YEAR

It can be easy to allow excitement to overtake your logic, Gemini. But you need to be patient and not allow exuberance to interfere with the tasks at hand.

sudoku

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Cancer, a hefty workload at the office may zap your desire to do much else. However, don’t pass up the opportunity when a social engagement beckons this week.

LEO July 23– August 22

Leo, you will have to continue your rather hectic pace this week, even when you start to feel tired. Fortunately, you are excited about some of the things on your to-do list.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Virgo, getting involved with the right people now opens doors that previously may have been closed to you. Do not squander the opportunity to use these new contacts.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Libra, conflicting emotions arise in the week ahead. You have the desire to fulfill people’s expectations of you, but you also just want some time to yourself.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

Maintaining your focus on chores is nearly impossible this week, when you are easily distracted by anything else that sounds interesting. Try to get your work done.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Reestablish your priorities, Sagittarius. Doing so will help you live up to your end of the bargain on various commitments. If necessary, ask others for help.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 •CROSSING CLARK’S CROSSING DAY, MONTH, YEAR • CLARK’S GAZETTE GAZETTE

15 XX

Pee Wee Wildcats stay unbeaten The Warman Pee Wee AA Wildcats defeated the Humboldt Broncos 7-3 at the Warman Legends Centre, November 30 and used their momentum to down the Battlefords Barons 7-4, December 1 in North Battleford. Nolan Seto led the way for the Wildcats with one goal and two assists. During Sunday’s con-

test, the Wildcats scored three power play goals to secure the win. Holden Knights led the scoring for Warman in that game with two goals and one assist. The Wildcats now possess an 8-0 record and second place overall in the league. The Midget AA Wildcats suffered a 5-3 loss to the

Battlefords Barons on November 30. Clayton McKenzie scored two goals for the Wildcats. The Pee Wee Wildcats will be on the road in Meadow Lake, December 6 and 7 while The Midget Wildcats will host Meadow Lake at the Legends Centre on December 6.

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

7050

7050

Careers

Careers

City of Warman EMO Coordinator - Part time The City of Warman is seeking a Coordinator for our Emergency Measures Organization. This part-time position will report directly to City Council and requires a person with strong organizational and communication skills, a good working knowledge of management of Emergency operations. The successful candidate will oversee the Emergency Measures Operations Centre in an emergency, and is responsible for following the existing plan and continually improving it to meet the changing needs of our City. Applicants should possess or be willing to obtain the following: • A minimum 5 years’ experience in Emergency Management, Po lice, Fire, EMS or Public Safety as a First Responder or Manager, or further General Management experience. • Incident Command System (ICS) 100, 200 Level formal training preferred, with future consideration for ICS 300 Level. • Strong oral and written communication skills - good people skills • Strong working knowledge of Windows-based computer system operation, including Microsoft Word and Excel. • Willing to continually learn, be highly motivated and a good selfstarter working independently or in a team environment. • Proven record of being organized and able to co-ordinate tasks amongst diverse groups of people towards a focused goal. How to apply: Please submit resumes to City Hall no later than 5pm on Friday December 6th. Please include a cover letter and send to: City of Warman Box 340 Warman SK S0K 4S0 Attn: Kendall Shram, Councillor Email: kendalls@warman.ca Phone: (306)221-7226 Fax: (306)933-1987 We thank all applicants for their interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

now accepting proposals for the Vanscoy Arena 2013 - 2014 season for

ArenaVANSCOY Ice Maintenance COMMUNITY RECREATION BOARD and Caretaker

is now accepting proposals for the for maintaining the The successful proponent will be responsible Vanscoy Arena 2013 – 2014 season for ice surface, general cleaning and up keeping of the arena facility and minor building and tractor maintenance. The successful proponent will also be responsible for collecting ice rental fees. The successful proponent will be responsible for maintaining the ice surface, general cleaning and upkeep of the arena facility and minor building tractor maintenance. successful proponent will also be for collecting ice rental Should theandproponent beThewilling to manage iceresponsible bookings over andfees. Should the proponent be willing to manage ice bookings over and above current minor hockey and recreational bookings, the above hockey and recreational bookings, Board Board will sharecurrent a portion (to minor be negotiated) of the hourly ice rental rate with the successful proponentsthe for these rental times. will share a portion Proposals (to bewillnegotiated) of the hourly ice rental rate be received no later than Thursday December 12the , 2013rental times. with the successful proponents for Proposals can be faxed to 978-0237

Arena Ice Maintenance & Caretaker

th

Mailed to Vanscoy Community Recreation Board – PO Box 246 – Vanscoy, SK Proposals will be received no later than Thursday, December 12th, 2013 Emailed to vanscoyrecreation@gmail.com Proposals be: or dropped off at the Village Officecan at 109 Main Street, Vanscoy

The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals for any reason. `````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

(306) 978-0237 Vanscoy Community Recreation Board PO Box 246 - Vanscoy, Sk. S0L 3J0 vanscoyrecreation@gmail.com Emailed: Dropped of at: The Village of Vanscoy Office 109 Main Street, Vanscoy Faxed: Mailed:

The Vanscoy Community Recreation Board is currently seeking expressions of interest for a certified Learn to Skate instructor to facilitate our local learn to skate program that will run from early January through to the end of February. Expressions will be received no later than Thursday December 12th, 2013. Expressions can be faxed to 978-0237, mailed to Vanscoy Community Recreation Board – PO Box 246 – Vanscoy, SK, emailed to vanscoyrecreation@gmail.com or dropped off at the Village Office at 109 Main Street, Vanscoy

The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals for any reason.

JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $32/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403854-2845; Email: chrysler @telusplanet.net. TJ LOGGING of Whitecourt, Alberta is now taking resumes for 2013 - 2014 logging season. Experienced buncher/skidder/lumber/process operators required. Please fax resume to 780778-2428. HOME BUILDING CENTRE, Red Deer. Building supplies Estimator/Salesperson for mostly residential construction. Building supplies experience essential. Familyowned business for 40 years. Call Rob 403-3436422. Email: rob@executive hbc.com. Apiary workers required for Spring/Summer 2014. Duties include unwrapping bees, feeding bees, building & repairing equipment, making nucs, supervising hives, pulling honey, extracting, winter preparations, wrapping hives. Resume to: tonylalondesales@sasktel.n et or Lalonde Honey Farms Inc., Box 42, Clavet, SK S0K 0Y0. Attn: Dan Lalonde. Attention Semi Operators! Are you looking to downsize? Haul RVs from USA to western Canada! 5-6 day round trip. Looking for 1 ton O/O. 1-800-867-6233; www.roadexservices.com. Tarnes Electric Kindersley, SK are requiring labourers, electricians & apprentices for various projects in Kindersley, Kerrobert and surrounding areas. Fax resume to 306-463-6550 or email tarnes.electric@sask tel.net. Family Physician Required: Current busy medical office for physician(s) available for lease immediately in downtown Prince Albert. For more information: Terry- 306-9222090; pa.pharmasave@ shaw.ca; www.medi-cross. com.

DeaDline

for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

Chiefs split weekend games By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The Delisle Chiefs spit games

over the weekend with a 9-3 pounding of the Saskatoon Westleys, November 30 and a tough 5-4 loss to Carrot River’s Tri-Town Thunder, December 1. The Westleys got off to a strong start scoring first in the opening period, but the Chiefs six straight goals through the first and second periods put the Westleys in a hole they could not crawl out of.

The Westleys tried to half the score with two more of their own, in the latter half of the second, but three insurance markers in the second and third periods by the Chiefs won the game. Rookie forward Josh Reinbolt scored four goals and one assist, followed by Mark Ganter who scored one goal and two assists and Tanner Olson who had a goal and an assist in the contest. In Sunday’s game the Chiefs found themselves playing catchup early when the Thunder shut out

the Blue and Gold by three goals until the latter half of the second and third periods when the Chiefs started to mount a comeback. The Chiefs scored four goals by Jase Smalcel, Stacy Campbell, Mark Ganter and Josh Murray to tie the game in the third period. The Thunder played the spoiler when Stacy Lowes and Dallas McIntosh connected to score the game winning goal with less than five minutes remaining on the clock.

RE-DEFINE YOURSELF WITH THE BACK-TO-WORK PROGRAM Are you unemployed, between the ages of 5564 and looking to re-enter the workforce? This FREE 8-week program will aid you in finding employment by helping you: • Plan your career path • Develop your resumes and cover letters • Learn effective job search techniques • Prepare for a successful interview • Gain work and-or volunteer experience • Receive training to develop skills

Location: Warman Campus Program dates: Feb. 3 - March 28, 2014 Application deadline: Jan. 8, 2014 People aged 50-54 or 64-and-over may also be considered for admission.

For more information email Cristal at cristalg@greatplainscollege.ca or call (306) 657-1855. This project is funded by the Government of Canada and the Government of Saskatchewan’s Ministry of the Economy.

greatplainscollege.ca 1.866.296.2472 Clark's Crossing Gazette Older Worker Program ad Jan 2014.indd 1

11/25/2013 1:13:16 PM

13121RS00


16

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013

Bruins skate circles around Merchants By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The Delisle Bruins extended their winning streak to three games after a 9-3 pounding of the Conquest Merchants in Sask Valley Hockey League (SVHL) action, November 29. After an opening season shut out loss to the Kyle Elks on November 8, the Bruins regrouped for an 8-7 win over the Eston Ramblers on November 10; followed by a 6-3 road win over the Beechy Bombers on November 16; and the lopsided victory over the Merchants. Bruins head coach Jimmy Climenhaga said the Merchants were a young team and it showed on the ice. “They are a good team in the sense that they are young and they are going to get better,” said Climenhaga. “It shows a bit with our veteran team. We move the puck a little better and we don’t chase it as much.” There weren’t too many shots

that didn’t end up as goals on the score sheet. In the opening frame the Bruins outshot the Merchants 15-4, which the teams increased to 45 to 15 before the game was done. During the second period the Merchants pulled goaltender Patrick Johnson after giving up seven goals. Johnson was replaced by backup Jarrett Dubkowski. After a two week break, Climenhaga thought that the win over Conquest was a good game in preparation for stiffer competition later on. Looking ahead, Climenhaga said his team needs to play a full 60 minutes to be effective. “We take some shifts off in games and come back,” he explained. “Our penality killing has been good, our power play is getting better. “I think five on five we need to take care of our end a little better. I think that is the big thing we will work on in practice in the next few weeks.”

HILARY KLASSEN | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

HILARY KLASSEN | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Tyler Karst of the Hague Royals tries to poke the puck out from under Robbie Holoien of the Dalmeny Fury

Dalmeny edges Hague for second win of season By HILARY KLASSEN

hilarylklassen@gmail.com

The Dalmeny Fury edged the Hague Royals, staying ahead through 60 minutes of play for a 7-5 win on Friday, November 29. The victory is the second of the season for the Fury. Coach Darren (Woody) Wutzke was pleased with his team’s performance. “The team showed good hus-

tle out there and they played their positions well. We had good goaltending as well,” he said. With both sides scoreless five minutes into the first period, the Fury got themselves two straight penalties and played five on three for a couple of minutes. The Fury successfully quashed all the Royals power play attempts, which seemed to

PUBLIC NOTICE

set the tone for the rest of the game. Shots on net didn’t tell the real story until late in the game. The first goal of the night was on Dalmeny’s first shot on net, while the Royals didn’t score until their 12th shot. The Fury scored with two seconds left in the second, putting them ahead 6-3, but shots on net were 16-8 for the Royals. Dalmeny’s Justin

D’Entremont had two goals on the night, while Dean Salzl, Brody Foster, Kyle Yarskie, Ian Kirk and Joel Cardinal-Schultz all contributed one goal apiece. Dalmeny hits the road for for a pair of games this weekend in Rosthern on Friday and in Waldheim on Sunday. The Fury’s next game is Friday, December 13 when the Bruno TBirds come to town. Game time is 8:30 p.m.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park No. 344 intends to adopt a bylaw under The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend Bylaw No. 9/94, known as the RM of Corman Park Zoning Bylaw.

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park No. 344 intends to adopt a bylaw under The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend Bylaw No. 23/10, known as the Corman Park-Saskatoon Planning District Zoning Bylaw.

INTENT The proposed Bylaw No. 54/13 will rezone the affected lands from Agricultural Residential 2 District (AR2) to Agricultural Residential 1 District (AR1). Proposed Bylaw No. 54/13 will provide for the subdivision of a residential parcel.

INTENT The proposed Bylaw No. 51/13 will rezone the affected lands from D-Agricultural Residential 1 District (DAG1) to D-Country Residential 1 District (DCR1). Proposed Bylaw No. 51/13 will provide for the subdivision of a residential parcel.

AFFECTED LANDS The affected lands are that portion of the SE 11-39-4-W3 shown shaded on the attached map.

AFFECTED LANDS The affected lands are that portion of the NW 22-36-4-W3 shown shaded on the attached map.

PUBLIC INSPECTION Any person may inspect the proposed Bylaw at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office at 111 Pinehouse Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, up to 5:00 p.m. until Friday, December 13, 2013.

PUBLIC INSPECTION Any person may inspect the proposed Bylaw at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office at 111 Pinehouse Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, up to 5:00 p.m. until Friday, December 13, 2013.

PUBLIC INSPECTION Any person may inspect the proposed Bylaw at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office at 111 Pinehouse Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, up to 5:00 p.m. until Friday, December 13, 2013.

PUBLIC HEARING Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed Bylaws. All written comments received by 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, December 10, 2013, will be forwarded to Council.

PUBLIC HEARING Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed Bylaws. All written comments received by 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, December 10, 2013, will be forwarded to Council.

PUBLIC HEARING Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers at the R.M. of Corman Park No. 344 Office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed Bylaws. All written comments received by 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, December 10, 2013, will be forwarded to Council.

Issued November 20, 2013 at the City of Saskatoon, in the Province of Saskatchewan. Adam Tittemore, Administrator

Issued November 20, 2013 at the City of Saskatoon, in the Province of Saskatchewan. Adam Tittemore, Administrator

Issued November 20, 2013 at the City of Saskatoon, in the Province of Saskatchewan. Adam Tittemore, Administrator

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Blake Rolston (20) and teammate Kevin Mryglod (9) of the Delisle Bruins create traffic in front of Conquest Merchants defenceman Blayke LeFaivre and goaltender Jarrett Dubkowski

PUBLIC NOTICE

Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Rural Municipality of Corman Park No. 344 intends to adopt a bylaw under The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend Bylaw No. 8/94, known as the R.M. of Corman Park Development Plan. INTENT The proposed Bylaw No. 55/13 will provide for textual amendments to the Agricultural Objectives of the R.M. of Corman Park Development Plan to allow for the re-subdivision of Agricultural Residential 2 sites that existed prior to the initial Development Plan, 1982 to allow for property line adjustments that would not increase the number of developable sites. AFFECTED LANDS The affected lands are all lands contained within the R.M. of Corman Park that are zoned Agricultural Residential 2 (AR2).


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Business & Professional

17

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

CALL (306) 668-0575 for rates & deadlines

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www.gogreenfurnaceclean.com Jeff Williams Free furnace filter PLUS (306) 881-6169 change out 10% OFF

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~ Immediate Cremation ~ Memorial Services ~ Traditional Services ~ Memorial Tea ~ Celebration of Life ~ Private Family Services

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main Hall seating 600 Banquets up to 400 Kitchen & all amenities Ice machine & walk-in cooler no catering or corkage fees

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PROFESSIONAL BOOKKEEPING SERVICES

(306) 652-5052 Proudly Serving Saskatoon and Area.

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The VSA Rovers U12 Boys Div. 2 team took the gold at the Lakewood Kickstart soccer tournament held in Saskatoon Nov 7-10. Pictured are (back row) coaches: Russ Dyck, Rob Noel, Justin Baldwyn. Middle row (l-r): Noa Kolosnjaji, Josh Baldwyn, Kieran Dyck, Manny Pandher, Kameron Noble, Trysten Towson. Front row: Ty Baier, Jackson Doell, Hudson Noel. Not pictured: Kaden Cadman.

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18

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013

Business & Professional

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

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Wednesday, November 27 was an afternoon of basketball as Warman High kicked off their season with a series of games. Warman Community Middle School’s Dustin Gustafson is pictured with the block on a layup attempt by Warman High Junior Thomas Beynon. The Warman High School Junior Girls hosted Osler, while the Junior Boys hosted the Warman Community Middle School. In the evening the Senior Girls dominated the Saskatoon Christian School winning by a score of 76-13. The Senior Boys game against the Saskatoon Christian School was much more competitive with the host team winning 70-57.

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Business

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013 PG. 19

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FUNDING FOR MERCY FLIGHTS

STARS gets financial boost from Warman business By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Every donation makes a difference when it comes to keeping STARS air ambulance helicopters in the air. And according to Kimberly Kroll-Goodwin, Development Officer with the Shock Trauma Air Rescue Service (STARS) Foundation, every donation can help save a life. Kroll-Goodwin accepted acheque in the amount of $1,000 from a Warman business on Friday, November 29. Bill and Elaine Peters, owners of I-Deal2-U Thrift Store presented the funds to the STARS foundation. The business, which opened earlier this year, sets aside a portion of its income every month to donate to community organizations. The business previously made donations to the Osler and Warman Fire De-

partments. Kroll-Goodwin said the STARS air ambulance system costs about $20 million annually to operate. Since it began operations in Saskatchewan, it has been kept busy, she said. “We’re averaging 1.7 missions per day,” said Kroll-Goodwin. “The number of flights varies, but we’re in the air almost every day. On some days, it’s busier than others and we can have several calls on any given day.” Kroll-Goodwin said the average mission costs $5400, including fuel for the helicopter. “We always have one flight nurse, one flight paramedic and two pilots on the call,” she said. “Sometimes a transport physician will go as well, but if that physician isn’t able to, he or she will be in contact with the medical team on the phone at all times.”

STARS receives $10 million in annual funding from the provincial government, and generates the balance through fundraising campaigns. The bulk of its funds are brought in through an annual lottery, but Kroll-Goodwin said there are also ongoing donations from corporations and individuals. Donations can be made online through www.stars.ca or by contacting Kroll-Goodwin at 306-659-1505. The STARS foundation is moving into a new hangar building at the Saskatoon airport at the end of December. The building was funded by a donation from PotashCorp. “We’re excited to be moving into the new location,” said Kroll-Goodwin. “We’ve outgrown our current one.” The current helicopters used by STARS can reach a radius of 250 miles from Saskatoon.

Government predicts budget surplus Thanks to a diverse and growing economy, Saskatchewan remains on track to balance its books in 2013-14, with surpluses projected for both the General Revenue Fund (GRF) and Summary Financial Statements. “Balanced budgets are a key part of our government’s Plan for Growth,” Finance Minister Ken Krawetz said. “Managing spending is an essential part of our commitment to fiscal responsibility. We’re confident the Saskatchewan economy is well positioned to continue to withstand some expected volatility in the natural resource sector over the remainder of this fiscal year.”

The Mid-Year Report projects the province will finish the year with a $22.8 million pre-transfer surplus in the GRF and $677.7 million in the Growth and Financial Security Fund. The Summary Financial Statements are projected to show a surplus of $467.0 million at year end, up $317.2 million from budget. Economic growth is now forecast to increase to 3.6 per cent in 2013, mainly due to record crop production. Saskatchewan continues to experience record population growth, has the lowest unemployment rate in the nation and leads the country in employment growth and growth in average week-

ly earnings. Volatility in potash revenue was offset by increased oil revenue, resulting in a GRF revenue decrease of $33.9 million from budget. Expenses are forecast to be $8.1 million higher than budget. Disaster assistance spending as well as increased support for the Saskatchewan Assured Income for Disability program and other disability initiatives are the main areas of higher spending than projected at budget. Beyond those needed increases, the Mid-Year Report shows that most other ministries and agencies are holding the line or reducing costs, identifying $75.6 million in expense reductions.

Winter weights now in effect across province Shippers are likely welcoming the colder, wintery weather, as winter weights came into effect at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, December 1. “Trucking is a vital aspect of our export-based economy, particularly in a province that continues to grow,” Highways and Infrastructure Minister Don McMorris said. “Shippers can

haul heavier loads during colder winter months, which results in fewer trips and cost savings.” When a roadbed is frozen, secondary weight highways contain the same strength as primary weight highways, which support the heaviest legal loads on Saskatchewan roads. Since it allows efficient movement of goods from secondary to prima-

ry weight highways, shippers using secondary weight highways benefit from winter. Winter weights are typically removed on March 15, but shippers need to check the status regularly. As in the past, when temperatures rise and roadbeds remain soft, the ministry may remove winter weights in some areas.

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PotashCorp cuts 440 jobs in province Workers in Saskatchewan suffered a huge hit when Saskatoon-based Potash Corp decided to cut its workforce by about 18 per cent, affecting 1,045 people — with the biggest hits in Saskatchewan as well as Florida and New Brunswick. The company says its decision was based on a low demand for potash and phosphates, two major types of fertilizer used to promote crop growth. The biggest job cuts will be in

Saskatchewan, where 440 people will be affected — about 42 per cent of the total announced Tuesday. Most of these job losses will be at the company’s Lanigan division, where one of two mills will suspend production by the end of 2013, and its Cory divison, where production will be reduced, as well as the Saskatoon headquarters. The Saskatchewan government said it would dispatch its

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Across from City Hall

Kimberly Kroll-Goodwin (right), Development Officer for Shock Trauma Air Rescue Service Foundation (STARS), accepts a cheque for $1,000 from Bill and Elaine Peters of the I-Deal-2-U Thrift Store in Warman. The Peters donate a portion of their store’s profits to a community organization every month.

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rapid response teams to help those affected find work in other sectors. It also said it would also look to improve its work to match training resources with labour needs. The cuts in New Brunswick will see 130 people affected while the rest will be outside Canada, including more than 435 in the United States. Florida will lose 350 jobs while another 85 people will be affected in North Carolina.

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20

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013

Corman Park Council sets initial meetings with multi-parcel developers RM tackling road transfer By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

With 21 proposals for multi-parcel country residential subdivisions to consider, councilors with the RM of Corman Park are loooking to get started on the process of choosing which developments get the green light. Councilors decided to begin meeting with potential developers on Friday, December 13 and Wednesday, December 18. The meetings are open to the public, but are aimed at providing developers with an opportunity to explain their proposals to council and are not designed to be a forum for pub-

lic debate. The public hearings will come at a later date. Division 1 councilor John Germs suggested the presentations be open, rather than in-camera. “I think it’s important for people to know that whatever developments we proceed with have to comply with rules and regulations and bylaws,” noted Germs. “It’s important for people to hear what those proposals are. We need to give people a chance to listen and watch the dialogue between the council and developers.” Corman Park Reeve Judy Harwood said communication between developers and the public is essential.

Council initially received 31 multiparcel development proposals last summer. That number was narrowed down to 21 based on pre-set criteria for ranking them into high, medium and low categories. Only high and medium-ranked proposals advanced to the second stage of the process, which was public consutation. Developers were required to consult with neighbours within a 1.6 kilometer radius of their proposed project. The deadline for the public consultations was December 2. The upcoming presentations to council are also part of the second stage. Council is hoping to hear all the potential developers’ proposals by mid-

January. Each developer will have 30 to 45 minutes for their presentation. But even then, it will take an estimated 1015 hours for all the presentations. Following presentations to council, further discussions will take place at the Planning Committee level to narrow the number of proposals that advance to Phase 3. These discussions will include feedback from the provincial government’s Community Planning division, the City of Saskatooon, the provincial Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure, the Saskatoon Health Region and the provincial Water Security Agency.

Construction of the new Dalmeny Access Road has resulted in severances of some widely-separated portions of the “old” road. Those road portions are being transferred by the Ministry of Highways to the RM of Corman Park and council is now grappling with the extra costs of maintaining small, scattered portions. The RM is considering several options, including the possibilty of reverting them to gravel. Gravel surfaces would allow the RM to incorporate those roads into its regular grader schedules.

13121MC03

Clark's Crossing Gazette - December 5, 2013 issue  
Clark's Crossing Gazette - December 5, 2013 issue  

Clark's Crossing Gazette - December 5, 2013 issue

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