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Martensville Mayor Kent Muench stands in what will be the city’s new council chambers on Tuesday, October 15. Muench was joined by other members of council and administration staff for a brief tour of the new city hall building on Centennial Drive, adjacent to the civic centre. City manager Scott Blevins anticipates staff will be able to move into the spacious 10,000 square foot building in early December.

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FIRE PREVENTION WEEK ACTIVITIES

Area departments demonstrate safety, rescue operations By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

Fire departments in Warman, Martensville and Dalmeny held open houses on October 10 to mark Fire Prevention Week, which came to an end October 13. The theme of this year’s campaign focused on the dangers of kitchen fires. According to the provincial government and research by the National Fire Protection Association, two out of every five fires start in the kitchen. The Martensville Fire Department (MFD) had about 200 people attend the open house in that city. There were toy fireman hats, temporary tattoos, fire apparatus’ displays and presentations for kids of all ages. The department used the prevention week’s theme to demonstrate its own mock kitchen fire to show how fast a fire can worsen if the right extinguishing procedures are not followed. “Our intention was to first show people what happens when you put water on a kitchen fire and how rapidly water causes the fire to spread,” said MFD Lt. Larry Sigfusson. “The second was to show people the proper techniques for putting it out by putting a lid on it and putting on a pair of oven mitts. The third involved showing how to smother a fire, turning the heat off and then getting out of the house to call 911.” Emergency planning was also a part of Fire Prevention Week and an important lesson Sigfusson is happy to educate people about. “One thing people tend to forget is if they have a home escape plan because if you do have a fire you only have a limited time to get out of the house,” Sigfusson added. “The ability of fire departments to respond to a fire is based on

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SESSION BYLAW REVIEW AND RATEPAYER MEETING DATE: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2013 TIME: 7:00PM LOCATION: DUNDURN COMMUNITY HALL 214 3RD ST. DUNDURN, SK

JAMES TARRANT | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Dalmeny Fire Department members lift the roof off a car to demonstrate the procedures undertaken to safely remove occupants in the event of a motor vehicle accident the stats of 50 years ago. So, if you have a fire that is fully developed in three minutes, there isn’t a fire department in the world that can meet that response time.” Warman Deputy Fire Chief Russ Austin said people are generally knowledgeable about fire safety but explained that most people are unbelieving a fire can happen to them. “Knowledge is power when it comes to safety; whether it is fire safety or safety within your house. There are some things that people don’t think about or have just taken for granted. If you are not prepared and you do experience a fire it will be dramatically different than for someone who has given fire safety a little bit of forethought.” The Warman Fire Department’s open house had an impressive turn out of about 750 people, which is double what

the department expected, said Austin. Kids dressed up in fireman gear and shot water at targets – a very popular activity the department had never offered previously. Austin said the department wanted to demonstrate to kids that a fireman should be a welcoming and not an intimidating figure. “They see us walking around in full turn-out gear with a breathing apparatus. Then they get the opportunity to put the suit on themselves and then it is not so strange to them.” The Dalmeny Fire Department’s demonstration was more intense and focused on car seat and vehicle safety, said Lt. Joanne Elder. “We chose to do this demonstration because 15 to 20 per cent of our calls are motor vehicle accidents. Our promo-

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tion tonight was vehicle safety and car seat safety.” Members demonstrated the steps taken when there is a motor vehicle accident and an adult and child are trapped inside. Elder explained the steps involved, including a patrol of the accident scene for dangerous materials, securing the vehicle, disconnecting the battery and looking inside to check for hazards. The glass is then taken out and the doors and roof are removed to ensure the occupants are extricated safely. “People are typically intrigued with how vehicles come apart,” Elder noted. “They like to see that we have the tools and personnel who are competent in the use of them. These demonstrations are important at presenting what fire persons know, how we train and that we are competent in our skills.”

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 PG. 3

High-risk offender residing in Saskatoon area

20 years for Borden health clinic The Borden Primary Health Care Centre celebrated its 20th anniversary on Tuesday, October 8 with a community barbecue for residents. At right, students from Borden School line up amongst the autumn leaves for their meal, Above, Carol Konchuk who has worked at the Borden Health Clinic for 25 years, officially retired on October 11. She is handing over the reins at the clinic reception desk to Lorrarine Lajoie (at left). TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Corman Park working to foster development, says Reeve By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The RM of Corman Park has a council that is united and works well together, which marks a big change from a year ago, according to reeve of the municipality Judy Harwood. In an address to the Corman Park annual ratepayers meeting in Saskatoon on Wednesday, October 9, Harwood said when she threw her hat into the ring for the position of reeve in the municipal election in the fall of 2012, she ran on a commitment to bring respectful leadership back to Corman Park. That has happened, she said. “The elected councillors work as a team, regardless of their differences. There are no longer splits on council or within the RM. We all must realize that any threats to our existence should not come from within. It’s more important than ever that we have a united RM.” Harwood said over the past year, the RM has settled most of its outstanding legal issues, has gone through a number

of staffing changes and dealt with many challenges related to heavy snowfall, flooding and road maintenance. Key staff positions – including that of administrator and public works director – were filled, residential and industrial development is increasing and the RM has implemented a comprehensive road construction and maintenance plan. “We have an area of 800 square miles and a road network of about 1,200 kilometers, serving a population of almost 9,000 ratepayers,” she noted. Harwood said the severe flooding last spring created hardships for many residents. “We’re working with government, the Water Security Agency and the Opimihaw Creek Watershed Association to find permanent solutions.” According to Harwood, the RM of Corman Park is “open for business” and noted the municipality is working with its neighbouring urban centres – including Saskatoon – to hammer out an appropriate development plan that ensures growth is sustainable, accommodates

the needs of urban municipalities’ growth expectations and also provides flexibility for RM landowners who want to develop and subdivide their properties in a booming economy.

EFFICIENT OPERATION

Administrator Adam Tittemore told ratepayers at the annual meeting that its “an exciting time” for the municipality because of the huge amount of development opportunities. At the same time, he added, there are competing interests that have to be taken into account during regional planning discussions. “In terms of long-term planning, we want to make sure we take advantage of economic opportunities out here now for sustainable economic growth,” said Tittemore. “We have seen over the last year, an increase of over 75 per cent in building permit values. We recently had a call for multi-parcel country residential subdivisions and we received 31 proposals for developments. The development proposals range from four lots to over 1,000 lots.”

Tittemore said the RM is looking to increase its tax base by encouraging more commercial, residential and industrial developments. The past year was a reassessment year for the Saskatchewan Assessment Management Agency (SAMA) and most ratepayers saw the assessed value of their land and buildings jump by quite a bit, Tittemore acknowledged. “Every four years SAMA does a physical reassessment of all the properties in the province. The last time it was done was in 2009 and there have been some drastic changes in the market value since then. The average residential assessment increase this year was 50 per cent. The average commercial assessment increase was 100 per cent and the average assessment increase for agricultural land was 30 per cent.” Tittemore said the RM council lowered the mill rate to compensate for the increase in assessment value. The RM has set up a tax installment prepayment program for ratepayers looking to

spread their tax payments over 12 equal monthly payments, rather than paying one large lump sum. “This program is being set up in January, 2014,” he said.

ROAD MAINTENANCE

The RM of Corman Park is committed to a four-year rotation for its road gravelling program, says Joe Stewart, Director of Public Works for the RM. “That means we’ll be working to travel one-quarter of our roads every year,” said Stewart. “We are going to hire more contractors and start the program earlier in the year.” Stewart said the RM had a late start this year and, as a result, its gravelling program won’t be completed until this month. “Next year, I hope to have our gravel program done by July or August,” said Stewart. “That will be a huge improvement.” The RM is looking to find long-term sources of aggregate for its gravel program. The RM is also developing a CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

Plenty of development applications

Saskatoon City Police are warning the public about a high-risk offender who is now residing within the Saskatoon area. James Peter McKnight, 34, has a history of exposing himself and touching himself inappropriately in front of both male and female children in public places. He is considered at high-risk to James Peter re-offend. McKnight The Prince Albert Police Service issued the same public advisory earlier this year, however McKnight has now relocated and is residing in the Saskatoon area. He is described as a Caucasian male, 5’10” in height, 160 lbs., with a medium build, short brown hair and green eyes. McKnight is prohibited from: a) attending a public park or public swimming area where persons under the age of 16 years are present or can be reasonably expected to be present, or a daycare center, schoolyard, playground, or community center; b) seeking, obtaining or continuing any employment or volunteering in a capacity that involves being in a position of trust or authority towards persons under the age of 16; c) using a computer system for the purpose of communicating with a person under the age of 16. He must also reside at a Saskatoon address and undergo treatment. Police add that it is important to note that this information is intended to enable members of the public to take suitable preventative measures and not to embark upon any form of vigilantism or unreasonable conduct toward this individual.

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(Left to right) Delisle Primary Health Centre Nurse Practitoner Alison Mescall, Receptionist Bailey Schumacher and Chiropractor Dr. Lisa Merkosky

Delisle Primary Health Centre offers variety of services for residents By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Keeping the community healthy is what the Delisle Primary Health Care Centre is all about, says Angela Luron, manager of the facility which operates under the umbrella of the Saskatoon Health Region’s (SHR) Primary Health Services. “It’s really about ensuring people have access to primary health care,” said Luron in an interview during an open house at the centre recently. “We offer a wide range of services in one building and it effectively brings health care into the community so people don’t’ always have to travel to Saskatoon to access those services.” While the Delisle Primary Health Centre doesn’t provide emergency medical treatment, it plays a key role in keeping people healthy so they don’t end up in emergency rooms. Luron explained that the Delisle First Responders program, combined with Saskatoon-based MD Ambulance, provide excellent trauma care in emergency situations. “We work closely with the first responders and MD Ambulance,” she said. The Delisle Health Centre has a team of professional health care providers working in a variety of fields, including a physician, nurse practitioner, chiropractor, dentist, pharmacist educator, massage therapist, mental health and addictions counsellor, registered nurses (foot clinic), home care services, a medical laboratory, public health (immunizations and baby health clinics), and client patient access services (CPAS). It also houses the offices of the community recreation director and a consultant from the SHR “In Motion” health program. “Some of the primary health team members work for SHR, while others are independent practitioners who lease space in the building,” stated Luron. “The community benefits by having all these team members in one location. It’s convenient and the team members can tap into each other’s expertise. It’s a collaborative approach that really puts the community first.” While the town’s 2012 covered health population was roughly 1,600, the Delisle Primary Health Centre serves a vast area. “There are approximately 2,800 people in total in our geographic area who potentially could access the services here in this facility,” she said. “Many prefer to go to

mary health for people in this area.” The health centre responds to the needs and suggestions of the community through a Community Health Council, regular discussions with residents, and by being part of the community inter-agency organization.

Saskatoon, but we find when we have a structure like this in a rural community, it’s the people who have trouble with transportation – or who have trouble accessing services in Saskatoon – that tend to make use of our services. The goal we have is to improve access to pri-

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

5

Radisson celebration unveils Epp statue Submitted by

VIOLET KYLIUK

Prairie Spirit School Division

The Town of Radisson is holding a special Fall Celebration on Friday, October 18 at the Town Hall on Main Street. Why celebrate? We acknowledge the blessings of our abundant harvest, a very successful Centennial Celebration in August and the generosity of the Epp family. Why not share this with our friends, neighbours and townspeople? The event kicks off with the unveiling of a remarkable sculpture of a black bear, cre-

ated by the renowned artist Bill Epp and graciously donated to the Town of Radisson by his wife, Betty. The donation is to commemorate the Radisson Centennial 2013. Epp was born in Glenbush, SK in 1930. As a professor at the University of Saskatchewan and a founding member of the Prairie Sculptors’ Association (PSA), he had a strong influence on many contemporary sculptors and artists. Epp travelled and studied in many continents and worked in multiple mediums, but is best known for his bronze sculptures. Throughout his illustrious

career, he was commissioned to create many monuments across Canada and abroad. He died in 1995. Cocktails are available at 5 p.m., the unveiling at 6 p.m., followed by a roast beef dinner and entertainment. Advance tickets are available at Wenner Foods and the Town Office. Sales are limited to 165 tickets, so don’t miss a chance to share in the spirit of abundance and pride for a town that accomplished so much! Come out and enjoy the evening. For more information, contact the Town Office at (306) 827-2218.

APPRENTICESHIP AWARDS PRESENTED

Wade Dolan of Martensville received the 2013 Outstanding New Journeyperson Award in the Truck and Transport Mechanic trade at a ceremony in Regina on Friday, October 4. The award was presented by Garry Kot (left), board chair of the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC) and Deputy Minister Kent Campbell on behalf of Minister of the Economy Bill Boyd.

Blair Knowlton received the 2013 Outstanding New Journeyperson Award in the Electrical trade at a ceremony in Regina on Friday, October 4. Knowlton also won the Saskatoon Electrical Contractors Association award and the George Pellerin Memorial Scholarship, which is awarded to the person with the highest mark in the journeyperson examination across all trades.

13103CP00


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 PG. 6

Rural nursing homes facing challenges

Where is Michael Sean Stanley? By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

COMMENTARY

I don’t know about you, but every time I received an RCMP report in my email over the last two weeks informing me about the whereabouts of sex offender Michael Sean Stanley, it made me cringe. The hunt for Stanley has become a folly of sorts. It reminds me of those “Where’s Waldo” books or better yet the children’s show “Where in the World is Carmen San Diego?” It is no joking matter, but it has become one. It was October 1 when Stanley ripped off his electronic monitoring device. From that date parents, women and local schools have been paranoid about his whereabouts. It felt like every time you blinked, Stanley was possibly in a different place. First he was in Lloydminister, then unconfirmed sightings in Kindersley, then Saskatoon, then Edmonton and then back to Saskatoon. Surprise! He is now in the United States. Big questions are probably going through the minds of many Canadians. First, how did he take off an electronic monitoring device? I mean, if it is a device that is supposed to monitor a violent offender you would think that it wouldn’t be that easy to remove. Secondly, why hasn’t he been caught? I understand Western Canada is a large area to search for someone – almost as bad as searching for a needle in a haystack. One of the excuses I have heard was that Stanley did not fit the stereotypical criminal profile, which made him easy to blend in. Really? So if a criminal doesn’t have squinty eyes, long hair with a pony tail or a patch over one eye he can’t be caught? I know the RCMP are overtaxed with the amount of work they have to do. As a growing province, Saskatchewan will be in need of more RCMP officers. I would like to make clear that I am not blaming them. When a criminal is able to freely travel across two provinces and across the CanadaUSA border, it has people shaking their heads and asking questions. Whether you like it or not, Stanley’s escape does make authorities seem incompetent because, as everyone knows, catching criminals comes with the job title. That leads to my third point. How did Stanley get across the border? How safe are we that a known criminal that has a track record for violent behaviour can get across the border into the United States. Using fake IDs and passports are common, but you would think that security on North America’s largest undefended border would have extra security measures in place for a criminal like Stanley. Should we feel more comfortable that Stanley is in the United States now and not within our borders? That depends on who you ask. Dan Laville, Alberta’s justice department spokseperson, said in an email conversation with the Edmonton Journal that “Stanley’s record of criminal offences are not serious enough to justify asking American authorities to turn him over.” The newspaper also stated that the U.S. Marshall’s office is not tracking Stanley and is not aware of his whereabouts. Actions like this suggest that sexual abuse is not really that serious. At least not as serious as murder or terrorism. If you were to ask a victim of sexual abuse or violence the trauma itself takes a lifetime to get over, if it ever happens. In a perfect world Stanley should have a ball and chain electronic monitoring bracelet weighing 100 lbs. Or, better yet, he should be behind bars where he belongs. The fact that he is not says a lot about the ability and resources of Canadian authorities to track dangerous criminals and for the Canadian Justice System. These kinds of criminals should be in jail and not simply handed an electronic monitoring bracelet.

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While there is a penchant to focus on the bad news from the recent health minister’s report on the status of nursing homes in Saskatchewan, rural residents can take some solace in the report’s good news.

MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

At least compared with their counterparts in the cities, rural nursing homes seemed to fare slightly better. Health Minister Dustin Duncan last spring asked the chief executive officers of each health district to tour every nursing home facility, talk to staff, patients and family members and report back. What resulted is a 311-page report released on the Government of Saskatchewan website that outlined some disturbing accounts of the care provided to our elderly. Some of the worst stories came from the Saskatoon Health Region, including “delays in toileting that result in continent residents soiling

fact that rural nursing home employees – especially those in smaller communities – are very likely looking after someone’s loved one that they have known all their lives. Regardless of staffing levels, this automatically makes the desire to go that extra mile – perhaps a trait more common in those who come from smaller communities. And while many rural communities are contending with aging facilities, the staff and community is inclined to compensate to produce a better nursing home experience. But the very fact that there seems to more problems in the cities isn’t great for rural nursing care in either the long- or the short term. The immediate “fix” is a $10-million “Urgent Issues Fund” set aside by Duncan in the wake of last week’s announcement. It’s not much and the lion’s share will likely be gobbled up by urban nursing homes where the need seems greatest. But if one looks at Saskatchewan’s demographics, it may not be good for rural nursing care in the long run, either.

Currently there are some 8,700 beds available in the province’s 156 nursing homes and 17 hospitals and health centres. Of those, 62.8 per cent are Level 4 care. It is a system costing $749 million a year – $619 million of which comes from the province and the remaining $130 million from fees that currently range from $1,025 to $1,951 a month. That works out to a cost of $76,896 per resident per year. And the frightening reality is that it will become much more expensive in the next few decades with rapid inflation in health care and that baby boomers coming of age in the next 20 to 25 years. However, the rural Saskatchewan has a higher proportion in that geriatric demographic now. It also has less baby boomers. That may mean a shift of emphasis on nursing homes to the urban centres that have more baby boomers. For as big a challenge as it is for rural communities to care for their elderly now, that challenge may have just gotten greater.

Reader Opinions

Conservatives policy letting our veterans down Imagine you are a Canadian soldier who has been disabled in the line of duty—what kind of support do you think you’d get as you transition to civilian life under this supposedly military-friendly Conservative Government? Odds are you are in for a lot of headaches. Under the Conservatives’ New Veterans Charter, you will get a lump sum payment instead of a disability pension. Many—including Canada’s Veterans Ombudsman—say that this sum is inadequate for the pain and suffering you’ve endured. A group of injured vet-

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themselves” and residents being put to bed at 5:30 p.m. and awakened at 5:30 a.m., but not fed breakfast for hours. Also disconcerting is Regina home residents getting baths less than once a week – a problem brought to the attention of the legislature this spring that sparked Duncan’s call for this report. In all cases, the culprit wasn’t so much neglect of the patients but simply a lack of staffing – an especially acute problem in the cities. Of course, this doesn’t mean there aren’t problems in rural areas. Nor does it mean dedicated and caring of nursing home staff everywhere aren’t doing their best under the circumstances. But if rural nursing home staff are doing slightly better, one can see why. In many smaller communities, a solid job in a nursing home may be slightly more prized and appreciated, so they may not necessarily suffer from shortages as much as nursing homes in the cities where there may be more job options. Also of consequence is the

P ublishing

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erans is suing the Conservative Government because they say the money they have received is paltry and doesn’t even keep up with Workers’ Compensation awards. When you try to access government services for help, you’ll find a system that the Auditor General says is overly complex and hard to use. You’ll have a one-in-four chance of being released from the Canadian Forces without a support plan because the Department can’t even meet its own service standards. If you don’t live in a major city, you’ll have to drive for

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hours if you need a meeting with a Veterans Affairs official because the Government is closing 9 Veterans Affairs’ offices, including Saskatoon. If the Department makes a mistake, you’ll have a tough time getting it fixed. The Veterans Ombudsman found that in cases that ended up in Federal Court, the Veterans Review and Appeal Board had failed to make fair decisions 60 per cent of the time. The state of the system is shocking. As one Veteran told me recently: “Many believed that their government would look after

them, but obviously we were wrong. The battles that we have at home hurt more than those that were fought in other parts of the world...” The Conservative Government puts more time and energy into using veterans for photo-ops than it does in meeting their needs. That’s wrong. Our veterans put their lives on the line for our country. We owe it to our veterans to do everything we can to help them recover, reintegrate into civilian life and live with dignity and respect. Jim Karygiannis, MP Liberal Party Veterans Affairs Critic

HAVE AN OPINION? EXPRESS IT HERE.

The Clark’s Crossing Gazette welcomes Letters to the Editor regarding topics of interest to our readers. The Gazette reserves the right to edit letters for brevity and clarity. Letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, signature and daytime telephone number for verification purposes (name and daytime telephone number in the case of emailed letters). Letters must be tastefully written and meet the Gazette’s legal standards in order to qualify for publishing. Letters must be signed and include contact information for authenticity purposes. The Gazette does not necessarily support or oppose the opinions, expressed or implied, in this newspaper. The Clark’s Crossing Gazette is independently owned and operated. Any reproduction for non-personal purposes, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. The Gazette is distributed free of charge to residents in the area. Subscriptions outside the market area within Canada are available at a rate of $99.00+GST/yr.

VOL. 6 NO. 11


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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Abandonment of study will not deter patients from MS liberation treatment Local women say they would have procedure performed again By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

A recent multiple sclerosis study by University of Saskatchewan and University of British Columbia researchers may not discourage people from seeking alternative methods to treat symptoms of MS. The goal of the study was to find out whether narrowing veins in MS patients was one of the triggers that caused the disease. The study concluded that there was no link between narrowing neck veins and multiple sclerosis, a theory that was developed by Dr. Paolo Zamboni‘s 2008 paper called the Big Idea. Zamboni suggested that blocked blood vessels – specifically the jugular veins that drain blood from the spinal cord and brain to the central nervous system – may be one of the triggers that lead to MS. The medical name for the condition is called chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). Zamboni’s theory lead to the development of the liberation treatment, which involves stenting the jugular veins to increase blood flow. In the years after Zamboni’s theory, people with MS have been flocking to treatment centres in places such as Costa Rica and spending about $20,000 each to have their jugu-

lar veins opened. Martensville’s Judy Penill was one of those patients. She has had MS for about 10 years and decided that the liberation treatment would help her with balance issues and the ability to process information which had become increasingly difficult as the disease progressed. Penill received the treatment in December 2010 and said she felt like a whole new person afterward. “I felt great. I could walk without hanging onto anybody and I was very much in touch with what was going on around

lems. After the treatment, Unger said she didn’t see a huge improvement, but said she is falling less and her condition since the treatment has been stable. Unger said she would get the treatment again but the only issue for her is cost. “[The government] wont do the treatment in Canada. I am a little bit bitter about that. I heard in Canada that the liberation treatment could be done for under $5,000.” According to the University of Saskatchewan, Dr. Katherine Knox – who co-authored the study with Dr. Anthony Traboul“[The government] won’t do see, medical director of the UBC Hosthe treatment in Canada. I pital MS Clinic of am a little bitter about that. Vancouver Coastal Health – and their I heard in Canada that the colleagues looked at libertation treatment could 177 adults, including people living with be done for under $5,000.” MS, their siblings, • Tammy Unger and unrelated peome.” ple who did not have MS. They Penill said that her MS symp- imaged the veins using both ultoms improved for four to six trasound and catheter venogmonths, but she has noticed raphy, a more complicated prothat she once again needs assis- cedure that involves taking an tance to walk. She did say that X-ray of the vein after injectshe would get the liberation ing it with a special dye. Their treatment again despite what conclusions found that CCSVI the University of Saskatchewan “occurs rarely in both patients and University of British Cowith multiple sclerosis and in lumbia study concluded. healthy people,” with no specif Like Penill, Tammy Unger ic link to MS. They also found from Hague also received the that Zamboni’s ultrasound criliberation treatment in 2010. teria for CCSVI did not reliably Unger’s symptoms included loss pick up narrowing of the veins of balance and eyesight probas shown by catheter venogra-

Johner Boys coming to Borden Brad Johner and his sons are coming to Borden in early November. The award-winning country music star, along with sons Lucas, Jesse, Quinn and Matthew, are playing a benefit concert on Saturday, November 2 for the Borden Community Centre Preservation Committee. “The hall has been there a long time,” said Debbie Hembery, a member of the community hall preservation committee. “It’s really the centre of the community and it’s so important to keep it in good repair.” The committee is looking to renovate the downstairs bathrooms in the community hall and the funds will be used for that purpose, said Hembery. “The bowling alley is located in the basement and fixing up that part of the building is a priority for us right now.” She said ongoing renovations planned for the future include roof repairs. The community centre in Borden houses a variety of facilities, including the village library branch, a bowling alley and seniors centre. The hall is also used regularly for socials, dances, funerals and weddings. It also hosts weekly sessions of the local dance club and other community organizations.

Having an artist of Johner’s stature play in Borden is a big draw, said Hembery. “We’re very excited to have him come out to our community. It will be a great concert.” The evening is being billed as “Supper with Brad Johner and the Johner Boys” with 60 supper tickets available, sold

in advance only. There will also be 244 additional tickets available for the post-supper concert only. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door, and are available by calling 306-9972011 or 306-827-5007 or by email at Rickinhranch2009@ hotmail.com .

WARMAN Thrift Shop Thank you to everyone for your support! Last year we were able to send approximately $94,000 to the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC), to help out the with the needs of people in our community and around the world. We ask you to bring only items to the store that can be sold so we can make money to further our ministry

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phy. Saskatchewan Health Minister Dustin Duncan wonders why that if there is no link with narrowing veins and MS, why do MS patients who receive the liberation feel better? “We are going to continue to be involved with MS research. We haven’t decided yet what our next steps are going to be. We had indicated with the Albany Trial that ended that we were going to regroup with the MS community, the researchers and decide what government’s next course of action might be.” Duncan wouldn’t guarantee if this research would be centered around liberation therapy or possibly other treatment methods.

ka. What Broeska has discovered in his research and through results of patients who have participated in the clinical trial is that stem cells will seek out areas of the disease that are causing the symptoms. “[Stem cells] are attracted to certain proteins. In response to those proteins they will express a number of different proteins that will neutralize the oppos-

ing proteins,” said Broeska. Knox said using stem cell methods to treat MS is something Canadians are looking at, but not something their research group is focusing on right now. She said research work could be done in the future, but right now she said the university doesn’t have the present capacity of active research in stem cell studies in humans. 13103SS01

NEW STEM CELL TREATMENT One of the latest MS treatments that is gaining new ground is treating MS with stem cells. Dr. Doug Broeska, who is CEO of Winnipeg-based Regenetek, has been leading research in this area. MS patients can sign up for a clinical trial with Regenetek at a cost of $30,000, which is also based on whether the patient qualifies. The treatment is performed at a clinic in India and qualification for the treatment is based on informed consent process where medical records, a clinical diagnosis and other information for the MS patient is needed. Regenetek is also partially funded by a clinical trial company in India, which means the company will pay for half of the cost for the treatment. The remainder of the cost has to be covered by the patient. There have been 60 MS patients treated around the world with no trace of the MS showing up afterwards, says Broes-

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Martensville Athletic Pavilion beams put into place By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Construction is underway on Martensville’s new multimillion dollar Athletic Pavilion. The first of several structural beams for the open-concept state-of-the-art recreation complex, located next to the Martensville High School, were erected last week by AHC Group construction company. “It’s an exciting day, no question,” said Martensville city councilor Tyson Chillog as he watched the first beam as it was put in place by two massive cranes. “It’s going to be a great addition to our community.” The foundation for the building was put in place over the summer and the structure and fabric will be put up in stages over the next six to eight weeks. “They do the fabric and structure all at the same time as they work through the construction,” explained city manager Scott Blevins, who was also watching the construction take place on Wednesday, October 9. “It goes up in pieces. The fabric itself has to be stretched between each beam.”

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Two cranes work in tandem to lift the first of several aluminum beams onto the foundation of the Martensville Athletic Pavilion on Wednesday, October 10 The challenge, noted Blevins, will be for the structure and fabric to be in place before the weather gets too cold. There is a minimum temperature at which the fab-

ric cannot be applied. “They’re a little behind schedule,” he added, “but hopefully the fabric gets put in place before it gets really cold.”

The facility will feature a massive clear span interior and will contain a full-size oval running track and three full-size sports courts. The building will eventually be

connected to the Martensville High School, which is also slated for expansion and renovation in the next couple of years. The entire project is the

largest single civic undertaking in Martensville’s history. When it was unveiled on December 13, 2012, it was projected to cost between $31-million and $40-million. The entire project, a partnership bewteen the City of Martensville and Prairire Spirit School Division, is expected to be completed by the fall of 2016. The Athletic Pavilion itself should be ready for use by next summer, if all goes well, said Blevins. When finished will be comparable in size to the Physical Activity Centre (PAC) at the University of Saskatchewan. Materials for the new facility are supplied by Calgary’s Sprung Instant Structures Ltd. Structural advantages of this type of building include shorter construction time, lower costs and greater energy efficeincy. The company claims the buildings are 35 per cent more energy efficient than comparable traditional buildings and are engineered to withstand high winds, heavy snow loads and other environmental forces. While the coverings need to be replaced after 30 years, the aluminum frame is guaranteed for the life of the building.

Students learn basics of money management By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Students at Warman High School got a lesson on the basics of managing their money recently from the Canadian non-profit organization Investor Education Fund (IEF). The IEF was founded by the Ontario Securities Commission and provides unbiased educational information to the public. One of the organization’s most popular outreach programs is called “Funny Money”. The hour-long session is geared toward teens and gives them a hands-on demonstration of the importance of budgeting, cash flow and making smart investment decisions. Denis Grignon, a writer and stand-up comedian from On-

tario, told a gymnasium full of students in Warman that there are three basic rules when it comes to keeping track of your personal finances. “Rule number one is ‘know your flow’,” said Grignon halfjokingly. “That means keep track of your cash flow. Know what you’re spending your money on and keep track of your income. “The second rule is ‘Control what you owe.’ That’s the one that everyone struggles with. It’s a tough one because your debts can pile up quickly and if you only make minimum payments on credit cards, you will end up paying a lot more over time. “The third rule is ‘Invest some dough’,” Grignon continued with his wordplay. “But

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that only applies if you have money set aside to invest. Don’t bother about the third point if you don’t respect the first two.” Grignon said it is vital that young people learn the basics of financial literacy early so they can stay on track later in life. Using elements of audience participation and stand-up comedy techniques, Grignon drew his audience in and kept them involved throughout the session. The IEF program is aimed at encouraging Canadians to achieve financial stability. “It’s not about becoming a millionaire or getting rich quick,” Grignon explained to the audience. “This is about helping you become solid, stable, sensible and financially-responsible citizens.”

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Magic Johnson coming to Credit Union Centre for We Day celebration in November International charity and educational partner Free The Children, alongside Regional Title Sponsor PotashCorp, announced the lineup of speakers and performers taking the stage to inspire thousands of students who have earned their way through service to attend We Day Saskatchewan at the Credit Union Centre on November 6. NBA legend, Magic Johnson will share his passion for social change with the crowd. Sing-

er-songwriters Tyler Shaw and Kay will get the thousands of youth in attendance off their seats and build excitement for their journey to make the world a better place. Also included in the star-studded lineup is inspirational speaker Spencer West, traditional African male choir, the Kenyan Boys Choir and national spoken word champion Chris Tse, with unforgettable speeches and performances. In the year of the 50th anniversary of his father’s memora-

ble I Have a Dream speech, an exciting addition to the lineup is human rights advocate Martin Luther King III, who will be speaking at all We Day events across North America in 2013. Leading the electrified crowd will be award-winning recording artist Shawn Desman, host for We Day Saskatchewan, along with international activists and co-founders of Free The Children, Craig and Marc Kielburger. The full list of speakers and performers an-

nounced to date includes: · Magic Johnson (@MagicJohnson) – NBA legend, twotime hall of famer and philanthropist · Martin Luther King III – Human Rights advocate and eldest son of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. · Shawn Desman (@DaRealSD) – Platinum-selling, JUNO and MMVA Award-winning recording artist · Tyler Shaw (@TylerShawMusic) – Certified gold selling artist and Free The Children ambassador · Neverest (@Neverestmusic) – Chart-topping, MMVA nominated Canadian pop-rock band · Kay (@mynameiskay) – Canadian singer-songwriter · National Chief Shawn A-inchut Atleo – National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations

· Donisha Prendergast (@rastatrekka, @RasTaMovie) – Filmmaker, actress, dancer, poet and Bob and Rita Marley’s granddaughter · Jillian Martin – Miss Teen Canada-World 2013 · Kenyan Boys Choir (@ boyschoirkenya) – Traditional African male choir, who sang at the 2009 inauguration of President Obama · Craig and Marc Kielburger (@craigkielburger) – International activists and co-founders of Free The Children · Spencer West (@spencer2thewest) – Me to We inspirational speaker, Free The Children ambassador, author and double amputee who climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro on his hands and in his wheelchair in June, 2012 · Molly Burke (@mollymetowe)

– Visually impaired Me to We motivational speaker who speaks out against bullying and the power of hope · Chris Tse – Me to We inspirational speaker, national spoken word champion and humanitarian · Youth speakers – Hannah Alper and Vishal Vijay “I’ve been involved with We Day for a few years and it’s exhilarating to be with thousands of young people who are working so passionately to make the world a better place,” said Shawn Desman, platinum-selling, JUNO and MMVA Awardwinning recording artist. “After seeing Free The Children communities first-hand in Kenya, I understand the impact CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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PUNCHING HIS OLYMPIC TICKET Warman boxer wins North American super-heavyweight amateur title, sets sights on Olympics By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

When Joel Hardes of Warman stepped into the boxing ring last summer in California against an opponent who was 6’7” inches tall and weighed 281 pounds, he didn’t feel intimidated. “I’ve never been knocked out or even dazed by a punch yet,” said Hardes, who himself stands 6’1” and weighs in at 255 pounds. “Sure, I was a little nervous before the fight but once it started the adrenaline

kicked in.” Hardes also had confidence going into the 2013 Desert Showdown Amateur World Boxing Championship tournament in Indio, California July 9-13. Facing the reigning American champion, he not only held his own against a much larger, heavier opponent, Hardes actually came out on top. While the judges initially awarded the Desert Challenge championship to Hardes’ opponent in the third round, officials changed their mind a few weeks later after viewing a video of the fight because of mistakes made by the judges. Hardes’ opponent committed several fouls, but did not have any points deducted from his score at the time. After review, Hardes was declared the winner. Winning the Desert Chal-

lenge championship was the icing on the cake for Hardes. He had already come from virutally nowhere to win a unanimous decision a week earlier in San Carlos, Arizona. The 23-yearold was crowned the champion in the super-heavyweight division at the Native American Boxing Championships (NABC) in Arizona from July 4-6. Held annually at the Apache Gold Casino Resort in San Carlos, AZ, the NABC is an event sanctioned by USA Boxing, the national governing body of Olympic-style amateur boxing. Not bad for a guy who was introduced to the sport only six months earlier. Hardes, who took three years of post-secondary education in the pre-Medicine program at the University of Saskatchewan CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

Naturally gifted boxer pushing hard

Joel Hardes of Warman displays his stance and his SuperHeavyweight Division championship belt from the 2013 North American Boxing Championships TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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Ugly victory over Esks doesn’t worry players As the colours of the leaves change around here, so too have peoples’ attitudes towards victories by their beloved Saskatchewan Roughriders. On a windy fall day at Mosaic Stadium this past Saturday, with yellow and orange leaves tumbling in and around the CFL’s oldest ballpark, the Saskatchewan Roughriders held on to beat the Edmonton Eskimos 14-9 in a game which will never be shown on ESPN Classics. Saskatchewan stopped Eskimos quarterback Mike Reilly on a goal line stand with just over a minute to go to preserve a five-point victory and officially snuff out any chance of Edmonton making the playoffs in 2013. The outcome also greatly enhanced the Riders’ chance at hosting a playoff game for the first time since 2010. In the summer months, when this CFL season was still in its infancy, there was a tendency for the Rider Nation to flame a game like that. Quarterback Darian Durant threw for a puny

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170 yards and the team ended up with three turnovers on the day (in the exact same fashion their opponents gave up the football). There was no need to worry about getting up to visit the washroom during this one. You wouldn’t have missed much until the final minute, which in some ways, is a good thing. However, there were simply no big plays from a Rider perspective. Saskatchewan didn’t register a single offensive play over 30 yards which has led some to scratch their heads, but the defense came up to the rescue again. How does that saying go about defense and champion-

ships again? The talk on coffee row, and for sure on our TV and radio shows this week, would have surely been about the “ugly win” and how the team had better pick it up, “or else!”. But not now. Green football fans are not concerned about style points any longer. With the way this season has turned out, a threeway slugfest between Saskatchewan, Calgary and B.C. right down to the finish line, everyone was simply happy and satisfied with the victory. “I’m thankful for a lot of things,” Rider head coach Corey Chamblin when asked for what he’s most thankful on this Thanksgiving weekend. “Pro-

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fessionally I’m thankful this team has survived the storms we’ve had, got 10 wins, and how this team is learning to play together and stay together. I’m proud of this team right now. “And I’m also thankful they didn’t get that 3rd-and-1!” So the Riders improved to 10-5 and can clinch a home playoff game with a victory over B.C. Saturday at Mosaic Stadium. My preseason prediction of an 11-7 record and second-place in the West is looking real good now but the Riders could just as easily get to 12 wins. Or even 13! There are plenty of interesting things to watch down the stretch, not the least of which is the battle between Rider tailback Kory Sheets and Calgary running back Jon Cornish. Cornish is 137 yards ahead of Sheets for the league’s rushing crown with three games to go. “I sat out three games (with injury), he hasn’t and that’s pretty much all that matters,” CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

Sheets, Cornish battle for title

RESULTS T EAM


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

11

Rebels hold off Wolverines Road to provincial championships begin this weekend By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The Delisle Rebels locked up second place in the Northwest Conference with a convincing 49-22 win over the visiting Warman Wolverines on Thursday, October 10. The showdown for second place – which also marked the end of the regular season for both teams – looked like it could go either way at the midway mark of the game. Delisle held a slim 14-13 lead heading into the half, but Warman possessed the momentum. “It was a close game. Anything could have happened at that point,” said Rebels head coach Ken Byers after the game. “Everyone talks about the big plays in football games. They look at the touchdowns and the big runs and the long passes. But sometimes people miss the real game-defining moments. “Jake Schumacher made a huge block early in the second half and that really changed the momentum,” Byers continued. “Everything turned in that one play. It was a gamedefining and maybe even season-defining moment for our team.” Schumacher said he just did his best to step up and get the job done when Delisle quarterback Kyle Richardson gave him his assignment in the huddle. “We managed to make a big play out of it,” said Schumacher. “That felt good. This is my final year in high school football and I want to contribute as much as I can, especially going into the post-season.” The Wolverines, meanwhile, relied heavily on their defense to keep them in the game.

Delisle running back Sam Michnik is wrapped up by Warman defensive lineman Brandon McKimmon in Delisle’s 49-22 victory on Thursday, October 10

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“I thought our defense played pretty well, especially in the first half,” said head coach Tyler Scheidt. “Our offense woke up late in the second quarter and made two big plays for touchdowns heading into the half, but we just had too many penalties and left the offense in bad field position for most of the game.” After a back-and-forth battle for most of the first quarter, the Rebels scored late in the opening frame when Dane Arnsten punched the ball in on a oneyard run. Midway through the second quarter, Sam Michnik rambled 40 yards for the Rebels’ second major. Kyle Richardson converted on both touchdowns to make it 14-0 with about two minutes to go in the opening half. Simon Epp got his team on the board when he shed two tackles and scampered 75 yards to score the Wolverines’ first touchdown. Cole Balazsi kicked a successful convert. Warman took possession of the ball again with 11 seconds to go in the first half. A shortyardage third-down gamble

paid off and, on the next play, Warman quarterback Josh Misskey hooked up with receiver Tyler Hume for a 70-yard touchdown pass and run play to pull the visitors within one. Delisle was able to block the convert and preserve their thin single-point lead heading into the half. In the third quarter, Delisle added three touchdowns by Michnik, Evan Morris and Torrin Schumacher while Balazsi countered with a late field goal for the Wolverines. Michnik and Clayton MacKenzie and accounted for Delisle’s touchdowns in the fourth quarter, while Tyler Hume recorded a major for Warman. Delisle now hosts North Battleford’s John Paul II while Martensville travels to Warman for conference playoffs this Saturday, October 19. “We’re at the point in the season now where every game is important,” Scheidt added. “We play Martensville at home and what could be more fun than that?” Both games are set for 1:00 p.m.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

Hanley remains undefeated Sabers 36 Lions 32 By WAYNE SHIELS

essenceofsask@gmail.com

It was a battle of unbeaten teams but the host Hanley Sabers kept their perfect record intact with a narrow 36-32 win over the Gull Lake Lions in 1A Conference 3 action on Thursday, October 10. The Sabers were first on the board when Kody Rowlett powered his way into the end zone on a five-yard touchdown run. Hanley kicked the convert for an 8-0 lead. The Sabers then successfully executed a short kickoff and took control of the ball on the Lions 45-yard line. After the teams exchanged three and outs at midfield, Saber’s Dion Bouchard rumbled to the Lions 26-yard line. The Sabers moved the ball to the 11-yard line before QB Joel Peters ran around the end for a TD. Another successful convert made the score 16-0 Hanley. Gull Lake responded by moving the ball down the field on a series of runs, culminating in 16-yard TD run by Jake Anderson. A successful convert made the score 16-8 at the end of the first quarter. Hanley started the second quarter with a long drive and scored on a 30-yard run by Kody Rowlett. Gull Lake speedster Ryan Evans then ran back a 75yard TD on the ensuing kickoff. The Lions tied the score 2424 on a TD pass to Kevin Sousa with 5:42 left in the half. Han-

Meadow Lake downs Martensville The Martensville Royals are optimistic heading into their 9-man high school football conference playoff game this Saturday, despite a 53-13 road loss to the Meadow Lake Spartans on Thursday, October 10. The game in Meadow Lake was the final regular seasoncontest for the Royals. They now take on the Warman Wolverines in Warman on Saturday, October 19 at 1:00 p.m. The winner of that game advances to the provincial quarter-final on Saturday, October 26. “We are still trying to come back from injuries and our defence needs to work on pass coverage,” said Royals head coach Lyle Evanisky. Despite the injuries, he expects his team to be motivated when they take on their arch-rivals. “Should be another good match up,” he said.

SaSkatoon

ley was quick to respond with a pair of passes to Jesse Presnell to set up the Sabers deep in the Lion’s end, where Peters ran for his second major. Hanley failed on the convert before the Lions took possession of the ball on Hanley’s 47-yard line. Gull Lake scored on a long pass and run to Mathew Vaughan and took the lead 32-30 following a successful convert. Hanley was able to regain the lead in the third quarter after a great diving catch by Tareq Halabi set them up on Gull Lake’s 9-yard line. On his second try, Peters was able to break the plane of the goal to give his team a 36-32 lead. The convert was just wide. Gull Lake was able to advance to Hanley’s 12-yard line before being stopped on two consecutive incomplete passes. Hanley prevented Gull Lake from scoring points when the line broke through to block the Lion’s field goal attempt and the Sabers took over the ball on their own 13-yard line. A pass to Jesse Presnell moved the Sabers up to their 40-yard line and then advanced into Gull Lake territory on scrambles by Peters. The drive stalled and for most of the fourth quarter the defences for both teams held strong. With two minutes left in the game, Gull Lake went deep to receiver Jared Down who made an spectacular diving grab and was down by contact inside Hanley’s two-yard line. With the game on the line

the Sabers’ defence came up huge, stopping Anderson on three consecutive plays. On first down Brody Richmond powered through the middle to stop Anderson for a two yard loss. On second down Anderson slipped as he attempted to cut to the right resulting in another loss. On the third down play, Anderson took a pitch out and attempted to run around the left end but was stopped at the four-and-a-half yard line on a great open field tackle by Damon Prystupa. With the turnover on downs, the Sabers needed a first down to assure victory. The first play was an incomplete pass, but on second down Peters moved around a rushing Lions defender, then cut inside a second defender before breaking another tackle and carrying two defenders on his back – diving to get the first down. With only 14 seconds left the Sabers were able to kneel down on consecutive plays and celebrate a hard fought victory. Coach Mark Anderson had high praise for his football team stating that despite some first half injuries to key players, the team really rallied. “It was a real gut check for our boys. At half time we said someone needs to step up and they did. It was just tremendous. So, I am really proud of the boys. All the credit to them.” With the win Hanley will be hosting a playoff game on Saturday, October 19.

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Hanley’s Brody Richmond stops Gull Lake’s Jake Anderson with 1:18 left

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Aberdeen gets by Biggar The Aberdeen Crusaders won their final regular season game 34-28 on Thursday, October 10, finishing out their 6-man football season on a high note. The team gets set to play their conference final payoff game in Unity this Saturday, October 19 at 2:00 p.m. Crusaders head coach Justin Olnhoff said the contest against Biggar was exciting. “Our slow start left us trailing at the half 16 - 0 after a couple heartbreaking dropped passes on our final drive,” said Olnhoff. “Our second half was solid, with the defense making

key stops and the offense driving hard each and every play. “ The Crusaders went ahead with about 3 minutes on the clock and were able to hold on to the victory, despite a large surge from their offense in the closing plays. “Tough game, exciting win, great support from our parents who brought food and had a tailgate party with the boys afterward,” said Olnhoff. “It was nice to see the character and the heart of our players as they battled back to win the game, despite the sizable deficit going into the second half.”

Hafford defeats Dalmeny The Dalmeny Cougars finished out their inaugural 6-man high school football season on the road with a loss to Hafford on Thursday, October 10. The Cougars completed the season with a record of 0 wins and 5 losses, but were competitive in all their games.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

13

Draude cracks roster, hones skills with WHL’s Hitmen By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

It takes a lot of hard work to make the roster of a Western Hockey League team but Warman’s Terrell Draude has earned his spot on the Calgary Hitmen roster this year. Draude played his Pee Wee AA hockey in Warman and suited up with the Saskatchewan Bantam AA Hockey League’s Sask Valley Vipers before playing with the Saskatchewan Midget AAA Hockey League’s Saskatoon Contacts last season. In 2011-12 Draude led the SAABHL in scoring with 54 goals and 40 assists in 24 games. With the Contacts he recorded 14 goals and 15 assists in 39 games. On October 2, Draude added an assist in his very first game with the Hitmen against the Lethbridge Hurricanes, a game the Hitmen won 5-3. Draude said it felt great to get his first point. “It was a relief to get it out of the way. Ever since I got drafted I wondered how long it would take for me to make an impact on the team if I made it as a 16-year-old and I did.” After leading the league in scoring in the 2011-11 SAABHL season, the Calgary

PHOTO COURTESY MARK HUXLEY | CANESCAST

Warman’s Terrell Draude scored his first point in his first game with the WHL’s Calgary Hitmen October 2 Hitmen made Draude their second round pick in the 2012 Bantam Entry Draft. Hitmen coach Mike Wil-

liamson said he sees a lot of promise in Draude. “He has a very skilled soft set of hands, great size and we

kind of project him as a big power forward either playing on the wing or in the middle. It is going to take a little time for him to get up to speed and strength of the league. He is progressing well and we feel he is going to be a great player for us as he improves,” said Williamson. Draude says he sees himself as a player who can contribute in just about any game situation. Draude’s coach in AA Pee Wee and with the Sask. Valley Vipers, Shaun Priel, knows that all too well. “His ability to shoot the puck, handle the puck and then use his body size to get physical. He was 6’1” when he played for me and when you are that big going against smaller guys, you are able to create space for yourself and the puck,” said Priel. “He was the leading scorer in the league by a pretty good margin. There would be some games where he would have eight to 11 points in a game just because his skillset allowed him to do that.” Williams said because of Draude’s size, he has been playing the 16-year-old on the wing, which is a position the 6’3”, 210 lb. Draude is

Soccer regional championships set for weekend High school soccer teams are gearing up for regional soccer championships this weekend.

1A BOYS

Hepburn School is participating in the Region B tournament at Rosthern Junior College in Rosthern. Hepburn takes on Oskayak at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, October 18. The winner of that games takes on Rosthern Junior College at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, October 18.

2A BOYS

Martensville and Osler Val-

ley Christian Academy are participating in the Region C finals tournament in Muenster on Saturday, October 19. Martensville takes on Muenster at 9:30 a.m., while Osler VCA goes up against Humboldt at 11:30 a.m. The winners of both those games advance to the regional championship game at 3:00 p.m.

3A BOYS

Warman High School is one of five teams vying for the Region A championship hosted by

Carlton High School in Prince Albert on Saturday, October 19. Warman’s first game is against the host Carlton team at 11:30 a.m. The winner of that game goes on to play in the regional final, slated for 3:00 p.m.

Cameron School at 3:00 p.m.. on Friday, October 18, with the winner advancing to take on

comfortable with. “As a winger they like me to go to the wall to get pucks out of the zone. They also need big guys on the wall to win battles.” Draude said he wouldn’t have made it to the WHL if it wasn’t for the coaches he had in Warman and Saskatoon, whom he credits for helping to shape the person and player

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he is today. Priel said it is always a good feeling when a player moves on to a higher level. “I do what I do in coaching and teaching to build relationships with kids. It is nice to hear there are opportunities for our kids and it is nice that he picked up a few things from our coaching staff along the way.”

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

Vipers come back to earn tie against Regina

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

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Broncos Goalie Eetu Laurikainen makes save as Collin Valcourt is hauled down by Brycen Martin

Four-star goaltending backstops Blades MOOOO-DEEEE!! The good-natured cheer of support for the on-again, offagain Saskatoon Blades’ goaltender was back on-again this past week. Alex Moodie started, and won, all four games the Bridge City Bunch played. He stopped 25 shots Wednesday, October 9 and was the second star in a 6-1 triumph over the Vancouver Giants. He followed that up with a 29-save effort Friday, also at Credit Union Centre, as the Blades nipped the Swift Current Broncos 2-1. That was worthy of second star status. Those turned out to be the warm-up acts for the 18-yearold Winnipeg product. It was on the road where Moodie really shone. He was the first star, with 39 stops, in Saturday’s 5-3 triumph in Brandon and finished up Thanksgiving Day as the undisputed first star with 40 saves as Saskatoon escaped Moose Jaw with a 2-1 triumph. “He just has that confidence right now that he knows he’s going to make the save and that, for our hockey club, is huge because now they have the confidence in Alex that if there is a breakdown, they’re not afraid of what’s going to happen,” said Blades’ assistant coach Curtis Leschyshyn following the Monday matinee triumph over the Warriors. “That’s dynamite right now and Alex has really been, the last two games, really been

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good!” Good enough to be better than the 16-year-old call-up from the Winnipeg Wild AAA Midgets who went 9-3-1 while Andrey Makarov was away at the 2012 World Junior Hockey Championship. And, putting to rest all memories of last season’s nightmares. The doubters have been silenced…for now! ***** BLADES PLAYER OF THE WEEK – The personal numbers for Alex Moodie are impressive. Four starts, four wins with just six goals against on 139 shots. That translates into a goals againstaverage of 1.50 and a save percentage of .957. Overall for the season, the 18-year-old Winnipeg product has a 4-3-0 record, a goals against-average of 3.01 and a save percentage of .919. ***** ROSTER UPDATE – The tinkering with the roster continues. Last Thursday, Saskatoon exchanged left wingers with RedP.O. Deer, sending Box 670 17-year-old Ryan Polei to the Rebels for Delisle,Cory SK S0L 0P0Gen18-year-old Millette. eralP:manager Lorne Molleken (306) 493-2750 then recalled 17-year-old de-

fenceman Ross Hnidy from Nipawin of the SJHL and released blue-liner Kevin Pochuk. By doing so by October 10, Molleken receives a seventh round pick in the 2014 Bantam Draft from Red Deer, in addition to the third round selection from the summer deal that send centre Lukas Sutter to the Rebels. The updated roster remains at 24 players…two goalies, seven defencemen and 15 forwards… the detailed list follows: Goaltenders: Alex Moodie (95), Troy Trombley (94); Defencemen: Graeme Craig (93), David Nemecek (95), Ayrton Nikkel (95), Ryan Coghlan (95), Nelson Nogier (96), Clayton Kirichenko (96), Ross Hnidy (96); Forwards: Collin Valcourt (93), Nathan Burns (93), Brett Stovin (94), Nick Zajac (95), Logan Harland (95), Nikita Scherbak (95), Austin Calladine (95), Cory Millette (95), Matt Revel (96), Ryan Graham (96), Austin Adamson (96), Graham Millar (96), Nick Gomerich (96), Ryan Pruden (96), Cameron Hebig (97). ***** UPCOMING GAMES – The Bridge City Bunch will face

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 PG. 16

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Classic novel springs to life on Bethany stage The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe appeals to all ages

The cast of “The Lion, the Witch a nd the Wardrobe” includes (back row l-r): Spencer Groenenboom, Justin Lawrence, Brayden Harder, Ellaina Brown, Benjamin Thielmann, George Hembery, Micah Elgaard, Matthew Von Kampen, Ashten Eby, Tracey Friesen, Charlene Preston, Clesea Braun. Front row: Stephanie Driediger, Julia Pauls, Josiah Fillmore, Krystal Esau, Cassandra Wiebe, Benjamin Heier, Michelle Dyck, Judith Schulz, Cherie Bright, Sydney Knull, Brooklyn Penner, Pei Chu, Tanaya Brown, Ehpaw Eh.

By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The student cast of “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” are pumped about Bethany College’s latest fall drama production. “Definitely, they’re having fun, especially during the rehearsals,” confirmed Susan J. Goerz, director of the upcoming play which is scheduled to run October 31, November 1 and 2 at the college in Hepburn. “They’re very hard workers and have learned their lines. We’ve got all the costumes prepared. Now we’re working on getting the scenes just right and making sure everything falls into place like it should.” This is the 18th annual drama production staged at Bethany College and every year it gets more popular – and the bar gets raised – said Georz. One difference in recent years is that it is a dessert theatre, rather than a full-scale dinner theatre. “It was a bit too much strain on the kitchen staff, preparing the meals for all the students and then using the same ovens to prepare a meal the same day for all the theatre patrons as

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

well,” said Goerz. “And the audience doesn’t seem to mind.” The production of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, by C.S. Lewis, is a dramatic adaptation of the famous English author’s classic children’s novel. It’s a fantasy tale about four children from London who, like others of their generation, were moved out of London during the height of the bombing during World War II. They go to live with a professor and discover a magical wardrobe that leads to an enchanted

land called Narnia where there are myths, legends, talking animals and evil queens abound. Beneath the adventure story is a sub-plot based on the life and death of Jesus. “C.S. Lewis modelled the character of the professor on himself,” explained Goerz. “He was in that situation where he hosted children from London during the war and he was concerned that they didn’t understand the Gospel, so he wrote this book as a way of communicating that to them.”

The cast of the play is quite large, with over 30 characters, something Goerz said that’s both a challenge and a benefit. “In terms of appealing to a larger audience and gaining awareness and support throughout the college, it really helps to have a lot of the students involved in the production,” she said. “There’s also a lot of family members that will come to the play and perhaps see the college and even the town of Hepburn for the first time. We always have our doors

open to newcomers and this is one way of bringing everyone in. It’s also nice to see all the alumni and supporters that come to the performances every year.” Goerz said the big benefit to the students is that participation in the play not only gives them academic credits, it also helps build their confidence, establishes friendships and helps many of them come out of their shell. “It’s also a great thing to have this kind of communi-

ty theatre in a small town like Hepburn,” she said. “It’s such an important part of the cultural life of any community.” Goerz added that because so many of the characters in the play are animals, the costumes took much longer to complete than in past year’s productions. She herself did a lot of the sewing, with help from others in the college and the community. “The costumes are so important to this play. They all have to reflect the same vision.”

Langham production of Peter Pan musical hits high note with audience By SELA BALZER

Langham Correspondent

If you missed the Musical theater performance of Peter Pan in Langham on the Sept. 27-29 weekend you really missed out. The long hours and sometimes sleepless nights that Gillian Pearson, founder of the Langham Prairie Players, put in paid off big time for the group. Her cast of 16 kids and five adults did her proud; they were fantastic with their vocals and acting skills. At times the 14 active lapel mikes became somewhat of a challenge for Michael Zacharias and Tracy Horton Rice – who were operating the sound and lighting board – but nothing, not an arcing mic or any amount of feedback took away from the magic of live the-

ater experienced by those of us sitting in the audience. Peter Pan, played by Alicia Rice, very sweetly and capably interacted with the children in the audience getting them to “blow on the count of three” to help Wendy, Michael and John fly off to Never Never Land and Tinker Bell’s ‘fairy dust’ was also a hit, probably more so with the little ones than the adults who found themselves pixie dusted as well, never the less it was fun for all. It was obvious that the success of the show was the result of total group participation; everyone from the lead roles down to the littlest of the lost boys was having a great time, their faces were radiant and their enthusiasm was evident in the many songs throughout

the show. The costuming and stage set were very well done, bright and pretty and so realistic, the life-like alligator delighted my three-year-old great granddaughters and everyone else alike. Also, switching from one scene to another in 60 seconds or less rated the Peter Pan stage crew a 10 out of 10 in my books. This show was truly an all-around outstanding performance by the Prairie Players team. But it doesn’t end here, our Langham kids are being offered more. Gill Pearson started a fall session of ‘Prairie Players Musical Theater’ on Wednesday, Oct. 2 at the Langham Community Hall. For more information contact Gill at (306) 716-0827 or gappearson@live.co.uk.

The Prairie Players production of Peter Pan was staged in late September in Langham. Peter Pan (Alicia Rice) and Tinker Bell (Marina Rice); Pirate (Dexter Deugau) and Smee (Gillian Pearson). SELA BALZER | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Call for a tour & complimentary lunch Housekeeping & linen service Heated underground parking • Full kitchens in every suite • Transportation service • Aging in place services as needed • Meals served in the lovely dining room over looking the South Saskatchewan River & Gabriel Dumont Park • •

Chosen as Saskatoon’s retirement home for the City of Saskatoon 2013

(306) 664-1250 www.riversideterrace.ca 915 Saskatchewan Crescent W.

PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY


Classifieds

deadline

Mondays 12:00 Noon

$8.00/wk for the first 25 words 35¢/wk per word thereafter + GST THE

IAGL B DE

Run your word ad FrEE! 3 consecutive weeks with no changes, get the 4th week

how to PLACE your Ad In-person 109 Klassen St. West Warman

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • PAGE 17

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General Notices

ads@ccgazette.ca

Coming Events “Sunshine Housing Incorporated”

Wishes to invite you to our annual Fall Supper

Registered Massage Therapist

Hague Harvest Trade Show

KMP Massage Therapy is now offering services at

Reid Chiropractic

(Clarkboro Ferry Road - 6.2km east of Highway 11 at Warman)

to make your next appointment call

Saturday, October 19th 10am - 4pm

306-370-6597

Featuring

Scentsy Everyday Style Lets Make some Meals

Pitrun gravel. Located within 25 kms of Warman.

Arbonne Norwex Silpada Jewelry

Deadline for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m. Call (306) 668-0575 Fax (306) 668-3997 ads@ccgazette.ca

306-668-0575 Call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

Fax 306-668-3997 Fax your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run) to 306-668-3997 anytime and we will process payment to your credit card

Postal Mail P.O. Box 1419 Warman, SK S0K 4S0 Cash | Cheque | Money Order

Send your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run)

Ad Classifications ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060 MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040

REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060 Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ...........6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ...................6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

Great food, Silent Auction & Door Prizes. Your donations are greatly appreciated!

Warman Mennonite Special Care Home

Fundraising Supper Thursday, Oct. 24th. 5pm to 8pm at the Brian King Centre. Menu: Keilke, ham, sausage, cream gravy and desserts. Admission by donation. Proceeds go towards the new Northview Mennonite Haven addition.

1120 telephone

@ Grace Mennonite Church Neuanlage October 19th 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Hague Municipal Hall

LOOKING TO PURCHASE Call 227-8298

Email your ad then call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

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Coming Events

Katherine Peters

Cash | Cheque | Money Order

E-mail

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Coming Events

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Soup & pie FuNDRAiSeR

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Thank You Notes

Friday, October 25 5:00pm - 8:00pm Osler Mennonite Church 212 2nd Ave., Osler Justina has a rare genetic disorder called Hypophosphatasia, where her body can’t process calcium. As a result she requires surgery on her skull to open bones that have fused too early.

We invite you to join us for food & a silent auction to raise funds for her surgery.

THANK YOU! I wish to thank all who attended and contributed to the lovely bridal shower for Brandy Kardash on October 6th. Special thanks to Sharon Assman, Ann Wardaugh and Peggy Wainwright for arranging such an enjoyable and beautiful afternoon. On behalf of Brandy, her mother Donna and me. Thank You all. Claudia Dyck.

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Legal Notices TAX ENFORCEMENT LIST

Rual Municipality of abeRdeen n0. 373 pRoVince of SaSKatcHeWan

NOTICE is hereby given under The Tax Enforcement Act that unless the arrears and costs appearing opposite the land and title number described in the following list are fully paid before the 17th day of December, 2013, an interest based on a tax lien will be registered against the land. NOTE: A sum for costs in an amount required by subsection 4(3) of The Tax Enforcement Act is included in the amount shown against each parcel DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY PT OF TOTAL SECT. SEC. TWP. RANGE MERIDIAN TITLE NO. ARREARS SE Pt 6 37 2 W3 138912419 6,194.24 A 101972662 138912408 6,194.24 B 101972662 138912385 6,194.24 C 101972662 138912420 6,194.24 6 1 101861333 135380415 5,754.72 7 1 101995117 141004190 392.53 10 1 101995117 141004325 391.37 4 2 101861333 134016544 4,933.27 5 2 101995117 141004224 359.83 6 2 101995117 144022889 394.45 7 2 101995117 141004189 394.55 9 2 101995117 141004279 392.87 A 102079076 142018545 291.89 NE 36 37 2 W3 135222263 19,531.62 44 102053685 W3 142340565 1,351.66 NE 1 38 2 W3 136903811 136903822 327.75 NE 12 38 2 W3 114268439 222.63 NW 12 38 2 W3 114268417 270.20 SE 12 38 2 W3 114268394 285.23 SW 12 38 2 W3 114268372 186.76 NE Pt 32 38 2 W3 117665006 2,022.88 NW Pt 32 38 2 W3 138691806 456.96 SE 28 38 3 3 114198666 1,526.64 SW 28 38 3 W3 114198688 65.84 SW 10 39 2 W3 135325391 135325414 135325436 5,817.30

TOTAL ADVERT. COSTS 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 750 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50

ARREARS & COSTS 6,201.74 6,201.74 6,201.74 6,201.74 5,726.22 400.03 398.87 4,940.77 403.33 401.95 402.05 400.37 299.39 19,539.12 1,359.16

15.00 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50 7.50

342.75 230.13 277.70 292.73 194.26 5,030.38 464.64 1,534.14 73.34

22.50

5,839.80

Dated this 10th day of October, 2013 Gary dziadyk, administrator

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Coming Events ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SHOW & SALE. October 28 to November 3 (inclusive) at Market Mall, Preston & Louise, Saskatoon, during mall hours. Child ID Clinic, Thursday, Oct. 17 from 3 to 8 p.m. at the Dalmeny Library. Free ID booklet, fingerprints taken, valuable safety advice from the Dalmeny Police. Chronic Pain Management Monday, Oct. 21 from 2-4 p.m. at Dalmeny Library. Arthritis Society offers 2 hours on coping, ideas, discussion on living with chronic pain. DINNER THEATRE: The Langham Theatrical Company presents A Musical comedy ‘WAY OUT WEST IN A DRESS’ November 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, & 10. All dinners at 6:00 pm with show to follow except for Thurs. Nov. 7 show only at 7:00 pm and Matinee Sun.Nov. 10 Dinner at 1 pm. Tickets available from Sela 283-4381. $35 ea. or a table of 8 for $250. Nov. 7th tickets $20.00. More inf o r m a t i o n : www.langhamtheatri calcompany.ca Gospel Echoes Team Annual Benefit Auction. November 1, 2013 Supper & Music, 4:30 to 8:00 pm. Nov 2, 2013, Breakfast: 8:00 am, Auction: 9:30 am, Brian King Ctr, Warman SK We are now accepting donations of new or good quality used items. To donate or, for more information: Call 306-9334228 Grow Marijuana Commercially. Canadian Commercial Production Licensing Convention October 26th & 27th. Toronto Airport, Marriot Hotel. www.greenline academy.com. Tickets 1-855860-8611 or 250-870-1882.

Coming Events GOSPEL ECHOES TEAM BANQUET Thursday, October 24, 2013, 6:30 pm Smiley’s Restaurant 702 Circle Dr. E., Saskatoon SK *All you can eat buffet *Gospel Music by: Harvest Team, Goshen IN Reimer Family, Arborg MB *Prison Testimonies *Multi-Media Please call for reservations: 933-4228 or 230-4219 A freewill offering will be received PLANNING AN EVENT? Tell everyone about it in Coming Events. Ads start at $8 per week, reach over 40,000 readers. (306) 668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca. Deadlines are Mondays at noon.

2013 FALL DISTRICT MEETINGS The Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association (SCA) extends an invitation to all cattle producers in the province to attend the SCA fall district meetings. A total of eleven (11) district meetings are scheduled between October 21st & October 28th, 2013 For information contact: Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association P: 1.877.908.2333 E: info@saskbeef.com W: www.saskbeef.com Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s Association - to promote the well being of all production sectors of the Saskatchewan beef cattle industry through effective representation from all regions of the province.

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Coming Events LEARN OF GOD’S plan & purpose for this earth. w w w . t h e christadelphians.org. Warman Mennonite Special Care Home. Fundraiser Supper. Thursday October 24 5:00PM - 8:00PM Brian King Centre. Menu: Keilke, ham, Sausage, Cream gravy & desserts. Funds designated for the North View Mennonite Haven addition. Warman Farmers' Market, indoors at the Legends Centre on Thursdays from 26 p.m. Greenhouse grown vegies, baking, crafts and much more!

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Services Offered

COLOUR COPYING

Full service colour copying while you wait or for pick-up later Save money and avoid city traffic and lineups!

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

109 Klassen St. W, Warman Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m. (Closed from 12 - 1 p.m.) Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 Email: ads@ccgazette.ca

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For Sale Queen Pillowtop Matress Set. New in plastic. Must Sell. (306)717-5898


Classifieds

18

DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

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For Sale Bond Industrial SEA Containers

Selling New Used and Modified Sea Containers for storage. Guaranteed wind water and rodent proof. Delivery available. Ask about modifications eg. doors, windows, insulation, new paint, power, etc. Modify your container for your specific needs. Call Bond Industrial at 306-373-2236 email joe@bondind.com or visit our website at www.bondind.com.

HOT TICKETS

for fans in Rural Saskatchewan Only

WINNIPEG JETS

1 night U-Drive Packages are available for ALL HOME GAMES Packages include: Hotel, Tickets & Dinner

See the SOLD OUT GREY CUP Game

Tour packages includes 4 Nights Hotel Accommodations and Grey Cup Tickets Nov. 21st - 25th in Regina Go online to www.dashtours.com or call Dash Tours at 1-800-265-0000 One Call & You’re There

METAL ROOFING, SIDING, AND TRIMS. 36” TuffRib/Low-Rib Colored 83¢/sq.ft. Galvalume 72¢/sq.ft. Largest Color Selection. Custom Trims Manufactured In-house 40 Year Warranty. Call MEL-VIEW METAL 1-306-752-4219. PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call The Gazette at 306-668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca for details. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1800-457-2206 www.crown steelbuildings.ca WATKINS PRODUCTS Household, health and wellness products. Famous for cinnamon pepper, vanilla, medicated ointment, cleaners. Call Independent Associate: Joan (306) 931-3716, Warman.

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Farm Equipment GOOSE NECK cattle trailer. As is. $2,800.00. 12ft JD cultivator. 18 ft. JD swather, $2,200, good working condition. Sealpoint Saimese kittens, $100-150. Clavet SK. (306) 931-0957.

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Livestock For Sale squeeze shute for younger cattle 306-239-4621

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Feed And Seed HAY-SMALL BALES. Alfalfa brome crested wheat hay mixture. Hay is under shed. $3.50 a bale. Close to Saskatoon (306) 260-7831 FEED BARLEY WANTED: Diamond Holsteins ltd near Osler is looking for feed barley 48lb or better. Will pay elevator price. Call Phil at (306)716-4597 Wheat straw in 4 x 5 round net wrapped bales$20 each, Warman 933-2805 HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

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Homes / Condos For Sale 10 KM South of Estevan New 1750 sq. Ft. home on 10 Acres 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 6 Appliances. Just $525,000. Call 780-554-3087. HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575.

CANADIAN MANUFACTURED backed by 10 year warranty -multi family, single section, motel style homes -Qualify for C.M.H.C.Financing FOR MORE INFO CALL 1.800.249.3969

www.medallion-homes.ca Hwy 2 South Prince Albert

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

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Homes / Condos Autos For Sale For Sale Hafford 1140 Sq Ft Bungalow 3 bedroom; 1 1/2 bath; 2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater ;water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512 ONLY A FEW UNITS LEFT! 55-plus adult community, ground level Ranchers. www.diamondplace.ca. (306) 241-0123, Warman, SK.

Find much more on our website

www.magicpaintandbody.com

2240B - Avenue C. North Saskatoon

652-7972

or (306) 260-4691

Email: magicpaintandbody@shaw.ca

Free iPod with SGI claim - conditions apply • • trades considered • • NOW OFFERING LUBRICO WARRANTY!

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Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 22 1/4’s South West - 58 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK QUICK PAYMENT. YMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca RM 370, 371 SW 6 37 24 w2 plus 500 acres: total assessment 107,910. Direct seeded and well farmed. Offers until 11/11/13. cell: 306. 657.4050, leo@agm power.ca.

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Autos For Sale FOR SALE: 2011 Venza, V6 AWD, loaded, 40,000 kms., 1 year left on warranty. Sunset Bronze Mica in colour with beige leather interior. Asking $32,000. (306) 9556464. FOR SALE: White 1999 Ford Tarus - PS, PW, AC, heated side mirrors, keyless entry, coded door, power trunk, 3L engine, 203,851km. Suggested repair sheet available. (306)934-6975 Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1877-796-0514. www.yourap provedonline.com.

SGI ACCREDITED

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Recreational Vehicles Indoor/not heated RV and Boat storage, located 20 minutes North of Saskatoon. $6 a linear foot per month. Call 306-239-4612

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Auto Parts Wrecking auto-trucks: Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. NorthEast Recyclers, 780-8750270, Lloydminster.

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Business Opportunities Well established Central Saskatchewan weekly newspaper for sale. Contact sasknewspaper@gmail.com. Serious inquiries only.

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Career Training

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

This Week’s C R O S S W O R D Across 1. Fused alumina 8. Tower and spire 15. Native of Italy’s “la Superba” 16. One of a pair of pack animal baskets 17. Heavy downpour (4 wds) 19. Amazon, e.g. 20. “Encore!” 21. Max ___, German surrealist artist 22. Toll 23. Australian runner 24. Is frugal 27. Norsemen 31. Fifth canonical hour 32. Renaissance fiddle 33. Hangup 35. A chip, maybe 36. ___ Badenov, cartoon character 37. “Eh” (hyphenated) 38. The “p” in m.p.g. 39. High school formal dances 40. Even if, briefly 41. Promising 43. Drooping of the upper eyelid 44. Bunk 45. To be carried along by currents 47. The individual soul (Hinduism) 50. Native New Zealander 51. Freon (abbrev.) 54. Military operation involving nerve gas (2 wds) 57. Harvesting machines 58. Stores in a silo 59. Joins the military 60. Flusters Down 1. City on the Yamuna River 2. Economical 3. Condo, e.g. 4. “Smoking or ___?” 5. Pours from one container to another

6. Conventions 7. Nickel, e.g. 8. Attention ___ 9. “The Joy Luck Club” author 10. Native 11. Football play (2 wds) 12. Subatomic particle 13. Endurance 14. At a previous time 18. Second-place award (2 wds) 22. “Trick” joint 23. Barely gets, with “out” 24. Become unhinged 25. Contents of some cartridges 26. Foreword, for short 28. Storklike wading bird 29. Small caves 30. Bar offering

Your business could be showcased in this space Call our Advertising Specialists now!

Marie (306) 491-1673 Candace (306) 227-6303

Horoscopes

Several positions available. Email resume to:

mt.recruiter@ yahoo.ca

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Careers Pharmacy Manager for Wadena Drugs, Wadena, SK. Full time, permanent position. Email resume or inquiries to wadena@phar machoice.ca attn: Yvonne Linnen.

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

A senior’s health crisis passes, and you have much to celebrate, Capricorn. Bring everyone together for some food and fun. Time is ticking on a project.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Unbelievable, Aquarius. A friend bails on you again. It’s not like them to be so irresponsible. Find out what is going on and do your best to get them back on track.

PISCES February 19– March 20

Money talks, Pisces. Don’t dismiss the value of a dollar, especially as it pertains to your talents. You could always use more cash. A deadline is extended

ARIES March 21– April 19

Magic is in the air. Can’t you feel it, Aries? Whatever you’ve been avoiding, now is the time to confront it and deal with it. The results will astound you.

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Is hiring Medical Transcriptionists to work from home. Experienced MTs and CanScribe Career College graduates should apply.

32. Carrot, e.g. 34. Shouts of disapproval 36. No angel 37. Coin opening 39. State flowers of Indiana 40. Initially (2 wds) 42. Seafood dish 43. Carnivorous fish 46. Crew member 47. “God’s Little ___” 48. Accordingly 49. Breakfast, lunch or dinner 50. Come together 51. Poker action 52. At liberty 53. British tax 55. Computer monitor, for short 56. Hale

Seriously, Taurus, the timing is off. Move the event to another day. A taste of the good life motivates a friend to change career paths. Be supportive.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

Green is in, Gemini. Take a look around your home and find some ways to implement the three R’s. Mother Earth and your bank account are counting on your part.

sudoku

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Fitness goals are re-evaluated, and new strategies are implemented. A face from the past revives an old dream. Go for it, Cancer. A memo makes an interesting point.

LEO July 23– August 22

Cooler temperatures create the ideal backdrop for romantic adventures. Whisk away that special someone. Destiny calls. Do you hear it, Leo?

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Success is a relative term. If you’re happy with where you’re headed, Virgo, that’s all that matters. Cast away the doubts of others and get a move on.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

A situation arises at work, and the outcome is iffy at best. Do what you can to help, Libra, but don’t go over-board. The planning for a special event begins.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

You’re a hard worker, Scorpio, and your home is proof of it. There is no shame, however, in calling in a pro now and then—especially if you are in over your head.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Extreme conditions call for extreme measures, Sagittarius. Think outside of the box and make a plan of attack. You have one shot to get it right.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

19

BORDEN & DISTRICT News By LORRAINE OLINYK lolinyk@ccgazette.ca

The Megabowl that Colonsay, Allan and Borden Volleyball teams participated in on October 9 raised over $5,000 for the Sask Children’s Foundation. There were many different fundraising events going on in the different schools and they are to be commended for raising that amount.

RADISSON CELEBRATION

The Town of Radisson is having a special Fall Celebration on Friday, October 18 at the Town Hall, with cocktails at 5 p.m., unveiling at 6 p.m. with roast beef dinner and entertainment to follow. Radisson is celebrating the blessings of an abundant harvest, a very successful Centen-

nial Celebration in August and the generosity of the Epp Family. The event kicks off with the unveiling of a remarkable sculpture of a Black Bear, created by renowned artist Bill Epp and graciously donated to the Town of Radisson by his wife Betty, to commemorate the Radisson Centennial 2013. Mr.Epp was born in Glenbush, Sk in 1930, was a professor at the U of S and a founding member of the Prairie Sculptor’s Assoc(PSA) and had a strong influence on many contemporary sculptors and artists. He travelled and studied in many continents and worked in multiple mediums, but is best known for his bronze sculptures.

Epp was commissioned to create many monuments across Canada and abroad during his illustrious career, passing away in 1995. Dinner tickets are $5, limited to 165 people and available at the Town Office(306-827-2218) or Wenner’s Foods.

FOWL SUPPERS

Upcoming fowl suppers in the area are Maymont United Church on October 20th at 5 p.m., Speers United Church at Speers Rec Hall is October 23rd starting at 5 p.m., Borden Lion’s is November 17th and Radisson’s Rec Board supper is November 23rd.

FRIENDSHIP CLUB

Borden Friendship Club held their first monthly Kaiser

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

7050

Careers AUTOMATED TANK Manufacturing Inc. is looking for experienced welders. Competitive wages, profit sharing bonus plus manufacturing bonus incentive. Full insurance package 100% paid by company. Good working environment. Keep your feet on the ground in a safe welding environment through in hole manufacturing process. No scaffolding or elevated work platform. Call Cindy for an appointment or send resume to: cindy@autotanks.ca. 780846-2231 (Office); 780-8462241 (Fax). Satellite TV and internet installer/retail assistant. Must be able to work independently. Computer experience an asset. Must have valid drivers license. Training provided. Watrous Furniture, Box 1029, Watrous, Sask. watrous.furn.appl@sasktel.n et Required person to COOK AND CLEAN for 10-15 man road construction camp. Accommodations provided. Successful applicant will be required to travel with the construction crew. Must have valid driver’s license; safe food handling ticket; and experience in a similar environment. Send resume and two work references to: Bryden Construction, Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0. Fax: 306-769-8844. Email: brydenconstruct @xplornet.ca

7050

Careers CRYSTAL SPRINGS VILLA CONDOS is seeking individual(s) to remove snow from front decks, sidewalks and driveways for Nov. 1, 2013 to Mar. 15, 2014. Hourly or contract rate negotiable. Contact Jerry Ives at (306) 955-5017. HELP WANTED: Dairy farm near Osler now hiring parttime/full-time employees for milking and general labour. Milking three times per day so some split shifts, days, nights and weekends. Call Brad Kornelius at (306) 2604904. JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $30/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS for late model CAT equip: motor scrapers (cushion ride), dozers, excavators, rock trucks, graders (trim operators). Camp job. Competitive wages plus R & B. Valid drivers license req’d. Send resume and work references to: Bryden Construction and Transport Co. Inc. Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0; email: brydenconstruct@xplornet.ca Fax: 306-769-8844

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

8010

Auction Sales

Call The Gazette at (306) 668-0575

Langham News

AUC T ION • AUC T ION • AUC T ION • AUC T ION • AUC T ION

LEASK FALL ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE AUCTION SALE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2013 9:00 AM

Leask Hall - Leask, SK Advertising: Wheat Pool, CCM, Coke, Pepsi, Canada Post. Tins: Oil Co. Syrup, Peanut Butter, Jam, Grease, Tobacco, Honey. Glassware: Royal Dalton, Fancy, Medalta, Carnival, Decorative, Art Glass, Oil Lamps, CN Lanterns. Tools. Communication & Photography: Vintage 16mm Projector, Slide projector, cameras, telephones, wooden radios, cabinet stereo. Paper Related: Magazines, hockey cards, manuals, framed prints, calendars, catalogues. Toys & Games: Military: Hand grenade, dagger, artillery shells, WWII items, spurs, cuffs. Furniture: Household & Numerous Misc. Items.

Contact

Frederick Bodnarus 1-877-494-BIDS (2437) • (306) 227-9505

www.bodnarusauctioneering.com

Photo by Sela Balzer

Pleasant Hill Mennonite Church seniors, including Abe Penner and Henry Neudorf, recently toured the Langham museum and were able to check out the wooden horse named‘Sliver’ pulling a caboose

PL #318200 SK

WESTERN CANADA’S TRUSTED AUCTION COMPANY

By SELA BALZER

Langham Correspondent AUC T ION • AUC T ION • AUC T ION • AUC T ION • AUC T ION

PRIME WEST FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE AUCTION

SUNdAy, OCTOBER 27, 2013 2:00 PM

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Radisson OORP - Tina Hessell, Roberta Harris, Linda Yuskiw, Supreme HRL Margaret Brown and in front, Audrey Baker Tournament on October 8th, the meeting in the Town Office House, Hands on Ministry and with 12 out to enjoy the game five ladies enjoyed supper toSPARC(National charity at Uniand winners were Jean Hrynigether with SHRL Brown at a versity re deafness in children uk of Borden and Justin Katlocal restaurant. which RP and Elks donate to). erynch from Langham. At the meeting, the ladies fi Her motto for 2013-14 is Pride Kaiser/cards are every Tues- nalized the Remembrance Day in our Past, Promise in our Fuday at 7 p.m. and tournaments Service on November 11 at 10:45 ture and she presented each the 2nd Tuesday of each month. a.m. at Radisson Hall with Pas- lady with her pin. The Senior’s Harvest Tea and tor Bornhuse presiding and the In lieu of a gift or mileage, Bake Sale is October 22nd in RP provide the lunch. Radisson will send a donation the club room at 2 p.m. and the Santa Claus Day was set for to the Elks and Royal Purple flu shots are in the Community December 14, when the RP hold Fund for Children. The Lodge Centre starting at 3 p.m. a Tea, Bake Sale and Hamper sold and returned five raffle Raffle at 2 p.m. in the Hall and books for the Walk-A-Thon to be ROYAL PURPLE Santa brings candy bags for all held in Moose Jaw October 19. Radisson Royal Purple meetthe kids out on the street. The next meeting on Noveming held October 7th had a spe SHRL spoke on her work as ber 4th will be Past HRL’s night cial visitor – Supreme Honored supreme, of some of her travand the members will eat out Royal Lady Margaret Brown els and of her visit to Saskatoon at a local restaurant before the from Lloydminister. Prior to and touring Ronald McDonald meeting.

Contact

Frederick Bodnarus 1-877-494-BIDS (2437) • (306) 227-9505

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WESTERN CANADA’S TRUSTED AUCTION COMPANY

The smell of Shirley Ikert’s homemade cinnamon rolls, fresh baked that morning, wafted through the air as people entered the doors of the Museum Friday morning, September 6, for the annual Harvest Sale. As in past sales, the cabbage borscht and fruit tarts were the ‘hot’ items but the tables full of home baking, garden veggies and perennials disappeared by noon as well. Kudos to the Plus 60’s club for organizing this annual event. On September 12 care givers from the Senior Citizens Home escorted a number of wheel chair residents to the Museum for an informative and fun history lesson on Langham and how it all came to be. Rose Dick had done her homework and was well prepared to give the talk and answer any questions the guests had. Shirley Ikert assisted Rose by serving coffee and snacks to the group. The museum and Plus 60 club participated in the annual Passport to Langham once

again this year. The free draw item went to Mr. Passor. Corinne Waldner and Nicole McLaren graciously hosted the Pot Luck supper on Wednesday, September 25, which saw all chairs occupied to the extent that the two of the guests found themselves eating their supper in the kitchen. Following the meal Corinne entertained the attendees with interesting and humorous ‘Did You Know’ facts like; did you know that a donkey’s eyes are situated on its head in a position that allows it to see all four of its feet at the same time? Birthday people in attendance were Lloyd and Evelyn Strelioff, Mike Zadorozny and Pete Ens, there were multiple winners of door prizes with the hostess gift going to Doris Tarasoff, which was very fitting as she had taken four shifts of ‘coffee hostess’ in the month of September. On Saturday, Septepmber 28, Rose and Henry Dick and Doreen Nickel hosted an event at the Museum as a tour group of 20 seniors from Pleas-

ant Hill Mennonite Church in Saskatoon toured the facility. The hosts were well organized and divided the guests into three groups, while group one toured the basement area group two went outdoor and group three stayed on the main floor. Many an item and most of the machinery pieces triggered fond memories for the seniors. At the end of the tour the guests were treated to coffee and goodies and a sneak preview of the musical the Langham Theatrical Company will be presenting in November. I gave a little bit of history on our club, and then with Music director Gillian Pearson working the CD player, the in-costume cast members who were present sang our theme song ‘Way Out West in a Dress’. Guests then heard the story of the play which was followed by two snippets of dialog and their subsequent songs. At the conclusion of our drama promotion a draw was made for two tickets to our Gala Opening Night performance on October 30. Mary Funk was the lucky recipient.


20

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

Business & Professional

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and is currently pursuing a potential career with the RCMP, had never stepped into a ring before last Christmas. He tried the sport on a whim at Hub City Boxing Club in Saskatoon and immediately caught the eye of one of the trainers. “He asked me how long I’d been boxing,” said Hardes. “He was surprised to find out I’d never done it before. I’d always played hockey and other sports.” Hardes’ natural ability and high fitness level helped him progress rapidly. With the support of his family, he made the trek to Arizona to take part in one of the biggest First Natons boxing tournaments in the United States. His style of fighting is similar to Mike Tyson’s – getting close to an opponent and using raw power to hammer away repeatedly. Most box-

ers in the 200-pound plus superheavyweight division prefer to fight at arms-length but Hardes said his style keeps his opponents off-balance. He won every match he entered at the event. “Normally, it takes a lot of years of training to get to that level,” said Hardes. “But the one thing I have going for me is that I have a lot of power. The trainer I work with told me you’re either born with it or you’re not. You can’t train power.”

EYE ON OLYMPICS

Hardes was an unknown entity heading into the two amateur boxing tournaments in the United States last July, but the boxing fraternity in Canada has definitely heard of him now. After returning home, he immediately received an invita-

tion to the 2016 Olympic Trials next summer in Toronto. “That’s a goal that I really want to pursue,” said Hardes. “I want to wear the maple leaf and represent my country at the Olympics.” Meanwhile, Hardes continues to train hard while awaiting his security clearance before starting classes at the RCMP Depot in Regina next spring. He runs six kilometers each day and is on a specialized boxing training regimen to develop his techniques. If he makes the cut at the Olympic Trials, he’s determined to put everything he’s got into winning a medal at the 2016 Olympics. “They said they need to train the boxers in the Olympic program for two years,” he said. “The Olympics is big. That’s what I’m shooting for now.”

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Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

(306) 688-0575


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 • CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

Real estate

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Athletics Director Bethany College - Hepburn

The Alumni tournaments are always a favourite event for me and the volleyball weekend was no exception. The 21st Alumni Volleyball Tournament was held on September 13-14 and was the first look at the new Eagles teams that will represent Bethany College for the upcoming season. The women’s team have big shoes to follow as defending PAC Champions but with four returning players on the roster, they look to be competitive once again. Coach of the women’s team, Daniella Klassen says she looks forward to each alumni tournament on a couple of levels. First, to get some play-

ing time in with her past teammates and the second reason is to see how the current team will match up against the other alumni teams. This year on the women’s side, the Alumni 3 team (20102012) were matched up with the Alumni 1 (2003-2007) team in the finals. The younger alumni team took the title of Alumni Champs, winning in two sets. The current Eagles team played hard but fell short to the alumni teams taking the fourth place finish. On the men’s side, the alumni teams proved to be too much for the current Eagles as well. The youngest Alumni team (2008-2012) took the tournament playing the other Alumni team (1998-2009) in the finals. The winning team was mostly made up of teammates

who had played together for the 2010 season, possibly giving them that familiarity advantage. During the always fantastic brunch, Donna Andres was recognized for her support of the college as this year’s Volleyball Alumni of the Year. Andres has been a big part of our history in Eagle Athletics and continues to be supportive with ideas and resources. Although they anticipate challenging and competitive volleyball, the Eagle teams look forward to a rewarding season ahead and appreciate the opportunity to match skill against those who came before. Our appreciation to all the alumni who came and participated in this exciting weekend and we hope to see you all again next year.

Women’s volleyball champs (back row, l-r): Jaymie Peters, Kristen Andres, Shelley Dueck, Tracy Lynn Willems, Courtney Paetkau, Terri Omani, Alvin Thielmann (athletics director). Jill Wiens (front).

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21

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Men’s volleyball champs: (back row, l-r): Corey Dueck, Kendall Wiens, Tim Peters, Cory Braun. Front row (l-r): Andrew Reddekopp, Daniel Kroeker. PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY TAYLOR BROWN


22

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

Dirt bike operator injured north of Martensville We Day celebrations Continued from page 9

FROM THE CELL BLOCK Submitted by

SGT. WARREN GHERASIM Warman RCMP

On October 7 at 6:12 p.m. police responded to a call of a dirt bike collision on private property northeast of Martensville. Police attended with Martensville Fire and Ambulance personnel. It was determined that a 20-year-old male was practicing different stunts on a private track when he flipped the bike on a ramp and lost control and wiped out. Ambulance transported the man to hospital with non-life threatening injuries. No offences appeared to have been committed and no charges are being contemplated.

WANUSKEWIN RD. CRASH

On October 8 at 12:27 p.m. police received a call of an injury motor vehicle collision at the intersection of Highway 11 and Waneskewin Road, near Saskatoon. Police attended with MD Ambulance and Warman Fire and discovered a southbound Pontiac Sunfire had collided with a tractor trailer unit that was turning from the highway to go north on Range Road 3052. The driver of the Sunfire was injured when his vehicle collided with the second of two pup trailers being hauled by the semi. The driver of the Sunfire, a 43-year-old man from Prince Albert was transported to hospital where he was treated and released the following day. The driver of the semi, a 58-yearold Alberta man, was uninjured but was issued a violation ticket for making a left turn without yielding to oncoming traffic.

IMPAIRED DRIVERS CAUGHT

Police arrested five people for impaired driving between October 12 and 13 in different incidents. On October 12 at 2:38 a.m., while police were conducting a checkstop at Centennial Drive in Martensville, a motorist was stopped and it was determined she had been drinking. The woman was given a roadside screening device test, which she failed. She was taken to the police detachment where she then provided breath samples that were in excess of the legal limit. A 44-year-old Martensville woman was later released on impaired driving charges and was released to appear in court on December 4. On October 12 at 3:30 a.m. police observed a vehicle being operated at excessive speeds within the City of Martensville. The vehicle was pulled over by police and the driver displayed symptoms of impairment from alcohol. He was arrested and taken to the police detachment where he provided breath samples that were more than twice the legal limit. The man, a 22-year-old Martensville resident, was later released on charges of impaired driving and will appear in court on December 11.

WARMAN COLLISION

On October 12 at 6:00 a.m. police were called to the 100 block of 5th Avenue North in Warman for a complaint of a fail to remain accident. Upon police attendance it was determined that a vehicle had collided with two parked cars on that street and that the driver had fled the area. Investigation revealed that the driver was at a residence on another street in Warman. Police attended there and located a

17-year-old male who advised that he had driven into the two parked cars. The youth displayed symptoms of impairment from alcohol consumption and was arrested for impaired driving. He was taken to the police detachment where he provided breath samples in excess of the legal limit. The youth was released on charges of impaired driving and delivered back to his parents. The matter is scheduled to be heard in Youth Court on December 11.

DRUNK ON THE YELLOWHEAD

On October 12 at 10:45 p.m. police received multiple calls of a black GMC pick-up being operated erratically on Highway 16 near Langham. Police patrolled that area and located a vehicle matching the description. The vehicle was observed weaving in traffic and was stopped by police. The driver, a 29-year-old resident of the Battleford area, displayed strong signs of impairment. The man was arrested and taken to the police detachment where he provided breath samples that were almost triple the legal limit. The man was later released to appear in court on November 27.

OFF-ROAD ADVENTURE

On October 13 at 12:23 a.m. police received a report of a vehicle that had left the highway and driven over some railway tracks and sustained some damage on Highway 7 at Delisle. Callers reported the vehicle and driver were near an ice cream shack in Delisle. The vehicle had left by the time police arrived but officers were able to locate the vehicle eastbound on Highway 7, east of Delisle. The vehicle was observed to be damaged and smoking as it was being operated along the highway. Police pulled the vehicle over and determined the driver was impaired from alcohol consumption. The man, a 30-year-old Saskatoon resident, was taken to the police detachment where he provided breath samples that were more than double the legal limit. The man was released on charges of impaired driving and failing to

report a collision. He is scheduled to appear in Provincial Court on November 27.

THEFT IN BORDEN

On October 7 at 8:30 a.m. police received a complaint that a laptop computer and some cell phones were stolen from a party near Borden on Saturday, October 5. The complainant advised that the lap top was being used to play music and, when it was left unattended, it was stolen. Afterwards it was revealed that other people at the party had property such as cell phones taken as well. Police have no suspects as of yet but are seeking the assistance of anyone who may know who is responsible for the theft.

FAREGOER ARRESTED

On October 8 at 3:20 a.m. police received a call to a residence on Bendel Crescent in Martensville where a taxi cab driver advised that a fare had left his taxi without paying. Police were advised that a man had been driven to the residence and dropped off and exited the cab without paying the fare of $47.50. Police spoke with the occupants of the residence and they advised that no one was inside and gave permission for police to search their yard. An intoxicated man was found hiding in the backyard and was arrest-

ed. A 23-year-old Martensville man was transported to police holding cells where he was held until sober and released on charges of transportation fraud.

YOUTH MAKES THREATS

On October 7 at 4:41 p.m. police were called to a Warman area residence for a call of a domestic disturbance. A woman advised that her 16-yearold son was acting irrationally and had attempted to assault her. A 16-year-old male was arrested. As a result of police observations, the youth was taken to hospital under the authority of the Mental Health Services Act for an evaluation by medical personnel. No charges are being contemplated and no one was injured.

FALSE ALARM IN OSLER

On October 8 at 4:08 a.m. police received a distress call from a woman in Osler who advised that she had heard a loud noise in her residence that sounded like a door slamming and that she lived alone and no one else should be in the residence. Police attended and went through the house and discovered that a mattress that had been propped against a wall had fallen over. No further assistance was required.

that students all across Canada are making by building schools and providing kids overseas with an education. I realize now more than ever how important it is to celebrate the work students involved with the We Act program are doing.” “We are thrilled to be partnering with the international charity Free The Children to bring We Day back to Saskatchewan. The combination of entertainers, speakers and Free The Children co-founders Craig and Marc Keilburger really inspires young people to make social change in their communities. We love the fact that youth earn their tickets to We Day through acts of local and international service,” said Rhonda Speiss, PotashCorp’s Manager of Corporate Philanthropy. We Day is a stadium-sized educational event and a movement of young people leading local and global change. We Day is tied to the year-long

program, We Act, which supports students and educators with free educational resources, student- led campaigns and support materials to help turn the event‘s inspiration into sustained activation. Since 2007, youth involved in the We Act program have raised $37 million for over 1,000 local and global causes and logged more than 9.6 million volunteer hours. The 2013/2014 We Day season will be the largest season to date. We Day will see more than 160,000 in attendance, in 12 cities across North America, and internationally for the first time ever with We Day UK in spring 2014, truly making this a global movement for change. We Day Saskatchewan will be streamed live on www.weday.com on November 6, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. CT. We Day is free of charge to the thousands of students and educators in attendance, thanks to the generous support of sponsors.

Town of Dalmeny

OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, October 22 at 7pm JJ Loewen Community Centre Dalmeny Town Council invites Dalmeny residents to our Open House.

Come see what is happening in Dalmeny: Family Owned & Operated . Crematory On-Site

• • • • • • •

hear about how the Town assets are being managed see what exciting things we can expect in the near future meet council members and staff visit with house builders learn about local groups meet new neighbours and visit with “old” ones take advantage of the opportunity to provide input into future park developments • see the preliminary landscape plan for Prairie Park and learn what the Rider Party is all about!

Displays will include:

Quality Service. Best Price. Guaranteed.

591 Centennial Drive North, Martensville SK

(306) 242 7888

www.cherished-memories.ca

North Ridge Developments • Ehrenburg Homes • River Ridge Homes Dalmeny Spray and Play Intergenerational Park Project along with Crosby Hanna and Associates • Town of Dalmeny Dalmeny Seniors • Curling Club • Communities in Bloom

13103DA00


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Business CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 PG. 23

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Legends Plaza taking shape as Warman business activity booms By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A new Co-op gas bar in the Legends Plaza in Warman will feature a convenience store and a minimum of 16 gas pumps . The new gas bar will anchor the north end of the Legends Plaza shopping centre, while a massive Co-op grocery store will be a major draw at the south end of the plaza, located at the corner of Centennial Boulevard and Clubhouse Boulevard. Construction of the Co-op grocery store and paving of the parking lot is well underway and several other businesses will be building in that location in the near future, according to Sarah King, economic development officer for the City of Warman. “The Co-op grocery store will be a major asset for the community,” said King. “It will employ over 100 people when it is up and running. One of the things that many residents have been asking for is more options when it comes to shopping for food. If all goes well, the Co-op grocery store should be open for business in the spring.” The Co-op gas bar will also help meet a growing demand. The existing Co-op gas bar on Central Street is expected to remain open for the foreseeable future.

King said a building permit has been issued for a freestanding fast-food restaurant in the Legends Plaza mall. An announcement on the name of the chain is expected shortly. Another business locating in the mall is a dental clinic. Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence said she’s excited to see several new businesses moving into Warman, noting there will be many more once the new Highway 305 is completed. After that road system is in place, hopefully by next year, a major commercial development by Avatex Developments, at the

High School, will be the new home of a Subway franchise, as well as house the offices for the local Remax real estate firm. A new business, Prairie Chicks, is relocating to this building from its current location in Hague. There will also be some leaseable space on the second floor of the building. Oaksmith Interiors is preparing to open its second location in Warman in the near future. It currently has one location in Saskatoon. A Dollarama store will be taking over the former Bargain Shop space in the Warman Plaza on the west end of Central Street. The Dollarama owners are currently renovating the space and it is expected the store will open in the next few weeks, prior to Christmas. A second Subway location will also be opening in the Legends Centre, the multi-purpose recreational facility and q Warman Economic Development Officer Sarah King hockey arena. King said ICR Realty corner of the new Highway 305 is currently handling the marand Centennial Boulevard, will keting for the restaurant and really take off, she said. concession at the Legends Cen In the meantime, other major tre and it is hoped a contractor changes are also underway for will soon be found to operate Warman’s business landcape. those facilities. “The request The Diamond Central Plafor proposals (RFP) is still out za, a new building on Central there and anyone interested Street across from the Warman should contact ICR,” said King.

“The Co-op grocery store will be a major asset for the community. It will employ over 100 people when it is up and running.”

Week highlights economic role of co-ops

NEW SAFETY AND TRAINING FACILITY OPENS

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

With increased economic activity in oil and gas, mining, construction and other industries, the need for safety training continues to grow. Dave and Norma Chalmers of Dalmeny, owners of Trinity Safety and Training in Saskatoon, celebrated the grand opening of the company’s new location at 135A Wheeler Street in Saskatoon’s north end on Thursday, October 10.The couple started the safety-training and supply business seven years ago. Pictured above are Dave Chalmers, Saskatoon Mayor Don Atchison, Hon. Rob Norris and Norma Chalmers cutting the ribbon to officially open the new facility. Below, Dave Chalmers and Hon. Rob Norris, minister of Advanced Education speak with Kimberly Kroll-Goodwin of Warman, development officer with STARS Air Ambulance, in the company’s new classroom facility.

The Government of Saskatchewan led the province in congratulating Saskatchewan co-operatives for their contribution to growing the economy and social programs across the province by proclaiming Saskatchewan Co-operative Week from October 13-19. “Co-ops continue to expand the reach of their services and the depth of their programs by keeping a firm finger on the economic pulse of Saskatchewan and responding accord-

ingly,” Social Services Minister June Draude said on behalf of Economy Minister Bill Boyd. “The co-ops have, over the years, proven to be a reliable partner in the economic growth of the province and we look forward to more investments from the sector.” According to the Saskatchewan Co-operative Association, which is leading the festivities in the province, there are close to 1,200 co-operatives operating in virtually every economic

and social sector. In Saskatchewan co-ops are involved in agricultural supplies, community development, financial services, retail services, child care, health care and recreation. Coop week events are posted on www.sask.coop. In a survey of top 100 businesses in the province, co-ops occupy a quarter of the list. In addition, the sector provides jobs to more than 15,000 people and controls billions of dollars in assets.

Full-time job numbers hit record high The number of people employed on a full-time basis hit a record in September, according to new figures released by Statistics Canada today. Fulltime employment was 465,100 last month, the highest ever for the month of September and up 11,800 from a year ago. More than 80 per cent of the new jobs created in Saskatchewan in the past year were full-time jobs while across Canada, fewer than half of the new jobs created were full-time. “More jobs, more people and more economic activity continue to make Saskatchewan the place to be,” Energy and Resources Minister Tim McMillan said. “The increase in fulltime jobs is impressive as it provides working people with more stability and security which leads to a better quality of life.”

There were 555,500 people working in the province in September, the highest ever for that month. That’s an increase of 14,700 jobs compared to last September, a 2.7 per cent growth rate which is the second highest among the provinces. Unemployment in Saskatchewan was 4.3 per cent in September 2013, tied with Alberta for the lowest in Canada, and well below the 6.9 per cent recorded nationally. Saskatchewan has had the lowest unemployment rate among the provinces for nine consecutive months. “Today’s report is full of good news as Saskatchewan maintains the lowest unemployment rate in Canada for the ninth straight month,” McMillan said. “Our economy is one of the best in the country right now, and is attracting people

and investment.” Other highlights include: Regina’s unemployment rate was 3.0 per cent and Saskatoon’s was 4.4 per cent. Regina had the lowest and Saskatoon the second-lowest rate among major Canadian cities. Regina has had the lowest unemployment rate among major Canadian cities since August 2011. Youth unemployment was 9.1 per cent, the second lowest among the provinces. Regina’s employment was up by 9,000 or 7.1 per cent and Saskatoon was up by 11,900 or 7.7 per cent compared to last year. Off-reserve Aboriginal employment was up by 4,800 (12.3 per cent) for eight consecutive months of year-over-year increases. Aboriginal unemployment is down from 14.6 per cent to 12.0 per cent in the past year.


24

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013

Continued from page 3

Continued from page 10

Plenty of development applications Sheets, Cornish battle for rushing title 10-year capital purchase plan for equipment to replace machinery before it wears out, thereby increasing efficiency and getting the best value for its trade-ins, said Stewart. The RM undertook a concerted program of ditch and channel clearing to alleviate the severe flooding problems in some areas of the RM this past spring, said Stewart.

DEVELOPMENT PRESSURE

The tremendous pressure for development has meant the RM’s planning department is busy, according to Chad Watson, a manager in RM planning department. The RM council has

received 31 applications for multi-parcel country residential developments and, in late October, council will meet to discuss the applications and shortlist a number of those developments. The RM is also involved in regional planning discussions. “Corman Park is part of the Saskatoon North Partnership for Growth initiative, which also includes Saskatoon, Warman, Martensville and Osler,” said Watson. “This group meets on a monthly basis. In November, we’ll be participating in the Saskatoon Regional Growth Summit, which is being organized to help the region accommodate growth.”

Sheets smirked to reporters in Saskatoon last week. “Everybody knows that I’m a better back than he is and I’m pretty much not thinking about what he does anymore. Somebody told me about what he was talking about but he knows what’s going on over here. He knows that I’m a better running back than he is. You wanna talk about it? We’ll see what the numbers do at the end of the season.” Fun talk, but both players likely care more who’s carting around the Grey Cup at the end of the year rather than who finishes #1 in rushing. At least I hope they are.

Also the Riders made the biggest splash at last week’s CFL trade deadline by acquiring defensive end Alex Hall and his league-leading 15 sacks from Winnipeg in exchange for lineman Patrick Neufeld. Hall contributed three tackles against Edmonton in his Rider debut and appeared to be a force. In explaining the move, Rider GM Brendan Taman said it was a chance for his team to go “all-in” in this monumental season. Now only the Riders, Lions and Stampeders are left at the table. And it’s time for the dealer to deal another hand.

Continued from page 13

Regional Soccer championships Osler VCA at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, October 19. The regional championship game is slated for 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 19.

2A GIRLS

Martensville High School is scheduled to play Ahtahkakoop on Friday, October 18 at Saskatoon Umea Fields at 3:00 p.m. If they win, they play Saskatoon’s Bishop Mahoney High School on Saturday, October 19 at 10:00 a.m., with 13103M the winner advancing to the regional championship at 2:00 p.m. The top two teams advance to the provincial final.


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Clark's Crossing Gazette - October 17, 2013 issue