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Children’s Commissioner for Wales

RIGHT’S CHALLENGE Badge Requirements & Activities for Senior Section Explorer Scouts

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Index Page Introduction and Badge Requirements

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1 Working Independently 5 – 10 2 Red Alert (Wide Game) 11 – 16 3 Rights Power Walk 17 - 20 4 Rights Environment 21 – 22 5

Relay to Get Your Right’s Respected

23 – 29

6 Right Spots Wrong Spots 30 – 31 7 CCfW Guessing Game 32 – 34 8

Post it Storm and Voting

35 – 36

9 The Island 37 - 39

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Introduction and Badge Requirements This badge was conceived to provide a vehicle through which Senior Section members, Explorer Scouts and Young Leaders in Wales could learn about their rights, the Children’s Commissioner for Wales (CCfW) and to encourage their participation. Participants can complete the challenge in 3 ways:

1. 2. 3.

Work together as a unit; Work individually; or Train younger scouts/guides to obtain the badge.

Table 1 below shows how the activities in this resource pack can help participants achieve the requirements of the badge. The activities are varied to cater to most abilities and are designed to provide leaders with an instant programme, with instructions on how to carry out the activity, lists of equipment required and additional information which can be downloaded as required. Working together as a unit Complete the requirements below using the activities indicated, or use your own activities. (We would welcome details of any activities you have designed yourselves to pass on to others scouts.guides@childcomwales.org.uk Table 1 Requirements 1 Know Article 12 of the UNCRC and 4 other rights that all children have and tell someone outside of guides/scouts about them

Activities to choose from 2 or 3

2 Know where to get information on children’s rights 3 Know the name of the Children’s Commissioner for Wales

4, 5, or 7 4, 5, or 7

4 Know what the Children’s Commissioner does. 5 Know how to contact the Children‘s Commissioner for Wales 6 Understand the Advice and Support Service 7 Should children and young people be seen in a positive way? Send your views to Children’s Commissioner for Wales 8 Use backchat on the Children’s Commissioner for Wales website 9 With your leader meet with the rest of your unit and talk about what you want at meetings. You may want to talk to your District Commissioner about a District forum (Article 12) 10 Invite someone to talk about United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child

4, 5, or 7 4, 5, or 7 4, 5, or 7 1C 1C 1D

1E

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Work individually If participants are interested in working independently or in small groups, give them the Activity Sheets 1A – 1E. Or, to introduce the badge to them initially you could run one or two of the activities from the early stages (requirements 1-6). This will introduce them to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and/or the Children’s Commissioner for Wales. Training Other Members Particularly with Young Leaders it may be more appropriate that they take on the leadership role in leading on training for the badge. In this scenario those wishing to complete the challenge should follow the Activities outline in the relevant document for the section they are interested in. There are some abbreviations in the pack: CCfW UNCRC

- -

Children’s Commissioner for Wales United Nations convention on the Rights of the Child

On our website you will find additional information for leaders regarding the Children’s Commissioner and the UNCRC. You can also download: • • • •

UNCRC Poster; CCFW leaflet; Personal learning record Group Questionnaire

A poster and leaflet should be given to each participant, to help them evidence their learning for this badge so they can make their own personalised children’s rights leaflet. The Children’s Commissioner would also like to hear about how young people have been involved in this badge. So please email us at scouts.guides@childcomwales.org.uk and tell us what you have done and how many young people have been involved. Please encourage the seniors or explorers to send us the group questionnaire which is part of their activity 1E. Many thanks.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Working Independently

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Welcome to the Children’s Commissioner for Wales Rights Challenge. You can achieve this challenge independently by completing this section.

How to do it: There are four stages A – Find out about the Children’s Commissioner for Wales B – Find out about Children’s Rights C - Give your ideas to the Children’s Commissioner for Wales D - Give your ideas to your leaders

What you will need: As well as this activity, you will find access to the internet useful, Posters about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, information about the Children’s Commissioner for Wales and maybe the Scout and Guide badge resource pack. These can be downloaded from the Children’s Commissioner for Wales Website www.childcomwales.org.uk when you do activity 1A. You will also need resources like paper, pens scissors

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 1A

Find out about the Children’s Commissioner for Wales

The first challenge you face is to find the answers to these questions. You can find out using the website www. childcom.org.uk. Write your answers in the boxes.

Questions

Answers

What is the name of the Children’s Commissioner for Wales?

What does the Children’s Commissioner do?

How can you contact the Children‘s Commissioner for Wales?

When should someone contact the Advice and Support Service?

From the Rights Challenge badge section of this website you also need to download the Children’s Commissioner for Wales’ information leaflet and a poster about the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child. These will help you with the next activity, 1B.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 1B

Find out about Children’s Rights

This next challenge is to think about problems, solutions and how rights can help. Think of a problem that some children and young people face. This can be young people that you know or young people you have heard about, they can be near or far away. On a big sheet of paper draw a target (a big circle, then 4 smaller circles inside each other). Draw the face of the young person or write an imaginary name for this young person in the middle circle. In the next circle write the problems this young person faces. Now read the UNCRC rights poster you have downloaded from the website. When you have read it talk about which rights would be particularly useful for the young person you have drawn. Cut out and stick these or write these rights in the next circle of your target. In the last circle write the names of people that this person could go to for help and how. Take a look at the Children’s Commissioner for Wales leaflet that you have downloaded and make sure you have got the name of the Children’s Commissioner in this circle. You could also go on the Internet or ask other people to get more ideas about who might help and who knows about children’s rights. This will help you with activity 1E.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 1C

Give your ideas to the Children’s Commissioner for Wales

This challenge is to make sure you can use your right, Article 12 to communicate with the Children’s Commissioner of Wales in two different ways. The Children’s Commissioner asks young people for their views on issues that other people are talking about. Go to www.childcom.org.uk and click on ‘Backchat’. Find out what the Children’s Commissioner wants to find out about at the moment, if you want to, reply to the questions. The Children’s Commissioner also wants to know your ideas about what you think is important. Draw pictures, make a collage or write a story about something positive you know a young person has done. This could be a big success they have had or just a small kind thing they have done for someone else.

Question

Answers

Should all young people be seen in a positive way?

Send your answers to this question to the Children’s Commissioner by email or freepost. Email: scouts.guides@childcomwales.org.uk Address: Children’s Commissioner for Wales, Freepost RRGL XLYC BHGC, Swansea, SA7 9FS

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 1D

Give your ideas to your Leader(s)

This challenge is to make sure you and the other members of your unit can use their right, article 12, to communicate their ideas to your leader, and maybe even to the District Commissioner. Run an activity with your unit to help them decide on some new ideas for things you can do together. You may want to invite the District Commissioner to attend – discuss this with your leader.

You will need: Post it notes Pens Paper of varying sizes. Balls/beanbags or sticky dots. Sticky tape It takes at least 30 minutes

How to do it: Ask each participant to write a list of ideas for activities that your unit could do in future weeks. Each idea should be written on a separate post-it note. After 5 minutes Ask everyone to bring their suggestions together and to stick their post it notes on the wall. Then tell everyone to sit in a circle. If the suggestions are about the same idea, group them together. When the ideas are grouped together, move each idea to a different space around the room. Ask your leaders or the District Commissioner if all these ideas are possible. If they say yes, leave the idea on the wall. If they say no ask them to explain why. Once you have sorted through all the ideas in this way, give each participant a ball, beanbag, sticky dot or other object and ask them to vote by placing the objects by the idea they most want. Count the votes then take the two least favourite ideas off the wall. Ask people to pick up their objects and vote again. Carry on in this way until there is only one idea left. When the top idea has been chosen, agree with your leader when it will be possible to do it. And offer to help!

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 1E

Talk

For this challenge invite someone in to your unit to talk about the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child. Think about what you found out on the internet when you were doing activity 1C. Who could know about children’s rights and invite them to discuss rights with you and your unit. If you do not get a reply keep trying. Your leader may be able to give you some help with ideas of who to contact.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 2

Red Alert (Wide Game) Meets requirement: Size of group: Whole unit + 3 facilitators

Time required:

What it does:

You will need:

This is an energetic game designed to promote group dynamics and create opportunities for discussion of rights as a way of introducing young people to the UNCRC. This is a complicated game with complex roles for all the players. Note that this activity requires a number of facilitators: 10 playing participants require a minimum of 3 facilitators (1 coordinator, 1 central post, and 1 hunter) plus 2 Rights Informers, who can be played by participants as well. It requires preparation, organisation and careful observation of participants to ensure that no-one is feeling left out. The more facilitators you have the more safely and smoothly the game will

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45-60 minutes SPACE

50 - 70 Rights Cards cut in half in different colours Scissors Sticky tape Whistle Signs, hats or other distinguishing clothing for hunters

run.

How to do it: Preparation •

Go over the game instructions and role cards thoroughly so that you understand how the activity works.

Copy role cards 1 coordinator, 1 central post, 1 hunter plus 2 rights informers, for facilitators and any participants who will play rights informer roles.

Brief facilitators and any participants who will play roles.

Copy or write the 10 Rights Cards on different pieces of coloured paper in order you have some 50 cards altogether, this is what you need for a group of 10-15 participants. For each additional 5 participants, add another colour (e.g. for 25 participants you need 70 cards in seven colours).

Cut the Rights Cards into strips of individual rights.

Cut Rights Cards in half so that the right is no longer written in full, but so that a number can be seen at either end of the cards which will aid them being matched up together later. Divide the half-cards into two stacks. Give one stack to the Central Post and divide the other

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales •

Check the location for the game, risk assess and define the borders of the playing area. Establish locations for Central Post and the different Rights Informers.

Instructions: 5- 10 Minutes 1. Gather the participants at Central Post and introduce the activity: A Red Alert has been given and they have been asked to take action to protect the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This convention gives rights to children all over the world but ten children’s rights have been ripped in half and have disappeared. They seemed to be lost forever. However, fortunately, half of the missing ten rights have been recovered. It is this unit’s challenge to find the missing half and restore the full right. If they can collect all the Rights Cards in a given time they win against the Hunters, who endanger Children Rights. 2. Establish the length of the game. Explain the boundaries of the game and agree on an audible sign to indicate the beginning and the end of the game. Explain that you will be outside the game making sure that everyone is safe and follows the rules. 3. The facilitator playing the Central Post gives every participant a half-card and keeps a store of the rest of them. Explain that the goal of the game is find the other half of their card – matching the number and the colour - in order to make a complete Rights Card, they need to find Rights Informers who may be able to give them the other half of their rights. 4. When you have both halves of the card, you should bring them to Central Post. 5. Introduce and explain the role of the Central Post to the participants: • • •

The activity begins and ends at Central Post. When you have both halves of a Rights Card, you bring it to Central Post. The person there will stick the two halves together and hang up the completed Rights Card. You will be offered another card.

6. Introduce and explain the role of the Rights Informers to the participants: • • • • •

The Rights Informers have the missing half cards. They will be located in different parts of the playing area where players can find them. Most Rights Informers will stay in one place; however, at least one Rights Informer will walk around. You will go up to a Rights Informer and show them your half card. If the Rights Informer has the other half of that card, he or she will give it to you. You will then take the completed card to Central Post, take another half card and begin again. If a Rights Informer doesn’t have the other half card, you have to find another Rights Informer. During Hunting Seasons the only safe place is within arms length of the Rights Informers. If you can touch a Rights Informer, the Hunters cannot catch you. The Rights Informers will now go out and take their positions.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 7. Introduce and explain the role of the Hunters and the system of ‘hunting seasons’: • •

• •

During hunting seasons Hunters try to catch you and take your rights away. Each time they catch you, Hunters rip your half-card into two pieces. Theygive one of the torn pieces back to you and keep the other torn piece to give to the Rights Informers. This means that every time they catch you, it becomes harder to complete your card because it is in smaller pieces. You will know it is hunting season when you hear a whistle or horn sound once. When hunting season is over, it will be blown twice. Remember: the only place where the Hunters cannot catch you is within armslength of a Rights Informer.

Play: 20 – 30 Minutes Start the game. The participants start running around in the playing area, looking for the Rights Informers in order to complete the half-card they have. End the game when all the cards have been completed or the time is up.

Debriefing and evaluation: 15 – 20 Minutes 1. Debrief the activity by asking questions such as these: • • • • •

What happened during the game? What were the most exciting moments? Did you have a strategy? If you played this game again, would you do anything different? What do you think of this activity?

2. Relate the activity to human rights by asking questions such as these: • • • •

When we say we have “the Right to ...”, what does this mean? Do you think that these Rights are ‘universal’? Are they respected all over the world? In real life, who could the ‘hunters’ and the ‘card-people’ be? What can we do in our daily life to make sure that everybody has the same rights?

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales At the end of the activity To meet requirement 1 Distribute posters of the UNCRC and ask them to find Article 12 and the rights they found on there. Ask them to choose 4 rights to tell people about, as well as article 12. Check the following week to make sure this has been done.

Suggested minimum numbers of facilitators 20 players: 4 facilitators (1 coordinator, 1 central post, 2 hunters plus 3-4 Rights Informers) 25 players: 5 facilitators (1 coordinator, 1 central post, 3 hunters plus 4-5 Informers)

Roles ROLE OF COORDINATING FACILITATOR (1 facilitator) At the beginning you will explain the game and establish the boundaries. You will also make clear what your signal is to stop the game at the end or in case of emergency, which should be quite different from the signal for the ‘hunting season’. Make sure both participants and facilitators understand and maintain their roles. During the activity you will keep watch to see that no-one is playing roughly or doing anything that might endanger a child. Intervene or stop the game if necessary. You will keep the first aid kit and supply of bottled water for use if necessary. At the end of the time, you will end the game and run the debriefing. ROLE OF CENTRAL POST (1 facilitator) As the name already implies, this should be a central, fixed location. The activity begins and ends here. You provide half cards to participants and keep the rest of the half-cards that have not been given to the players. The Rights Informers hold the other halves of all the cards. •

A participant who has both halves of a Rights Card will bring it to you. You then let them choose a new half card from you.

Stick the completed halves of the Rights Card together. Hang the completed cards on a wall or tree so that the can easily see their progress.

Note that as participants start choosing new half-cards, they will start developing their own strategy for completing full colour-sets, instead of randomly completing cards. You should encourage but not initiate this strategy building.

As participants withdraw from the game, get them to help you with the tasks at the Central Post.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales ROLE OF THE RIGHTS INFORMER (2+ participants or facilitators) Divide a full set of half-cards among yourselves. •

Find yourselves a position in the playing area. You should not be hidden but spread out. The participants should be able to find you.

All but one Rights Informer remain in one place. One Rights Informer walks around during the game, allowing this facilitator to keep an extra eye on the whole game.

Players will come to you and show you half a card. If you have the other half of this card, give it to the player.

During Hunting Seasons, there is a safety zone around you as far as you can reach. Within this zone, Hunters cannot catch the players.

Even when you have no more half cards to give away stay at your location until the final sound indicates the end of the game. Then go back to Central Post, gathering participants along the way who may not have heard this sound.

HUNTERS (1+ facilitators) •

Your role is to catch players and take rights away during hunting seasons. Each time you manage to catch a player, rip the half-card of this player into two pieces. Give one torn piece back to the player and give the other torn piece to one of the Rights Informer . This means it becomes harder for the player to complete this card.

Hunting Season is a very exciting moment for the participants. Do it regularly but for short periods. Blow the horn or whistle once when the hunting season starts; twice to announce its ending.

Hunters should dress alike (e.g. with a sign, hat, coat, or scarf ) and be very visible. Make noises during Hunting Season to increase the excitement of the children.

When ‘hunting’ participants, it is more the purpose to increase excitement than it is to catch them. If you catch too many or the same players, the children may get discouraged.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Rights Cards 1.

Every child has the Right to protection

1.

2.

Every child has the Right to education

2.

3.

Every child has the Right to healthcare

3.

Every child has the Right to free time activities and playing

4.

Every child has the Right to a name and a nationality.

5.

Every child has the Right to choose his/her own religion

6.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Every child has the Right to information

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Every child has the Right to form an association

8.

9.

Every child has the Right to live in a house with his/her family

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10.

Every child has the Right to have their say and be listened to

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 3

Rights Power Walk Size of group: Any size

Meets requirements: 1

What it does:

Time required:

This activity gets the whole group up and moving, but quite slowly. It introduces young people to the sorts of advantages and disadvantages different people experience. It then helps them reflect on how getting the rights in the UNCRC can help improve everyone’s experiences. If you do not have a lot of space, or if some participants have limited movement you can give each one a counter and get them to move the counters across a table, rather than participants moving across the room.

You will need:

20-30 minutes

Rights Poster (one for each participant) Reality and rights statement Character cards Space for participants to take 12 steps

How to do it: Give each participant a character card. Get the participants to line up on one side of the room. Explain to the participants that you are going to read out a number of statements. For each statement, if participants feel it applies to their character they take a step forward. If it is something their character is unable to do they must stay where they are. Read out the reality statements (see attached). Some of the characters will move for nearly every statement and will end up on the other side of the room, while others will hardly move at all. Once all the statements have been read out, get each participant (starting with whoever moved the furthest) to read out their character card. (allow 10 minutes) Facilitate a discussion with the group about the levels of disadvantage different characters have and how this affects their ability to claim their rights. Some questions to prompt the discussion might include: • • • • • •

Who was left behind? Why were they left behind? Why was the gap between those at the front and those left behind so big? Was there any difference based on age and gender? How did it feel to be left behind or move forwards? How might this affect the different characters’ ability to claim their rights?

(Allow 5-10 minutes)

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Now get the young people back up in a line and ask them to imagine they are one of the disadvantaged young people. Read out the rights statements (see attached) and they should all move forward at every step. (Allow 5 minutes)

At the end of the activity: On the rights poster ask them to find Article 12 and to choose 4 rights to tell people about, as well as article 12. Check the following week to make sure this has been done.

Character cards: 1. A local councilor 2. The boss of a local children’s charity 3. A politician at the Welsh Assembly Government 4. A politician at UK Government 5. A School Teacher 6. A Youth Worker 7. A 14 year old boy in a detention centre 8. A 13 year old girl living in a care home 9. Single mother with three children, aged 12, 6 and 2 10. A traveller boy aged 13 11. A girl with a disability, aged 9 12. A 17 year old pregnant girl 13. A primary school girl aged 7 14. The Head Teacher of a local private school 15. A 12 year old boy on the school council 16. A Policeman 17. A 15 year old boy who has been excluded from school

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Reality statements:

Only the following 1. My opinion is listened to 2. I get to meet politicians and people from Government 3. I get new clothes when I want 4. I can watch TV, go to the cinema and spend time with my friends when I want 5. I am not in danger of being physically hurt 6. I get to see and talk to my parents 7. I can speak at town meetings 8. I have access to transport so I can go where I want to, when I want to 9. I went to or expect to go to university or college 10. I have plenty of information about health issues which affect children and young people 11. I can pay for treatment in a private hospital if necessary 12. I can get a job, earn my own money or get social security benefits if I need them.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Rights statements:

Article 1: Everyone under 18 has all these rights Article 3: Everyone should always do what is best for each child Article 6: You have the right to life and to be healthy. Article 12: you have the right to say what you think should happen and be listened to Article 13: You have the right to information Article 19: You have the right not to be harmed and should be looked after and kept safe Article 24: You have the right to good food and water and to see a doctor if you are ill Article 28: You have the right to learn and to go to school Article 31: You have the right to relax and play Article 42: The government should make sure people know about children’s rights

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 4

A Rights Environment Size of group: Any size What it does: This activity uses the metaphor of a tree in a healthy environment to support young people to think about problems, solutions and getting rights respected. It introduces them to both the UNCRC and the role of the Children’s Commissioner for Wales.

Meets requirements: 1- 6 Time required: 30 - 40 minutes You will need:

Rights Poster (one for each participant) Environment key card CCfW info sheet Large paper Washable Pens Scissors Glue

How to do it: Ask the participants to think of five issues or problems that face young people today. Depending on the focus of the group, these can be local, national or global issues. If you have been or will be doing community or commonwealth badges, you can link this activity to those. (5 - 10 minutes) Once they have identified the issues, split the participants into patrols or pairs and ask them to pick one issue per group. Using the Key to the ‘Rights Environment’ on the next page and the poster on the UNCRC, ask the groups to draw the trunk of a tree and then use the key card to help them draw the rest of their own Rights Tree. After 5 minutes give them the rights poster, so they can add leaves. After another 5 minutes give them the CCfW info sheet, so they can identify rights makers, that is organisations or individuals that have the responsibility of helping children get their rights, to help them change the environment and help the problem they have identified (slowly) disappear. (20 Minutes)

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales At the end of the activity To meet requirement 1 On the rights poster ask them to find Article 12 and to choose 4 rights to tell people about, as well as article 12. Check the following week to make sure this has been done. To meet requirement 2 – 6 Ask them about the role of the CCfW. Point out that they themselves can be rights makers for other children if they haven’t said this. Note that the Children’s Commissioner for Wales is happy for children and young people to contact his office. Sometimes when we can’t help, we suggest other organisations or people who may be able to help. (10 minutes)

Key to the Rights Environment •

Draw the Trunk – and write on it the issue you have chosen

Draw the Roots – and write on it the root cause of the problem or issue

Draw the Branches – and write on them what needs to change or solutions

Draw leaves – then look at the rights poster and write the article numbers of different rights that will help get the solutions you want. You can cut out the leaves if you want.

Draw things that help trees grow and be healthy – rain, sun and manure – and write on these the names of people who can help rights makers, that is organisations or individuals that have the responsibility of helping children get their rights.

Take a look at the Children’s Commissioner for Wales information sheet and cut out as many different ways as you can see of contacting the Children’s Commissioner and getting the rights makers to do their job.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Relay to get your rights respected Size of group: Small groups What it does: This activity uses scenarios that have been developed with other young people to provide participants with real life situations they can relate to. It avoids young people having to talk directly about their own experiences, in case they may not wish to. Each group explores rights the young person in the scenario may need and the difficulties they may face. They then explore who else may be able to help get these rights respected. By making it a race, it avoids young people dwelling on difficulties for too long and it focuses on positive outcomes. It also develops young people’s skills in learning to follow instructions that are given verbally.

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Meets requirements: 1- 6 Time required: 45 minutes You will need:

Rights Poster (one for each participant) Paper Scenario cards Info for lawyers Pens Scissors Sticky tape or blue tac The numbers of the scenarios written on separate pieces of A4 and the words ‘Rights NOT Respected’ and Rights Achieved’ written on 2 different pieces of A4.

How to do it: Preparation Browse all ten scenarios in this activity and select ones that you feel your group will be interested in. Make sure you have at least enough to give one to each group. Write numbers on the back of the scenario cards you have selected. On the wall, where possible, or on the floor, stick two pieces of paper about 5 feet apart. The piece of paper on the left should say ‘Rights NOT Respected’ and on the right ‘Rights Achieved’. In a column under ‘Rights NOT Respected’ put the pieces of paper that have scenario numbers written on them.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Getting Started Form the group into a circle and place the scenario cards on the floor in the middle of the circle, so that the numbers face upwards. Explain that you are going to play a game to learn about the problems young people face and the rights that can help them. They are going to have a race between groups to move from rights not being respected to rights being achieved. Ask someone from each group to choose a number, then go and collect and read out their card. (10 minutes) Split into Groups Give each group a copy of the UNCRC and 4 pieces of A4. Tell each group to look at their scenario card and think about which rights would be useful in that case. Their first task is to write at least 5 rights from the UNCRC on the piece of paper and then send a group member to put their right next to the numbers on the wall. Then ask a different group member to do the same. (5- 0 minutes) Additional Tasks When the group member comes with their rights give them the next task: •

On the next piece of A4 write the difficulties they think their young person might face in getting their rights respected, then to return and stick up their answers

When the group member comes with their difficulties give them the CCfW Info sheet and their next task: •

On the next piece of A4 write the people who they think could help their young person and how. Write these people in order going from who they would tell first to last.

When the group member comes with the people who can help give them their next task: •

On the next piece of A4 write what would happen in the end, if everything turns out right and this young person gets their rights.

When the first patrol sends someone up with positive outcomes tell them they are now lawyers. Give them their lawyer sheets and tell them to go and help other patrols. When the next positive outcome arrives, end the game.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales At the end of the activity:

To meet requirement 1 On the rights poster ask them to find Article 12 and to choose 4 rights to tell people about, as well as article 12. Check the following week to make sure this has been done. To meet requirement 2 – 6

Ask them about the role of the CCfW. Point out that they themselves can be rights makers for other children if they haven’t said this. Reinforce that the CCfW is only there for when they have tried other people and ask again who these other people could be. (10 minutes)

Variation:

If there are more than 6 participants, one participant could volunteer to act as lawyer. The scenarios relate closely to certain articles in the UNCRC and you can refer to the lawyer to read out to the rest of the participants. You will need to print out the Info for Lawyers and UNCRC Articles. Alternatively a leader can take this role. Use the list of Articles to familiarise yourself with the UNCRC. Keep it handy to use as a reference whilst running the session

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales SCENARIOS Scenario 1 My name is Karen; I’m 15 and have just been suspended from school. Someone in my class was slagging me last week and I lost it and hit them. The teacher had to split us up and blamed the whole thing on me. This really annoyed me and I ended up swearing at the teacher. This is the 3rd time I’ve been suspended from school and I’ve been told they don’t want me back. Scenario 2 My name is Keith, I’m 14. There’s a new supermarket just opened up the road from where I live. Me and my mates started hanging around up there ‘cos there’s a shelter and it’s better than hanging around the estate where we just get moved on. The supermarket installed this thing called a mosquito that makes a really annoying noise but adults can’t hear it. It’s really high pitched and loud. We can’t hang around there anymore but we’ve not really got any other place to go. Scenario 3 My name is Donna and I’m 17. I hang out with my mates in a park on a Friday night. We usually have a drink and the locals have recently complained about the noise we make. Last week the Police came along and told us to “move on”. We started to tell the police that we’ve nowhere else to go but they weren’t bothered. We started getting angry and they said they could give us an ASBO and charge us for breach of the peace.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Scenario 4 My name is Steven and I’m 15. I was going home on the bus last night minding my own business playing loud music, through the loudspeaker on my mobile phone. The driver came upstairs and told me I had to get off the bus. I refused as I didn’t think I was doing anything wrong and the driver said he would have to get the police. I’ve been in bother recently so didn’t want to make things worse and ended up leaving and threw a stone at the bus as it left. Scenario 5 My name is Jane and I’m 14. My family moved to Wales a couple of years ago from Somalia in Africa. There is a war there and people are in real danger. We are called Asylum Seekers but the Government here has said we can no longer live in Wales. My friends were put in prison before they were sent home and this could happen to me any day. I’m afraid of going to prison and of going back to Somalia. Scenario 6 My name is David and I’m 13. I have dyslexia and have been finding school work hard. My mum had an argument with my teacher as my mum thinks I should be getting more help with my school work. My mum has taken me out of school and she is teaching me at home. I find this a bit boring and I’m missing all my friends at school. Scenario 7 My name is Barbara and I’m 17. I have recently moved into supported accommodation after having been in care. After 3 months I was kicked out because of loud music, having friends over all the time and being drunk with my friends. I moved into a friend’s house and slept on their sofa but we had an argument recently and I’ve ended up living on the street.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Scenario 8 My name is Carl and I’m 15. I live in a children’s home and have been asking to stay at my mate Jimmy’s house for ages. The staff at the children’s home said I can’t stay at Jimmy’s house as a police check would need to be done on Jimmy’s parents. To begin with I was too embarrassed to ask Jimmy’s parents but I eventually plucked up the courage and they have now had a police check done. They are really keen for me to stay with them next weekend. The staff at the home checked with my mum last night but she has said she doesn’t want me to stay at Jimmy’s as she doesn’t like me mucking about with him. Scenario 9 My name is Kate and I’m 14. I have been going to a youth club for the last couple of years. I like it there as I have been able to meet new friend from outside school and play different sports and games. I took part in a campaign recently about young people being interviewed negatively in the media! The club is closing down because there is no more funding. This is a nightmare as there’s nothing else going on in the area. I’m worried I might start mucking about with my other mates as the last time I did that I got in trouble with the police. Scenario 10 My name is John and I’m 15. I live with my mum and my younger brother. I got home yesterday and realized that someone had been reading my diary. It’s not the first time this has happened and I thought it was my brother but now I’m thinking it’s my mum. I’m really scared now because some of the stuff in my diary is personal about me and my girlfriend and I haven’t told anyone. If my mum has read this I’m worried about what she’ll do.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Info for Lawyers Scenario 1 Karen aged 15: Articles 12, 13, 28, 29 Scenario 2 Keith aged 14: Articles 15, 31 Scenario 3 Donna aged 17: Articles 15, 16, 31 Scenario 4 Steven aged 15: Articles 12, 16, 31 Scenario 5 Jane aged 14: Articles 6, 22, 37, 38 Scenario 6 David aged 13: Articles 23, 28, 29 Scenario 7 Barbara aged 17: Articles 20, 24, 25, 27 Scenario 8 Carl aged 15: Articles 12, 15, 18, 19, 25, 31 Scenario 9 Kate aged 14: Articles 15, 31 Scenario 10 John aged 15: Articles 16, 20, 25

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 6

Right Spots Wrong Spots Size of group: Any size What it does: This creative activity supports the group to make a map or a model of their local area. They learn about the UNCRC then identify places where they get their rights and where they don’t. They talk about what needs to change to get their rights respected everywhere. They then learn about the CCfW and talk about who they could complain to before talking to him. The idea is for them to explore their own lived experiences in their community and think constructively about making changes.

Meets requirements: 1- 6 Time required: 45 - 80 minutes You will need:

Rights Poster (one for each group) CCfW leaflet (one for each group) Junk(recycled materials) for map-model making Red paper Pens Scissors Sticky tape Cocktail sticks and blue tac

How to do it:

Distribute the UNCRC poster and ask the young people to mark (e.g. with rights flags) the areas where young people are able to access their rights – RIGHT SPOTS (e.g. school, park, health centre). Each right can be cut out from the poster and made into a flag using a cocktail stick and stuck to the map/model using blue tack. (Allow 10-20 minutes depending on how developed the models are. If the activity is done together by the whole unit they may need to negotiate with each other about differences of opinion)

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Then ask the young people to make red flags for places where their rights are not upheld such as shops when they have been moved on from sitting outside, places where there are bullies. (Allow 10 minutes) Get the group to choose one place where their rights are not respected and facilitate a discussion about who could give them some help to change this. If you have time and are willing to support this, get the young people to write a list of who they will talk to first, then second then third, etc. If they are doing this as one big group write everyone’s ideas down on a big piece of paper. Alternatively they can do it in patrols and compare ideas at the end. When they have run out of ideas, give them information leaflet on the CCfW and ask them to read it and say how they could go to him for help and when they have run out of other options. (10 – 20 minutes

At the end of the activity:

To meet requirement 1 On the rights poster ask them to find Article 12 and to choose 4 rights to tell people about, as well as article 12. Check the following week to make sure this has been done. To meet requirement 2 – 6 Check that they all know the name of the CCfW and that they understand how he can help.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 7

CCfW Guessing Game Size of group: Any size

Meets requirements:

What it does:

Time required:

This activity uses a quiz about the Children’s Commissioner as a way of learning about his role. It starts as a game in which the participants try to guess correctly from the multiple choice answers you read out. By the end the goal is for every participant to know all the answers. There are a variety of ways in which they can guess the answers, they can be still or running about, quiet or noisy.

You will need:

2,3, & 4

20 minutes

Quiz sheet A, B, C cards for each team OR Ball or bean bag for each participant OR Bluetac or sticky tape and A,B,C written large and placed in 3 corners of the room

How to do it: •

Still and quiet : Split the participants into groups of between 3 and 10. Give each group 3 sheets of paper or card and ask them to write A, B and C on them. Read out the first question and 3 possible answers (see attached for questions and answers). The groups must then decide what the correct answer is and hold up the corresponding card. Give the correct answer and supporting information written on the quiz sheet and then read out the next question.

Slow movement: Rather than answer cards place three buckets with A, B and C written on them and give each group 3 balls or bean bags to vote with. Once they have decided on which is the correct answer, each individual or one member of the team comes forward and puts the ball or beanbag in the corresponding bucket to vote for their answers.

Fast and noisy: Designate three corners of the room as a different answer and stick up the pieces of paper A, B and C. Ask the pack to come and stand with you in the remaining corner. You read out the question and they run to the corner they think indicates the correct answer When you read out the right answer, if they are in the right corner they cheer. After each answer it may be best to bring the group back to your corner before they answer the next question. NB for question 4, everyone will be right, so everyone will cheer.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Quiz: 1. WHO is the Children’s Commissioner for Wales?

a.

Someone who works for the Welsh Government

b.

Someone who plays football for Wales

c.

Someone who makes sure everyone knows about children’s rights

A. Keith Towler is the Children’s Commissioner for Wales. Some people think he works for the Government but he’s not a politician. Although he enjoys playing football, he doesn’t play football for Wales! He supports children and young people to find out about children’s rights. He also speaks up for them nationally on important issues – being the children’s champion in Wales. 2. WHAT does he do?

a.

supports children and young people to find out about children’s rights

b.

provides counselling for children and young people

c.

runs a marathon every morning before work

A: It’s Keith’s job to make sure that children and young people know about their rights. Although he can give advice and information, he doesn’t provide counselling. And although he walks his dog every morning, he doesn’t run a marathon! 3. HOW does he do it?

a.

By magic

b.

Lots of ways like:

Listening to children and young people to find out what’s important to them

advise children, young people and those who care for them if they feel they’ve got nowhere else to go with their problems

telling important people what you think and how to make things better

c

through building schools and clubs for young people

A: The right answer is ‘b’. You can find out more about what Keith and his team do on their website: www. childcomwales.org.uk

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 4. Where can I find out information about the UNCRC?

a.

The website of the Children’s Commissioner for Wales: www.childcomwales.org.uk

b.

From teachers at your school

c.

By writing to or phoning the Children’s Commissioner for Wales

A: All of your answers are correct! . 5. WHY would you call the Children’s Commissioner’s freephone number?

a.

To win a prize

b.

To order a pizza

c.

To get advice about a problem if you haven’t got anywhere else to go

A: The Children’s Commissioner has a freephone advice and support line for children, young people and the people who care about them, to have someone to turn to when they run out of all other options when dealing with a problem. You can phone, text, email or write to our advice and support team. The phone number and text is free and won’t show up on your phone bill. The phone number is 0808 801 1000 and the text is 80800, start your text with COM. Our advice and support team are not counsellors, they work with children, young people and adults who are involved to help them find a solution. If you just want to talk to someone you can call ChildLine on 0800 11 11.

At the end of the activity Go over the correct answers to make sure everyone remembers them and ask each participant to fill in the

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Post-it Storm and Voting Size of group: Any size

Meets requirement: 9

What it does:

Time required:

The aim of this activity is to enable participants to

You will need:

get a positive experience of achieving Article 12 the right to express their ideas and be listened to – in a safe environment. The activity requires that you

8

30 minutes

Paper of varying sizes Post it notes

take on some of the suggestions for future activities

Pens

that your pack will make to you. You will need to

Balls or beanbags or sticky dots

think before the activity, about any limits you might

Sticky tape.

have on what you are able to do, so that you can explain these if need be.

How to do it: Ask each group to write a list of ideas for activities that your unit could do in future weeks. Each idea should be written on a separate post-it note. After 5-10 minutes, ask everyone to bring their suggestions together and to stick their post it notes on the wall. If suggestions are about the same idea, group them together. When the ideas are grouped together, move each idea to a different space around the room. If there are any ideas that you really can’t follow through on, tell them and explain why, take this idea down from the wall. If there are ideas that will take lots of work, money or other resources, but you are willing to do it if they get involved ask them if they are willing to help make it happen. If they say yes, leave the idea on the wall.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales Once you have sorted through all the ideas in this way, give each participant a ball, beanbag, sticky dot or other object and (while the leaders turn their backs and count to 10) ask them to vote by placing the objects by the idea they most want. Write down the least favourite option on a flip chart or board, making a list for them all to see. These are ideas for another time, then take this idea off the wall. Turn your back again and count to 10 asking them to vote again on the remaining ideas. Carry on in this way until there is only one idea left.

At the end of the activity: When the top idea has been chosen, tell the group when it is going to happen and plan with them what you all need to do to make it possible. Ask each participant to fill in what you are all going to do in section E of their individual learning record.

Variations: Participants can work in pairs or small groups to write their post it notes. This can be helpful if there are nervous or shy participants in the group or if younger ones need help with writing. To make it faster (if there are a lot of ideas) take down two ideas each time.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales The Island

Size of group: Pairs, Small Groups

Meets requirement: 1 & 5

What it does:

Time required:

Introduces the idea of law and rights

You will need:

9

30 minutes

Copy of UNCRC Flipchart/whiteboard Pens

How to do it: Sit participants in a large group in the middle of the room and explain to them that you are about to tell them a story, and they have to use their imagination. You will be the story teller and all they have to do is listen and can close their eyes if they wish. 1.

Read aloud the following story, (you can tailor this to suit the desired age group). You are about to go on a holiday, and have been saving your money for a few months, to pay for it. You are really excited and have your bags packed and ready to go. You are picked up by a limousine and arrive at the docks where a massive ship is waiting for you. The ship is beautiful and seems to go on for miles, it’s so big. As you board the ship you notice that there are children of all ages there. You go up the gangplank and see babies crawling past you, toddlers are playing on the deck and teenagers are waving from balconies. The interesting thing is that everyone is speaking different languages and wearing different clothes. There seems to be someone from every religion and culture on earth on this ship. The ship sets sail and over the next few days you explore as much as you can. There is something for everyone, a football stadium with your favourite team playing, a disco with your favourite music, video games as well as every sport you can imagine. This is proving to be the best holiday you could ever imagine. Then one night you are awoken by an alarm. The ship has struck an ice berg and you need to evacuate. You go on board a comfortable lifeboat with plenty of food and water. Everyone gets out alive and no one is hurt. After a few hours you arrive on an island. Everyone has made it, and although they are a bit tired, they seem to be okay. The island is very big; there is fresh water and fertile soil for growing crops. But here you are with hundreds of other people standing on a beach waiting for some instruction.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales 2.

Break participants into groups and give each a flipchart paper and pen.

3.

Explain to participants that they must develop a list of three rules of how they are going to govern their island. These must be general principles such as ‘everyone must be treated fairly’ (but not this one!)

4.

Once each group has at least three rules, go through the following scenarios, getting the groups to come up with solutions to the problems and write or draw them on the flipchart. Note that it isn’t necessary to do all of these and you can make up your own, to suit a certain topic or idea. The point is to get the participants to begin thinking of how rules are developed to deal with problems that arise.

Scenarios 1.

One day you are walking along the beach and a boy comes up to you and states that he has been doing the same job of gathering fire wood for three weeks. He is tired and wants to do something else. He is annoyed as everyone else who lives near him use the firewood, but won’t help him. What will you do?

2.

You are approached in the evening by three people. One is being violently sick. The other two explain that the man is being sick because he has eaten all the pineapples the group has collected; he has eaten so many he’s made himself ill. What do you do with the man, and how do you prevent this happening again?

3. A girl comes up to you distraught; she has a walkman with her. Last night the batteries in the walkman where stolen. The girl explains to you that the batteries were taken by a boy who lives near her on the island and he is using them to put in his gameboy and won’t give them back. How do you deal with this? 4.

A boy is crying to you because he feels that no-one is listening to him as he is younger.

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Children’s Commissioner for Wales After the scenarios explain to the group that advance scouts have noticed smoke rising from the other side of the island. After further investigation you realise that there are others on the island who out number you 60 to 1. What do you do? Your scouts have reported that those in the other camp are ill. They need medicine which you have from your supplies. Will you share it with them? After the group has come up with solutions get each to feedback to the wider group and have a general discussion about the solutions they came up with. Explain to the group that the island you thought was imaginary is actually very like our own world, we tend to live in our own islands and there are many groups of ‘others’ who we deal with. Many years ago in the wake of tragedy, a group of people from many different races came together to develop a set of principles or rights, for all people across the world. This was then developed further into a list of rights for children and young people which is called the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Hand out a UNCRC poster to each person and begin to match the solutions each group came up with to a right, for example discrimination can be linked to Article 2. The right to be heard is article 12.

Variation This could be developed further to inform children on the role of the Children’s Commissioner to protect these rights, or you could have a more general discussion on an individual right or why we have rights at all.

*Activity adopted and reproduced with permission from UNICEF

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Senior section explorer scouts final oct 13